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FORT WAYNE & ALLEN CO.. IND.



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3 1833 01721 8980

Gc 977.2 P97DAA 1910



:>UE DEBRIS



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PURDUE DEBRIS

\' O L U M E XXII



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657168

^0 George ^bc

autlior, aiiimniis, anb jMrmbrr of tlie IBoarb
of JCrusttfs

triiis iBooti IS Srbicatcb

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aCfjt Class of i^mctffn J^unbrrb

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(greeting



HISTORY, tmditi<)\i, custom— tlw tliree bear upon
()i\e aiiotf]er. And be tlie time ancient or modern,

the environment, the world of flie ^reat iidfioiis
or the self-co}itained one of college life, tlie lav.: holds
true.

So, (IS zve pass out into t}}e new and imtried,
■ive present lierein our cherished memories. Meniories
of honest purpose, (uul of less noble aim; of serious
thouf^ht and idle jest; — n\ingled ivith praises and
knocks, fancy diid trntli — they (we ours.

Reader, proceed.



rr*r»



THE 1910 DEBRIS

.Ki Ki ssi. u Editor-in-Chief

N ^ Business Manager

n Smiiii Associate Editor

-^1 1 M \MiN Associate Editor



.












John MnviiKLL Drahkm.k.




Literary Editor






FHANK Rami.xt Sarckm-..




Athletic Editor






Jay Ciin-LAM. Ha.klem


iN


... .Organisations Editor






Lee Hoi.LowAV Goeuel. . .




.... Fr;'ternitv Editor






Dale Stevexs Cole




Art Editor






Kkiji Cowley Mlsser


James Ray.monh Joxes

Roy Wjllumsox Cosover

RouERT Brice Fall,
Harold Ach Lipi.n.sky.
Charles Sam ill Heal.

CaKI, Or.AF SOMI.AHL.


Pliarnmc.v Editor

matJ Associates:

Photograplier

Pliotograpiier 1 retired )

Orrie Emaniel Gall.i'.

LORETTA Mae Wai la.e.

FREI.ERHK KEMThK S\VI..ERT.
BKll.NAUll SoBKL.




"










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>Jn*HJCi4ir/







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AMiRfw A. Ad



^ DoWMNt;.

C. Harris.



BOARD OF TRISTEES.
Columbia City Gkok.e A.



JOSKPH D. Or.lVER.



South



OFFICKRS OF THK BOARM

AnnisoN C. Harris . . Presiiie

Andrew A. Adams Vice-Preside

Edward A. Ellsworth Secretai

Jam es M. Fowler Treasur



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
C. Harrls. .Joski'H D. Om



AUDITING COM.MITTKE.



COMMITTEE OX AGRICULTrRE.

Charles Do\v>
Hi nmy A. Mii.iKR.
"OMMITTKE ON HORTICULTrRE.



Charles Do'



Lafayette

. . . Bridgeport
...Shelbyville
. Montmorenci




Post graduate theses due.

Spring entranfe examinations begin

Baccalaureate theses due.

Commencement weelv.

Commencement.

Fall entrance examinations begin.

Sept. 14. Registration for regular

dents.
Condition examinations.
First semester begins.
Examinations for advanced credit.
Registration for graduate students
Thanksgiving Day.
Christmas holidays begin.



Christmas holidays end.
Jan. 14. Farmer's short cou
Winter school in Agriculti
Registration for second
First semester ends.
Second semester begins.
Winter school in Agrici
Condition examinations.
Post graduate theses du
Memorial Day.
Spring entrance examii
Baccalaureate theses du



History of Purdue University




aft of congress, passed July 2, 1SC2, Purdue
ty was organized. This act provided land
liurpose of aidlns in the maintenance of col-
the several States, for the purpose of in-
1 in Agriculture and Mechanical Arts, with-
ut excluding scientific or classical branches, and in-
hiding Military Science.

By an act, approved March 6, ISGo, the State of
under obligation to the United States by accepting
and claiming the benefits of the above mentioned act of July 2, 1S62, and
agreed to comply with all conditions and provisions named therein.

John Purdue and other prominent citizens of Tippecanoe county as-
sured the location of the University at Lafayette by their liberal offers
of land and money. John Purdue gave $150,000 and 100 acres of land,
while 130 acres of land and $80,000 more were subscribed by others.

Through the provisions of the Hatch, Morrill, Adams and Nelson acts,
Purdue receives annually $09,000 besides the legislative appropriations
from the general government, and has non-productive property in land,
buildings and equipment to the amount of $1,253,000.

Instruction was first begun at Purdue in 1874, and the first class, con-
sisting of one man, was graduated in 1S75, Since that time the develop-
ment of the institution has been remarkably great and the stu-
dent enrollment has increased from one to nearly 2,000, while the
instructional corps has increased from six to nearly 200. Since its
foundation the following presidents have directed the affairs of the
university in a careful and conscientious manner:

Richard Owen 1872-1874

Abraham C. Shortridge . .1874-1875

Emerson K. White 1875-1883



Richard Owen guided the university very carefully through its first
two years. At this time there were only three courses — Science, Engineer-
ing and Agriculture, the engineering course being a general one at that time
and all work was done in what is now the Pharmacy building. During
the next year under the direction of Abraham Shortridge, six buildings
were finished on the campus, two members added to the institutional
corps and the enrollment increased front one to sixty-four. During the
following eight years, under the leadership of Emerson E. White, the
university developed quite rapidly, due possibly to the introduction of
military science. The courses were systematized, University hall and the
Agricultural building were completed. The faculty numbered twenty and
the enrollment 254.

For the seventeen years following 1SS3 James H. Smart occupied the
presidency and great things were accomplished. At this time the
Pharmacy course was added and the Junior Preparatory course abolished,
shops were erected, schools of Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering
were established and the Experiment Station was built with an annual ap-
propriation of $15,000, besides a general appropriation by the legislature.
It was during this period that the new Mechanical building, which had
just been completed, was burned and the present one erected.

During the past ten years President Stone has guided the university
successfully and has seen the completion of the new Experiment Station,
Fowler Hall, Control Power Plant, Physics building. Civil building, Me-
morial Gymnasium, and last, but not least, the new and extensive shops
which will still further increase the efficiency of the university as an edu-
cational institution.



^




q^



History of the Past Year




Ml-: man of philosophical mind has said that history
should be the statement of the effect of events upon a
Iieople. rather than a mere record of those events. In
siuh a combination of past performances and present
londitions affording a basis for future predictions, it
\\ould seem that the desired result had been attained.
And so. in our own chronology for the past year we
see past influences involved in the present, which will
ill turn mold into form what is yet history unmade.

For the last time returning in the autumn to Old Purdue and her fa-
miliar scenes, we could not but note the obvious changes which have taken
place in our brief career of four years. We could not but note, mentally,
our first impressions of the campus, the buildings, the faces which are
now so familiar, and the absence of the faces of some who have since
passed from within our midst. We have seen the completion of more than
one new building and the addition of much new equipment, all of which
is toward the ever rising standard of the institution and the men which
she turns out. We have seen on the
athletic field seasons of varying suc-
cess. We have contributed from our
ranlcs to all the activities of a college
life. So ends a brief retrospection.

September of 19n9 dawned upon
the Class of 19in as Seniors. The for-
malities of registi'ation over, and hav-
ing become well initiated into the rou-
tine of school W'Orli, attention was cen-
tered upon the prospects of the football
field. But only disappointment was to
be our lot for another and our hist
year. The absence of former stars of
the gridiron, together with other
causes, seemingly unknown and irreme-
diable, brought us no semblance of the
old-time success of which we might
well be proud. In mid-season Coach
Speik's resignation was requested by
the Athletic Board, and Coach Jones

17




\vas put in control. The results were no mere gratifying, and at the end
of the season the Athletic Association voted to grant no football insignia
for the year.

The night of September 17 saw the sixteenth annual contest between
the two lower classes. The usual and ever strenuous melee being over,
three hundred-odd painted and bedraggled Freshies were led in chains
to Stuart Field where the customary antics were performed. The Tank
Scrap, time-honored and unique, will ever hold its place as preeminent
among college class scraps. Although now pulled off under a new system
which is obviously the better, nevertheless in the minds of older classes
the contest has lost some of its strong features by being under the regula-
tion of a fixed set of rules. But may the Tank Scrap ever remain a fea-
ture of the annual history of Purdue, and may lack of spirit on the part
of no class ever let it die.

Chief among the material changes about the campus has been the
addition of four new buildings, viz.: Farm Mechanics. Stock, Judging
Pavilion, and the New Shops. During the summer of 1909 the large stack
of the power plant was torn down and
replaced by a new structure, and a new
"Custodis" met our eyes as we re-
turned.

In the faculty organization a few-
changes have been made. The depart-
ment of Applied Mechanics has been
separated from the Mechanical Engi-
neering department, and Professor
Dnke.s. of Case School of Applied Sci-
ence, placed in charge. Professor Han-
cock left us early in the year to accept
a professorship in another college. Dr.
Herman Babson has been made head of
the German department, while several
other new names have been added to
the instructional corps.

The football season and Thanks-
giving over, now came a lull in athlet-
ics and other activities, and all awaited
with pleasant anticipations the holi



days which should break the monotony of class-room work. Then a brief
two weeks' respite; and the long grind, the last lap for us, was begun.

With the coming of the basket ball season and the loss of one of our
best players, things began to look gloomy: but the cloud raised after the
first game, and the student body as one man stood back of Coach Jones
in his effort to turn out a good team. Due to the efficiency of this ma-
chine, I.afayette saw two monstrous Night Shirt Parades, one after the
Illinois game and one after the Minnesota game. The team was so good
that it was thought unnecessary to have a parade after such an insignifi-
cant game as that with Indiana.

Our debut into indoor track meets resulted in second place in the
Conference for us. The development of Myers, McWayne and Calvin, in
addition to the old standbys — Hench. Richards, Gannon and Wason — has
helped our track prospects wonderfully.

Then came the warm spring days, and with them the call for baseball.
There ar'j several stars missing: but as we go to press no one doubts that
"Xick" will be able to develope men to fill all the vacant places, and natu-
rally w'e look for a comfortable place near the top of the list when the

But the im))ression should not be gained that athletics receive all
our attention, for such is far from the real facts of the case. Throughout
the year we have had from time to time the pleasure of listening to many
of the foremost men of the country upon various subjects. And nside



from lectures of a more or less technical nature, through the good offices
of the Purdue Lecture Course, we have had the opportunity of hearing
many men of world-wide fame.

Among our Uiusical organizations the band has played a very impor-
tant part, and has won only praise from every source. The selection of
Mr. Emrick as director, after his leadership for the four years while he
was a student in the University, has made the high standard of the organi-
zation assured. While the Glee and Mandolin clubs have not been very
active durin;; the year, the Orchestra has played its usual important part
in the musical programs of the year. Along dramatic lines, the Harlequin
Club has had the most successful season in its history. "The City Chap,"
George Ade's latest musical comedy, was presented to three record-break-
ing houses in Lafayette: and the performance at Indianapolis was in every
sense a hit.

With tlie opening of spring and all its accompanying activities, then
we first began to realize that our college careers were nearing the end.
Enjoying for the last time the athletic events, the convocation exercises,
the 1911 Junior Prom, and the various other social and entertaining fea-
tures, we say goodby, for the last time as students, to the scenes which
fo.- four brief years have been so closely interwoven with our lives.

So has closed the year 1909-10 : and we can safely say that it has been
the most enjo>ablc of our college years, and one of the most brilliant and
successful in the history of Purdue.




New Shops




ADM1NI5TPATION



WI.NTHROP ELLSWORTH STONE. PhD,, LL,D,.
President of the University,

STANLEY COULTER. Ph.D., LL.D..
;tar.v ot the Faculty and Dean of the School of Scie

CHARLES HENRY BENJAMIN. M.E.. D. Eng..
Dean of the Schools of Engineering.

JOHN HARRISON SKINNER. B.S..
Dean of the School of Agriculture.

ARTHUR LAWRENCE GREEN. Ph.C. Ph.D..
Dean of the School of Pharmacy.



WILLIAM CARROLL LATTA. M.S..
Superintendent of Farmer's Institutes.

ARTHUR GOSS. M.S., A.C.,
ireitor of Agricultural Experiment Static

WILLIAM MURRAY HEPBURN. A.M.,
Librarian of the University.

EDWARD HATTON DAVIS. S.B..
Registrar ot the University.

EDWARD A. ELLSWORTH.
Bursar of the University.



The Engineering Schools




versit.v in honor

chanic arts as v,

liresent Schools of Engineering.

the Engineering department recei

administration of President Smart



[JGIXG from the present standing of the Engineering
Schools in our University circle, it seems hardly pos-
sible that engineering is only a by-product of the
original organization, and that the original institu-
tion of our great Purdue was the Indiana Agricul-
tural College. In 1SC9 a change in this college was
made possible by donations of John Purdue and
others, the new institution being dubbed Purdue Uni-
ts benefactor, and including in its curriculum the me-
is agriculture. From the "Mechanic Arts" grew our
Along with the rest of the University,
ived its first great impulse under the



Mechanical



Mechanical Engineering at Purdue attempts to give.

first a solid theoretical foundation and then as much
jiractical application as time will admit. This year marks the initiation
of a new subject, "The Theory of Gas Engine Design and Operation": and
tlie fact that Professor Ludy has charge of the course insures its suc-
cess. This move, however, left the Mechanics department without a head;
so Professor Dukes was imported from Case School of Applied Science,
and placed in charge of the department.

At present the Mechanical Laboratory is crowded beyond its capacity.
In some cases the engines are so close together that the students are
handicapped considerably when trying to test them. Next year this will
all be eliminated, by extending the Engineering Laboratory into the space
at present occupied by the Practical Mechanics department. Each year
engines have been added, until now there is not a single foot left which
does not support a steam engine, steam turbine, gas engine, air com-
pressor, pump, condenser or some other piece of apparatus. The latest



addition is the engines from a compound Baldwin locomotive. Their power
is absorbed by two of the largest prony brakes in existence.
„. ^ • I The Electrical Engineering School secured a new lab-

oratory first, and now has plenty of room for generators,
motors, switchboards and other apparatus. One of the conspicuous adorn-
ments is the large interurban car which occupies the east end of the lab-
oratory. Many spare moments are spent on the overhead traveling crane,
which is made to go through all sorts of maneuvers, in transporting chairs
and small boxes about the laboratory. The practical Telephone depart-
ment still holds out in the thin atmosphere of the upper regions.

A visitor is impressed most by the size of the laboratories and hum
of the machines; but any Senior Electrical could tell of more weary hours
spent in poring over abstract theories, than spent in operating electrical
machinery.



Civil



The Civil School is. in many ways, not the least of the three.
They originated the idea that in union there is strength; and
at almost any class meeting that idea may be seen cropping out. the beauty
of the scheme being that it works.

By this time the Civils have become well settled in their compara-
tively new building, and are progressing so rapidly along all lines that
they are on equal terms with any like school in the country. They have
as good a corps of instructors as any other of the schools in the Univer-
sity. A very popular branch of the subject, which has developed recently,
is Sanitary Engineering. The graduated students are making good, and
there is a demand for more of them.



Chemical



Purdue offered
in the school ye
indergraduate stu
cal Engineering.



; first course in Chemical Engineering
of 190G-1907. Those who complete the
receive the degree of Bachelor of Sci-



Although this department has never been organized formally into
so-called "School," as have the departments of Mechanical, Electrical an
Civil Engineering, yet it is recognized as being on practically the sani
basis. At present Prof. P. N. Evans, of the Chemistry department, is i
charge of the work in Chemical Engineering.

The course is designed to prepare men for those commercial Industrie
wliich involve chemical operations on a large scale; and therefore not onl
the principles of Chemistry are emphasized, but also those of Mechanics



and Electrical Engineering. During the first two years the students r
ceive about the same work as those in the Mechanical and Electrical d
partnients. In the Junior and Senior years the course includes the fund;
mental work of the other engineering departments.

Graduates may expect to begin work in the Chemical Laboratorie
but later to enter the works as chemical engineers; this experience is tl:
best preparation for subsequent connection with the management.




^RLES HE.\RY BENJAMl



TBI



Dean of the Schools of Engineering and Dirertcr of the Engineering Laboratories.
M.E. University of Maine. 1S81; Doctor of Engineering. Case School of Applied Sci-
ence, 1908; Member American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Member Society for
the Promotion of Engineering Education; Honorary Member Engineering Society of
Cleveland.



BENJAMIN



^1 lK?a






T




Mechanical


Engineering




LEWELLYN V. LUDY. TBII. 2H.


CICERO BAILEY VEAL. TBn.




Professor of Mechanical Engineering.


Assistant Professor in Machine Design. B.S.. Purdue rniversily.




B.S., Purdue University, 189S; M.E.,


1902; Member American Society Mechanical Engineers.


^r^\


1900; Member of the Indiana Engi-




m \


neering Society; Member Indiana


OSCAR COLE.MAN KLIPSCH. TBII.


ml


Academy of Science; Member Society




for the Promotion of Engineering


Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. B.S., Purdue University, 1901;


Education; Member American Society


.\I K,. 19IIV.


j1C4


of Mechanical Engineers.


TIIO.MAS TAYLOR EYRE. TBII.


wkl^


lAMES DAVID HOFFMAN. TBn.


In.structor in Applied Mechanics. B.S., Purdue University. 190.T;




Professor of Engineering Design. B.S.


Member Society for the Promotion of Engineering Education.


^^^^^^^H^^^^K


in M.E., Purdue University, 1S90;




^l^^^^^^^^^^^r


M.E., 1S93; Member American Society




^^PF^


.Mechanical Engineers; Member and


LAWRENCE W. WALLACE.




President American Society of Heat-


Instructor in Locomotive and Car Design. B.S., Agricultural and Me-




ing and Ventilating Engineers: Mem-


chanical College of Texas. 1903; Memlier Western Railway Club.


LUDV


ber Society for the Promotion of En-






!;ineering Education; Member Indiana


BE.NEDICT FREDERICK RABER. TBII.




Engineering Society; Member Indi-






ana Academy of Science.


Instructor in Machine Design. B.S,. Purdue University, 1907.


l.ons EUGENE EXDSl.EY. TBII. 'hK*.


CLAUDE SYLVESTER .lOHNSON.


Associate Professor of Railw


ay Mechanical Engineering. B.S.. Purdue


Instructor in Mechanical Eusincering. H.S,. Purdue University. 1901.


University, 1901; M.E., 190.


; Member Western Railway Club; Mem-




ber Society for tlie Pronioti
diana Engineering Society.


n of Engineering Education; Member In-


CHARLES HERBERT LAWRANCE.

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. U.S.. Clarkson School of


AUTHIK WILLIAMS COLE.




Technology, 1900; Member Society for the Promotion of Engineering


Assistant Professiir of M,.,-li


iiirMl Kimiiii-cring. B.S., Worcester Poly-


Education.


technle Institiii. iin,- \i


: I'i": \l.n,l)er American Society Me-




chanical Engiii.-. r M. mi.c


\n,. 1 H ;,i, In.-^titute Electrical Engineers;


IIOWAKD LEROY HUTCHINSON.


Member National i i., ,;:,,, |,|,i


s., i, i^ \h.inl)er Society for the Promo-


Instructor in .Machine Design. Ph.B.. Sheffield Scientiflc Scliool, Yale


tion of Engineering K.IiumIi




University. 1907. 1


ai i^a



Wir.LIAM TEMPLE HECK.

Instructor in the Engineering Laboratory. U.S.. Penni^.vhania Stale
College, 1904.



GEORGE WESLEY MUNRO.

Instructor in Engineering Labor
E.E., 1S9S.

HAROLD SHIELDS DICKERSOX.

Instructor in the Engineering Laboratory
Igan. 190j.

WILLIAM C. STO.NE.

Superintendent of Mechanical Laboratory

EVERETOX COXRAD BROMMER.



C. C. AUSTl



B.S., Purdue University, 1897



B.S., University of Mich-




CT^ai IKS


u




!


Department of Practical Mechanics




^^^^^ MICHAKL JOSEPH GOLDEN. 92.


R. BERTRAM GREGG.




^K^^^lk Professor of Practical Mechanics.
^^^^^ W B.S. in M.E.. Purdue University, 1S93:
■nnVk !, M.E., 1894; Member American Societ.v
^J t of Meclianical Engineers: Member
Y^ - Jk> Society of Naval Architects and Ma-
^^^, ^Hk rine Engineers; Pellow Indiana Acad-
^^I^^P'^^^BL Science.


Assistant in Wood Shop.

JESSE DAY TRUEBLOOD.
Assistant in Wood Shop.

MORTON Tl'MEY.

Assistant in Foundry.




^HLjhBP^ alpha pierce .L\]MIS0.\. Ki.

TW^^^^'' Professor of Mechanical Drawing.
^W-y^' g j^ J, j,^ Purdue University. 1S95;
M.E., 1897; Member American So-
GULDEN ciety of Mechanical Engineers.


FOSTER F. HILLIX.

Assistant in .Machine Shop.

A. E. HENNIXG. OS.

Assistant in Practical Mechanics. B.S.. Purdue Universi

WAYNE S. BELL.


y, 19(19.


WILLIAM PAYSON Tl'R.XER.


Assislant in Practical Meclianics.




Professor of Practical Mechanics. Graduate of the School of Me-
chanic Arts. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1SS6; Member of
American Society of Mechanical Engineers; Member Society for the
Promotion of Engineering Education.


LOUIS KELLER.

Assistant in Forge Shop.
CRIPS BENEDICT MOORE. 2N.




RALPH BROWX TRL'EBLOOD.


Assistant in Practical Mechanics.




Assistant Professor of Practical .Mechanics. U.S., Purdue University.
i;iii2.


GEORGE SOMMERS BAXTER.

Assistant in Practical Mechanics. B.S., Purdue Universit


y. 19(IS.


IIFI K\ fOI


CLIFFORD DOWNS BUSHNELL.




liisirucior iii Piaclical .\l.-chaiiir-s. I!,S,. Purdue University. 1890;
.M.S., 1S92.


Assistant in Practical Mechanics. B.S., Purdue University, liiuil.
JOHN JACOB DIETRICH.


DROOK BUCKLEY ELLIS ( retired 1.
Assistant in the Foundry.


Assistant in Wood Shop.
JOHN A. VAN COURT.

Assistant in Wood Shop.




JOH.V FRAN-CIS KELLER.


CHARLES ANDREW HAAG.




Assistani in Forge Shop.




Assistant in Machine Shop.


. i


2S^I IK^




"C"I ^'^^"I'Ei""



Civil Engineering



lAM KE.XDRICK HAT'



ATO.




Professor of Civil Engineering. A.B..
rniversity of New Brunswick, 1887:
C.E., Cornell University, 1891: A.M.,
I'niversily of N'ew Brunswick, 1898:
I'h.D., 1901; Fuertes Gold Medal at
Cornell University, 1903; Civil Engi-
neer Forestry Service, United States
Department of Agriculture: Member
International Society for Testing Ma-
iiii;{ls. Member American Railway
l)M,L,'in''t ling and Maintenance of Way
.\^suci;ilion; Member of American


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