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pub Chas. C. Chapman & Co..

History of Tazewell county, Illinois ; together with sketches of its cities, villages and townships, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history; portraits of prominent persons and biographies of representative citizens. History of Illinois ... Digest of state laws online

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Online Librarypub Chas. C. Chapman & Co.History of Tazewell county, Illinois ; together with sketches of its cities, villages and townships, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history; portraits of prominent persons and biographies of representative citizens. History of Illinois ... Digest of state laws → online text (page 1 of 79)
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UNIVERSITY OF
LLINO/S LIBRARY




LI E) R.A FlY

OF THE

U N IVLRSITY

Of ILLINOIS

H62S



IllINOIS mmmi SURYET



HISTORY



OP



TAZEWELL C01IST\'



J



ILLINOIS;



TOGETHER WITH SKETCHES OF ITS CITIES. VILLAGES AND TOWNSHIPS; EDUCA-
TIONAL, RELIGIOUS, CIVIL, MILITARY, AND POLITICAL HISTORY; POR-
TRAITS OF PROMINENT PERSONS AND BIOGRAPHIES OF
REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS.



HISTORY OF ILLINOIS.

EMBRACING ACCOUNTS OF THE PKE-IIISTORIC RACES, ABORIGINES, FRENCH,

ENGLISH AND AMERICAN CONQUESTS, AND A GENERAL REVIEW

OF ITS CIVIL, POLITICAL AND MILITARY HISTORY.

DIGEST OF STATE LAWS.



ILLUSTRATED.



CHICAGO:

CHAS. C. CHAPMAN & CO,

1879.



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1879, by

CHAS. C. CHAPMAN & CO.,

In the Office of the Libnirian of Congress, at Wasliington, D. C.






J. W. FRANKS .t SONS,

PKINTKRS AND BINDERS,

I'EORIA, ILI/.






PREFACE



• The earlj' historj' of Tazewell county is peculiarly interesting, and we
are enabled to give it from the very earliest occupancy of Illinois by the
whites. In point of time of its soil being disturbed by Europeans, it is
more remote than any other section of our great Prairie State. The second
centennial of its first settlement is at hand. In the county are places of
unusual historic interest, and to those who have located here we judge it
will be a source of no little gratification to inform themselves on the ante-
pioneer history of the county, which we detail at considerable length. In
the compilation of this work we pass over a period of two hundred years.

We have taken much care in recording the pioneer history, that future
generations, those who will not have the early settler to relate to them
the history incident to the settlement and development of this county,
may familiarize themselves with it through this medium; and that the
reader may see the county in all its various stages of progression. We do
not profess to have fully delineated the trials, suflTerings, and hardships
that were experience*! in converting even this fertile land from its virgin
wildness into the luxuriant and densely populate<l country it now is. No!
for human tongue or pen is far from being adequate to that task.

Different persons have given us honest and sincere, but nevertheless
conflicting accounts of the same events, and it has been both a difficult
and delicate task to harmonize them, and draw therefrom reasonable and
approximately correct conclusions. We had only one aim in view, one
plan to carry out, and that was, to record events impartially — to detail
them as they have actually occurred.

That we have completed our work, fulfilled all our promises to the
uttermost, we feel conscientiously assured, and we submit the result of
our labors to the charitable consideration of this intelligent an<l liberal
people. It must not be expected that, in the multiplicity of names, dates,
and events, no errors will be detected. We do not dare hope that, in the
numerous and varied details, this book is absolutely correct, nor is it ex-



PREFACE.



pected that it is beyoml (.riticisni, yet we believe it will be found to be
nieasurablj' correct and reliable. We have labored assiduously and with
studious care to make it a standard work of reference, as well as an
authoritative record for future historians to build upon.

Believing a work of this nature would be comparatively incomplete
without speaking of the history of the State, of which Tazewell county
forms no unimportant portion, we have carefully prepared a condensed,
yet very complete history of Illinois, which we incorporate in this volume.
And as a valuable aid in transacting every-day business, we append a
carefully compiled digest of Illinois State Laws, which both the l>;.isiness
man and farmer will find of great value. *-

Before laying aside our pen, we desire to express our warmest thanks

to the editors of the various newspapers pul)lished throughout the county;

to the county officials, and to the people in general for the assistance and

lil)eral patronage given us-

CHAS. C. CHAPMAN & CO.
Pekin, June, 1879.



CONTENTS.



HISTORY OF ILLINOIS.



MOUND-Bl'ILDERS 17

INDIANS 21

Illinois Confodcnicv 23

Starvfd Uock .". 2o

Sites iiiul Foxes 24

Miiiuiers and Cnslonis 27

Sinj.'le-lnin(kMl Conihat with Indians ... 2'.)

EAULY DISCOVEKIES ;!1

Nicholas I'errot :'.l

)liet anil Marquette :!1

LaSalle's Explorations ;!;5

(Jreat Hattle of the Illinois :il

Tonti safe at (irci'n liiiy ;. 11

LaSalle's Assa.ssination i:!

FKKNCH (Hcr I' ATION 44

First Settlements 44

Thi' .Mississii)i>i Coninanv 45

ENGLISH HILK ." 47

(!ei). (.'lark's Exploits 51

ILLINOIS 55

Coinitv of Illinois 55

NOKTHWESTEUN TEKIUTOHY 55

Onlinanee of 17s7 50

St. Clair <;overnorof N. \V. TeiTitor>' .. 59

ILLINOIS TEKIUTOKY 59

WAR OF 1M2-TIIE OL'TlUiEAK 59

Ma.ssiicre ()f Fort Dearborn till

Exi>editions up the Missis.sippi 71

ILLINOIS AS A STATE 74

Orpiniziition 74

Derivation of the name Illinois 77

State Hank 7.S

LaFayette's Visit

(iranimar luid Cook contrasted

HISTOKY OF

CHAPTER I.

Settlement and Orpinization 1,VJ

La.'^alle's Ex]>lorations 189

The War of 1.S12 u. 19(;

The I'ioneers 2()U

Oriranizalion of I ho County '2117

Fii-si Mill .". 2119

A leu First Things 210

The Di'e]) Snow '214

Suilileii Change 217

High Water 21.S

The lieantiful Prairies 2-20

CllAPTEK II.
Ini])ortant Labors of the County Comniis
sioner's Court ".



79
82



CHAPTER III.
Black Hiiwk War i'>('>

CHAPTER IV.
Geology 207

CHAPTER V.
Zoology and Rotjvny 272

CHAPTER VI.
Criminal Record 28S

CHAPTER VII.

Important Labors of the Board of Super-
vLsors :«)0

CHAPTER VIII.
Blooded Stock ;!0s

CHAPTER IX.
Under-ground Railroad 313



INDIAN TROUBLES

Winnebago War

BLACK HAWK WAR

Stillnian's Run

Battle of Bad Axe

Black Hawk Cajitured

Biographical Skelcii of Black Hawk

FROM l.s:;4 TO 1.S42

Internal lni]inivemeiits

Illinois and Michigan Canal

Martvr for Liberty.

PRAIRIE PIRATK?"

.MORMON WAR

MEXICAN WAR ■..'."

Battle (»f Ihiena Vista

THE WAR FOR THE UNION

States !<( 'ceiling

The Fall of Sumter '.

Call for Troops promptly answered

The War ended — The Union restored

Schedule of Regiment.s

DUELS

DKESS AND M.^NNERS

PHYSICAL FE.VTURES OF ILLINOIS

AGRICUKTUKE

GOVERNORS OF ILLINOIS

Lieiitenant (iovernors

Stale Odieials

U. S. Senators

Representatives in Congress

CHICAGO

The (Jri'at Fire

Commerce of (.'hicago

STATES OF THE UNION

TAZKWKI.L COUNTY.

CHAPTER X.
Pioneer Life

CHAPTER XL

The Rebellion

Tazewell County Volunteers

CHAPTER XII.
Tazewell (.'ounty B:ir

CHAPTER XIII.
T0WN.SI111' IIi.sTiiKii:s:—

Boy n ton

Cincinnati

Deer Creek

iH'lavan

Dillon

I-:im (irovc

Fond du Lac

Groveland

Hitlle

Hopedale

Little Mackinaw

Malone

Morton

Mackinaw

Pekin

Sand Prairie

Spring I^ake

Treniont

Washington

CHAPTER XIV.



80
«3
84
87
90
91
92
95
95
97
98
102
104

lis

119
1-25
120
1'27
128
137
i:w
141
149
l.M
l.V)
l.")7
100
101
102
105
170
172
173
177



321



351



38-1



M



308
414
427
4-2;!
451
40<J
4rhS
475
480
491
51:;
5'2ti
5:u
.5-14



017
Vu'A)
lk")2
60-2



County Oflicials and Political Historj'.
Election Returns



706
711




COXTEXTS.



Pikin Times

Tiizewell County Repubii'(5^n.'

\Nti.shiiif,'ion Ilcnilii.f.

iK'hiviin AfivtriisLT

Delavaii Times

Miiiior News .

'nu;i.,velIIn.JependentV.'.r.;:; n'^

Ia-k».\ Tfiider

Frtie Presse



718
722
-■24
726
727



Starved Rrxk .



728

720

TM

ILLUSTKATIONS,



CHAPTKR XVI
Railroads:—

I-, B. <t w. Ry.

f: K & J. K. R.;;;

t;- A. 6, St. L. R. R ::::;;;:::;:

P-, L. A: D. Ry.

T„ P. ct w. R'y ..::::;

111. Midland R R

C, P. iV 8. \V. R.



R..



7;i2
7a3
TM
735
TJH
739
730



All Inxjiiois Chief •• ^'

<;i'n. Cn-o. K. (lark '*'

49



tieii. Artliur St. Clair

Old Fort Deurboni ^

Old Kiiizic House... ''^

Pontiuc bo



Scene on Fox River

Lineoln .Monuiiant ^-^

A.sylum furFeel.le Minded.""" HI

N..U hern Normal Iniver^ity }^

( entral In.sane Ilo.spital ''

Indu.sinal Lniversliy iii;; "?"



Black Hawk ...... ..'.'.'." G-* F:.\j)o.sitioii Building ^"^

'k '^- ^i iV ^ K- K. n^n:::::: .'S La«'>i,i« street Tunuei;;;;;.;;. ]^i

Lve and I-Jir Iidir.nurv ^. ,1? J.^^ ^nb - 1^2

louse ^^^

Tazeweucoiuity".'.'.";/;.;;";;;;;;;;;;;;j^2?



(

Evi a„u ijir iimr.nury .
Deaf and Dumb Institute



111
11.5



Allensworth, W P J'OKTRAIT.S,

Alfs. Ovrd. ^^

BiKon, E. H -l-l

Bemis, T. K. -^^



Iie<iueaith, Johii"'. tJ'-?

Be<iueaith, KlizabethV.V.V. „!?

Breniieman, Jacob .... ik^

< latoii, John... •^^'

Crabb, Daniel . ■^^'^

Cobleigh, G. R....; 322

Crawford, James .'^1

Darah, Robert... ■^^'

Frey, Rudolph ■'•'■♦'

Gaines, John .. •**-

(iolden, C. L.... -»-!

<jt».lden, Mrs. Kliz,i ii. ■;.■;; ^J')

Gnesemer, Adam Vii^

IIjuls, Kli ... 40/

IIa<i.s, Ann Catherine;;;:;:: SH

iraa.s, hdward **^-'

Hall. Ini B ftW



553
575
497
432
W4
315



Luuisey, Jean

Luppen, Luppe

McI)owell, Mrs. Kitty
McKinstry, John ...
Marshall, Horaces...'
Martin, James p
Minicr, Geo. W .

Minier, .Sarah ^^'^

Minicr, T.L... ^^^

Minier, Ellen ^^^

Nichols, Geo '^^^

Orendorfi; G. P *^-

R^mkjn, Daniel m"V ^

Rankin, John S ^-^

Reardon, John "'-^

bundle, wiiiiaui::;;;.;:; -^^

Shurtleir, Flavel ^^

Smith, D. c." 229

Smith, Fred ^'^

Smith, Ties ^"5



Hill, Xehemiah... ^'~ Stoehr, Geoitre ^'^

ilill, Einilv .^W Stoehr, Mar%- M -^-^

Jlippen. h! W ; o4S Studyviu, John •*-'•'

Hottinan, John ... ^"•''•' ^Vil.son, Dr R ii yi ■''■''

Ireland, Fraiicis;:." ^'•'^ Woods, Abraham " "^



of Courts



74::
74;j



Irwin, Joe B . 39

Larimore, TimoVhv'.V.'. fir

Lindsey, James A '^^

oo3

T„ DIGE.ST OF

Laws

Juris<iietion
C«junty
Com. o
Fences
Drainagi

Trespass of SU)Ck.'.'." J-*^

Kstravs im

Horses ;;;:;; 749

Marks and Brand.s "*

Articles of AgreemeiitV." iJj

Judgment N'ote...::: '^2

Interest . 7.J3

Wills ;"""'.v.'.v;;;;;;;;; i^



■-—•'', Abraham co^

\\oods, Harriet M ^l

^^ood, Dr. E F 636

Ziiiger, Louis.....::;;; ™i

•■ 599



•STATK LAWS.

Subscription.



'% *,v."!?' ;;.;;;;;;;;;;; ~fi ['y^^'^^-t for PereoiVara-nic^i ^,

1. of Highways if* ^ e" si w^rt Libel. '^"»'^es ^4

ees ^4-1 Lender "5

nage .'.".V "4C. Drunkcnnes.s ; - "^^



Dc.scent....

Deeds .;;;;;;;

Tr,T'rlf ^'^.""'^ '''"^"st Deedl':

1 rust Deeds

I-eiiis ..

Bill of Sale ;;:.'.'.'.'.";; '••-

Daysof (Jraoe "W

7t»,5

7(J5
706



755
7.V.(
7W)
761
7(52



niiess

Marriage Contract

School Months

Infants

Adoi.tion of ciiiidreVi v.:

Church Organizations...

Game

Millers ;.■.■.■.■.";

I'aupers

I'ublic and PrivaieConVeyancti'
^N ages and Suikeholdera. f
Sundav

Ie^o!l'iv'''VV^''"^''^"^i«''ToiT^s:...
jA'gal Weights! " "
Bees

Dogs '..;



• and Meiusures ..



777

. 778

. 7S0

. 780

. 781

. 781

. 782

785

785

786

787

7SS

7.SK

7S,S

789



Limitation of Action.'." ' ".'
Iteceipts

E.veiiipii,,„si^rom F\7rcedj^^^^^^^

Ijii)dl..r.ls and Tenants '^'

Criminal ]jiw.. '67

Taxes ! 770



cnieity toAiVimak;::;;;;;;; Zfj?



Names
f. S. Mail.*!.....""'
Itates of Postage
Rates of p



790
790
792



i^^-:t:?k.W!?ter' ^''-'•■^^"-Matte-r:::::: m

Mc.iey urriers .;: i^f

794






■■■■■■iir^'M





■4




w>«^^



*Si^



M



/



,c'ri*^' tr. :v.,,^



()i-^



3^7l';)yj';f.L €IIUNT¥




^Li.iNin'^



r




Scale ■/' Miles lo f/ir ineJi.

/Mm '/I /ari/,rI/isforxo/'7hznM'ff('oXl




HISTORY OF ILLINOIS.



FORMER OCCUPANTS.



MOUND-BUILDERS.

The numerous and well-authenticated accounts of antiquities
found in various parts of our country, clearlj' demonstrate that a
people civilized, and even highly cultivated, occupied the broad
surface of our continent before its possession by the present In-
dians; but the date of their rule of the Western World is so re-
mote that all traces of their history, their progress and decay, lie
buried in deepest obscurity. Nature, at the time the first Euro-
peans came, had asserted her original dominion over the earth; the
forests were all in their full luxuriance, the growth of many cen-
turies; and naught existed to point out who and what they were
who formerly lived, and loved, and labored, and died, on the conti-
nent of America. This pre-historic race is known as the Mound-
Builders, from the numerous large mounds of earth-works left by
them. The remains of the works of this people form the most in-
teresting class of antiquities discovered in the United States. Their
character can be but partially gleaned from the internal evidences
and the peculiarities of the only remains left, — the mounds. They
consist of remains of what were apparently villages, altars, temples,
idols, cemeteries, monuments, camps, fortifications, pleasure
grounds, etc., etc. Their habitations must have been tents, struc-
tures of wood, or other perishable material; otherwise their remains
would be numerous. If the Mound-Builders were not the ancestors
of the Indians, who were they'^ The oblivion which has closed over
them is so complete that only conjecture can be given in answer to
the question. Those who do not believe in the common parentage
of mankind contend that they were an indigenous race of the West-
ern hemisphere; others, with more plausibility, think they came
from the East, and imagine they can see coincidences in the religion
of the Hindoos and Southern Tartars and the supposed theology of



18 HISTORY OF ILLINOIS.

the Mound-Builders. They were, no doubt, idolators, and it has
been conjectured that the sun was the object of their adoration. The
mounds were generally built in a situation affording a view of the
rising Bun: when enclosed in walls their gateways were toward the
east; the caves in which their dead were occasionally buried always
opened in the same direction; whenever a mound was partially en-
closed by a semi-circular pavement, it was on the east side; when
bodies were buried in graves, as was frequently the case, they were
laid in a direction east and west; and, finally, medals have been
found representing the sun and his rays of light.

At what period they came to this countr}', is likewise a matter of
speculation. From the comparatively rude state of the arts among
them, it has been inferred that the time was very remote. Their
axes were of stone. Their raiment, judging from fragments which
have been discovered, consisted of the bark of trees, interwoven
with feathers; and their military works were such as a people
would erect who had just passed to che pastoral state of society
from that dependent alone upon hunting and fishing.

The mounds and other ancient earth-works constructed by this
people are far more abundant than generally supposed, from the fact
that while some are quite large, tlie greater part of them are small
and inconspicuous. Along nearly all our water courses that are
large enough to be navigated with a canoe, the mounds are almost
invariably found, covering the base points and headlands of the
bluffs which border the narrower valleys; so that when one finds him-
self in such positions as to command the grandest views for river
Bcenery, he may almost always discover that he is standing upon,
or in close proximity to, some one or more of these traces of the
labors of an ancient people.

GALENA MOUNDS.

On the top of the high bluffs that skirt the west bank of the Mis-
sissippi, about two and a half miles from Galena, are a number of
these silent monuments of a pre-historic age. The spot is one of
surpassing beauty. From that point may be obtained a view of a
portion of three States, — Illinois, Iowa and Wisconsin. A hundred
feet below, at the foot of the perpendicular cliffs, the trains of the
Illinois Central Railroad thunder around the curve, the portage is
in full yiew^ and the " Father of Waters," with its numerous bayous



HISTORY OF ILLINOIS. 19

and islands, sketches a grand paraoraina for miles above and below.
Here, probably tlioiisands of years ago, a race of men now extinct,
and unknown even in the traditions of the Indians who inhabited
that section for centuries before the discovery of America by Colum-
bus, built these strangely wonderful and enigmatical mounds. At
this point these mounds are circular and conical in form. The larg-
est one is at least forty feet in diameter at the b&. 9, and not less
than fifteen feet high, even yet, after it has been bt, ten by the
storms of many centuries. On its top stands the large stump of an
oak tree that was cut down about fifty years ago, and its annual
rings indicate a growth of at least 200 years.

One of the most singular earth-works in the State was found on
the top of a ridge near the east bank of the Sinsinawa creek in the
lead region. It resembled some huge animal, the head, ears, nose,
legs and tail, and general outline of which being as perfect as
if made bv men versed in modern art. The ridore on which it was
situated stands on the prairie, 300 yards wide, 100 feet in height,
and rounded on the top by a deep deposit of clay. Centrally,
along the line of its summit, and thrown up in the form of an
embaiikment three feet high, extended the outline of a quadruped
measuring 250 feet from the tip of the nose to the end of the
tail, and having a width of IS feet at the center of the body. The
head was 35 feet in length, the ears 10 feet, legs 60 and tail 75. The
curvature in both the fore and hind legs was natural to an animal
lying on its side. The general outline of the figure most nearly
resembled the extinct animal known to geologists as the Megathe-
rium. The question naturally arises. By whom and for what pur-
pose was this earth figure raised? Some have conjectured that
numbers of this now extinct animal lived and roamed over the prai-
ries of Illinois when the Mound-Builders first made their appearance
on the upper part of the Mississippi Valley, and that their wonder
and admiration, excited by the colossal dimensions of these huge
creatures, found some expression in the erection of this figure.
The bones of some similar gigantic animals were exhumed on this
stream about three miles from the same place.

LARGE CITIES.

Mr. Breckenridge, who examined the antiquities of the Western
country in ISIT, speaking of the mounds in the American Bottom,
says: "The great number and extremely large size of some of



20 HISTORY OF ILLINOIS.

them may be regarded as furnishing, with other circumstances,
evidences of their antiquity. I have sometimes been induced to
think that at the period when they were constructed there was a
population here as numerous as that which once animated the
borders of the Nile or Euphrates, or of Mexico. The most num-
erous, as well as considerable, of these remains are found in pre-
cisely those parts of the country where the traces of a numerous
population might be looked for, namely, from the mouth of the
Ohio on the east side of the Mississippi, to the Illinois river, and
on the west from the St. Francis to the Missouri. I am perfectly
satisfied that cities similar to those of ancient Mexico, of several
hundred thousand souls, have existed in this country."

It must be admitted that whatever the uses of these mounds —
whether as dwellings or burial places — these silent monuments
were built, and the race who built them vanished from the face
of the earth, ages belbre the Indians occupied the land, but their
date must probably forever baffle human skill and ingenuity.

It is sometimes difficult to distinguish the places of sepulture
raised by the Mound-Builders from the more modern graves of the
Indians. The tombs of the former were in general larger than
those of the latter, and were used as receptacles for a greater number
of bodies, and contained relics of art, evincing a higher degree of civ-
ilization than that attained by the Indians. The ancient earth-
works of the Mound-Builders have occasionally been appropriated
as burial places by the Indians, but the skeletons of the latter may
be distinguished from the osteological remains of the former by
their greater stature.

What finally became of the Mound-Builders is another query
which has been extensively discussed. The fact that their works
extend into Mexico and Peru has induced the belief that it was
their posterity that dwelt in these countries when they were first
visited by the Spaniards. The Mexican and Peruvian works, with
the exception of their greater magnitude, are similar. Relics com-
mon to all of them have been occasionally found, and it is believed
that the religious uses whicii they subserved were the same. If,
indeed, the Mexicans and Peruvians were the progeny of the
more ancient Mound-Builders, Spanish rapacity for gold was the
cause of their overthrow and final extermination.

A thousand other queries naturally arise respecting these nations



HISTORY OF ILLINOIS. 21

which now repose under the ground, but the most searching investi-
gation can give us only vagae speculations for answers. No histo-
rian has preserved the names of their mighty chieftains, or given an
account of their exploits, and even tradition is silent respecting
them.

INDIANS.

Following the Mound-Builders as inhabitants of North America,
were, as it is supposed, the people who reared the magnificent
cities the rains of which are found in Central America. This peo-
ple was far more civilized and advanced in the arts than were the
Mound-Builders. The cities built by them, judging from the ruins
of broken columns, fallen arches and crumbling walls of temples,
palaces and pyramids, which in some places for miles bestrew the
ground, mast have been of great extent, magnificent and very pop-
ulous. When we consider the vast period of time necessary to erect
Buch colossal structures, and, again, the time required to reduce
them to their present ruined state, we can conceive something of
their antiquity. These cities must have been old when many of
the ancient cities of the Orient were beino: bailt.

The third race inhabiting North America, distinct from the
former two in every particular, is the present Indians. They
were, when visited by the early discoverers, without cultivation,
refinement or literature, and far behind the Mound-Builders in
the knowledge of the arts. The question of their origin has long
interested archieologists, and is the most difficult they have been
called upon to answer. Of their predecessors the Indian tribes
knew nothing; they even had no traditions respecting them. It is
quite certain that they were the successors of a race which had
entirely passed away ages before the discovery of the New "World.
One hypothesis is that the American Indians are an original race
indigenous to the Western hemisphere. Those who entertain this
view think their peculiarities of physical structure preclude the
possibility of a common parentage with the rest of mankind.
Prominent among those distinctive traits is the hair, which in the
red man is round, in the white man oval, and in the black man flat.
A more common supposition, however, is that they are a derivative
race, and sprang from one or more of the ancient peoples of Asia.
In the absence of all authentic history, and when even tradition is



32 HISTORY OF ILLINOIS.

wanting, any attempt to point out the particular location of their
origin must prove unsatisfactory. Though the exact place of origin
may never be known, yet the striking coincidence of physical
organization between the Oriental type of mankind and the Indians
point unmistakably to some part of Asia as the place whence they
emigrated, which was originally peopled to a great extent by the
children of Shem. In this connection it has been claimed that the
meeting of the Europeans, Indians and Africans on the continent
of America, is the fulfillment of a prophecy as recorded in Gen-
esis ix. 27: "God shall enlarge Japheth, and he shall dwell in the
tents of Shem ; and Canaan shall be his servant." Assuming the
theory to be true that the Indian tribes are of Shemitic origin,
they were met on this continent in the fifteenth century by the
Japhetic race, after the two stocks had passed around the globe by
directly different routes. A few years afterward the Hamitic
branch of the human family were brought from the coast of Africa.



Online Librarypub Chas. C. Chapman & Co.History of Tazewell county, Illinois ; together with sketches of its cities, villages and townships, educational, religious, civil, military, and political history; portraits of prominent persons and biographies of representative citizens. History of Illinois ... Digest of state laws → online text (page 1 of 79)