Pre-1801 Imprint Collection (Library of Congress).

A vocabulary of such words in the English language as are of dubious or unsettled accentuation, in which the pronunciation of Sheridan, Walker, and other orthoepists, is compared online

. (page 11 of 18)
Online LibraryPre-1801 Imprint Collection (Library of Congress)A vocabulary of such words in the English language as are of dubious or unsettled accentuation, in which the pronunciation of Sheridan, Walker, and other orthoepists, is compared → online text (page 11 of 18)
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arabaffador from the Pope. .

Mr. Walker makes the a long
in this word like a in fate,
whieh I have followed; Mr.
Sheridan pronounces it fliort,
marking the word leg'-gat.

LEGATOR, leg.ga-tor'. S.
[from Lego, ,Lat,] One who
iTiakes a will and leaves lega-
cies.

Dr. Johnfon, Dr. A(h, and
Mr. Entick, place the accent
on the fecond fy liable of this
word ; Mr. Sheridan and Mr.
Walker lay the ftrefs on the laft
fyllable, which is undoubtedly
the beft ufage.

LEGEND, iS'.jend. S. [/e-
genda, Lat.] A chronicle or
regifter of the lives of faints ;
any memorial or relation ; an
incredible unauthentick narra-
tive ; any infcription, particu-
larly on medals or coins.



** And in this legend all that glorious deed
" Read, whilft you arm you, arm yoa
" whilft you read."

Fairfax.

Mr. Sheridan, Mr. Scott,
Mr. W. Johnfon, Mr. Bailey,
Mr. Entick, Mr. Perry, Mr.
Walker, and Mr. Kuchanan,
found the €, in the firft fyllable,
long, as I have marked it. Dr.
Kenrick arid Dr. Afh pronounce
it {hort.

^ LEGENDARY, l^d'-j^n-
da-r^. A. [from hgendario,
Spanifh.J Pertaining to a le-
gend.

Dr. Johnfon and Mr. She-
ridan ha\% not this word. 1
have made the e, in the firft fyl-
lable, fhort, like Mr. Walker,
who fays, " As the prepeding
word (UgendJ has, by the
cleareft analogy, the vowel in
the firft fyllable long, fo this
word, by having the accent
higher than the antepenultimate,'
has as clear an analogy for hav-
ing the fame vowel fhort."
This analogy, however, is con-
tradifted by Dr. Afh, Mr. W.
Johnfon, Mr. Scott, Mr, En-
tick, Mr. Perry, and Mr. Bu-
chanan.

^ LEGISLATOR, led'-jif-lL
tur. S. {legijlc^tor, Lat. Icgijla^
teur, Fr.J A lawgiver, one who
makes laws for any ^ommu**^
nity.

Dr. Johnfon, Dr. Afh, Mr.

Entick, and Mr. Bailey, accent

this word on the penultima ;

N a Mr;



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L E S



L I E



Hit; hJte; h^ll. B^t ; bear; be^rr Fit; fight; field.



Mr. Sheridan and. Mr. Walker
lay the ft re fs on the firft fy lia-
ble, which I have preferred.

,^ LEGISLATURE, ledzh'-if-
la-tftiur. S. [from legijlator^
]Lat.j The power that makes
laws.

The only difference between
the pronunciation of Mr. She-
ridan and Mr. Walker refpeft-
ing this word is, that the former
founds the laft fy liable fhort,
as I have marked' it, and the
latter makes it long, marking it
led'rjif-la-ture. Mr. Walker
blames fomerefpeftable fpeakers
of the Houfe of Commons^ for
founding the e in the firft fyl-
lable long, as if written Leegif.
la'ture. This long found of
the t is fupported only by Mr.
W. Johnfon. Dr. Kenrick,
Mr. Scott, and Mr. Perry, make
the <?, fliort, like Mr. Sheridan
jmd Mr. Walker.

LEPORINE,. Icp'.p6.r!ne.
K\lep6rinus,\a^!i?!^ Belonging
to a hare,

I have made the e fhort, in
the firft fy liable of this word,
like -Mr. Walker. Mr. Sheri-
dgn gives it the long found, pro-
nouncing the word l^'-po-rine.
Dr. Afti feems to fupport Mr.
Sheridan : Mr. Perry and Mr.
Eiitick favour the fhort found
pf Mr, Walker, ' "

J.E$T, \h^. Conj, [Johnfon ^



fays itisfromtheadjeaive /<?a/^.3
That not ; for fear that.

Moft of our orthoepifts pro-
nounce this word two ways,
l^ft, or l4^ft. Mr. Walker
however gives a preference to
the former (which I have fol-
lowed), and thinks the fecond
fhould be exploded. Mr. She-
ridan founds it both ways alfo ;
but by giving precedence to
the firft, we may fairly infer he
preferred it, and this feems tQ
be the beft ufage,

LIBIDINOUS, li-bidMn-us.
A. \libidinoJu5 ^ Lat.] Lewd,
luftful.

I have followed Mr. SherK
dan, who, in this wofd (and
libidinoujly) makes the t, in
the firft fy liable, long, like i in
fight ; Mr. Walker pronounce^'
the i fhort^ marking the word
l^-bid'-in-us.

LICENTIATE, l!-fen'-flilt..
S. [lie^ntialus^ Lat.] A man
who ufes a licenfe ; a degree in
Spanifh univerfities.

Mr. Sheridan pronounces
this word as I have marked it,
the laft fyllable fliort ; but when
it is a verb, he makes it long,,
marking it JItate. Mr. Wal-
ker pronounces both fubftantivQ
and verb the fame, founding
the laft fyllable long, and mark-
ing the word li-f en'-fh^-ate.

LIE, li. S. [//<,' French.]
Any thing impregnated with



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LI G



L O A



Not; note; no^fe. But; bufli; blue. Love-l}; lye. Tk'm; THis.



fome other body, as fope or
fait.

Mr. Sheridan pronounces
this word ll. I have followed
Mr, Walker, whp fays, " I
have differed from -Mr. She-
ridan and agreed with every
other orthoepift in giving this
ward the fame found as he, a
falfehood.'* Mr. Sheridan's is
the French manner.



uant.



LIEUTENANT, llf-t^n-
S. \_lieutenant, Fr,] A
deputy, one who afts by vica-
rious authority ; in war, one
-who holds the next rank, to a
fuperiour of any denomination.

** Sent by our new lieutenant ^ who in Rome,
** And fmce from me, has heard of your

" renown ;
<* Icome to offer peace."

Philips.

I have followed Mr. Sheri-
dan in the pronunciation of
this wo*d, as it appears to me
to be the beft ufage, particu-
lar! y- in the army. Mr. Wal-
ker founds it l^v-ten'-nant, and
fays, ** This word is fre-
quently pronounced by good
fpeakers as if written Liv tenant.
The difference (continues hej
between the fliort i and (liort e
is fo trifling as fcarcely to de-
ferve notice ; but the regular
found, as if written Lewtenant,
feems not fo remote from the
corruption as to make us lofe
^11 hope that it will ift time be
the actual pronunciation."

LIGATURE, )ig'-ga-tfli6r.
^.[ligature, fr. ligatura^ Lat.J



Any thing bound on, bandage ;
the aft of binding ; the ftate of
being bound.

Mr. Sheridan pronounces
this wprd as I have marked it ;
Mr. Walker founds it lig'-ga-
ture.



' LILACH, 15'
Fr.j A tree.



-lik. S. [lilas.



Both Mr. Sheridan and Mr.
Walker pronounce this word
as I have marked it, making the
i, in the firft fyllable, long, like
i in fght The latter adds.

This word is pronounced-
by the vulgar as if Written ia;)'-
loci:'

LIMATURE, li'-ma-tflior,
S. [limatura, Lat.] Tilings of
any metal, the particles rubbed
off by a file.

*rhe above is Mr. Sheridan's
pronunciation of this word-
Mr. Walker founds it li'-mi-
ture.

LITHESOME, lixn'-fum,
A. [from Li^e, Sax.] Pliant,
nimble, limber.

This word is neither in Dr.
Johnfon, Dr. Afh, ^or Mr*
Sheridan's Diftionaries^ I have
founded it as Mr. Walker has
marked it, the i long. It is
often (but improperly) pron
nounced lijfum,

LOAM, lom. S. [l»m, laam,
Sax, limus^ Lat. from a</xf»,

a fen.



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L U M



MAM



Hat; \^ke; hall. Bet; blar ; belr. Fit; fight; field.



a fen> Junius J] Fat unftuous
earth, marl.

Mr. Sheridan arid Mr. Wal-
ker pronounce this word as I
have marked it ; but the latter
fays that it is vulgarly pro-
nounced as if \^(ritten loom.

^ logomachy; l&.gim'.
a-k^. See Monomachy.

To LOW, IS. V. N. [hloxan.
Sax.] To bellow as a cow.

*' Largie oxen in the fields were lowing :
•* Cood grain wv fbw'd : good fruit was
" growing. "

Piwios..

Both Mr. Sheridan and Mr,
Walker found this word as I
have marked it» yet it is often

fronounced as if it rhymed to
ow ; and the latter of thefe
gentlemen, in his Rhyming
Difclionary, publifhed in 177,5>
followed that pronunciation,
though he has fince, with much
propriety, changed his opinion.

LUMBAGO, Jim.ba.g5.

S. [iumii^ Lat.the loins.] Lum-

, bago are pains very troublefome

about the loins and fmall of the

back.

Mr. Sheridan and Mr. .Wal-
ker found this word as I have
marked it; the latter obfcrvcs,
** This word is often pro-
jiounced with the Italian found
of ^,,as heard in fatktr; but
fhis mode of pronouncing the
scented a^ m words frgm the



Latin, hasheen long and juftly
exploded."

LUSTRING, li'te-Hang-
S. [from liijtu^ Fr.} A fluning
filk. .

I have marked this .word like
Mr. Sheridan. Mr. Walker
pronounces it luf'-ftring; but
fo far from this beiijg the ufual
manner of foun<Jing the word,
that Dr. Johnfon (who rarely
troubles himfelf further thai? to
place the accent) adds, '* com-
monly pronounced lutefiringj*
Mr. Walker, however, has, iii
the fequel, fpelled the word as
Dr. Johnfon fays it is pro-,
nounced, and then adds, " This
corruption of Luteftring for
Zzv/i'n 72^ is beyond recovery.*'



M.

MALEADMINISTRA.
.TION, raal-ad-mln-nif,
tra'.fhun. S. [from mal (bad)
and adminiftratton, Fr* or frona
male and adminiftratie^ Lat J
Bad management of affairs^

Mr. Sheridan pronounceathe
^, in the firll fy liable of this
word (and maUconfent^ male^
contented, maleeontentedly ^ male^
contentednofs, malepraBice^ and
maletreatmentj , fhort, as I have
marked it ; Mr. Walker (in the
fame words) founds it long,
like a in hate ; but there can
be little doubt that the' beft
ufage is with Mr. Sheridan.

MAMMILLARY, mW-mlU



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M AsN



MAR



Not; nAte; no&fc. Bit; bufli; blue. Love^Jr- l^'e. TXin; mlu



iJ-r^.- A, {mamitlaris, Lat J
Belonging to the paps or dugs.

Mr. Nares and Mr. Walker
accent this word on the firft
fy liable, which I have followed.
Dr. Johnfon, Dr. Afti, Mr.
Entkk, and Mr. Sheridan, lay
the ftrefs onthefecond. John-
fon's fpelling is here followed,
but Sheridan and Walker write
thfe word Mamillary.

MANCHINEEL, mantOi-
in.4^1'. S. [mancanillfl, Lat.J
A large tree, a native of the
Weft Indies.

Mr;^ Sheridan lays the flrefs
on the firft fyllable of this
word ; Dr. Johnfon, Dr. Afli,
and Mr. Walker, accent it on
the laft, which is certainly the
beft ufage.

MANKIND, m^n-kylnd'. S.
\^man and kind,'] The race or
fpecies of human beings.

" The proper ftudy of mankind is man."
V Pope.

Dr. Afh and Mr. Bailey
pronounce this word with the
accent on the firft fyllable ; Dr.
Johnfon, Mr. JEntick, Mr. She-
ridan, and Mr. Walker, lay the
ftrefs on the laft, which is the
general pronunciation.

MANTUA, mSnt'.ti. S.
[perhaps corrupted from man.
teau, Fr.] A lady's gown.

«* Not Cynthia, when her mantua's pinnM

" awry,
*' E'er felt fuch rage, refcntment, and

♦* de%)air,
«* As thou, fad virgin! for thy ravifti'd!
- *' hair."

FopE.

6



1 have followed Mr. Sheri-
dan in the pronunciation v of
this word ; Mr. Walker founds
it mSn'-tftiu-4.



I t

mar-a-



MARANATHA,
naM^A. S. [Syriack^ It was^
a form of denouncing a -cutfe,
or anathematizing among the
Jews.

Mr. Sheridan lays the ftrcfe
on the fecond fyllable of this
word ; Dr. Johnfon, Dr, Afh,
Mr. Entick, and Mr. .Walker,
accent it on the third, which I
have followed.

MARIGOLD, ml'rj^'-g^ld.
S. nif^ryand gold; Caltha^
LatTj A yellow flower.

" The marigold^ whofc courtier's fee
" Echoes tlie fun, and doth unlace
" Her at his rile."

Cleavelanit.

1 have marked this word after
Mr. Sheridan, who makes the
tf , in the firft fyllable, long, 4ike
a in hate^ as does alfo Mr.
Buchanan. Mr. Scott, Mr^
W. Johnfon, Mr. Perry, and
Mr. Walker, give the a the'
(hort found as in marry. It is
properly obferved by the latter,
that gold, in this word, is never
corrupted into goold, y

MARMOSET, mar'.mS-zet. .
S.' [marmoufet, Fr.] A fmall
monkey.

" I will ij)fl:ru£l thaehow
" To iaart the uimble matmofetV
Shakspeare.

Mr. Sheridan, Mr. Entick,

and



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MAT



M A U



nk; hke; hUll. Bet; bear; be^r. Fit; fight; field.



and Mr. Bailey, accent this
word on the laft fyllable ; Dr.
Johnfon, Dr. Afli, and Mr.
Walker, lay the ftrefs on the
firft, which I have preferred.

. MATRONAL, ipit'-r&.nJl.
A. [matronalis^ Lat.] Elderly,
ancient.

Dr. Johnfon, Dr. Afli, Mr.
Entick, Mr. Scott, Mr. Perry,
and Mr. Sheridan, accent this
word on the firft fyllable, the
four laft giving the firft a the
long found of a in hate, ^r.
Walker marks it mat'-ro-nal,
or mLtr&'-nal (the firft of
which I have followed) ; he
pronounces the a in both fhort,
like a in hat^ and feems to pre-
fer the accent oh. the firft fyl-
lable. Dr. Alh gives the firft
a likewife' the Ihort found.
Mr. Bailey lays the ftrefs on
the third fyllable. See Pfl-
tronal. In matron and ma.
tronly, Mr. Walker pronoun-
ces the a long, like Mr. She-
ridan.

To MATURATE, mat'-u-
rate. V. A. [from maturo, Lat.]
To haften, to ripen. V. N. To
grow ripe.

I have marked this word like
Mr. Sheridan; Mr. Walker
pronounces it matfli'



3 2^

-u-rate.



m4'-t&-



^ MATURATIVE,
ra-tiv.^ A. [from matUro^ Lat.]
Ripening, conducive to- ripe-
9



nefs ; conducive to the fuppu-
ration of a fore.

Mr. Sheridan and Mr. En-
tick lay the ftrefs on the fecond
fyllable of this word; Dr.
Johnfon, Dr. Afh, and Mr.
Walker, accent it on the firft,
which I have followed. The
latter pronounces the word
matfli'-ii-ra-tive.

MAUNDY-THURSDAY,

ml'n-dy-^Aurz'-da. S. [derived
by Spetman from mande, a
hand-bafket, in which the king
was accuftomed to give alms to
the poor.] The Thurfday be*
fore Good Friday.

Mr. Sheridan prpnounces
this word as I have marked it,
making the a^ in the firft fyl-
lable, found like a in kall^ as he
has alfo in maundy and to
maunder. The two latter, Mr.
Walker thinks, ought to be
founded with the Italian «, and
he fays maund is pronounced
nearly as if written marnd.
He is miftaken however in fay-
ing to maunder is neither in
Kenrick nor Sheridan, for I
find it in the fecond edition of
the latter, marked man-d^r, and
I believe he has the heft ufage
on his fide in the pronunciation
of all three of thefe words.
Mr. Nares pronounces to maun^
der with the a like a in hat.
Maundy -Thurfday is marked
by Mr. Walker, mawrj'-d^, or
man -dl-Murz'-da. He allows
the firft is the raoft common,

but



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MED



ueu



Not; n&te; noife. Bfit ; bufti; blue. Love-lJ^; lye* Th'm; thIsi



tut prefers the latter, which is
the pranunciation of Mr. Nares.



urn



MAUSOLEUM, mi.f6-li'.
S. \mauf oleum ^ Lat.] A
pompous funeral monument.

** Thy vcrfe all monuments docs far fur-

« pqfs :
** No maufoleum*s like thy Hudibras."

Mr. Entick accents this word
on the fecond fyllable; Dr.
Jolinfon, Dr. Afh, Mr. Bailey,
Mr. Sheridan, and Mr. Walker,
lay the ftrefs on the third fyl-
lable, which is certainly the pre-
vailing prdnunciation.

MAYOR, mi'r. S. Imaire,

Fr.] The chief magiftrate of a

, corporation, who, in London

and York, is called Lord

Mayor.

, I have marked this word like
Mr. Sheridan ; Mr. Walker
pronounces it ma'-ur.

MEDICINAL, me-dif-in-
el. A. [medicinalis^ Lat.] Hav-
ing the power of healing, hav-
ing phyfical virtue ; belonging
to phyfick.

** Come with words as medicinal as true,
•* Honcft as either : to purge him of that

'• humour
" That prcffes him from fleep."

Shakspeare.

. . Both Mr. Walker and Mr.
Sheridan give two * ways of
placing the accent on this word :
firft on the fecond fyllable, as
I have marked it, and then on
the third. Dr. Johnfon ac-
cents it on the penultima,



though he tells lis it is now
commonly pronounced with
the ftrefs on the fecond fylla-
ble. Mr. Bailey, Dr. Afh,
and Mr. Entick, accent it on
the fecond fyllable, and Mr^
Walker gives it the preference!
It certainly is the belt ufage.

MEDIOCRITY, me-d^hok'.
kry-ty. S. [mediocriie^ Fr. rric^
diocritas, Lat.] Small degree,
middle rate, middle ftate ; mo-
deration, temperance.

I have marked this word after
Mr. Sheridan ; Mr. Walker has
it mi-d^-6k^-r^*t^, or ml-jl-
6k'-r^.t^.

MEDIUM, m^'-dyum. S,
[medium^ Lat. J Any thing in-
tervening ; any thing ufed in
ratiocination in order to a con-».
clufion ;' the middle place or
degree^ the juft temperature
between extremes.

*• I mufl bring together
" All tbefe extremes ; and muft remove all

** mediums y
" That each may be the other's objeft.**
Den HAM,

I have followed Mr. Sheri-
dan in founding this word;
Mr. Walker pronounces it me'*
d^-um, or me'*je-um.

MEMOIR, me-moi'r. S.
[mcfifoire^ Fr.] An account of
tranfaftions familiarly written; ,
account of any thing.

" Be our great raaftej-'s future charge

" To write his own memoirs^ and leave hf>

" heir
" High fchemes of -government and plans

** of wars."

Prior.

O Dr.



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M E R



MET



Hat; hite; hall. Bet; hhr ; heir. Fit; fight; field.



Dr. Afli, Mr. Bailey, Mr.
Scott, and Mr. Entick, accent
this word on the firft fyllable ;
Dr. Johnfon Mr. W. Johnfon,
Dr. Kenrick, Mr. Buchanan,
and Mr. Perry, have it on the
lafl: ; and Mr. Sheridan and Mr.
.Walker found it both ways,
giving precedence however to
the ftrefs on the laft fyllable,
which 1 have followed. Mr.
Walker founds the oi in this
word like oi in oil.
r

MERCHANT, merUMnt.
S. [marchund^ Fr J One who
trafEcks^o remote countries.

I have followed Mr. Walker
in founding the ^, in the fir 11
fyllable of this word, like c in
bet, Mr. Sheridan pronounces
it like a in march fma r-tlhant J ;
'and it is certain (fays Mr. Wal-
ker}, that about thirty years
ago, this laft was the general
pronunciation. At prefent
however, it is rarely fo founded
but by the vulgar.

MERMAID, mer'-mad. S.
[mer, the fea ; and ?naiJ.'] A fea
woman.

" Thou rcmembrcft,
*1 Since once I fat upon a prmnontory,
*' And heard a mermaid on a.dolphm's back
** Uttering fuch dulcet and harmonious

'* breath,
** That the rude fea grew civil at'hci^ fong."
Shakspeare,

Mr. Sheridan and Mr. Wal-
ker found this word as I have
marked it ; the latter ' obferves
that the firft fyllable, however,
is freqjLiently pronounced like



the noun mare; but this is a
vulgarifm which muft be care-
fully avoided.

METALLINE, met'-taU
line. A. [from metallum, Lat.3
Impregnated with metal ; con-
fifting of metal.

Dr. Johnfon, Dr. Afh, and
Mr. Bailey, accent this word
on the fecond fyllable, as does
Mr. Sheridan, who pronounces
the laft fyllable fhort (me-tal'-
lin). Dr. Kenrick, Mr. W.
Johnfon, Mr. Scott, Mr. Bu-
chanan, Mr. Entick, and Mr.
Walker, lay the ftrefs on the
firft, which I have followed.^

METALLURGY, raet'-t^f-
lur-j^. S. [metallum^ Lat. and
«pyop, Gr.] The art of working
metals, or feparating them from
their ore.

Mr. Perry accents this word
on the fecond fyllable;^ Mr,
Bailey, Mr. Buchanan, and
Mr. Sheridan, on the third ;
Dr. Jolinfon, Dr. Afh, Mr.
Scott, Mr. Entick, and Mr.
Walker, lay ^ the flrefs on the
firft, though Mr. Walker fays
Dr. Johnfon places it on the
fecond fyllable like Mr. Pgrry^
but I find it on the firft in the
feveiith edition. I have pre-
ferred the accent on the firft
fyllable. There Is the fame
difference between thefe ortho-
epifts in the pronunciation of
Metalliuc^ift,

METON.



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M I e



M I L



>Jot; nite; noife. But; bufli; bl^e. Lovell^; lye. Tiiin; this.



METONYMY, mLtM-L
xxi^. S. [metonymic^ Fr. yul\avv^a^
Or.3 A rhetorical figure, by
^which one word is put for ano-
tlier, as the matter for the ma-
teriate; He died by fteel, that
is, by a fword.

Mr. Walker marks this word,
firft as I have, and then adds, or
xn^t'-&-nim-^ ; but he prefers
tlie former, which has the ac-
oent on the fecond fy liable, in
^wrhich he is fupported by Dr.
Johnfon, Dr. Kenrick, Dr. Afli,
Kir. Badley, Mr. Buchanan,
and Mr. Perry. The accent
on the firft fyllable is the pro-
nunciation of Mr. Sheridan,
JMr. Nares, Mr. W. Johnfon,
Mri Scott, Mr. Entick, and
Mr. Gibbons, (the Rhetorician).

MICHER, mit(h'-ur. S.
[probably from miche, Fr.]
A lazy loiterer, who fkulks
about in corners and by places;
hedge-creeper.

Mr. Walker pronounces the
2, in this word and the verb
to michc^ long, like i in fight ;
while Mr. Sheridan, whom I
have followed, founds it fhort,
like i in fit. The former of
thefe celebrated orthoepifts
thinks Mr. Sheridan's pronun-
ciation, in this inftance, Irifti ;
- but, without ever having croffed
St. George's Channel, I never
heard the word pronounced
otherwife than Mr. Sheridan
has marked it, ^nd it un-
4oubtedly is very commonly



founded in that manner. \x\
fchools. In fupport of the
long found of the «, Mr. Wal-
ker fubjoins, ** There is a cha-
rafler in the farce of the Stage
Coach, written by Farquhar,
called Micher, and this (con*
tinues hej I recolleft to have
heard with the i long."

MICROGRAPHY,mi-kr6g'^
ri-f ^. S. [fc/xf f f and y^tt^, Gr.]
The defcription of the parts of
fuch very fmall objefts as are
difcernible only with a micro-
fcope.

Dr. Johnfon and Mr. She-
ridan place the accent on the
firft fyllable of this word ; Dr.
Afli and Mr. ^ Walker lay the
ftrefs on the fecond, which I
have preferred.

^ MILLEPEDES, mll'-l^
pedz. S. [millepieds, Fr. milk
and pej^ Lat.] Wood-lice, fo
called from their numerous
feet.

Mr. Walker marks this word
mil'-l^.pldz, or mll-lip'-^-d^z,
and thinks the former (which is
like Mr. Sheridan's, with the
accent on the firft fyllable, and
which I have adopted) is the
moft correft, but the latter the
moft fafhionable. Befides Mr.
Sheridan, the accent is placed
on the. firft fyllable by Dr.
Johnfon, Dr. Kenrick, Mr.
Scott, Mr. Bailey, and Mr.
Entick ; while Mr. Nares, Mr.
W. Johnfon, Mr. Buchanan,
O z and



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M I N MIS

Hat; Kite;. hill. B^ ; bear; belr. Pit; fight; field.



and Mr. Perry, Tay the ftrefs on
the fecond. Dr. Alh accents
the word Millepe'des, Mr.
Walker, with much propriety,
t>bferves, that though this word
is feldom i\fed in the fingular,
there is no reafon why it fliould
not, and then it muft neceffarily
become a Milliped, ''\ Centi-
pede^ properly Centiped (con-
tinues hej, is adopted ; and by
forming Centipeds in the plural,
Ihows us how wc ought to form
and pronounce the word in
queftion ; and if Antipodes has
not yet fubmitted to this ana-
logy, it is becaufe, like Caiitha-
rides. Caryatides, Manes, &c.
it is never ufed in the fingular."

^ MIMOGR APHER, mi-
mog'-gra-fur. ^S. [^t'/^^, and

^pat^ft^.] A writer of farces.

Mr, Sheridan makes the «, in
the firft fyllable pf this word,
long, like i in fi^ht, which I
have followed, Mr. Walker
founds it fhort, like e in jiie,

MINACIOUS, hi!^ha'-flius.
A. [min(t^y . Lat J Full of
-threats^

In this word and Minacity
Mr» Sheridan founds the i, in
the {irft fyllable, long, like i in
^g^^t which I have preferred ;
Mr. Walker prgnoi^nces it fhort,
like ^ m m,^

MINATORY, miULtur-y.

^.[^minor, Lat.J Threatening.

I hav^ folh>w^d Mr, Sheti-



dan in this word, and made the
t l6ng ; Mr. Walker pronounces
it fhort, marking it min'-ni*



tir-^



MINOTAUR, min -nS-tawn
S. [^minoiaure, Fr. minus and
taurus, Lat.] A monfter in.
vented by the poets, half man
and half bull.

'' Thou may *ft not wander in that laby-

" rinth,
** There minoUurs and ugly trcafofis lurk."
SuAiMP£A&s,

The 2, in the firft fyllable of
this word, is pronounced long
by, Mr. Sheridan and fhort by
Mr. Walker. I have foUowe4
the latter.

MIRACLE, mlr'-Lkl. S,
[miracle, Fr. miraculum, Lat.]
A wonder, fomething above
human power ; in theology, an
effeft above human or natural
power, performed in atteftation
of forhe truth, '

'* Be not offended, nature's-mir^w:/^,
" Thoa art allotted to be ta*en bynse."
Shakspeare.

I have marked this word like
Mr. Walker, Mr. Sheridan
pronounces it m^r'-akl, which
Mr, Walker thinks vulgar;
but the difference afluredly is
very little, and but juft percept
tible, In miraculous, mira-'
tuloujly, and miraculoufrtefs^
Mr. Sheridan makes the i, in
the firft fyllable, long, like i in
fgkt ; while Mr. Walker pro-
nounces it fhon, like e in me,
I prefer the ktter, '

MIS.



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M I S



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Not; note; no&fe. But; bdfli; blue. Love-lJ^; lye. Tiiin; this.



MISCELLANY, mif^fel.
ifen-)^. S. [mifcellanea, Lat.]
A mafs or colleftion formed out
of various kinds.

All our orthoepifts, and all
cur di6lionaries ancient and
modern, accent this word on
the firft fyllable ; yet it is often,
though vefy improperly, heard
with the ftrefs on the fecond
fyllable.

MISCHIEVOUS, mif'-tlh^
vfis. A. [from mtchef^ Fr.]
Harmful, hurtful, deftruftive ;
fpiteful, malicious.

** I'm bqt a half-ftrain'd villain yet ;
** But mongrel mifckicvous/*

Dryoen.

Though our orthoepifts are
unanimous in accenting this
word on the firft fyllable, yet
it is often pronounced with the
ftrefs on the fecond fyllable,
but this chiefly by the vulgar.
The adverb and fubftantive have
the accent on the firft fyllable
alfo.

MISOGAMIST, mi-f6g'.
ga-mlft. S. [/^<r» and ytil^,
Gr.] A marriage hater.

I have- made the i long, in the
firft fyllable of this wor^d, like


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Online LibraryPre-1801 Imprint Collection (Library of Congress)A vocabulary of such words in the English language as are of dubious or unsettled accentuation, in which the pronunciation of Sheridan, Walker, and other orthoepists, is compared → online text (page 11 of 18)