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students undertake highly individualized research studies under the direction of
distinguished scholars.

Undergraduate Program. No undergraduate major is offered in the Jones
Graduate School; however, such undergraduate courses as accounting may be used to
fulfill major requirements in the interdisciplinary program in managerial studies. This
degree program is described on pages 58 and 256.

Students admitted to the Honors Program in Managerial Studies may elect certain
graduate courses in accounting and administrative science as part of their major
requirements. In addition, the undergraduate major in managerial studies for Rice
students admitted as seniors to the Jones Graduate School may be partly satisfied by
course work taken for the Master of Business Administration and Master of Accounting
degrees.

Graduate Programs. The Jones Graduate School of Administration offers the
Master of Business Administration and Master of Accounting degrees and the Doctor of
Philosophy. Applicants to these programs must submit scores on the Graduate
Management Admission Test (GMAT), all college transcripts, and three letters of
recommendation. Application forms are available from and should be submitted to the
Office of Admissions and Student Affairs, Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 1 1 3

Administration. Graduates from any university and from a broad range of undergrad-
uate majors are considered for either professional program. Students enrolled in the
Jones Graduate School represent a wide variety of undergraduate majors, including
economics, managerial studies, mathematics, mathematical sciences, political science,
history, languages, fine arts, natural sciences, engineering, and business administra-
tion. An accelerated "3-2" degree plan is available to exceptional students from Rice
and other universities in which students may take graduate courses in their senior year,
thereby completing the master's degree by the end of five years of college study.
Admission to the Jones Graduate School is highly selective and limited to those who
have performed with distinction in their previous academic work and on the GMAT.

Completion of either degree program requires two academic years. Students must
maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least "B" and may be required to pass a
special examination during their last semester in residence or take additional course
work to determine eligibility for graduation. There is no thesis requirement, although
there is a thesis option in the Master of Accounting degree.

Any student with a cumulative grade point average worse than 3.0 ("B") will be
placed on academic probation and assessed further. If 40 percent or more of the
student's cumulative hours are in courses for which he or she received a grade worse
than "B-", the student will be reviewed for probable dismissal. A course grade worse
than "C-" does not constitute successful completion of the course, which must be
repeated, but such grades are included in calculation of grade point averages until
replaced. Any student who has completed 64 graded hours but who has a cumulative
grade point average worse than 3.0 ("B") may, at the discretion of the Jones Graduate
School, be administered a special examination (oral or written) or be required to take
additional course work to determine eligibility for graduation, but the student is subject
to dismissal.

In addition, students are expected at all times to maintain high standards of
ethical and professional conduct. They are treated as professional colleagues and are
expected to behave accordingly. Failure to maintain such standards is grounds for
disciplinary action, including dismissal.

Undergraduates contemplating graduate work in accounting or administrative
science are encouraged to take course work in principles of accounting, principles of
microeconomics, and business data processing. College mathematics through calculus
is helpful. However, no specific undergraduate course work is required for admission to
either master's degree program.

Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) The M.B.A. program seeks to
prepare students for high-level management positions in business, government, and
nonprofit organizations.

Completion of the M.B.A. program requires a minimum of two academic years in
residence. Students must successfully complete 62 semester hours in administrative
science and related subjects, plus the Dean's Seminar and Managerial Communication
(Administration 502, 504) for two semester hours.

The following courses are required for the M.B.A. program: Administration 502,
504, 511, 531, 532, 541, 542, 561. 562, 591, 592; Accounting 501. 502, 524. The first
year of the program is completely required and consists of foundation courses including
accounting, communications, economics, finance, legal and governmental processes,
organization theory, and quantitative methods. The second year features two case
method courses on management strategy designed to integrate the foundation skills
taught in the first year through case analysis and a computer-supported management
simulation game. Oral and written communication skills are emphasized in both years.
Required courses may be waived in exceptional cases where the student already has the
equivalent preparation. The residence requirement is not reduced, but additional
elective courses are made available.

Each student is required to select at least one area of concentration for elective
courses. With the assistance of an adviser, each student selects courses to meet the
student's goals and objectives. Most courses will be in administrative science or



114 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION ■•; '

accounting, but they may also include graduate or upper division offerings in other
departments. Definition of a concentration is relatively flexible, subject to the adviser's
consent. Concentrations are available in accounting, business entrepreneurship,
finance, international management, managerial accounting and information systems,
marketing, and public and nonprofit management. Course work in operations research
or organizational behavior is available through the Departments of Mathematical
Sciences and Psychology for qualified students.

The international management program offers a set of elective courses in the
political, economic, and legal aspects of multinational activities. Students ordinarily
take Administration 571, 572, and 574. Students may take related courses in other
departments. The international management program is particularly relevant for
students with a strong background in foreign languages and cultures. Students lacking
such a background are strongly advised to take additional time (including summers and
possibly a third year) to acquire such skills. Basic language training does not qualify for
graduate credit toward the M.B. A. degree.

The Jones Graduate School offers an area of concentration in public and
nonprofit management. Students who wish to prepare for government or nonprofit
service select, with the assistance of an adviser, a set of elective courses tailored to meet
the student's career aims. Students may take related courses in other departments. The
M.B. A. core curriculum is specifically designed to promote the transfer of management
skills from the private to the public and nonprofit sectors. Students interested in
business entrepreneurship ordinarily take Administration 521 and 522 together with
related courses, particularly in finance and accounting.

Master of Accounting (M.Acco.)- The Master of Accounting program prepares
students for professional positions in public accounting as well as for a variety of senior
financial positions in business and government. The emphasis of the program is on
management as well as accounting preparation. Concentrations are available in
auditing, financial reporting, managerial accounting and information systems, tax-
ation, and the management areas listed above.

Completion of the M.Acco. program requires a minimum of two academic years in
residence. Students must successfully complete 62 semester hours in accounting and
related subjects, plus the Dean's Seminar and Managerial Communication
(Administration 502, 504) for two semester hours.

The following courses are required for the M.Acco. program: Accounting 501,
502, 511, 512, 513, 524, 527 or 529, 531, 541, 552; Administration 502, 504, 511,
531, 532, 541, 542, 561; and either Administration 562 or Accounting 560. The
remainder of the course work may be graduate or appropriate upper division courses in
the University. Required courses may be waived in exceptional cases where the student
already has the equivalent preparation. The residence requirement is not reduced, but
additional elective courses are made available.

Doctor of Philosophy. The Ph.D. program prepares candidates for teaching and
research careers. The program, which emphasizes research, normally requires a
minimum of three years of fulltime residence work. A bachelor's degree is required for
entry.

After a year of course work, a doctoral student must satisfactorily complete a
research paper before continuing. The student must also successfully complete a
comprehensive examination, given after two years of course work, prior to undertaking
dissertation research and writing. ., .o:. '■ , /^'^w..- ^' i.,



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 115



Accounting

Accounting Courses

305a,b. Introduction to Accounting (3-0-3).

Survey of the financial accounting principles and problems incident to the preparation and
use of balance sheets, income statements, and statements of changes in financial position.

406b. Management Accounting (3-0-3).

Uses of accounting data to plan and evaluate long-run investment and financing decisions
and short-run price, costing, output, and financing decisions of the business firm or public entity.
Prerequisite: Accounting 305, Economics 211, and Mathematical Sciences 280 or equivalent.

Mr. Uecker
iS '.^ i.'.ilb. /it.i.i , 0>." ';, fl

409a. Corporate Financial Reporting (3-0-3).

Using a case and readings format, the course deals with controversial issues in financial
accounting and the analysis and interpretation of companies' financial statements. Prerequisite:
Accounting 305. Mr. Bell

411a. Asset Accounting (3-0-3).

Deals with the major questions of asset valuation and income determination in the context
of accounting theory and the evolving financial, economic, and political factors which have
shaped the extant standards. The standard-setting prcKess is discussed. Prerequisite: Accounting
305! Mr, Shields

501a. Financial Accounting (3-0-3).

Introduction to accounting theory and practice with emphasis on the primary problems of
asset valuation and income determination. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Mr. Bell

502b. Managerial Accounting (3-0-3).

Intrcxluction to accounting systems designed to facilitate internal decision-making evalu-
ation and control by private and public organizations. Particular emphasis given to behavioral
impact of alternative internal reporting schemes. Prerequisite: Accounting 501 and graduate
standing. Mr. Uecker

511a. Asset Accounting (3-0-3).

Deals with the major questions of asset valuation and income determination in the context
of accounting theory and the evolving financial, economic, and political factors which have
shaped the extant standards. The standard-setting process is discussed. Prerequisite: Accounting
501 and graduate standing. Mr. Shields

512b. Equity Accounting (3-0-3).

Deals with the particular problems in the estimation of liabilities and stockholders' equity.
The focus is both on accounting theory and on the financial, economic, and piolitical factors that
have shaped the extant standards. Prerequisite: graduate standing or Accounting 41 1 and special
permission. Mr. Dharan

513b. Special Topics in Accounting ( 3 -0-3 ) .

Deals with the theoretical and technical problems of consolidations and branch accounting,
interim reporting, foreign operations, and international accounting standards. The course also
introduces accounting for government and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: Accounting 511,
512, and graduate standing. -. -■ . Mr. Hagigi

524b. Managerial Accounting and Finance (3-0-3).

Relationship between economic and current value accounting concepts of income;
investment and financing decisions and their stKial consequences; the framework of national
economic accounts. Emphasis on capital budgeting and financial theory. Prerequisite: Accounting
501 and graduate standing. Mr. Atherion

527a. Management Information Systems I (3-0-3).

Case studies concerning managerial problems; topics include business mcxdels, equipment
selection, data processing management, and systems development. A semester project is required.
Prerequisite: Accounting 502. Mr. Napier



116 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION '■ ■ ^ ' ■

528b. Management Information Systems II (30-3).

Basic cimcepts oi developing and implementing computerized management intormation
systems. Information needs for management and decision support systems are stressed. A semester
project is required. Prerequisite: Accounting 502. Not offered every year.

529a. Decision Support Systems (3-0-3).

Use ofdecision support systems in organizations. Prerequisite: Accounting 502. Mr. Napier

53 la. Federal Taxation of Business Enterprises (4-0-4).

Theory of United States income ta.xation and its application to corporations, partnerships,
proprietorships; study of decision models involving tax structure and tax planning in business
situations. Prerequisite: Accounting 501 and graduate standing. Mr. Vicbig

532b. FederalTaxationof Individuals (2-0-2).

United States individual income taxation, including consideration ot tax planning and
tax-favored retirement plans. Prerequisite: Accounting 531 and graduate standing.

Mr. Westhdmer

534b. Special Topics in Taxation (2-0-2).

Theory and structure of federal estate and gift taxation from both compliance and tax
planning standpoints; interrelated income tax planning, including income taxation ot estates and
trusts. Mr. Viebig

536b. International Taxation (3-0-3).

Tax considerations invt)lved in multinational operations. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

Mr. R.S. Ross, Mr. Singer

541a. Auditing (4-0-4).

Auditing standards and procedures, statistical sampling applications, audit programs and
reports, and professional ethics associated with the public accounting profession. Prerequisite:
Accounting 501, 502 and graduate standing. Mr. Uecker

542b. Auditing and Financial Reporting (2-0-2).

ExaminatKm of reporting issues associated with public accounting including auditors'
reports, financial statement disclosures, and SEC reporting. Prerequisite: Accounting 541 and
graduate standing. Mr. Wise

551a. Financial Accounting Practice (3-0-3).

This course emphasizes comprehension of FASB pronouncements on valuation, income,
and cash flow concepts. Prerequisite: Accounting 511, 512 and graduate standing.

Mr. Haichcn

552b. Seminar in Accounting Theory (3-0-3).

Development of accounting theory in historical context, uses of accounting data in the
decision-making prticess for managers and outside users, and consequent implications for the
standard-setting process and public policy. Prerequisite: Accounting 511, 512, and graduate
standing.

560b. Lawfor Accountants (3-0-3).

Civil law, common law, equity, state and federal court systems, contracts, sales, bailments
and carriers, commercial paper, agency, partnerships, corporations, unfair competition, bank-
ruptcy, secured transactions. Uniform Commercial Code, Uniform Partnership .Act. Prerequisite:
graduate standing. Mr. Friday

571a. International Accounting and Finance (3-0-3).

Uses the tools ot econt)mics and corporate finance to give a ct)nceptual understanding ot
internatK)nal accounting and finance. Topics include foreign exchange spot, forward and futures
transactions; foreign currency translation; international differences in financial reporting; and
performance evaluation of foreign operations. Prerequisite: Accounting 524 and graduate
standing. Mr. Hagigi

597a, 598b. Independent Study (0-0-3 each semester).

Independent study or directed reading on an approved project under faculty supervision.
Enrollment by special permission. Prerequisite: graduate standing.



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 1 i 7

602b. Seminar in Accounting Research I ( 3-0-3).

Team-taught seminar in a modular format introducing areas ot contemporary research in
accounting. Prerequisite: D(KtoraI standint;.

61 la. Seminar in Accounting Research II ( 3-0-5).

Continuation ot Accounting t>02. Prerequisite; Accounting t>02.

f.r . ■■.:
612b. Tutorial in Accounting Research (3-0-3).

Intensive study in an area ot accounting research m which the student expects to specialize.
Prerequisite: Accounting 602, 61 1.



u.l/ .d:.«M-



800a,b. Thesis Research (0-0-3 each semester).

Administrative Science

Administration Courses

502b. Dean's Seminar and Managerial Communication I (2-0-1).

Weekly seminar each semester (credit ^uen m spring) m which invited guests discuss a
variety ot management topics. Basic oral and written communication skills tor tirst year M.B.A.
and M.Acco. students; basic computer skills are also covered. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

.Mr, TufyiL: and staff

504b. Dean's Seminar and Managerial Communication II (2-0-1).

Weekly seminar held each semester (credit given in spring) in which in\ited guests discuss a
variety ot management topics. Advanced oral and written communication skills tor second-year
M.B.A. and M.Acco. students. Prerequisite; graduate standing. Mr. Tugg/e and skiff

505a, 506b. Faculty Research Seminar.

Faculty and invited guests meet periodically to present current research findings. Student
attendance is welcome. No registration is required, and no credit is ottered.

51 la. Organization Theory (3-0-3).

Examines psychology as applied to the organizational setting, the development of
organization theory, current approaches tt) the study of complex organizations, and the t)peration
of major types ot complex organizations in both private and public sectt>rs. Prerequisite; graduate
standing. , , , ^ _,,, ,.- ., . , .. Mr. Houv/I

512b. Personnel Management ( 3 -0- 3 ) .

Mt)dem approaches to the study and management ot people at work. Particular attention to
the description of work, techniques tor evaluating jobs and pertt)rmance, prttblems in attracting,
recruiting, selecting, training employees, and issues in supervision. Mr. HoucU

518b. Managerial Decision Making (3-0-3).

Review of current theories ot decision making in and by organizations. Emphasis on
behavioral decision theor>', human pri)blem solving, and organizational processes. Prerequisite:
Accounting 502 and Administration 5 1 1 and 532. Mr. Taylur

521a. Entrepreneurship and the New Enterprise ( 3 -0- 3 ) .

The economics ot entrepreneurship. The role of entrepreneurship in econt)mic growth.
Characteristics of entrepreneurs. Process t)t starting and managing a new business. Venture
capital. Legal and tax aspects ot new venture creation. Preparation ot a business plan. Prerequisite:
Administration 541. Mr. Williams

522b. Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Exchange (3-0-3).

How to negotiate. The "needs" approach to buying and selling a business. Enterprise
valuation. Deal and contract structuring. Corporate venturing. Special topics. Prerequisite:
Administration 521. Mr. Williams

523a. Real Estate Entrepreneurship I (3-0-3).

Identifies and analyzes real estate development opportunities. Prerequisite: Administration
541. Mr. Blumberg

524b. Real Estate Entrepreneurship II ( 3-0-3).

Examines financing aspects ofreal estate development. Prerequisite: Administration 541-

Mr. Isgur



118 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION >. T' . . •/

53 la. Quantitative Methods I (3-0-3).

Use ot statistical methods to analyze decision problems. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

•.1 -. ...,.,,. . Mr. Batsell

532b. Quantitative Methods II (3-0-3).

Application ot t)perations research to decision problems. Prerequisite: Administration 531
and graduate standing.

541a. Managerial Economics and Marketing 1(3-0-3).

Investment, price, production, and financing decisions in private and public economic
entities in the face of differing demand situations and market environments; pricing and
marketing strategies in these varying conditions. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

542b. Managerial Economics and Marketing II (3-0-3).

Marketing strategy and management in domestic and international markets; macroeconom-
ics ot business cycle fluctuations, fiscal and monetary policy, international trade and finance.
Prerequisite: Administration 541.

543a. Capital Markets. (3-0-3).

Financial environment of the corporation; use of money and capital market instruments;
roles of intermediaries and institutions. Prerequisite: Administration 542 and graduate standing.

545a. Investments (3-0-3).

Investment policy for individuals and institutions; structure of rates in financial markets;
investment timing and selection; principles of financial analysis and analysis of individual security
issues; securities markets, valuation of securities, retention of portfolios. Prerequisite: Administra-
tion 542 and graduate standing. Mr. Aihertun

546b. Corporate Financial Strategy (3-0-3).

Advanced financial topics of interest to the corporation: value creation, diversification,
risk-benefit analysis, tax policy, present value. Prerequisite: Accounting 524-

547a. Financial Theory (3-0-3).

Underlying assumptions and maximization problems in finance; demand, supply, and cost
for money capital; optimal capital structure and dividend policy; investment and financial
equilibrium in a capital asset pricing world; disequilibrium ana the real world. Offered alternate
years. Prerequisite: Administration 542 and graduate standing.

55 la. Commercial Banking (3-0-3).

Seminar in commercial banking. Prerequisite: Accounting 524. " Mr. R. L Ross

552b. Investment Banking (3-0-3).

Seminar in investment banking. Prerequisite: Accounting 524-

Mr. Atherton, Mr. Stanton

561a. Legal and Governmental Processes I (4-0-4).

Law as the medium in which American society functions: history', jurisprudential bases,
theory and practice of principal sources of law — common law, statute law, constitutional law, law
of government control. Political analysis and strategy; policy making in the public sector; public
financial management; business-government relations and p<ilitical environment of management;
regulatory policies. Extensive use of case materials and student presentations. Prerequisite:
graduate standing. Mr. Greanias, Mr. Windsor

562b. Legal and Governmental Processes II (4-0-4).

Continuation of Administration 561a. Examination of specific legal problems arising from
decisions made by public and private managers. Prerequisite: Administration 561 and graduate
standing. Mr. Greanias, Mr. Windsor

564b. Public Financial Management (3-0-3). ^

Political, economic, and accounting dimensions of financial management in public and
nonprofit organizations. Emphasis on budgeting systems, appropriations processes, cost-benefit
analysis, taxation, pricing, fund accounting, debt management, financial administration.

Mr. Windsor



ACCOUNTING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCE 1 19

571a. Political Risk Analysis (3-0-3).

Analyses ot piilitical and stKial factors affecting business operations abroad, including
domestic instability, foreign conflict, corruption, nationalization, indigenization, etc. A
simulation exercise is required. Also offered as Political Science 571.

Mr. wm litt Mehden, Mr. Mascarenhas

572b. Problems of International Management (3-0-3).

Decision problems of private and public sector entities involved in international economic
activities. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Mr. Mascarenhas

5 74b. Regulatory Law of Transnational Business Operations ( 3 -0- 3 ) .

National laws and international rules pertaining to trade in giKxis and services, direct foreign
investment, and foreign exchange operations. Mr. Cunningham

581a. Marketing Strategy (3-0-3).

This is a project course. In a three-phase prt)ject, students perform a competitive and
consumer survey and then write a strategic marketing plan for the chosen prtxiuct or service.
Prerequisite: second-year standing in the Jones Graduate School. Mr. Batsell

582b. Marketing Research (3-0-3).



Online Librarypseud AristotleRice University General announcements (Volume 1985/86-1986/87) → online text (page 15 of 41)