R. D. (Richard Doddridge) Blackmore.

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LORNA DOONE:



(^ (Romance of &]cmoov



By R. D. BLACKMORE,

//
AUTHOR OF "CRADOCK NOWELL," "ALICE LORRAINE," "CLARA VAUGHAN," TC.



Mt7 fjLoi ya.v TliXoTTOS, fiy fioi xpucreja raXavTa

'AAA' vTrb TO Trerpa t5.5' aaofxai, ayKcts ^x^^ '""">
'Zvvvofj.a fjLuA' iaopwv Tav 'S.MeXav is a\a.



WITH ILLUSTRATIONS,
By MR. F. ARMSTRONG, MR. W. SMALL, AND MR. W. H. J. BOOT.

FOURTH EDITION.



LONDON :
SAMPSON LOW, MARSTON, SEARLE, AND RIVINGTON,

LIMITED,

Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.
i!



[All rights reserved.'\






LO XDON:
PRINTED BV WILLIAM CLOWES AND SONS. Limited,

STAMFORD STREET AND CHARING CROSS.



PREFACE.

This work is called a " romance," because the incidents, characters, time, and
scenery are alike romantic. And in shaping this old tale, the Writer neither dares,
nor desires, to claim for it the dignity, or cumber it with the difficulty of an
historic novel.

And yet he thinks that the outlines are filled in more carefully, and the
situations (however simple) more warmly coloured and quickened, than a reader
would expect to find in what is called a " legend."

And he knows that any son of Exmoor, chancing on this volume, cannot fail
to bring to mind the nurse-tales of his childhood — the savage deeds of the
outlaw Doones in the depth of Bagworthy Forest, the beauty of the hapless
maid brought up in the midst of them, the plain John Ridd's Herculean power,
and (memory's too congenial food) the exploits of Tom Faggus.

March, 1869.



253235



PREFACE

TO THE SIXTH EDITION.



oXHc



Few thincTs have surprised me more, and nothing has more pleased me, than
the great success of this simple tale.

For truly it is a grand success, to win the attention and kind regard, not of
the general public only, but also of those who are at home with the scenery,
people, life, and language, wherein a native cannot always satisfy the natives.

Therefore any son of Devon may imagine, and will not grudge, the writer's
delight at hearing from a recent visitor to the west, that, " ' Lorna Doone,' to a
Devonshire man, is as good as clotted cream, almost ! "

Although not half so good as that, it has entered many a tranquil, happy,
pure, and hospitable home ; and the author, while deeply grateful for this genial
reception, ascribes it partly to the fact that his story contains no word, or thought,
disloyal to its birthright in the fairest county of England.

January, 1873.



PREFACE

TO THE TWENTIETH EDITION.



0j«<0




HAT a lucky maid you are, my Lorna!
When first you came from the Western
Moors, nobody cared to look at you ; the
"leaders of the public taste " led none of
it to make test of you. Having struggled
to the light of day, through obstruction
and repulses, for a year and a half you
shivered in the cold corner, without a
sunray. Your native land disdained your
voice, and America answered " No child
of mine ; " knowing how small your value
was, you were glad to get your fare paid
to any distant colony.

Still a certain* brave man felt con-
vinced that there was good in you, and
standing by his convictions — as the English
manner used to be — " She shall have another chance," he said ; " we have lost a
lot of money by her ; I don't care if we lose some more."

Accordingly forth you came, poor Lorna, in a simple pretty dress, small in
compass, small in figure, smaller still in hope of life.

But, oh but — let none of the many fairer ones, who fail, despond — a
certain auspicious event occurred just then, and gave you golden wings. The
literary public found your name akin to one which filled the air, and as
graciously as royalty itself, endowed you with imaginary virtues. So grand is
the luck of time and name ; failing which more solid beings melt into oblivion's
depth.

* The late Mr. Sampson Low the younger.



viii PREFA CE.

This you too must do, ere long; meanwhile, be proud of success beyond merit,
and rejoice yet more, that fortune showers fresh delights upon you. To shine
with adornment, as a female should, to find your words made pictures of bright
beaut}' — from pure love of you * — and thus to venture forth, to those who will
receive you kindly, through the force of habit and of nature.

October, 1882.

* This unwise lover is Mr. F. A. VV. T. Armstrong of Bristol



CONTENTS.



ELEMENTS OF EDUCATION



AN IMPORTANT ITEM



!>>eio



CHAPTER r.



CHAPTER II.



CHAPTER III.



THE WAR-PATH OF THE DOONES..



I'



A RASH VISIT



• e •>



CHAPTER IV.



23



AN ILLEGAL SETTLEMENT



CHAPTER V.



30



NECESSARY PRACTICE



CHAPTER VI.



33



HARD IT IS TO CLIMB



CHAPTER VII.



41



A BOY AND A GIRL ..



CHAPTER VIII.



49



CHAPTER IX.



THERE IS NO PLACE LIKE HOME



55



CHAPTER X.



A BRAVE RESCUE AND A ROUGH RIDE



60



CHAPTER XI.

TOM DESERVES HIS SUPPER



66



X CONTENTS,

rACB

CHAPTER XII.

A MAN JUSTLY rOPULAR ^2

CHAPTER XIII.

MASTER HUCKABACK COMES IN .. 79

CHAPTER XIV.

A MOTION WHICH ENDS IN A MULL Z7

CHAPTER XV.

QUO WARRANTO? Ql

CHAPTER XVI.

LORNA GROWING FORMIDABLE 99

CHAPTER XVII.

JOHN IS BEWITCHED I04

CHAPTER XVIII.

WITCHERY LEADS TO WITCHCRAFT IIO

CHAPTER XIX.

ANOTHER DANGEROUS INTERVIEW II5

CHAPTER XX.

LORNA BEGINS HER STORY I20

CHAPTER XXI.

LORNA ENDS HER STORY .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. „ I26

CHAPTER XXII.

A LONG SPRING MONTH I32

CHAPTER XXIII.

A ROYAL INVITATION ., ,. .. .. .. .. ,. .. .. .. I37

CHAPTER XXIV.

A SAFE PASS FOR KING'S MESSENGER .. .. I44

CHAPTER XXV.

A GREAT MAN ATTENDS TO BUSINESS > .. .. ISI

CHAPTER XXVI.

lOHN IS DRAINED AND CAST ASIDE .- I58



CONTENTS.



TO.



_ PAGB

CHAPTER XXVII.
HOME AGAIN AT LAST ' , ». .. 164

CHAPTER XXVIII.
JOHN HAS HOPE OF LORNA , 168

CHAPTER XXIX.

REAPING LEADS TO REVELLING .. ., 176

CHAPTER XXX.

ANNIE GETS THE BEST OF IT 183

CHAPTER XXXI.'

JOHN fry's errand .. ,. 191

CHAPTER XXXII.

FEEDING OF THE PIGS 20O

CHAPTER XXXIII.

AN early MORNING CALL 2o8

CHAPTER XXXIV.

TWO NEGATIVES MAKE AN AFFIRMATIVE ., 211

CHAPTER XXXV.

RUTH IS NOT LIKE LORNA , .. ,. 216

CHAPTER XXXVI.

JOHN RETURNS TO BUSINESS 221

CHAPTER XXXVII.

A VERY DESPERATE VENTURE 226

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

A GOOD TURN FOR JEREMY

CHAPTER XXXIX

A TROUBLED STATE AND A FOOLISH JOKE .. 244

CHAPTER XL.

TWO FOOLS TOGETHER ». .. 254

CHAPTER XLI.
COLD COMFORT •. .. k. 261



xii CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XLII.

TUF, GRF.AT WINTER .. ,. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ., 268

CHAPTER XLIII.
NOT TOO SOON .. .. ,. .. .. .. .. 276

CHAPTER XLIV.

RRGUGHT HOME AT LAST 283

CHAPTER XLV.

A CHANGE LONG NEEDED 29O

CHAPTER XLVI.

SQUIRE FAGGUS MAKES SOME LUCKY HITS 297

CHAPTER XLVII.

JEREMY IN DANGER .. .. .. •• 30$

CHAPTER XLVIII.

EVERY MAN MUST DEFEND HIMSELF .. 313

CHAPTER XLIX.

MAIDEN SENTINELS ARE BEST .. .. .. ,. 32J

CHAPTER L.
A MERRY MEETING A SAD ONE .. .. 328

CHAPTER LI.

A VISIT FROM THE COUNSELLOR.. .. .. 338

CHAPTER LH.

THE WAY TO MAKE THE CREAM RISE .. .. 345

CHAPTER LIII.
JEREMY FINDS OUT SOMETHING 35^

CHAPTER LIV.

MUTUAL DISCOMFITURE 359

CHAPTER LV.

GETTING INTO CHANCERY 3^9

CHAPTER LVI.

JOHN BECOMES TOO POPULAR 37^



LORN A KNOWS HER NURSE



MASTER HUCKABACK'S SECRET



LORN A GONE AWAY



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER LVII.



CHAPTER LVIII.



CHAPTER LIX.



CHAPTER LX.



Xlll

PAGB

406



ANNIE LUCKIER THAN JOHN 4^5



CHAPTER LXI.



THEREFORE HE SEEKS COMFORT



CHAPTER LXII.

THE KING MUST NOT BE PRAYED FOR ..



CHAPTER LXIII.



JOHN IS WORSTED BY THE WOMEN



SLAUGHTER IN THE MARSHES



FALLING AMONG LAMBS ..



SUITABLE DEVOTION



LORNA STILL IS LORNA



JOHN IS JOHN NO LONGER



NOT TO BE PUT UP WITH



COMPELLED TO VOLUNTEER



A LONG ACCOUNT SETTLED



CHAPTER LXIV.



CHAPTER LXV.



CHAPTER LXVI.



CHAPTER LXVII.



CHAPTER LXVI 1 1.



CHAPTER LXIX.



CHAPTER LXX.



CHAPTER LXXI.



421



427



436



443



450



457



465



472



481



488



495



xiv CONTENTS.

CHAPTER LXXII. '*"

THE COUNSELLOR AND THE CARVER -qj

CHAPTER LXXII I.

HOW TO GET OUT OF CHANCERY .. .. , _ ^^ -^g

CHAPTER LXXIV.

BLOOD UPON THE ALTAR rj,

CHAPTER LXXV.

GIVE AWAY THE GRANDEUR .. , C20



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



A Devonshire Stream Frontispiece page

Tiverton .. .. .. .. .. ., .. ., .. .. .. .. 2

Blundell's Gate— Cop's House ., .. .. 6

The Fight on the Ironing-box .. .. .. .. .. .. ., ., 11

A Moorland Guide-post .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 19

Dunkery Beacon Fire ., .. .. .- •• .. .. •• •• To face 20

A Visit to Sir Ensor .. .. 25

Farmer Ridd's Funeral 34

PORLOCK Bay To face z^

The Water Slide „ 46

A Pleasant Surprise To face ^^

Above Glenthorne .. ., « 58

ExE below Tiverton «. 69

Dulverton Bridge .. .. .. .. .- •• •• •• •• •• 80

Steps on the Barle ' To face 108

On the Exe .. • 112

Milk of Human Kindness To face 134

ExMOOR Roads •• ' •• •• ^45

DuNSTER Castle— Distant View To face 164



Oare Valley



168



Plover's Barrows.. .. , » 219

PoRLOCK Bay 226

Lynmouth To face 2U

Exe Bridge at Tiverton - 248

Exmoor. Dunkery .. .. 262

Dunkery Beacon 266

Winter Scene = .. .. 271

Thawing of the Window To face 281

Landacre Bridge To face 309

Minehead , .. .. '• " •• .. .. 327



XVI



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



DUI.VERTON

EXE NEAR DULVERTON ..

Watchett on Regatta Day

Watch ETT Bay

Glenthorne

A VICIOUS Horse viced .,

Oare Church

West Zuvland

Shield and Staff

The Fire-erands burnt out

Interior of Oare Church

"Thy Death, or mine"

Old Tree at Oare.— John Ridd's Tree



PACK

To face 332
.. 360

To face 384
3S7
397

To face 422
428

447
To face 477
498

515

'.ce 5 1 8

526



Tof



S^/%?oo<S ^r^^-V; '5 i'-



LORNA DOONE



A ROMANCE OF EXMOOR.



>o>^c



CHAPTER I.

ELEMENTS OF EDUCATION-.



F anybody cares to read a simple tale told
simply, I, John Ridd, of the parish of Oare, in
the county of Somerset, yeoman and church-
warden, have seen and had a share in some
doings of this neighbourhood, which I will
try to set down in order, God sparing my life
and memory. And they who light upon this
book should bear in mind, not only that I
write for the clearing of our parish from ill-
fame and calumny, but also a thing which
will, I trow, appear too often in it, to wit —
that I am nothing more than a plain un-
lettered man, not read in foreign languages,
as a gentleman might be, nor gifted with long
words (even in mine own tongue), save what
I may have won from the Bible, or Master William Shakespeare, whom, in
the face of common opinion, I do value highly. In short, I am an ignoramus,
but pretty well for a yeoman.

My father being of good substance, at least as we reckon in Exmoor, and
seized in his own right, from many generations, of one, and that the best and
largest, of the three farms into which our parish is divided (or rather the cultured
part thereof), he, John Ridd, the elder, churchwarden and overseer, being a great
admirer of learning, and well able to write his name, sent me his only son to be
schooled at Tiverton, in the county of Devon. For the chief boast of that
ancient town (next to its woollen-staple) is a worthy grammar-school, the
largest in the west of England, founded and handsomely endowed in the year
1604, by Master Peter Blundell, of that same place, clothier.




2 LORN A DOONE.

Here, by the time T was t\vcl\ e \cars old, I had risen into the upper school,
and could make bold with Eutropius and Caesar — by aid of an English version —
and as much as six lines of Ovid. Some even said that I might, before manhood,
rise almost to the third form, being of a persevering nature ; albeit, by full consent
of all (except my mother), thick-headed. But that would have been, as I now
perceive, an ambition beyond a farmer's son ; for there is but one form above it,
and that made of masterful scholars, entitled rightly "monitors." So it came to
pass, b\- the grace of God, that I was called away from learning, whilst sitting at
the desk of the junior first in the upper school, and beginning the Greek verb tutttw.

My eldest grandson makes bold to say that I never could have learned (f>i\e(o,
ten pages further on, being all he himself could manage, with plenty of stripes to




help him. I know that he hath more head than I — though never will he have
such body ; and am thankful to have stopped betimes, with a meek and
wholesome head-piece.

But if you doubt of my having been there, because now I know so little, go
and see my name, "John Ridd," graven on that very form. Forsooth, from the
time I was strong enough to open a knife and to spell my name, I began to grave
it in the oak, first of the block whereon I sate, and then of the desk in front of
it, according as I was promoted from one to other of them : and there my grandson
reads it now, at this present time of writing, and hath fought a boy for scoffing
at it — "John Ridd his name," — and done again in " vvinkeys," a mischievous but
cheerful device, in which \\e took great pleasure.



ELEMENTS OF EDUCATION. 3

This is the manner of a " winkcy," whith I here set down, lest child of mine,
or grandchild, dare to make one on my premises ; if he does, I shall know the
mark at once, and score it well upon him. The scholar obtains, by prayer or
price, a handful of salt-peter, and then with the knife, wherewith he should
rather be trying to mend his pens, what does he do but scoop a hole where the
desk is some three inches thick. This hole should be left with the middle
exalted, and the circumfere dug more deeply. Then let him fill it with salt-
peter, all save a little space in the midst, where the boss of the wood is. Upon
that boss (and it will be the better if a splinter of timber rise upward) he sticks
the end of his candle of tallow, or "rat's tail," as we called it, kindled and
burning smoothly. Anon, as he reads by that light his lesson, Y\{\:m^ his eyes
now and then it may be, the fire of candle lays hold of the peter with a
spluttering noise and a leaping. Then should the pupil seize his pen, and,
regardless of the nib, stir bravely, and he will see a glow as of burning
mountains, and a rich smoke, and sparks going merrily ; nor will it cease
if he stir w^isely, and there be good store of peter, until the wood is devoured
through, like the sinking of a well-shaft. Now well may it go with the head
of a boy intent upon his primer, who betides to sit thereunder ! But above
all things, have good care to exercise this art, before the master strides up to
his desk, in the early grey of the morning.

Other customs, no less worthy, abide in the school of Blundell such as the
singeing of nightcaps ; but though they have a pleasant savour, and refreshing-
to think of, I may not stop to note them, unless it be that "-oodly one at the
incoming of a flood. The school-house stands beside a stream, not verv
large, called " Lowman," which flows into the broad river of Exe about a mile
below. This Lowman stream, although it be not fond of brawl and violence (in
the manner of our Lynn), yet is wont to flood into a mighty head of waters
when the storms of rain provoke it ; and most of all when its little co-mate
called the " Taunton brook " — where I have plucked the very best cresses that
ever man put salt on — comes foaming down like a great roan horse and rears
at the leap of the hedge-rows. Then are the grey stone walls of Blundell on
every side encompassed, the vale is spread over with looping waters and it is
a hard thing for the day-boys to get home to their suppers.

And in that time, the porter, old Cop (so called because he hath copper
boots to keep the wet from his stomach, and a ntDse of copper also, in rio-ht of
other waters), his place it is to stand at the gate, attending to the flood-boards
grooved into one another, and so to watch the torrent's rise, and not be washed
away, if it please God he may help it.' But long ere the flood hath attained
this height, and while it is only waxing, certain boys of deputy will watch at
the stoop of the drain-holes, and be apt to look outside the walls when Cop is
taking a cordial. And in the very front of the gate, just without the archway,
where the ground is paved most handsomely, you may see in copy-letters done
a great P. B. of white pebbles. Now, it is the custom and the law that when
the invading waters, either fluxing along the wall from below the road-bridge,

B 2



4 LORN A DO ONE.

or pouring: sharpl\' across the mcAdows from a cut called "Owen's ditch" — and
I ni}\self ha\c seen it come both ways — upon the very instant when the waxing
clement lips though it be but a single pebble of the founder's letters, it is in
the licence of any boy, soever small and undoctrined, to rush into the great
school-rooms, where a score of masters sit heavily, and scream at the top of his
voice, " P. B."

Then, with a yell, the boys leap up, or break awa}^ from their standing ;
they toss their caps to the black-beamed roof, and haply the very books after
them ; and the great boys vex no more the small ones, and the small boys stick
up to the great ones. One with another, hard they go, to see the gain of the
waters, and the tribulation of Cop, and are prone to kick the day-boys out, with
words of scanty compliment. Then the masters look at one another, having no
class to look to, and (boys being no more left to watch) in a manner they put
their mouths up. With a spirited bang they close their books, and make
in\-itation the one to the other for pipes and foreign cordials, recommending the
chance of the time, and the comfort away from cold water.

But, lo ! I am dwelling on little things and the pigeons' eggs of infancy,
forgetting the bitter and heavy life gone over me since then. If I am neither a
hard ma:-i nor a very close one, God knows I have had no lack of rubbing and
pounding, to make stone of me. Yet can I not somehow believe that we ought
to hate one another, to live far asunder, and block the mouth each of his little
den ; as do the wild beasts of the wood, and the hairy outangs now brought
over, each with a chain upon him. Let that matter be as it will. It is beyond
me to unfold, and ma\-hap of my grandson's grandson. All I know is that
wheat is better than when I besjan to sow it.



( 5 )




CHAPTER II.

AN IMPORTANT ^^E^r,

OW the cause of my leaving Tiverton school, and the way of
it, were as follows. On the 29th day of November, in the
year of our Lord 1673, the very day when I was twelve
years old, and had spent all my substance in sweetmeats,
with which I made treat to the little boys, till the large
boys ran in and took them, we came out of school at five
o'clock, as the rule is upon Tuesdays. According to
custom, we drove the day-boys in brave rout down the
causeway, from the school-porch even to the gate where Cop has his dwelling
and duty. Little it recked us and helped them less, that they were our founder's
citizens, and haply his own grand-nephews (for he left no direct descendants),
neither did we much inquire what their lineage was. For it had long been fixed
among us, who Avere of the house and chambers, that these same day-boys were
all " caddes," as we had discovered to call it, because they paid no groat for
their schooling, and brought their own commons with them. In consumption
of these we would help them, for our fare in hall fed appetite ; and while we ate
their victuals we allowed them freely to talk to us. Nevertheless, we could not
feel, when all the victuals were gone, but that these boys required kicking from
the premises of Blundell. And some of them were shop-keepers' sons, young
grocers, fellmongers, and poulterers, and these, to their credit, seemed to know
how righteous it was to kick them. But others were of high family, as any
need be, in Devon — Carews, and Bouchiers, and Bastards, and some of these
would turn sometimes, and strike the boy that kicked them. But to do them
justice, even these knew that they must be kicked for not paying.

After these " charity-boys " were gone, as in contumely we called them — " If
you break my bag on my head," said one, " whence will >wdu dine, to-morrow ? " — .
and after old Cop with clang of iron had jammed the double gates in under the
scrufi"-stone archway, whereupon are Latin verses, done in brass of small quality,
some of us who were not hungry, and cared not for the supper-bell, having sucked
much parliament and dumps at my only charges — not that I ever bore much
wealth, but because I had been thrifting it for this time of my birth, — we were
leaning quite at dusk against, the iron bars of the gate, some six, or it may be
seven of us, small boys all, and not conspicuous in the closing of the daylight and
the fog that came at eventide, else Cop would have rated us up the green, for he



6 LORN A DOONE.

was churly to little boys when his wife had taken their money. There was
plenty of room for all of us, for the gate will hold nine boys close-packed, unless
they be fed rankl}', whereof is little danger ; and now we were looking out on the
road and wishing we could get there ; hoping, moreover, to see a good string of
pack-horses come b}-, with troopers to protect them. For the day-boys had
brought us word that some intending their way to the town had lain that morn-
ing at Sampford Pevcril, and must be in ere nightfall, because Mr. Faggus was
after them. Now Mr. Faggus was my first cousin, and an honour to the family,
being a Nurthmolton man, of great rcnuwn on the highway, from Barum town




W^''^-^. -^'f



^s^^»^-



^^=-c



even to London. Therefore, of course, I hoped that he would catch the packmen,
and the boys were asking my opinion, as of an oracle, about it.

A certain boy leaning up against me would not allow my elbow room, and
struck me very sadly in the stomach part, though his own was full of my parlia-
ment. And this I felt so unkindly, that I smote him straightway in the face
without tarrying to consider it, or wei-ghing the question duly. Upon this he put
his head down, and presented it so vehemently at the middle of my waistcoat,
that for a minute or more my breath s.eemed dropped, as it were, from my
pockets, and my life seemed to stop from great want of ease. Before I came to
myself again, it had been settled for us that we should move to the " Ironing-



AJSr IMPORTANT ITEM. 7

box," as the triangle of turf is called, where the two causeways coming from the
school-porch and the hall-porch meet, and our fights are mainly celebrated ; only
we must wait until the convoy of horses had passed, and then make a ring by
candlelight, and the other boys would like it. But suddenly there came round
the post where the letters of our founder are, not from the way of Ta.unton, but
from the side of Lowman bridge, a very small string of horses, only two indeed
(counting for one the pony), and a red-faced man on the bigger nag.

" Plaise ye, worshipful masters," he said, being feared of the gateway, " earn 'e
tull whur our Jan Ridd be ? "

" Hyur a be, ees fai, Jan Ridd," answered a sharp little chap, making game of
John Fry's language.

" Zhow un up, then," says John Fry, poking his whip through the bars at us ;
" Zhow un up, and putt un aowt."

The other little chaps pointed at me, and some began to holla ; but I knew
what I Avas about.

" Oh, John, John," I cried ; "what's the use of your coming now, and Peggy
over the moors, too, and it so cruel cold for her .? The holidays don't begin till
Wednesday fortnight, John. To think of your not knowing that ! "

John Fry leaned forward in the saddle, and turned his eyes away from me ;
and then there was a noise in his throat, like a snail crawling on a window-
pane.

" Oh, us knaws that wull enough, Maister Jan ; reckon every Oare-man knaw
that, without go to skoo-ull, like you doth. Your moother have kept arl the
apples up, and old Betty toorned the black puddens, and none dare set trap for
a blagbird. Arl for thee, lad ; every bit of it now for thee ! "

He checked himself suddenly, and frightened me. I knew that John Fry's
way so well.

" And father, and father — oh, how is father .'' " I pushed the boys right and
left as I said it. " John, is father up in town ! He always used to come for me,
and leave nobody else to do it."

"Vayther '11 be at the crooked post, t'other zide o' telling-house.* Her
coodn't lave 'ouze by raison of the Christmas bakkon comin' on, and zome o' the
cider welted."

He looked at the nag's ears as he said it ; and, being up to John Fry's ways,



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