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pers. ; see vv. 969, 992; Aul. 187 ; Epid. iv. 2, 33 ; Men. iii. 3, 27 ; Pers. iv. 3, 84 ;
iv. 4, 88; Miles 655; Trin. 352, 611. It will be seen from an examination of these
passages that there are no instances of a first pers. pi., or a second pers. sing, or pi., and
that the only personal pronoun used is ego, also that there is a decided preference for a verb
in first pers. sing., with or without the pronoun. Passages might be quoted from later
poets and prose writers in which equidem is joined with verbs in first pers. pi., and second
sing, and pi., but the use of any personal pronoun except ego is rare. Hence it appears
that originally the particle was joined with the pers. pronoun of the first pers., which,
following the general tendency of the classical languages, was very often omitted, and
that its application to other persons and numbers was gradually extended. What is stated
in the first part of last sentence might be illustrated from the writings of Sallust, and
particularly from Cicero, do hanc operam ; banc ; seen. v. 54. dooperam;see
n. V. 58. nimium; seen. v. 71. pcetiosa; "expensive"; cp. Epid. i. 2, 17. Ovid
speaks of "pretiosae vestes," A. A. i. 303, and "pretiosa odia." In Hor., C. iii. 6, 82,
the word has a different meaning, operacia; "workwoman," sc. meretrix, only here;
Phaedrus has mas., B. iv. 5, 5.

73. Simulato me amare ; cp. Cist. 97 ; Men. v. 2, 82. Utr-um . . . an or ne

. . . aw are the usual particles in double questions. The same particles as here are found
in V. 497 ; also Capt. 267 ; Trin. 306 ; Pseud. 709 ; Ter., Eun. iv. 4, 54. Hor., S. ii. 6,
73, has utrumne followed by an. Vtrum in these cases seems to put the question with
the verb, whilst ne is added to the first word, which modifies it, in order to draw a clearer
and more emphatic distinction between this and the second; for if utrum were omitted
and ne taken with the verb, or ne omitted, the main point of the question, the distinction
between joco and serio, would be considerably weakened ; see Madv. G. L. 452 obs. 1.
istuc, is compounded of iste and ce or perhaps hie, fern, istaec, mas. istic, neut. istoc or
istuc, and is quite distinct from the adverbs having the same form. It is used in all
the cases and genders of the sing, except genitive, and in nom. and accus. pi. neut.,



COMMENTARY AND NOTES. 97

and in nom. pi. mas. and fern.; see vv. 50, 112, 187, 202, 304-5, 322, 328, 834, 388,
450, 562, 584, 601, 679, 705, 725, 783, 801-2, 911, 1019, 1045, 1048, 1144-5, 1153,
1156, 1159, 1170, 1204; Amph. 686, 715, 784, 740; Cas. ii. 3, 18; t. 4, 23; Capt.
541, 548-9, 550, 551, 606, 608-9, 628-4, 627, 634 ; Men. iv. 2, 64, 91, 93, 95 ; Poen.
V. 4, 89 ; Bpid. ii. 2, 25 ; Merc. iii. 4, 34, 85, 89, 63 ; Pseud. 885, 712, 716, 798, 808,
864, 875, 890, 914, 981, 945 ; Miles 326, 618, 851, 1114, 1123, 1125, 1149, 1210 ; Most.
i. 1, 55, 67, 68 ; i. 3, 51, 95 ; i. 4, 8 ; ii. 2, 47 ; iii. 1, 95 ; Ter., Phorm. iii. 1 ; iii. 2,
28 ; Heaut. iii. 3, 51 ; v. 9, 16 ; And. i. 2, 15. adsimulem ; cp. Amph. 867. Pist. is
in doubts whether Bacchis requires him to make love to her playfully, or assume the
appearance of real earnestness as a genuine lover. After an exclamation of admiration
at his acuteness, she waives a direct answer to his doubting question, and tells him
more explicitly what she wants him to do. jp^A-

74. Heia, hex. of Aristophanes and the tragedians; a sharp, stirring particle, but
with a greater variety of applications in Latin ; cp. v. 405 ; Epid. ii. 2, 79. In Miles
1141 ; also Men. ii. 8, 35 ; Ter., Hec. ii. 2, 8 ; Phorm. iii. 2, 28, it seems to have the
same force as here ; see Cas. ii. 3, 14 ; iii. 6, 7. The form in the text is that of the
best MSS. The meaning seems to be "very good," or some expression of similar
import, hoc, refers to,,what follows ; " it is better to attend to this." hoc agere ; see
V. 991 ; Capt. 444, 480; Cas. ii. 6, 49; Cist. 83; Miles 1114 ; Pseud. 158; Poen. iii. 5,
16; V. 4, 39; Ter., Aiid: i. 2, 15; Phorm. ii. 8, 3, 88; Heaut. iv. 3, 16. quum; with
subj.; see n. v. 56.

76. quid ago . . . quid metuo; for mood, see n. v. 9. pol; seen. v. 35. quid
ais .f" '• What have you to say " ? This phrase either draws the attention to a new point
in the discourse, or recalls the hearer to something which has been overlooked; cp. vv.
601, 1154; Amph. 360, 414, 614, 841; As. 368, 887; Aul. 709; Pars. iv. 4, 12; Capt.
577, 612, 627, 990; Cure. 190; Ter., Heaut. iii. 3, 50; Phorm. v. 5, 5 ; Miles 368;
Men. ii. 2, 44; iii. 2, 22; iv. 2, 90; Trin. 193; Pseud. 615; Cas. ii. 3, 36; iii. 4, 4.
Quid est.0 "What's the matter"? cp. vv. 641, 995 ; Amph. 552 ; Aul. 542 ; As. 504,
654, 868 ; Capt. 578 ; Cas. ii. 6, 19 ; Cure. 62, 131, 665 ; Most. 66 ; i. 3, 16 ; ii. 1, 17 ;
ii. 2, 26, 27; iii. 1, 42, 107; iii. 2, 38, 34, 49, 51, 132; iii. 4, 5, 6, 19; iv. 3, 28;
iv. 4, 24, 30; Miles 171 ; Pseud. 22, 208, 615, 1066, 1184; Rud. iv. 4, 16; Trin. 799,
892, 1137.

77. Quid si; "suppose"; cp. vv. 728, 1186; Cas. ii. 3, 63-4; ii. 6, 5; iv. 8, 18;
Merc. iii. 8, 3; Capt. 599. ueniat; cp. Capt. 550. desubito; cp. Capt., Prol. 62;
Most. ii. 1, 63 ; Cic, Eep. vi. 2, 2 ; Ter., Heaut. iv. 2, 6 ; in Danae of Naevius. Tam
desubito? Attius (Eurysaces). " Cum desubito me orat mulier" (Ennius). "Desubito
famam tollunt " (Naevius). " desubito divortium fecerunt " (Novius). " Quid desubito
ad mevenisti? (Titinius). "... duco desubito domum" (Caecilius). "Et benivolentia
tenent desubito viros " (Afranius). prandium; "late breakfast"; cp. v. 713; Men.
i. 2, 59, 61; ii. 2, 2, 18; v. 9, 76-7, 80, 81; Capt. 479; Amph. 658. potatio;
"carousal," only here; cp. Cic, ap. Quint, viii. 8, 66; also Sen., Ep.

78. cena; " late dinner " ; cp. v. 183; Amph. 279; As. 926; Most. ii. 2, 54; v. 2,
9, 11, 18; Pseud. 796, 810, 819, 854, 879, 881, 890, 892; Trin. 468; Merc. iv. 4, 2;
Ter., Phorm, ii, 2, 28, conciliabulis sc, fornix; places of meeting; cp, Trin, 814.

79. mi anime; "my life"; cp. As. 657; Cure. 98, 165; Men, i. 8, 1; Most. i.
4, 23; Eud. iv. 8, 1. lepidus; "pretty," agreeable, "clever"; cp. vv. 60, 82, 91,



98 PLAUTI BACCHIDES.

202, 1168, 1178 ; Cas. ii. 3, 7, 10 ; v. 4, 36 ; Cure. 91, 114, 120, 167 ; Trin. 379, 390;
Men. i. 2, 23, 38, 39 ; Ter., And. v. 4, 45.

81. lepide; see n. v. 33; with first part of this v, cp. v. 1181, mea rosa;
cp. As. 657 ; Cure. 102 ; Men. i. 3, 9 ; True. ii. 4, 40, 70 ; ii. 6, 40, 59, 65.

82. qui ; see n. v. 51. ubi ; with subj. ; see n. v. 64, and cp, Cas. ii. 3, 39-40,
lepidum ; see n, v. 79. locum ; cp. preced. v. ; Cas. ii. 8, 42-3 ; iii. 2, 5 ; Merc, iii,
1, 46; iii. 3, 23.

83. Rapidus fluuius. Uss. cites a line quoted by Charisius and. Serviusfrom Virg.,
" Magnus est hie fluvius," in which fluvius is used in same sense as here, temere;
"without risk" ; op. v. 667; Aul. 616 ; Ter., Eun. ii. 2, 59 ; Heaut. iv. 1, 7 ; Phorm. v.
8,9.

84. Atque; "and indeed"; cp. vv. 471, 5.39, 570, 770, 820 ; Amph. 278 ; As. 709 ;
Cas. iii. 5, 80; iii. 6, 21; Capt. 355, 585; Miles 368; Merc. iv. 4, 2; Trin. 667. ecastor;
of the different explanations usually given of this word the most rational, not to say the
most scientific, is that in which it is taken as a shortened form of mecastoi- ; m is a weak
letter in Latin ; besides, in MSS. it is often not written at all ; and in fact the reading here
in is castor ; but admitting, on the authority of the early interpreters of MSS., that there
were two forms, that in the text must have been a weakened form of the other. On the
loss of the m it would become one word, the first part of which would lose its accent and
be pronounced short. That the word is compounded of en and castor is surely less
likely, seeing that the first part of it never could have been employed in invoking the aid
of a deity. Another explanation, that it is for per aedein. Castoris, is the least possible
looking etymology of all. The word is used only by women.

85. Quid ita P ito, of course, refers to Pist.'s last words, and Qitia gives the reason
for them; cp. vv. 99, 251, 677 ; Aul. 144 ; Epid. 72 ; Cas. iii. 1, IB. istoc; see n. v.
73. illecebposius ; only found here.

86. There is no necessity, I think, to write quam, which Uss. proposes, before nox
in this v., or potc quam, according to Gertz, which he adopts ; neither is it necessary that
nox inulier vinum ought to be in abl. case, for they are left out of the construction of
first part of sentence by the speaker, who is speaking generally, otherwise he would have
employed a pronoun in pi. num. ; istoc is neut., and merely prepares the audience for the
sentiment contained in the three terms, nox mulier viman in combination, hence the
omission of conjunctions. Weise, in a note on these words, says they seem to have
been a sort of proverb; and it may be added that our own words, "women and wine,"
are used in common speech in much the same way. The translation then will be,
"Nothing can be more alluring to a man in youth than this (expression), ' night, women,
wine.'" For sentiment, see Aul. 738, 788; Ter., Ad. iii. 4, 24; Ovid., Am. i. 6, 59.
Scholars quote also from Demosth. Contra Midiam, where a similar passage occurs,
rplis Eij^E '7ipo(pa.aiiS, fJ-iOw, spcora, ayvoiaV Jia to axoros, xai wxtos to Trpayfjox yEviaSai,
Dem. 526, 15. For omission of conjunctions, see Madv. G. L. 434; and cp. Amph. 891 ;
Aul. 391; As. 221, 817; Ep. iii. 4, 14, 90; Capt. 405; Cure. 280; Men. v. 9, 73;
Miles 647, 663, 952 ; Most iii. 2, 41 ; Pseud. 580, 677 ; Eud. 23 ; True. ii. 4, 83-4.

87. Age igitup; "well then"; cp. Miles 928 ; Merc. ii. 3, 42. equidem ; see
n. V. 72, pol ; see n. v. 38. causa tua; cp. v. 433 ; Men. v. 9, 86 ; Most. v. 2, 47,
55; Cas. ii. 3, 53; Cure. 150.



COMMENTAEY AND NOTES. 99

88. tu nullus adfueris ; "do not be present at all"; cp. vv. 191, 192, 544 ; As.
405 ; End. i. 2, 55 ; ii. 2, 11 ; Gas, ii. 4, 26 ; iii, 5, 1 ; iv. 2, 16 ; Most. ii. 1, 41 ; Merc,
i. 2, 55, 107; ii. 3, 180; iii, 3, 24; Men. v. 5, 27; Cist. iv. 2, 17; Trin. 606; Ter.,
Eun. ii. 1, 10; ii. 3, 54; And. iii. 4, 20; Hec, i. 2, 4; iii. 1, 39; iv. 1, 6; iv. 4, 31,
Phorm. V. 7, 49; see Madv. G. L. 455 obs. 5.

89. autem ; is used in a question when the words of another are repeated (here
nihili or nullus), and implies in the speaker a feeling of wonder and contempt ; cp.
Amph. 894; Pseud. 305; Most. iv. 4, 24; Ter., Eun. iv. 7, 28; v. 6, 7. nihili ; cp.
vv. 1156, 1161, 1209 ; As. 469, 850; Gas. ii. 3, 25, 31, 41 ; iii. 2, 29 ; Miles 180, 285 ;
Men. V. 6, 7 ; Merc. 1, 2, 15 ; Pseud. 239. ingenio ; see n. v. 616.

90. nugae; "nonsense"! cp. vv. 570, 640; Aul. 630, 643, 819, 821 ; Amph. 698,
620; As. 90, 801; Gapt. 527, 607, 964; Gas. ii. 5, 25; v. 3, 14; Gist. ii. 3, 39; Cure.
199, 604, 675 ; Most. v. 2, 24; Men. i. 1, 10; iv. 2, 63-7; Merc. i. 2, 11 ; v. 2, 101 ;
Pers. iv. 7, 8; Pseud. 238, 1081; Poen. i. 2, 138; iii. 5, 31 ; Eud. iv. 4, 107; Stich.
294; Trin. 396, 441 ; True. ii. 1, 21 ; iv. 2, 59. IVlulier; see n. v. 39. emancupo;
"I transfer myself to you"; only here, in Cure. 495 wancupo has much the same
meaning; cp. Hor., Epod. ix. 12 ; Cic, Fin. i. 7 ; Phil. ii. 21 ; v. 13.

91. Tuus sum ; cp. Gas. iii. 6, 25. Lepidus ; see n. v. 79.

92. cenam ; see n. v. 78, and cp. v. 538 ; Epid. 6 ; True. i. 2, 81. uiaticam ;
only here, from via, cena viatica (Sejttvov hSoinopixov), seems to have been an entertainment
given to one returning from a long journey ; see True. i. 2, 31. In Epid. v. 1, 9 ; Men.
v. 7, 50, we have viaticum, but not with same meaning.

93. intus; " from within " ; cp. vv. 791, 1046 ; Amph. 763 ; Gas. ii. 5, 43 ; v. 1 ;
Cist, iii. 8 ; Ep. iii. 2, 44 ; iii. 4, 45 ; Miles 1169 ; Men. i. 3, 35 ; Most. ii. 1, 58 ; iii. 1,
142; Pseud. 604; True. ii. 1, 43. foras ; old accus. pi. used adverbially; the only
other form in use is foris, abl. pi. It always means "towards the outside," or "with-
out," or an extension of these, and always -has reference, in the mind of the speaker, to
some well defined space outside the limits of which its force extends. Motion is always
expressed or implied. The word does not appear to have any connection with fores in
meaning, for the latter is the door that opens and shuts, whereas the former, when the
speaker is thinking of the inside of a house, always refers to the space outside ; cp. vv.
231, 381, 612, 1114, 1146; Gapt. 528; Gas. ii. 1, 16; ii. 2, 37; ii. 3, 56; ii. 6, 63;
iii. 2, 21 ; iv. 2, 10; iv. 3, 1, 20; Pseud. 604, 606 ; Miles 1248, 1394 ; Most. i. 1 ; iii.
1, 64 ; iv. 1, 19, 20, 41 ; iv. 4, 12 ; Men. i. 2, 15 ; Merc. v. 2, 67 ; Pers. iv. 8, 70 ; Eud.
i. 2, 82 ; V. 3, 64 ; Stich. 219, 596, 597, 612, 683 ; Trin. 276, 401 ; True. i. 1, 18.

94. opsonatum sit; Plautus has this verb sometimes active, sometimes de-
ponent ; for the former see next v., also 141 ; Aul. 272 ; Gas. ii. 8, 5, 55, 65 ; Most. i.
23; Merc. iv. 4, 14 ; Men. ii. 2, 1, 45 ; Miles 738 ; Gapt. 474 ; for the latter, Aul. 292 ;
Stich. 681. opulentum ; hardly the same in Trin. 469, "splendid." opsonium,
64-a;v(ov ; generally anything eaten with bread, and especially fish ; may be trans,
"entertainment"; cp. v. 129; Aul. 274, 283; Merc. iv. 4, 40; Most. ii. 1, 16; Men. i.
4,2.

95. opsonabo; see preced. v. nam; see n. v. 11. nam here impUes the
protasis (nisi opsonem) suppressed, flagitium; "a shame"; cp. vv. 1004, 1163; Trin.



100 PLAUTI BACOHIDES.

612; Men. v. 1, 19, 21, 35, 38, 39 ; Miles 693. mea gratia; "on my account"; cp.
Aul. 265 ; Amph. 657, 675 ; Men. i. 2, 41 ; iv. 3, 23.

96. operam dare; see n. v. 58. de tuo, " from your own."

97. Sine; see n. v. 21. Sino equidem ; see n. v. 21 and n. v. 72.

98. amabo ; see n. v. 42. Pist. does not express by the words te amare desinam
any real love for Bacchis — for it is not a question of love veith them, but of haste
in getting ready the entertainment — but merely says (in regular Hibernian phraseology)
that he will be back before he is after making love to her, and in compliance with
her request that he will do so when the soldier arrives. It is only after she insinuates,
as he thinks, that he is unable to control his conduct, and says that the soldier will
carry off the sister, that he responds to her blandishments, and for so far appears to do
so only in the interests of his absent friend Mnesilochus. He maintains the part of the
trusty friend throughout the play.

99. Quid ita.!* see n. v. 85. obsecro has much the same meaning as amabo,
"pray"; cp. vv. 141, 200, 261, 745, 835, 847, 861, 865, 1111, 1128; Most. ii. 1, 19;
Gas. ii. 2, 17, 25 ; ii. 3, 16 ; iii. 4, 30; iii. 6, 7, 85 ; iv. 4, 5, 33 ; Cure. 310, 313-14 ;
Poen. i. 2, 126 ; v. 4, 35 ; Eud. i. 4, 16, 25 ; True, v.' 67.

100. piscatus bonus; "a fine haul"; cp. Eud. iv. 2, 6, 7. meo animo; see
n. V. 12. hie, adv.

101. iVleus . . . St; cp. Cure. 431 ; Miles 334; Pseud. 381, 600. operam
dabo; see n. v. 58.

103. Dabitur opera; see n. v. 58. intro; always means towards the inside,
"inside"; cp. vv. 106, 572, 711, 818, 901, 1131, 1138, 1150, 1175, 1177-8, 1181, 1186,
1205 ; Aul. 81, 89, 90, 99, 100, 101, 103 ; Capt. 946, 948, 1022 ; Epid. ii. 2, 120, 122;
v. 1,55, 58; v. 2, 46, 48; Miles 394, 1248, 1250; Men. iv. 3, 18. 24; Most. ii. 1, 38,
43, 44, 50, 77; ii. 2, 40; iii. 2, 163-4; Stich. 567; Trin. 1078; Cist. iv. 2, 105, 107;
V. 6 ; Cas. 54 ; ii. 2, 39 ; ii. 4, 16 ; ii. 6, 67; 69, 70; ii. 8, 76 ; iii. 2, 27; iii. 6, 87 ; iv.
4, 12. laues; intr. "that you may bathe " ; cp. Amph. 795; Capt. 948; Most. i. 3,
1 ; Stich. 568-9 ; True. ii. 3, 1 ; Ter., And. iii, 2, 3 ; Eun. iii. 5, 34, 44-5, 48, 52.

104. Nam; seen. v. 11. ut; "inasmuch as"; cp. Men., Prol. 30 ; True. ii. 7, 26.
timida; our slang word "shaky" expresses the meaning. She thinks the appearance
of her sister indicates the dread arising from a journey by sea, and the weakness
which results from sea-sickness ; cp. Cure. 647 ; Epid. 59 ; Most. v. 1, 11.

105. This V. seems to have puzzled all the editors, including Lambinus, Herm.,
Bothe, Eitschl, Weise, Fleck,, and Uss. The last alone retains the reading of the MSS.
BO, but thinks the line ought to be rejected as unworthy of Plautus, and as it stands
in his text it can neither be translated nor scanned. Lamb, makes two changes — hinc
for huic, turhat for turhare, and adds soror at the end without authority. Weise makes
the same changes, and writes nos instead of soror at the end. Herm. makes three — hie
for huic, turhat for turbare, and decedimus for decedamus, and inserts nunc after hie and
qitin before deced. Bothe has hinc for huic, and jjiis for first qui; R. and Fleck., hie for
huic, and coepit instead of qui hue it, inserting hinc after deeed. There appears to have
been an older edition (that of Stephanus) than that of Lamb,, with the reading, Simul
hie vcscio, quid turhae est ; quin hinc deeediimts ? which Harm., E,, and Fleck, seem to have



COMMENTAKY AND NOTES. 101

partly followed. On the authority of this old edition and Harm., I have put decedim.tts
in the text, huic, (Pistoclero) changed by all the editors mentioned above except Uss.,
depends on decedimus. qui; see n. v. 51. turbare; "to cause confusion," depends
on it ; cp- Men. iii. 2, 21 ; Aul. 648 ; Most. i. 64 ; iii. 1, 14 ; v. 1, 12 ; Ter., Hec. iv.
4, 12 ; Miles 813. it ; ep. w. 682, 895 ; Hor. C. i. 2, 8 ; ii. 12, 28 ; Amph. 258 ; Ter.,
Hec. i. 2, 114 ; Gas. iii. 6, 68 ; v. 1, 1-2 ; also Miles 380 ; Eud. i. 2, 6 ; Pseud. 642 ;
Stich. 89; Lucret. iii. 896. it, the verb eo, of which our word "go," which always
implies motion from a place, is not always an exact representative, originally im-
plied only movement. When Plautus wishes to use a verb in the sense of "go," he
generally employs some of the compounds of eo. Trans., "who is proceeding hither."
decedimus; decedarmis is clearly an error of a scribe, who would be misled by the
similarity in meaning and termination between the verb in the text and eamits in line
103. Trans., "we are making way"; cp. Trin. 481; Ter., Heaut., Prol. 32; Amph.
977, 980, 983; Most. iv. 3, 24; Merc. i. 2, 7 ; Cic, Eep. i. 43. Lamb., Herm., Bothe,
Weise, punctuate thus . after it, E., Fleck. : , Ussing, , which has been adopted.

106. igitUP; may refer either to last v. or aliquantum in preceding; cp. v. 988.
intPo; seen. V. 103. lectum; see n. v. 52. lassitudinem; cp. Cure. 310; Epid.
V. 2, 6; True. ii. 3, 7; Merc. i. 2, 3, 16, 48; Men. v. 6, 10.

107. dudum (diu-dum) refers to the past, and when it is used with a past tense,
as it generally is in Plautus, there is no difficulty, for in this case it always means
"lately" or "just now " ; but when emphasized by another particle or used with a present
tense, its reference to past time is intensified, and means "some (considerable) or
a long time," which is its original force. If dudum in Plautus always means, as some
think, "lately" or "just now," which by a conventional usage of our language mean
the same thing, he never could have employed it with the present tense ; but it does not.
The proper representative in Latin of " just now" in its literal sense is modo or nuper ;
which, however, are not used in this sense with imperf. so often as with other tenses ;
cp. Merc. v. 2, 58. The same particles of time can, of course, be employed with verbs
in past, present, or future tense, but not with the same meaning. The translation here
is, " I have now for some time been following you in silence." In support of what has
been said cp. v. 1050; Pers. iv. 3, 35 ; Cist. ii. 1, 41 ; Stich. 310 ; Cas. ii. 6, 16, 62;
iv. 3, 8 ; As. 446 ; Merc. iii. 2, 13 ; Miles 406 ; Trin. 608, 812 ; also Ter., Eun. iv. 4,
80 ; Heaut. iv. 5, 10 ; Phorm. ii. 4, 19 ; Hec. iv. 4, 26 ; And. v. 2, 9 ; Cic, Att. iv. 5, 1.

108. Spectans ; cp. v. 212 ; Cas., Prol. 6 ; Most. iii. 2, 131, 142. tute ; cp. vv.
261, 566 ; Merc. ii. 4, 13 ; Amph. 740 ; Cas. ii. 8, 50 ; ii. 6, 48 ; iii. 4, 9. ornatu ;
"dress," sc, the garland worn at such entertainments; cp. v. 123 ; Cure. 2; Men. v.
1, 9; and "malaeum pallium" ; see also n. v. 69.

109. Namque ; more emphatic than nam; see n. v. 11 ; cp. Capt. 599 ; Cist. 70;
Miles 1226; Men. v. 9, 77; Merc. iii. 1, 10; Pseud. 555. ita me di ament; a form of
asseveration often met with in Plautus and Terence ; cp. Poen. iii. 1 ; ita, ut are correla-
tive, but the latter is now generally omitted; cp. vv. 890-93; Most. i. 8, 14; ii. 2, 86;
Ter., Heaut. iv. 5, 1; Phorm. v. 7, 61; Cas. ii. 8, 16. Lycurgus; either the Spartan
lawgiver or a famous Attic orator contemporary of Demosthenes. The former seems to
accord better with the sentiment here; cp. Cic, Att. i. 13, 3.

110. iiic. It has been proposed to read his or hisce for hie, on the supposition that



102 PLAUTI BACCHIDES.

there is no question of place here. But to what would his refer? There is no question
of pi. number, and there appears to be as good a reason for retaining hie in the text as
hinc in next v. Lydus comes up to the young man, he says he has been watching him,
and refers to the place in which the two are when he accosts him. We can infer from
what he says here that it was disreputable, and not such as a young gentleman ought to
frequent, ad nequitiem adducien; cp. Ter., Ad. iii. 3, 4 (Bent, emend.)-.

111. capessis, so. se conferre; c^. v. 1073; Amph. 258; As. 157; Trin. 299;
see also n. v. 423. adversum, adversa is the reading of the MSB., but I am inclined to
believe that the in not having been written in the original MS., the copyist took it for
an adj. in agreement with via. Plautus frequently employs the adv. adversum or
adverstis; cp. As. 293 ; Gas. ii. 8, 27 ; iii. 6, 8 ; Most. i. 4, 1 ; iv. 1, 17, 21, 37 ; iv. 3, 6,
9; Trin. 176. Quo . . . adversum ha,a here the sa,m6 toroe a.H quomim ; cp. Ter., Eun.
ii. 3, 14. Trans., " Whither are you now betaking yourself hence along the street with
such a train"?

112. pompa ; cp. Capt. 765 ; Cure. 2 ; Gas. iii. 5, 98 ; Gist. 91 ; Stich. 683 ;
True. ii. 6, 68; Ter., Heaut. iv. 4, 17. Hue ; he points towards the house of Bacchis.
hahet^habitat ; cp. Aul. 5; Men. 69; Trin. 198, 390; True. 58; ii. 1, 35. "Ubi
habet?urb6, agrone"? Attius (Philoctetes). " Ubi hie Moschis, quaeso, habet" (Afranius).

113. AmoP, personified by the poets for Cupido ; but see Most. i. 8, 7 ; Merc. v.
2,1-29; Capt. 858. Uoluptas; see Gas. i. 48; ii. 8, 17-18; Gic, N.D. ii. 23, 61.
The rest, except Uenus, are only comic jokes.

114. cp. Merc. V. 2, 5 ; Pseud. 65. Suauisuauiatio ; "sweet-kissing"; cp. v.
118 ; for this v. cp. also Ter., Eun. ii. 3, 9.

115. commercist; cp. Aul. 628; End. iii. 4, 20; True. i. 1, 77. damnosis-
sumis; " most ruinous " ; cp. Pseud. 415; Epid. ii. 3, 14; True. i. 1, 44.

116. dicunt male; ep. v. 461; Cure. 123, 513; Men. ii. 2, 35, 40; Most. iv. 1,
34; Stich. 114 ; Trin. 73, 186.

117. nee peete dieis; "not even of the gods do you speak respectfully"; ep. v.
731; As. 154, 468 ; Most. i. 3, 83 ; Poen. iii. 1, 13 ; Pseud. 1085.

118. Suauisuauiatio; see n. v. 114.

119. non umquam=)!«?!}Mam; "Did you never think she was"? se. Did you
never feel her divine influence ? The separation of the two particles makes the question
more emphatic. Instead of answering the pedagogue's question, he takes it out of his
mouth and puts it in a new form, without supplying the pronoun or repeating ullus,
and at the same time gives a reply, as if he had said, "ita esse," or responded directly
"ita est"; op. Gist. 88. It will be observed that the fun and banter in which the
young man indulges throughout this scene, and the staid prudence of the tutor, admir-
ably prepare the way for the introduction of Philoxenus later on. barbarus ; "You
are an ignorant foreigner." Lydus would not be taken for a Roman either by a Greek
or Roman audience ; cp. Gas. iii. 6, 83 ; Cure. 150 ; Eud. ii. 7, 25 ; Most. iii. 2, 144.

120. nimio, with eompar. ; see n. v. 71, and cp. vv. 149, 162, 311, 898 ; Most. i.
1, 69; i. 2, 61; ii. 2, 12; Merc. iii. 2, 6; Men. v. 6, 14; Pseud. 281; Stich. 746;
Trin. 84, 811, 887. Thalem ; ep. Capt. 273; Rud. iv. 3, 75. Thaletem also in use;
see Cic, de Rep. i. 16.



COMMENTAEY AND NOTES. 103

121. stultiop es ; "You are a greater fool." barbaro sc. Eoman; cp. As.,
Prol. 11; Capt. 491, 878; Miles 212; Poen. iii. 2, 21; Stich. 193; Trin., Prol. 19.
Poticio ; see Virg., Aen. viii. 269, &c. ; Liv. i. 7 ; ix. 29.

122. tantus natu ; "at such an age," in comparison with his own.

123. OPnatus ; see n. v. 108. ergo, has both the conclusive force of igitur, and
strengthens the words of its own clause. Pist. uses a strong neg., nemo; and there is
an antithesis between tihi adparauit and mihi paratumst, while placet is repeated. He
says, "Nobody, therefore (admitting what you say), provided this for you ; for me it was



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