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RECIPES TRIED AND TRUE.

COMPILED BY THE LADIES' AID SOCIETY OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH,
MARION, OHIO.

"We may live without poetry, music, and art;
We may live without conscience, and live without heart;
We may live without friends; we may live without books;
But civilized man cannot live without cooks."
- OWEN MEREDITH

MARION, OHIO:
PRESS OF KELLEY MOUNT.
1894.

Entered according to Act of Congress in the year 1894 by the
LADIES' AID SOCIETY OF THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, MARION, OHIO.
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress at Washington.

To the Mothers, Wives, Sisters and Sweethearts of the Good Men of
America this Book is Dedicated by the "TRUE BLUES."


PREFACE.

Although in putting forth this little book we do not claim that we are
filling a "Long felt want," yet we do feel that its many tried and
true recipes from our own housekeepers will be very welcome. We also
believe that it will not only be welcomed by those who recognize the
names and merits of the various contributors, but by all housekeepers,
young and old. There can never be too many helps for those who, three
times a day, must meet and answer the imperative question, "What shall
we eat?"

To the many who have helped so willingly in the compilation of this
book, the Editorial Committee would extend a grateful acknowledgment.

For the literary part of the work, we would beg your indulgence, since
for each of us it is the first venture in the making of a book.


MENUS.

"All the labor of man is for his mouth, And yet the appetite is not
filled." - SOLOMON.


SUNDAY BREAKFAST (WINTER). MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Oat Meal. Boston Brown Bread. Boston Baked Beans. Coffee.


PLAIN DINNER. EUGENE DE WOLFE.

Tomato Soup. Boiled Fish. Lemon Sauce. Roast Lamb. Mint Sauce.
Stewed Tomatoes. Sweet Potatoes. Spanish Cream. Coffee.


PLAIN DINNER. EUGENE DE WOLFE.

Bouillon. Boiled Spring Chicken. New Potatoes. New Peas. Lettuce,
Mayonnaise Dressing. Rhubarb Pie. Cheese. Crackers. Coffee.


OLD-FASHIONED THANKSGIVING DINNER. GAIL HAMILTON.

Roast Turkey, Oyster Dressing. Cranberry Sauce. Mashed Potatoes.
Baked Corn. Olives. Peaches. Pumpkin Pie. Mince Pie. Fruit.
Cheese. Coffee.


FAMILY DINNERS FOR A WEEK IN SUMMER. OZELLA SEFFNER.

Sunday.

Green Corn Soup. Salmon and Green Peas. Roast Beef. Tomatoes. New
Potatoes. Strawberry Ice Cream. Cake. Coffee. Iced Tea.

Monday.

Lamb Chops. Mint Sauce. Potatoes. Escaloped Onions. Cucumber
Salad. Orange Pudding.

Tuesday.

Veal Soup. Fried Chicken. Green Peas. Rice Croquettes.
Strawberries and Cream.

Wednesday.

Broiled Beef Steak. Potato Croquettes. String Beans. Tomato Salad.
Fruit Jelly. Cream Pie.

Thursday.

Potato Soup. Roast Veal. Baked Potatoes. Beet Salad. Asparagus.
Strawberry Shortcake.

Friday.

Boiled Fish. Egg Sauce. Lamb Chops. Peas. Escaloped Potatoes.
Lettuce, Mayonnaise. Raspberry Iced Tea.

Saturday.

Chicken Pot Pie, with Dumplings. Spinach. Cucumber Salad. Radishes.
Lemonade.


PLAIN FAMILY DINNERS FOR A WEEK IN WINTER. OZELLA SEFFNER.

Sunday.

Cracker-Ball Soup. Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding. Creamed
Potatoes. Celery. Mince Pie. Apricot Ice Cream. Cheese. Coffee or
Chocolate.

Monday.

Cold Roast Beef. Mashed Potatoes. Cabbage Slaw. Pickles. Plain
Plum Pudding. Cheese. Tea.

Tuesday.

Tomato Soup. Leg of Mutton. Caper Sauce. Baked Potatoes. Stewed
Turnips. Apple Pudding. Coffee or Tea.

Wednesday.

Lemon Bouillon. Baked Fish, with Drawn Butter. Roast Chicken.
Potatoes. Boiled Onions. Pickles or Olives. Cottage Pudding.

Thursday.

Roast Beef Soup. Stewed Tomatoes. Mashed Potatoes. Boiled Rice.
Turnips. Troy Pudding. Egg Sauce.

Friday.

Corn Soup. Chicken Pie. French Peas. Stewed Potatoes. Cream Slaw.
Suet Pudding.

Saturday.

Boiled Corn Beef, with Vegetables. Pork and Beans. Pickles. Indian
Pudding. Cream Sauce.


BREAKFASTS. Fall and Winter.


OZELLA SEFFNER.

1. Melon. Fried Mush. Fried Oysters. Potatoes. Rolls. Coffee or
Cocoa.

2. Melon or Fruit. Graham Cakes. Maple Syrup. New Pickles.
Broiled Steak. Corn Oysters. Coffee or Cocoa.

3. Melon or Fruit. Fried Oat Meal Mush. Syrup. Bacon, Dipped in
Eggs. Fried Potatoes. Coffee.

4. Oranges. Warm Biscuit. Jelly. Broiled Oysters on Toast. Rice
Balls. Coffee.

5. Oranges. Mackerel. Fried Potatoes. Ham Toast. Muffins.

6. Breakfast Bacon. Corn Griddle Cakes. Syrup. Boiled Eggs. Baked
Potatoes.


Spring and Summer.


1. Fruit. Muffins. Ham. Eggs. Radishes. Onions. Coffee.

2. Fruit. Light Biscuit. Breakfast Bacon. Scrambled Eggs. Fried
Potatoes. Coffee.

3. Fruit. Corn Meal Muffins. Veal Cutlets. French Toast.
Radishes. New Onions. Coffee.

4. Strawberries. Lamb Chops. Cream Potatoes. Graham Muffins.
Coffee.

5. Raspberries. Oat Meal and Cream. Sweet Breads. Sliced Tomatoes.
Hamburg Steak. Fried Potatoes. Coffee.

6. Berries. Breakfast Bacon, Dipped in Butter and Fried. Sliced
Tomatoes. Baked Potatoes. Muffins. Coffee.


A FEW PLAIN DINNERS. GAIL HAMILTON.

1. Tomato Soup. Cranberry Sauce. Roast Pork, with Dressing.
Potatoes. Peas.

DESSERT - Fruit and Cake. Coffee.

2. Vegetable Soup. Beef Steak and Gravy. Macaroni, with Cheese.

DESSERT - Cake and Lemon Pudding. Coffee.

3. Clam Soup. Boiled Chicken. Potatoes. Lettuce, Mayonnaise
Dressing.

DESSERT - Strawberry Shortcake, with Strawberry Sauce. Coffee.
Crackers. Cheese.


SOUP.

"A hasty plate of soup"


PREFACE.

The best soups are made with a blending of many flavors. Don't be
afraid of experimenting with them. Where you make one mistake you
will be surprised to find the number of successful varieties you can
produce. If you like a spicy flavor, try two or three cloves, or
allspice, or bay leaves. All soups are improved by a dash of onion,
unless it is the white soups, or purees from chicken, veal, fish, etc.
In these celery may be used.

In nothing so well as soups can a housekeeper be economical of the
odds and ends of food left from meals. One of the best cooks was in
the habit of saving everything, and announced one day, when her soup
was especially praised, that it contained the crumbs of gingerbread
from her cake box!

Creamed onions left from a dinner, or a little stewed corn or
tomatoes, potatoes fried or mashed, a few baked beans - even a small
dish of apple sauce - have often added to the flavor of soup. Of
course, all good meat gravies, or bones from roast or fried meats, can
be added to the contents of your stock kettle. A little butter is
always needed in tomato soup.

Stock is regularly prepared by taking fresh meat (cracking the bones
and cutting the meat into small pieces) and covering it with cold
water. Put it over the fire and simmer or boil gently until the meat
is very tender. Some cooks say, allow an hour for each pound of meat.
Be sure to skim carefully. When done take out meat and strain your
liquid. It will frequently jelly, and will keep in a cold place for
several days, and is useful for gravies, as well as soups.


A FINE SOUP. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Take good soup stock and strain it. When it boils add cracker balls,
made thus: To one pint of cracker crumbs add a pinch of salt and
pepper, one teaspoonful parsley, cut fine, one teaspoonful baking
powder, mixed with the crumbs, one small dessert spoon of butter, one
egg; stir all together; make into balls size of a marble; place on
platter to dry for about two hours; when ready to serve your soup put
them into the stock; boil five minutes.


ROAST BEEF SOUP. MRS. W. C. BUTCHER

To a good loin roast add six tablespoons of vinegar and small piece of
butter; salt and pepper; stick six cloves in the roast; sprinkle two
tablespoons of cinnamon and sift one cup of flour over it. Put in
oven in deep pan or kettle with a quart of boiling water; roast until
it is about half done and then strain over it three-fourths of a can
of tomatoes; finish roasting it and when done add celery-salt to suit
the taste, and one cup of sweet cream and some catsup, if preferred.


BEAN SOUP. MRS. H. F. SNYDER.

To one quart of beans add one teaspoon of soda, cover with water, let
boil until the hulls will slip off, skim the beans out, throw them
into cold water, rub with the hands, then remove the hulls; drain, and
rub until all hulls are removed; take two quarts of water to one quart
of beans, boil until the beans will mash smooth; boil a small piece of
meat with the beans. If you have no meat, rub butter and flour
together, add to the soup, pour over toasted bread or crackers, and
season with salt and pepper. Add a little parsley, if desired.


BOUILLON. MRS. W. C. DENMAN.

Take three pounds of lean beef (cut into small pieces) and one soup
bone; cover with three quarts of cold water, and heat slowly. Add one
tablespoon of salt, six pepper corns, six cloves, one tablespoon mixed
herbs, one or two onions, and boil slowly five hours. Strain, and
when cold, remove the fat. Heat again before serving, and season with
pepper, salt, and Worcester sauce, according to taste.


LEMON BOUILLON. LOUISE KRAUSE.

A DELICATE SOUP. - Take soup meat, put on to cook in cold water; boil
until very tender; season with salt. Into each soup plate slice very
fine one hard boiled egg and two or three very thin slices of lemon.
Strain the meat broth over this and serve hot, with crackers.


CORN SOUP. MRS. G. H. WRIGHT.

Cover a soup bone with water, and boil one hour. Add some cabbage and
onion (cut fine). Boil two hours longer. Add twelve ears of grated
sweet corn. Season to taste.


NOODLE SOUP. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Beat three eggs. Add a pinch of salt, and flour sufficient for a
stiff dough; roll into very thin sheets; dredge with flour to avoid
sticking; turn often until dry enough to cut; cut very fine, and add
to the stock five minutes before serving. Season to taste.


OYSTER STEW. MRS. J. ED. THOMAS.

Wash one quart oysters and place on the fire. When they boil, add one
quart of boiling milk, and season with salt, pepper, and plenty of
butter. Serve with crackers or toast.


POTATO SOUP. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

Slice four ordinary-sized potatoes into one quart of boiling water.
When done add one quart milk; into this slice one onion. Thicken just
before serving with one egg rubbed into as much flour as it will
moisten. Pepper and salt to taste.


POTATO SOUP. MRS. U. F. SEFFNER.

After stewing veal, use the stock. Slice four or five potatoes very
thin; lay them in cold water until thirty minutes before serving; add
them to the stock, with sufficient salt and pepper. Beat one
tablespoon of butter and one tablespoon of flour to cream; add to this
one pint milk; stir in the soup just before serving. This can be made
without meat by adding more butter and milk.


TOMATO SOUP. MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

Take half a can, or six large fresh tomatoes; stew until you can pass
through a course sieve. Rub one tablespoonful of butter to a cream
with one tablespoonful flour or corn starch. Have ready a pint
scalded milk, into which stir one-half saltspoon soda. Put the
strained tomato into the soup pot; add the butter and flour, after
having heated them to almost frying point; let come to a good boil;
add just before serving; season with a little pepper, a lump of loaf
sugar, a dust of mace and a teaspoon of salt.


TOMATO SOUP. MRS. HARRY TRUE.

One quart canned tomatoes, one quart of water, a few stalks of celery;
boil until soft. Return to stove, and add three-fourths of a teaspoon
of soda and allow to effervesce; then add the liquid from one quart of
oysters, one quart boiling milk and one cup of cream. Salt, butter,
and pepper to taste. Boil a few moments and serve.


TOMATO SOUP. MRS. T. H. B. BEALE

Put on soup bone early to boil. Have two quarts of liquor on the
bone. When done, remove the bone from kettle; put one can of tomatoes
through sieve; add to the liquor; then immediately add one-half
teaspoon soda, a small lump butter, one tablespoon white sugar, one
heaping tablespoon of flour mixed with a half cup of cream or milk;
salt and pepper to taste. After the flour is in let boil up three
times, and serve.


VEGETABLE SOUP. MRS. J. S. REED.

One-fourth head cabbage, three large onions, one turnip, three large
potatoes, two tablespoons cooked beans; boil all together till tender.
Pour off all water; then add one gallon of stock. Add tomatoes, if
you like.


VEAL SOUP. MRS. SAMUEL BARTRAM.

Put a veal soup bone over the fire in one gallon of cold water; skim
carefully as it comes to a boil; after it has boiled one hour season
it with salt and pepper and half teaspoonful (scant) celery seed. In
another half hour put in one-half cup rice, one medium-sized potato
(cut in dice or thin slices), two good-sized onions (sliced fine); let
boil one-half hour longer, and when ready to serve add one egg
(well-beaten), one-half cup milk, one tablespoon flour; let come to a
boil, and serve.


VEGETABLE SOUP. MRS. G. A. LIVINGSTON.

Three onions, three carrots, three turnips, one small cabbage, one
pint tomatoes. Chop all the vegetables, except the tomatoes, very
fine. Have ready in a porcelain kettle three quarts boiling water;
put in all except tomatoes and cabbage; simmer for one-half hour; then
add the chopped cabbage and tomatoes (the tomatoes previously stewed);
also a bunch of sweet herbs. Let soup boil for twenty minutes; strain
through a sieve, rubbing all the vegetables through. Take two
tablespoonfuls butter, one tablespoon flour; beat to cream. Pepper
and salt to taste, and add a teaspoon of white sugar; one-half cup
sweet cream, if you have it; stir in butter and flour; let it boil up,
and it is ready for the table. Serve with fried bread chips or
poached eggs, one in each dish.


FISH AND OYSTERS.

"Now good digestion, wait on appetite,
And health on both."
- MACBETH.


ACCOMPANIMENTS OF FISH. MRS. DELL WEBSTER DE WOLFE.

With boiled fresh mackerel, gooseberries, stewed.

With boiled blue fish, white cream sauce and lemon sauce.

With boiled shad, mushroom, parsley and egg sauce.

Lemon makes a very grateful addition to nearly all the insipid members
of the fish tribe. Slices of lemon cut into very small dice, stirred
into drawn butter and allowed to come to a boiling point, is a very
fine accompaniment.


RULE FOR SELECTING FISH.

If the gills are red, the eyes full, and the whole fish firm and
stiff, they are fresh and good; if, on the contrary, the gills are
pale, the eyes sunken, the flesh flabby, they are stale.


BAKED FISH.

Take large white fish or pickerel, make a dressing as for turkey, with
the addition of one egg and a little onion; fill the fish, wrap close
with twine, lay in baking pan; put in one-half pint of water, small
lumps of butter and dredge with flour. Bake from three-fourths to one
hour, basting carefully.


CODFISH WITH EGG. MRS. E. P. TRUE.

Wash codfish; shred fine with fingers (never cut or chop it); pour
cold water over it. Place the dish on the stove and bring the water
to a boil. Throw the fish in a colander and drain. Stir a
teaspoonful of flour smoothly with water; add two tablespoonfuls of
butter and a little pepper; bring to a boil; then throw in the
codfish, with a well-beaten egg. When it boils up it is ready for
table.


CODFISH WITH CREAM. MRS. E. P. TRUE.

Take a piece of codfish six inches square; soak twelve hours in soft,
cold water; shred fine with the fingers; boil a few moments in fresh
water. Take one-half pint cream and a little butter; stir into this
two large tablespoonfuls flour, smoothly blended in a little cold
water; pour over the fish; add one egg, well beaten. Let come to a
boil; season with black pepper.


SLIVERED CODFISH.

Sliver the codfish fine; pour on boiling water; drain it off; add
butter and a little pepper. Heat three or four minutes, but do not
let fry.


CODFISH BALLS. MRS. T. H. LINSLEY.

One pint shredded codfish, two quarts mashed potatoes, well seasoned
with butter and pepper - salt, if necessary. Make this mixture into
balls. After dipping them into a mixture of two eggs beaten with
one-half cup milk, place them in a dripping pan into which you have
put a little butter; place them in the oven; baste frequently with
eggs and milk; bake till a golden brown.


FRIED FISH. MRS. J. S. REED.

Wash the fish and dry well. Take one-half pint of flour and one
teaspoon salt; sift together, and roll the fish in it. Have lard very
hot, and fry quickly. When done roll in a cloth to absorb all grease.


OYSTERS ON TOAST. MRS. JOHN KISHLER.

Toast and butter a few slices of bread; lay them in a shallow dish.
Put the liquor from the oysters on to heat; add salt, pepper, and
thicken with a little flour. Just before this boils add the oysters.
Let it all boil up once, and pour over the toast.


ESCALOPED OYSTERS. EVELYN GAILEY.

Two quarts of oysters; wash them and drain off the liquor; roll some
crackers (not too fine). Put in a pan a layer of crumbs, some bits of
butter, a little pepper and salt; then a layer of oysters, and repeat
until the dish is full. Have cracker crumbs on top; turn a cup of
oyster liquor over it; add good sweet milk sufficient to thoroughly
saturate it, and bake three-fourths of an hour.


STEAMED OYSTERS. S. E. G.

Select large oysters; drain; put on a plate; place in the steamer over
a kettle of boiling water. About twenty minutes will cook them.
Season with pepper and salt; serve on soft buttered toast.


OYSTER GUMBO. ALICE TURNEY THOMPSON.

Cut up a chicken; roll in flour and brown well in a soup-pot, with a
spoonful of lard, two slices of ham, one large onion (chopped fine),
and a good-sized red pepper. When browned, cover the whole with water
and stew until the chicken is perfectly tender. Then add the liquor
of four or five dozen oysters, with water enough to make four quarts.
When it has again come to a good boil, add the oysters and stir while
sifting in one large spoonful of fresh file. Salt to taste. Serve
immediately, placing a large spoonful of boiled rice in each soup
plate.

"Gumbo File" is made of the red sassafras leaves, dried and ground
into a powder.


OYSTER PIE. MRS. ECKHART.

Make a rich pie crust, and proceed as you would to make any pie with
top crust. Have nice fat oysters and put on a thick layer, with
plenty of lumps of butter; salt and pepper, and sprinkle over cracker
crumbs. Put in the least bit of water, and cover with crust. Bake,
and serve with turkey.


OYSTER PIE. MRS. EMMA OGIER.

For crust make a dough as for baking powder biscuit. Take one quart
of oysters; remove a half dozen good-sized ones into a saucepan; put
the rest into bottom of your baking dish. Add four spoons of milk;
salt to taste, and dot closely with small lumps of butter. Over this
put your crust, about as thick as for chicken pie, and place in oven
to bake until crust is well done. Take the oyster left, add one-half
cup water, some butter, salt and pepper; let this come to a boil;
thicken with flour and milk, and serve as gravy with the pie.


FRIED OYSTERS. MRS. H. T. VAN FLEET.

Place New York counts in a colander to drain for a few minutes. With
a fork remove them separately to a dry towel. Place another towel
over them, allowing them to remain until all moisture is absorbed.
Have ready the beaten yolks of three eggs and a quantity of rolled
cracker, salted and peppered. Dip each oyster separately, first into
egg, then into cracker. When all have been thus dipped, have ready a
hot spider, into which drop four heaping tablespoons of butter. When
butter is melted, place in the oysters, one by one; fry a light brown,
then turn. Serve very hot.


PIGS IN BLANKET. FRED. LINSLEY.

Take extra select oysters and very thin slices of nice bacon. Season
the oysters with a little salt and pepper. Roll each oyster in a
slice of bacon; pin together with a toothpick; roast over hot coals,
either laid on a broiler, or fasten them on a meat fork and hold over
the coals. Cook until the bacon is crisp and brown. Don't remove the
toothpick. Serve hot.


SOUR FISH. MRS. W. H. ECKHART.

Take a whole fish; stew until tender in salt water; take out, lay on
platter. Throw a handful of raisins in the salt water and a few whole
cloves, allspice, stick cinnamon, with vinegar enough to give a sour
taste, and a tablespoonful of sugar. Thicken with flour to the
consistency of gravy; pour over fish. Serve cold. Fish may be served
with mayonnaise dressing, cooked in same manner.


SALT HERRING. MRS. JUDGE B.

Heat them on gridiron; remove the skin and serve with pepper and
melted butter.


SALMON LOAF. MARGARET LEONARD.

One small can salmon, four eggs beaten light, four tablespoons melted
butter - not hot - one half cup fine bread crumbs. Season with salt,
pepper, and parsley. Chop fish fine, then rub in butter till smooth.
Beat crumbs into egg and season before putting with fish. Butter your
mold and steam one hour.

SAUCE FOR SAME. - One cup of milk, heated to a boil; thicken with one
tablespoon of corn starch and one tablespoon of butter, beaten
together. Put in the liquor from the salmon and one raw egg, beaten
light; add a little pepper. Put the egg in last, and carefully pour
over loaf; Serve hot.


SAUCE FOR FISH.

Stir in one cup of drawn butter, the yolks of two eggs (well beaten),
pepper and salt, and a few sprigs of parsley. Let it boil. Pour over
fish when ready to serve.


SOUR SAUCE FOR FISH.

One-half cup butter, with one-half cup vinegar; let boil, then add two
mustardspoonfuls of prepared mustard, a little salt, and one egg,
beaten together. Make in the farina kettle. Stir while cooking.


BROILED OYSTERS.

Place good-sized oysters on pie plates; sprinkle well with flour,
small lumps of butter, pepper and salt. Cover with strained liquor
and a little cold water. Set in a warm oven fifteen or twenty
minutes. Nice to serve with turkey.


OVEN FRIED FISH. MRS. JANE E. WALLACE.

Open and clean fish (white or bass). Have fish pan spread thick with
butter, and lay fish in. Season with salt. Over this pour two
well-beaten eggs, and dredge with flour. Bake three-quarters of an
hour, and baste with butter and water. Garnish fish plate with
parsley.


ESCALOPED SALMON. CARRIE P. WALLACE.

Pick bones and skin out of one can of salmon, and mince fine. Use as
much rolled cracker as you have salmon, a little salt, and cup of
cream. Fill sea shells with this mixture, placing a small piece of
butter on top of each shell. Bake twenty minutes and serve in the
shells.


FOWL AND GAME.

"And then to breakfast with what appetite you have."
- SHAKESPEARE.


ACCOMPANIMENTS FOR FOWLS.

With boiled fowls, bread sauce, onion sauce, lemon sauce, cranberry
sauce, jellies, and cream sauce.

With roast turkey, cranberry sauce, currant jelly.

With boiled turkey, oyster sauce.

With wild ducks, cucumber sauce, currant jelly, or cranberry sauce.

With roast goose or venison, grape jelly, or cranberry sauce.


A GOOD WAY TO COOK CHICKEN. MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

Fricassee your chicken, taking care to brown the skin nicely; season
to taste. When done set by to cool; then remove all the bones; put
back into the liquor in which it was cooked; chop fine, leaving in all
the oil of the fowl. If not enough of the oil, add a piece of butter;
then pack closely in a dish as you wish it to go to the table.


DROP DUMPLINGS FOR VEAL OR CHICKEN. MRS. R. H. JOHNSON.

One full pint of sifted flour, two even teaspoonfuls of yeast powder,
and a little salt. Wet this with enough milk or water to drop from
spoon in a ball; remove your meat or chicken; drop in the balls of
dough; cook five minutes in the liquor; place around the edge of
platter, with the chicken or meat in center; season the liquor and
pour over it.


JELLIED CHICKEN. MRS. R. H. J.

Boil the fowl until the meat will slip easily from the bones; reduce
the water to one pint. Pick the meat from the bones in good-sized
pieces; leave out all the fat and gristle, and place in a wet mold.
Skim all the fat from the liquor; add one-half box of gelatine, a
little butter, pepper and salt. When the gelatine is dissolved, pour


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