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Québec (Province). Legislature.

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^If the Metals be arranged Silver, Copper, Iron, Tin, Lead, Zinc, each will become y
VUreoui by Its contact with that mhich precedes itf eind J^eeinous by that which y

follows it.
^In decomposing the Soda and Potcus^ bubbles rise at the Vitreous Pole,
whilst at the Resinous Pole metallic substances are formed, called^
Sodium and Potassium, — Spec. gra. Sodium, .972 — Potassium,

.865.



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320



OBVERSE.



HYDROSTATICS.

The Presiure of Liquid Fluids.

Mb. PiBciirf says, wttar is compreMible 1-S7th part less than its bulk.^
— Thejpressure of fluids is the same upwards, downwards, and in all direc -^v
tions. — ^The weight of water depends upon the hei^t, without any reference to
its width. — ^This power is applied to Mr. Bramah's Press; and the power of thls^,
machine is as the square of the area of the bottom of the cylinder is to that of the^
area of the fordng-pump piston-rod u-4^.~If the area of the piston be ( of a square^
inch, and the cylinder 1 foot, or 144 square inches, the power given will be as 676 to 1.
The pressure of water on every square inch of the sides is ISAa, ^

at the depth of 90 feet, and so ' portion, to a greater or \

leaser depth. The centre [>ressure of water against i

a square upright is taken it ] downwarda - ^When '

a solid body » plunged into a liquid, it displaces

a quantity equal to its buli. I



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REVERSE.



HYDRAULICS,

Force and Power of Fluid» in motion.

The weight or pressure of fluids is as their quantities or heights.
' The perpendicular pressure increases in the ratio of the altitude of the ^

column.
f If water falls perpendicularly, its motion will be regulated by laws as apply to

the falling of solid bodies.
'' Water flowing in a current, its motion is referable to that of solid bodies descending ^

inclined planes.
^ In rivers, the velocity and quantity discharged, will be as the square root of the depths.
^ The wine gallon contains 281 cubic inches ; the imperial gallon, 277.



Cubiein,

9.42

18.85

28.27

87.70



W



Ft. high

1
2

\ 4

\ There are three kind

shot The undersh

The overshot whee

A cubical inch of



Wt, Avoir.

27.81

54.62

109.24

278.09



Gel¥fine.

.2040

.4080

1.2240

2.0400 i



V



eels, breast, and over-)
elocity of the stream.

nd occupies 1800



PNEl



\heAir.



Fluids are divided into iwor-^Uutie or compressible, m air and t
^ lum'tUutie, m water and fluids.— ^tr possesses inertia, as the wind :
weii^t Ifilb. on the sq. inch. A cubic foot weighs BSSgn.^ a
enbio foot of watery lOOOos.— 7^ Atmoipken sustslns ^
a column of mercury of 29in.. and of water
d2ft. Sound travels lUSft. per
second.



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32 1



OBVERSE.



METALLURGY.

A cubic foot of Marble weiffhs 2521bs.— « cubic loot of Tin,

(the lightest of all metals) 5 1 61bs.— and Gold, Id261b8.

The great opacity of metals is in consequence of their density : hence

their reflecting power. — ^Lookins Glasses, merely by the metallic lustre '

of the silvering.

^Perfect medals — Gold, siWer, platina. — Imperfect medaU — Copper, iron,^

^ tin, lead. — Semi-^netaU — Antimony, bismuth, sine, nickle, cobalt, arsenic, mmn- ^

^ ganese.— -2>ttc(t^ft^y — Gold, silver, copper, iron, tin, lead. — Hardneu — ^Irou, pla- ^

Una, copper, silver, gold, tin, lead. — Tenacity — Gold, iron, copper, silver, tin, lead.

f — Fusihuity — ^Mercury, tin, lead, silver, gold, copper, iron, platina.



Extreme of Scale
Airfnmaoe
Ceit-iron melted
Do. begins to fase
Coimnon smith'i ) ^or
forge I



Weda. Fah.
240* 82277'
160 21877
160 20577
180 17977

17827



PlategUn fnmaoe 124^
FlintglMB farnftce 114
Derbj ChinA Vit. 112
Stoneware baked 102
Welding heat iron 95
Flintgleu foae 70



rak,

15897
15637
14387
13427
10177



Delf-ware biJced

Fine CN>ld melts

Ditto Silver ditto

Sweed. copper, do.

Brass

Enamel colors fdse



Wtdo, #M.
41* «107»
82 5287
28 4717
27 4587
21 8807
6 1857



Iron red hot in dav-light

Ditto ditto in the dark

Heat of a common fire

Zinc

Qnicksilver boils ...

Lead melts...



Fah,
1077'
752
790
700
660
594



Bismnth ...

Tin

Polished steel blue

Ditto straw oolonr

Melting mercury



Fah,
476*
442
580
460
89



A compound of 3 parts tin, 5 of lead, and 8 of bismuth, melts below

210 Fahr.

An equal quantity of heat is set free from water when it
assumes a solid form, and ice melts at 31^.



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REVERSE.



SPECIFIC GRAVITIES.



The Specific Gravity of a body is determined by weighing it first in air,^

^ then in water ; divide the total weight by the loss of the weight of water, and ^

the quotient is the Specific Gravity.

Water at 1000 is taken Jbr the unit for Solid* and Liquids-



Antimony 6.702

Arsenic 5.763

Bismuth 9.880

Brass 8.000

Cobalt 8.600

Copper 8.900

Acid,Acetic 1.062

— Fluoric 1.116

— Muriatic 1.200

— Nitric 1.271



1.925
2.300

7.248
7.788
11.35



Sulphuric 1.850

Flint 2.582
Glass 2.700
Granite2.750
Gum 1.4.52
Honey 1.450



Gold
Iradium
Cast Iron
Bar Iron
Lead
Manganese 8.000

Agate

Alcohol

Alum

Amber

Blood



Jet
Ivory

Limestone 2.500
Magnesia 2.300
Milk... 1.032



Mercury 13.61
Nickle 8.279
Platina 21.47
Potassium .865
Rhodium 1.065
Silver 10.47

2.500 Borax 1.714

0.809 Butter .942

1.714 Camphor .988

1 . 1 00 Caoutchouc .933

1.053 Chalk 2.657

1.300 Pitch 1.650

1.825 Tallow .770

Naptha .750

Oil ... .940

Turpentine .870



Sodium 0.972^
SteeUsoft 7.833
Steel, hard 7.840






Tin 7.291

Tungten 1.740
Zinc 7.100^

Coal ... 1.300
Coral ... 2.S57
Corundum 3.710
Dbmond 3.521
Ether .. .866

Peat... .800
QuarU 3.000
Steam .481
Port8to.2.496
S. watr. 1.028



Cork .240. Fir .560, Box .912, Mahogany 1.068, Oak 1.170, Lignum Vita

\ 1.888, Port Wine .997, Claret .998, Atmoe. air lOQO, Amo. ma .690, y

Carb. add gas. 1.527, Carba. Hydro. 0.972, Cblo. 2.500, Hyd.

gas O.O^MQr. acid gas 1.284, Nit. gas oi72. Nit. oxide

1.041, Oxygen 1.111, Solpb. Acid. 2m



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S28



OBVERSE.



CHEMISTRY.

Simple Anafyiti is to decompose and represent the elements of

a body.

Compound Analtfiii is when the elements of a body form new com

pounds, and cannot re-produce a similar substance.

Syttheiti is the re-uniting the component parts of any body to form similar

substances.
Chemical decomposition is the act of dividing a body into its simple elements,
All natural bodies are either solid, liquid, or aeriform.
A cubic foot of Atmospheric Air will hold in solution 1 1 grains of Water.
A cubic Jbot of Atmospheric Air weighs l^z. avoirdupois. — A cubic foot of Water^

1000 ounces.
The Properties of Atmospheric Air are fluidity, elasticity, expansibility, gravity.
Atmospheric Air composed of 21 Oxygen, 78 Nitrogen, about 1 per cent of Aqueous
Vapour, including 1000th part of Carbonic Acid. — Water, 88 Oxygen, 1 1 Hydrogen
Caloric present in all bodies : it must either be absorbed or reflected : its effects
are expansion, liquefaction, vaporization, incandescence, and combustion
Latent Heat of Caloric in Steam of 212<> b 950"" set free.

GcMMf— Volatile liquids whose boiling point is lower than any natural

iemperBt}xte.^^Cammon Fire A, Candle instances of incandescence.

Photphoretoenee^AhBorptlon of light.— -The Glow-worm

and Fire-fly are naturally phosphorescent.



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REVERSE.



CHEMISTRY.



Alkalies change the blue juices of vegetables green. There are^

three kinds-^Potash, Soda, the other Volatile, or Ammonia.

^Potash — The ashes of burnt vegetables, the base of which is Potassium.

Soda — The ashes of marine plants, the basis of which is also a Metal by^

voltaic decomposition, called Sodium.

fFor Percussion Locks — 1 Sulphur^ S Chlorate of Potash.

I The instant that Ammoniacal Gas and Muriatic Gas are thrown together, Asolid\
substance is formed, of little taste.

I Acids are, liquid, as the acetic ; solid, as the tartaric ; gaseous, as the oxygen. They

change blue vegetables to red.

[Acids owe their oxygen to the acidifying principle, and combine with alkalies, earths,
and metallic oxydes, to form compound salts.

i Sulphuric Acid — 8 parts Sulphur, 1 of Nitre, placed on a capsule of Water under a

\ receiver; fire the mixture whicn unites with the oxygen of the atmosphere, is absorbed

by the Water, forming Sulphuric Acid, the Oil of Vitriol of the Shops.

^Nitric Acid — 8 of Nitre, 2 of Sulphuric Acid, dbtilled and collected in a receiver
If absorbed by Water it is the Aquafortis of the Shops.
Muriatic Acid — 2 of Sea Salt, 1 of Sulphuric Acid collected in a receiver.
Condensed in Water, the Spirit of Salts of the Shops.
There are above SO kinds of Acids ; those ending in ic contain the most
Oxygen, those ending with ous the lesser : — thus. Sulphate^ a base
with Sulphuric Acid — Sulphite with Sulphurous — Sulphur-
ates Metals or Alkalies with Sulphur.
Hpdrat€s^~WBt€T folidified with a tape, as slacked
Lime. Protoxide, Ist^, deuotozide, 2nd.,
tritoxide, Srd., per oxide^ the
highest.



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38'2



OBVERSE.



ASTRONOMY.

Plane Astronomy detenninates the magnitudes, orbits,
and distances; Physical Astronomy the investigation of the
causes of the motions. The axis of the earth is that diameter
about which it performs its diurnal revolutions.

MovM In bit



Plweu. DUm.llII«. £j;|*JS



'Mercury
Venus
Earth
Moon



3000
7900
7470
2180



37000000
69000000
95000000
94000000



kit per bom

MllM.

95000

75000

68000

2290



Planett. DUm.MllM.

4189
89170
80000



Mars

Jupiter

Saturn



DliUlhim
8an,MU«. ""

144000000
490000000
900000000



G.Sidus 35865 1800000000



Moves in bli '
Mbit per bour.
MOet.

53000
25000
21000
16000



18 Satellites or Moons; Earth, 1 ; Jupiter, 4 ; Saturn, 7 ; Georgium Sidus, 6.

Moon distance from the earth 240000 miles, diameter, 2180 ; Sun distance 95 millioDS,

diameter, 883210.

7%tf Zodiacal Constellations and Suns entrance^ and the Signs.



nr Aries Ram 66 stars March 20
b Taurus Bull 141 stars April 20
n Gemini Twins 85 stars May 21
2Z Cancer Crab 83 stars June 21
SI Leo Lion 95 stars July 23
ifR Virgo Virgin 110 stars Aug. 23



^ Libra Balance Sept.23

Til Scorpio Scorpion Oct. 28
/ Sagittarius Archer Nov. 22

b' Capricornus Goat Dec 22

^ Aquarius Waterbearer Jan. 20
X Pisces Fishes Feb. 19



Of Comets — Three have been known, viz. — the 1st appeared 1531, the ^
' 2nd, 1607, and the 3rd, 1682. Herschell says, that seen in 1811
was 95 millions of miles from the sun, and 142 millions of miles
from the earth. Between Mars and Jupiter there are four
small planets — ^Vesta, Ceres, Pallas, and Juno.



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REVERSE.



ASTRONOMY.

The spots on the Moon always keep their places, never
vanishing or going from one side to another, as those of the
Sun do.

The Face of the Moon in her mean lihration^ drawn as she is seen through
Telescopes magnifying between 200 to 800 times.

Eclipses of theilfoon are caused r by the Earth's shadow falling
upon it when the Earth's body is interposed between
the Sun and the Moo Earth has two mo-
tions ; one round its u axis in 24 hours,
the other its annual notion round the Sun^
its axis always in- clined to its path, in
an angle of 29^^.



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336



OBVERSE.



MINERALOGY.

Simple and pure Eariht. — 1st, silex ; 2ndy alumine; Srd, zir-
con ; 4th, glucine ; 5th, yttria ; 6lh, barytes ; 7th, strontian ; 8th,
lime ; 9th, magnesia.
Alkalies, — Soda, potash, ammonia, lithia.
Malleable Metals. — Platina, gold, siWer, mercury, lead, copper, tin, iron, zinc,
palladium, nickle, cadmium.
Brittle Metals. — Arsenic, antimony, bismuth, cobalt, manganese, tellurium, Utanium,^
tantalium, molybdena, tungsten, chrome, osmium, iridium, rhodium, uranium, ceriam<
Bases of Acids. — Fluorine, chlorine, nitrogen or azote, boron, sulphur, phosphorus,

carbon.
Minerals are divided into genera^ containing one or more Families, — We have in
the EARTHY MINERALS.

1st genusy silicious. — Families — flint, garnet, idocrase, shorl, epidote, pitchstone
zeolite, lazulite, felspar, mica, slate, clay, lithomarge, homblend, augite.
2nd genus, magnesian, — Families — magnesite, talc, chiysolite.
Srd genuSf aluminous. — Families — ^ruby, nepheline, topaz, cyanite.
4th genusy zircon. — ^Family — ^zircon.
bth genus, glucine, — Family— emerald.



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REVERSE.



ACIDIFEROUS
EARTHY MINERALS.

1 ttgenust Calcareous. — Families — carbonates,pho8pates,fluate8,
sulphates, silicates, borosilicates, arseniates, tungstates. — 2nd genus,^
Aluminous* — Families— -sulphates, phosphates, fluates, mellates.— dr«{^
fgenusy Magnesian* — Families— carbonates, sulphates, borates. — ^thgenus^ ^ ,
Satytic* — Families — carbonates, sulphates. — 5th genusy Strontian. — Fa-
milies — carbonates, sulphates.

ALKALINE CLASS.

Ilstgenust Salts of Potash* — Family — nitrates. — 2nd genusy Salts qfSodct* — Fa*^

milies— carbonates, sulphates, muriates, borates.

METALLIC CLASS.
\st genusy Gold* — Families — alloys. — 2d genusy Platinum* — Families — alloys. — 34 1
genusy Palladium* — Families — alloys. — ith genus. Iridium* — Families — alloys. — 5^
genusy Tellurium* — Families — alloys. — 6M genus. Mercury* — Families — alloys, sul* I
pburets, oxydes, chlorides — Ithgenusy Silver* — Families— alloys, sulphurets,oxydes, /
chlorides, salts. — ^th genus. Copper* — Families— alloys, sulphurets, oxydes. — 9th j
genuSy Iron. — Families — alloys, sulphurets, oxydes, salts. — lOth genus. Manga-
^ nese* — Families — oxydes, salts. — llth genus. Uranium* — Families— oxydes. —
i2th genus. Cerium* — Families— oxydes, salts. — ISth genus. Tantalum* — Fa-y
milies — oxydes. — I4th genus. Cobalt* — Families — alloys, sulphurets, oxydes,
salts. — I5th genus, Nickle* — Families— alloys, oxydes, salts. — l^thgenus.
Molybdenum* — Families — sulphurets. — \7th genus. Tin* — Families,
-8ulphurets,oxydes. — i^thgenusy Titanium* — Families — oxydes, ^
salts.— 19<A ffenus, ZMe.— Families— sulphurets, oxydes, salts.— 20/A
genus, BumtiiA.— Families— alloys, sulphurets, oxydes. — 2Ui, ^
Lead—AHoyB, sulphurets, oxydes, chlorides, salts.— 22i«/,
Antimony, — Alloys, sulphurets, oxydes.— 23r«^ Ar-
fenlo^Alloys, sulphurets, oxydes.



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340



OBVERSE.




GEOLOGY.



^MicaSUte ...

^CUjSUte

/PrimitiTe Limestone
/ Primitiye Trapp ...

/Serpentine

Porphyry

Sienite

TopM Rock



The Globe 8000 miles diameter, 25000 circumference.

Compo9$i cf. Bbnuftwrt, ComtmU,

Felspar, qmutsy miea ... Granular
Mica, felspar, quarts ... Slaty

Mica, quarts Slaty



Quarts Rock
Primiti



ItiTe Flinty Slate
PrimitiTe Gypsum
White Stone ...



Shorl, copper, tin
(Garnet, lead,
1 pyrites

J Gold, copper, pyrites,)
t cobalt



{'^i^'hSSle^'''^} Rooflng slate Tin, lead, cobdt,silTer



Lime 57, carbonic acid 4S
Homblend



Gh«nular
Massive



Lead, sine, irim, gold
Silver, cobalt



Silez, magnesia, alomine ... Massive



(Quarts, felspar, horn-)

( stone, clay i

■ abU •



[ Native copper, so^HStone,
I asbestos

Gold, silver, lead, tin, iron,
\ copper
Abounds in iron



Massive

Bfassive

Massive ... No metallic ores

Veins & beds No metallic ores

Veins & beds No metallic ores

No metallic ores

No metsllic ores.



Felspar, homblend ...
Quarts, topas, schorl, day..

Bfilk-white quarts

Homblend and day-slate ..

Mica and fdspar Slaty

The above never contain animal or organic remains of planU or animals.
Transition^ or Oldest Secondary Rocks are Four in number y — viz.

Transition Limestone, is massive, of lime and clay, and contains zoophites

and shells, and seldom metaliferous.-— Transition Trapp, is massive, ofj '

basalt, and contains the amygdaloid— Grewacke, is in beds and veins,

and sand and clay slate is widely distributed, and contains

silver, copper, zinc, and lead.— Transition Flinty Slate, is

slaty, of silica and clay, of small importance.



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REVERSE.



SECONDARY ROCK8,

In which are abundance of the remains of plants and animals.



Old red Sandstone ... Strata

Ist Floetz Limestone ... Veins

' 1st Floetz Gypsum ... Granular

Variegated Sandstone ... Granular

^ 2nd Floetz Gypsum ... Granular

^ Shell Limestone Granular



Srd Sandstone
Rock Salt Formation
Chalk Formation
Floetz Trap Formation
Independent Coal Formation
Newest Floetz Trap Volcanic



Tertiary or Allutfial Deposits*

Sandy loam, clay, sulphur, bog iron ore, bituminous wood, gravels — ^In which is found

shells of oysters, muscles, and a few organic remains of land animals.
Chalk London Basin — North, Flamboroughhead, Yorkshire, to Hungerford, Wilt-
shire. South, to the North of (he Thames^ — North, West angle to the Isle of/

Thanet — JEcut, bounded by the German Ocean.
Isle of Wight — On the North, below Winchester.— Soti/^ Carisbrook, Isle of)
Wight — East, Brighton. — West, Dorchester.
Granite* — Scotland, Bascahwaite, Cumberland, Isle of Man, Isle of Anglesea,
Tavistock, Bodmin, St. Agnes, and Land's End, Cornwall.
Coal, — Northumberland, Durham, Whitehaven, Lancaster, Sheffield,
Wigan, Flintshire, Denbighshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwick-
shire, Leicestershire, Derbyshire, Gloucestershire, Monmouthshire, ^
Glamorganshire, Somersetshire.
Strata above the London Chalk — 1 st, Whitesand ; 2nd,
Pipeclay, Wood-coal, Sand, Pebbles, Shells; Srd,
London Clay ; 4th, Gravel, Sand, Shells,
Brickearth ; 5th, Vegetable Mould.



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344



OBVERSE.



CHRYSTALLOGRAPHY.



A name given to polyhedral bodies produced by nature and the

operations of chemistry.

All Cry$Uil$y with regard to shape, may be considered as rectilineal solids,

composed o{plane$y edgei^ and $olid angles.

The carbonate ofUme is found in 300 forms, & the oxyde of tin in 180 varieties

These complicated forme may be traced into one simple form^ termed the primitive

Crystal of that substance. — The primitive forms may be said to be comprehended

the five following solids,— vur. Ist^ the cube or rhomboid of 6 planes— 2m:^ the octohe^

dron of 8 planes — Srd, the tetrahedron of 4 planes — 4^A, the hexahedrai ptnsm of 8

planes— -5/A, the rhomhoidal dodecahedron of 12 planes.
If the mechanical anatomy is carried further, the ultimate result is a solid called the

integrant molecule.

The integrant particles of Crystals are the teti'ahedron^ the triangular prism^

the cube.
If the cleavage is pursued on a cube of common salt, the primitive form is the

cube.

If the cleavage is pursued on a cube of fluate of lime, the primitive

form is the octohedron.

Carbonate of lime is always broken into rJiomboidsy and

no other form.



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345



REVERSE.



In the Iceland rhomboid carbonate of lime there is a

double refraction ; one ray of light passes perpendicularly,

whilst another ray b refracted in a plane parallel to the diagonal.

Angles are divided into right, plane, solid, oblique, acute, and obtuse.

Triangles into equilateral, scalene, isocecles, rectangular. The side opposite to

the right angle is called the h^othenuee^ the other the legs.

Quadrangles into parallelogram, square, rectangle, rhombus, rhomboid, trapezium,

trapezoid.
Polygons into pentagon, five sides ; hexagon, six ; heptagon, seven ; octagon, eight ;

nonagon, nine ; decagon, ten ; duodecacon, twelve ; quindecacon, fifileen sides.

Pyramids whose bases are any polygon, and whose fisu^s are pointed triangles.

Icosahedrony a regular solid made up of twenty pyramids, whose summits meet in

a point, at the centre of the body.

Prisnh a solid figure of more than 4 planes, the 2 opposite ends being equal

and parallel to one another.

Parallehpipedy a prism, contained under 6 quadrilateral figures,

every opposite two being equal and parallel to one

another.



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OBVERSE.




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REVERSE.



CLASSIFICATION.



XtsM— NfttiTe and oarbonatd
/ lA W Mito n et Cludk|^ Bftthnrtone, PorUand, magnasiaiiy lepUriiimy mtflf.
MarbU Limettotie — ^ParUuiy Canan, white granular, black, rart antiqaa,
rouge aatiane, topentine, Bhell, brecciated, Imnachella.
SkUa c ti H e Carbonate <tf Lime—AguiOf atalactitie, octaoooUay floiforriy stalagmite,
/ ntinipar.

/ CryttaUmd QuihonaU ^.Lmm— PrimitiTe calcareous spar, Iceland, dogtooth, primitiTe
/ pearl spar.

I SulpkaU of Liwt0—QjTpmimy granular gjpsiim, compact flbroos, selenite, anhjdrons.
Flwite <2^XtNi«— Compact, earth j, fibrous, foUated.
PAofpAatefl/XMM - Compaot, crystallized or i^Mitite, phosphorite.
ilStif3f£t»— Wltherite or carbonate of barytes, hea?7 spar, sulphate of barytas.
, ifo^fMfui— Serpentine, steatite, asbestos, talk. Jade, oUorite, actinolite, boradte, chrysolite, olirine.
^'yvon^Hyacinth, eod/alite.
(SVitaiM— Beryll, emerald, endase.
^^icsi»fi#— Si^pbir^ mby, amethyst, chrysolite, topas, garnet^ oonmdom, emery, felspar, adolaria, kao-
lin of cmna, day, loam, fuller's earth, odures, mica, oyanite, slate, shale, or secondary sdiistns,
black crayon.
A Yftr -Q wa r ts, prase, Jasper, bloodstone, flint, diert, ohalcttdonr, onyx, sardonyx, ante, mocoa, cor-
nelian, cpa( cat*s-eye^ tonimaline, mbellite, hornblende, u^is Issnli, leolite.

SALINE.

AlioHne Satt^—FoUah, soda, ammonia.
Bartkv iSoA*— Solphate of alnmine.
MmUic iSSoA*— Snlphate of iron, sulphate of copper, sulphate of tine

INFLAMMABLE SUBSTANCES— Sulphur, diamond, amber, carbon, turf, peat, boTey-coal,y

Jet-coal, plumbsgo, bitumen, naptha, petroleum, asphaltum.

METALLIC— Platina, gold, sQTer, quidksilTer, cepper, lead, tin, iron, sine, antimony,/

^ arsenic, cobalt, bismuth. nicUe, manganese, molybdena, chrome, tellurium, uranium, y

^ titanium, tun^^tein, wouram.

ROCKS— Granite, cneiss, micaceous, sdiistus, porphyry, basalt, fbrrilite, trapp,
clinkstone, amayialoid, sienite, grunstein, j^bblestone, sand-stones, sihceous^ '
^ pebbles, tripoli, laTa, pussoluia, trass, pumice, obsidian.



X



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S.'i'i



OBVERSE.



PHRENOLOGY.



/

1 Amativeness
^2 Philoprogenitiveness
^3 Inhabitiveness
4 Adhesiveness
.5 CombatiTeness
1 6 Destructiveoess
\7 Suretiveaess
I 8 Acquisitiveness
\ 9 Construe tiveness

\




10 Self-esteem

1 1 Love of approbation
12 Caudousness
13 Benevolence
14 Veneration
16 Firmness
] 6 Conscientious-
ness /
17 Hope

18 Marvellousness /

/
/

/



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353



REVERSE.




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3.00



OBVERSE.



SAVERY'S
^^ STEAM ENGINE.



The tuggestion of uing the elastic force of Steam was made by the \

^Marquia of Worcester in 1663, and published in 1683. Captain Sayerj con-\

^■tmcted, and oMained Patent for the first Steam Engine in 1698. Sarery perceired \^

^that instead of exhausting the barrel of a common .hand^pnmp by the laborions method of \

1%. piston and a sucker, if it was first filled with steam, and the steam then condensed, the at A

/mospheric pressure would force the water in the well up into the pump barrel, and into any^

/vessel connected with it whose height did not exceed 84 feet aboye the lerel of the water in the well. ^^



D. E. are the boilers, T. T. the
)ls, B. B. and A. A. the
lator worked by hand, C. the
condensing pipe, mored al-
▼essel, S. the suction-pipe
the water which is to oe

To ascertain the
gine^find the area
lof the piston, and
' minute^ multiplied
elasticity of i the
number of /

foot in a mi- /


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Online LibraryQuébec (Province). LegislatureSessional papers → online text (page 19 of 25)