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A GOVE1,

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II I! ill III II! Ill

SIR RALPH WILLIA



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1



HOW I BECAME A GOVERNOR



HOW I BECAME
A GOVERNOR

BY SIR RALPH WILLIAMS, K.C.M.G.

V| .
LATE GOVERNOR OF NEWFOUNDLAND ; FORMERLY BRITISH AGENT IN

THE TRANSVAAL; RESIDENT COMMISSIONER or THE BECHUANALAND
PROTECTORATE; AND QOVERNOR-IN-CHIEF OF THE WINDWARD ISLANDS



WITH MAP AND ILLUSTRATIONS






LONDON

JOHN MURRAY, ALBEMARLE STREET, W.
1913



U)



AH rights reserved.



TO HER

WHO HAS SHARED MY WANDERINGS

FOR THIRTY-EIGHT YEARS, AND

WHO GAVE HER ALL THAT

I MIGHT PROSPER

MY WIFE



283605



PREFACE



IT is a simple matter to write a book if you have
plenty of material as I have had, but the preface
puzzles me. It should be, I think, like Sam Weller's
love letter, just enough to make you wish for
more.

I have dealt with many lands, many peoples,
many personalities and many personages. I have
ventured, with all humility, even to criticise some of
the systems of government of our Empire, both at
home and abroad.

I have tried to be courteous in my references to
others and to avoid hard words, knowing full well
that I myself am as open to criticism as are those
upon whose doings I have commented.

I have endeavoured as far as possible to eliminate
the personal element, and to write of matters which
are of general interest in connection with the countries
in which I have served.

I have told many stories, having, I trust, avoided
the pitfall of chestnuts, and I could have told a great
many more had I not exercised considerable restraint.

Those who have read my manuscript protest to
me that it is interesting throughout, but they look
upon it with the kindly eye of personal friendship.

The reading public is often elusive and hyper-
* b



x PREFACE

critical, and it takes very little to bore it to
extinction.

The book has been a labour of love to me, and my
hope is that there is at least something which may
commend it to all, and may serve to pass away an
hour or two pleasantly on a dull day.

It is in this hope that I submit myself to the
reviewers and to those who pay me the courtesy of
reading the story of my life.

RALPH WILLIAMS.



ST JAMES' CLUB,

LONDON, April 1913.



ACKNOWLEDGMENT

I am indebted to the courtesy of Messrs Elliott &
Fry of London, Messrs Barnett of Johannesburg,
Mr Pedrotti of Bulawayo, and Mr Holloway of
Newfoundland, for permission to reproduce some
of these illustrations.

RALPH WILLIAMS.



CONTENTS

CHAPTER I

ANCESTRY AND BOYHOOD

PAGE

Family History The Parys mines My grandfather Anec-
dotes of Wales The Skerries rock A galaxy of legal
talent Two picturesque old aunts Travelling sixty years
ago My father An old-fashioned squire Charles Water-
ton The Magistrates' bench" Drawing the parson " . I

CHAPTER II

EARLY REMINISCENCES

Our village schoolmaster Old-fashioned Sundays The King's
School at Chester Randolph Caldecott Beaumaris School
My stepmother Offer of a Naval cadetship Entrance
to Rossall Sir John Gorst Meyrick Beebee Poem on
the Gracchi I embark on the law Stories of the assizes
Baron Channell Welsh juries Typhoid and scarlet
fever Election stories I go to London Reminiscences
of London Irving and Toole play together Grenville
Murray and his paper Paddy Green I decide to emigrate
The sea chest .... 15

CHAPTER III

LIFE IN AUSTRALIA

Sail for Melbourne in Peter Stuart Arrival at Port Phillip
Melbourne Pilots Stories of Melbourne Society in-

Melbourne Jock Moffat Scandal in Victorian Parlia-

zi



xii CONTENTS

PA.GB

ment Neil Black of Glenormiston Charles Ryan-
Superintendent Hare I start for Benerembah A voyage
on the Murray and Murrumbidgee Arrival at Benerembah
Life in the Australian bush Stories of bushrangers
The Tichborne claimant Stray missionaries James
Tyson Visit to Tasmania Anthony Trollope Buried
treasure Sir Hercules Robinson Stories of Australian
Governors . . . . . . .30



CHAPTER IV

LIFE IN PATAGONIA

Association with Gordon Leave Sydney in Alexander Duthie
for London Complete voyage round the world in a sailing
ship We sail for South America in Garonne Adventure
at Lisbon Captain Cha worth Musters Events of voyage
Arrive at Monte Video Arrive at Punta Arenas in
Straits of Magellan Start for the Pampas The Pata-
gonian Indians Orelie Antoine the First Leave Pata-
gonia Life in Monte Video Visit to an Estancia
Narrow escape Return to England in Cordillera . 50



CHAPTER V

HERE AND THERE

My marriage Life in Quebec The old Tandem Club
Two Canadian Prime Ministers Niagara Running
the rapids French habitants Visit New York Rip
Van Winkle Return to England Trip in Switzerland
Round the Mediterranean Life in Jersey A flat in
London Stories and anecdotes of Life in London
Jefferson Davis A journey through Spain Charles the
Fifth 63



CONTENTS xiii

CHAPTER VI

FIRST JOURNEY TO SOUTH AFRICA

PAGS

Selous' book First journey to Africa Arrival at Cape Town
Society in Port Elizabeth Visit Grahamstown -A Wed-
derburn wagon A trip to Natal Am joined by my wife
and son Start from Grahamstown on trek to Victoria
Falls Trekking through the Cape Colony and Orange
Free State The Caledon River First experience of the
Boers President John Brand Life in Bloemfontein
Leave Bloemfontein ...... 73

CHAPTER VII

TO THE VICTORIA FALLS

The Orange Free State Arrival at Potchefstroom The buried
flag Captain Baillie A faithful dog Journey northwards
Arrive at Shoshong Tati and its ancient remains
The Lees of Mangwe Visit Bulawayo alone Bulawayo
as it was Story of Umsiligazi Lobengula Elephant
Phillips Return to Mangwe Departure for Victoria
Falls Dangerous meeting with Matabele impi Running
a "thirst" See elephants Arrive at Pandamatenka
Jesuit Missionaries ...... 86



CHAPTER VIII

LIFE IN THE FAR INTERIOR

Visit the confluence of the Chobe and the Zambesi Start for
Victoria Falls on foot Arrival at Victoria Falls and life
there First Englishwoman to reach the Falls Mr Arnot
Fever and trouble Lions in camp Nearly over the
border line Recovery and start on return to Bulawayo
Mr Thomas the Missionary Old Bulawayo First meeting
with Selous The rebel towns The great hippopotamus
case Anxious time in Matabeleland Lobengula's wives
Departure from Bulawayo Return to Port Elizabeth . 99



xiv CONTENTS

CHAPTER IX

THE BECHUANALAND EXPEDITION

PAGE

Life in London The Working Men's College I join Sir
Charles Warren The cause of the Bechuanaland Expedi-
tion Murder of Bethell Second journey to South Africa
in Grantully Castle Life on board Visit St Helena
A High Church cleric Popular demonstration at Cape Town
Sir Hercules Robinson General Sir Leicester Smyth
Dame Europa's School Special Correspondent of the
Standard Life with the expedition First meeting with
Cecil Rhodes Historic conference with Kruger at Blignauts
Pont Inniskilling Dragoons I arrive in Stellaland as
Special Commissioner to the filibusters Groot Adrian de
la Rey Life with Rhodes in Vryburg Rift with Sir
Charles Warren March to Mafeking Search for the body
of Bethell at Rooigronde The British Lion in Bechuana-
land Lord Milner as Sub-Editor The Maiden Tribute of
Modern Babylon . . . . . in



CHAPTER X

WITH CECIL RHODES

Cecil Rhodes His plans for the North Determination to tap
the Lake system of Central Africa Rhodes in England
Journalistic duel with Warren Appointed British Consular
Officer to South African Republic Visit to Amsterdam
Sir Evelyn Wood . . . . . .130



CHAPTER XI

BRITISH AGENT AT PRETORIA

Arrive at Cape Town for the third time Muddle as to my
appointment Early discomforts at Pretoria President
Kruger supports me Am gazetted as Consul-General ad
interim The suzerainty Appointed Diplomatic Agent



CONTENTS xv

PAOE

with letter of credence from the Foreign Office President
Kruger and "de oude vrouw" A quaint Executive A
secret conference" Village tales "Early days in Johan-
nesburg Two notable banquets Story of David Benjamin
Sir William Baillie Hamilton My forecast of the sub-
sequent rebellion of the diggers Stories of early days in
Pretoria Dr Leyds ..... 139



CHAPTER XII

PRETORIA

The Grobler Mission Only the old story of the credit going to
the wrong man Rhodes in Pretoria His prophecy as to
Kruger The Swazi imbroglio Sir Francis de Winton's
mission I visit Barberton A great reception Wit-
watersrand, the rush for wealth My letter to the Chamber
of Mines Snubbed by the Colonial Office A model
Governor "Send for Twigg" Pope Hennessy Sir
Henry de Villiers . . . . . .157



CHAPTER XIII

PRETORIA continued.

African strikes the Whale rock Sir Arthur Havelock Sir
Frederick Carrington Mr Merriman The first English
Cricket team Rhodes and the team A breeze with the
Bishop Stories of the President Corruption in the
Transvaal Exposure of swindlers Thomas Atkins
Leave Pretoria for England Rhodes' famous dinner-party
Dr Jameson Concessions from Lobengula Rhodes and
Home Rule The Charter granted Chartered Company in
Mashonaland The passing of Lobengula" Greater love
hath no man" End of my third period of service in
Africa ........ 173



xvi CONTENTS

CHAPTER XIV

GIBRALTAR

PAGE

Sir Jacobus de Wet I accept the Colonial Treasurership of
Gibraltar Gibraltar Sir Leicester Smyth Sir Cavendish
Boyle Sir Lothian Nicholson My beautiful home in
Gibraltar Wreck of the Utopia Funeral of Sir Lothian
Captains before Colonels Sir Robert Biddulph The Duke
of Cambridge" Oh, I am a regular old Tory "Mr and
Mrs Chamberlain Mrs Austen Chamberlain . .190



CHAPTER XV

GIBRALTAR continued.

Am appointed Captain of the Port A delightful post-
Smuggling into Spain LordRipon Kindness and courtesy
of many Admirals Lord Walter Kerr Captain Mahan
The Duchess of Cleveland a coal-heavers' strike Outrage
by the Riff pirates A terrible outbreak of scurvy Algeciras
Fair The Calpe hunt Captain Joshua Slocum The
fortifications of Gibraltar Mr Laird Clowes Suggested
abandonment of Gibraltar Tangier The Bishop's hat
Ballyhooly Sir Henry Jackson Accept Colonial Secre-
taryship of Barbados A sad good-bye . . . 206



CHAPTER XVI

BARBADOS

Sail for the West Indies Barbados " Cromwell's bauble"
Black and coloured men Redlegs Sir James Hay Too
many officials "Soup tickets" and their holders A
Governor and a Colonial Secretary The injustice of
appointing naval and military Governors " The Colonial
Secretary's Dream" Sir John Fisher's abandonment of
the Colonies " Three virtuous women " . . 226



CONTENTS xvii

CHAPTER XVII

BARBADOS continued.

PA08

The great hurricane of 1898 A fight with disaster Typhoid
fever Collapse from overwork Barbados and its forma-
tion Hurricane in Montserrat and the Leewards Cruise
in H.M.S. Indefatigable -The Island of Nevis Nelson's
marriage in Nevis Extract from the marriage register
of St John's Church Visit to the Leeward Islands St
Pierre and Mont Pel6e The Empress Josephine Out-
break of Boer War Enthusiasm of Barbados Sir
Conrad Reeves Sir John Pope Hennessy Obeah
Murder of Archie Pile Strange secretiveness of the
negroes ....... 239



CHAPTER XVIII

BARBADOS continued.

I act twice as Governor of Barbados Admiral Sir Frederick
Bedford The death of Queen Victoria I proclaim the
accession of King Edward Arrival of Sir Frederick
Hodgson as Governor of Barbados My wife's illness,
and our sudden departure from Barbados How I won
the love of the Barbadians Quaint negro characters
The sugar industry The Imperial Department of Agri-
culture and Sir Daniel Morris Chat about Barbados
Negro weddings Discipline in the United States Navy
Codrington College Arrival in England " Your friend
Milner" Lord Milner and his Ministers Mr Schreiner
General Sir William Butler Sir John Ardagh's report
The Boer ultimatum Lord Milner's visit to England
I accept Resident Commissionership of the Bechuanaland
Protectorate Departure for South Africa for the fourth
time ...... . 254



xviii CONTENTS



CHAPTER XIX

BECHUANALAND PROTECTORATE

PAOE

Cape Town in war time By train to Bloemfontein Sir Hamilton
Goold Adams Martial law Arrival at Mafeking Un-
generous criticism of General Baden-Powell The story
of the Protectorate Something about the Jameson raid
Basutos as Policemen Reorganisation of the Police The
Paramount Chiefs System of jurisdiction Chief Khama
Visits to the Chiefs Trial by me of case of murder, and
death sentence The Mount Nelson in war time Lord
Methuen and his staff Two brave young officers General
de la Rey's telegram A Cape Colony legal functionary
A visit to Lord Milner " The Kindergarten " . . 270



CHAPTER XX

BECHUANALAND PROTECTORATE Continued.

Death of Cecil Rhodes I am a guest of the Rhodesian Govern-
ment Scenes at the funeral "When that great Kings
return to clay" Rhodes' grave in the Matoppos The
Wilson Memorial Mr Ewald Esselen First meeting
with Lord Kitchener Johannesburg in war time Peace
declared What the Boer Leaders thought Repatriation
Mr Chamberlain visits Mafeking A story of " My Lords
Commissioners" Second visit to the Victoria Falls A
train journey to Salisbury . . . . . 287

CHAPTER XXI

BECHUANALAND PROTECTORATE Continued.

Take leave to England How the Protectorate is governed
Two semi-official cartoons Murder trial in a thunder-
storm German South-West Africa German war with
the Herreros Arnold Hodson Cattle disease in
Rhodesia The Tati concessions Farewell to Lord
Milner Lord Milner's work in Africa Lord Selborne as
High Commissioner Missionary work and its results
Native superstitions I decline the Governorship of British
Honduras Lord and Lady Selborne visit the Pro-
tectorate A great game drive A delightful trip . . 302



CONTENTS xix



CHAPTER XXII

THE GREAT BATAWANA CASE

PAOK

The great Batawana case Start for Lake N'gami The Chief
Khama Across one hundred and eighty miles of desert
The Botletlie River Lions on the road Arrive at Lake
N'gami Lake N'gami as it was and as it is Entrance
into Tsau Greeting from the Batawana Inquiry opened
The marriages of Lecholatebe A royal wife The
claimant Matibi Moremmi and Sekgoma A notable tea-
party The old queen" Matibi is the Chief "Conclusion
of the inquiry I give my decision "And Morena was
right in what he spoke " My Basuto Police . . 324



CHAPTER XXIII

LAST DAYS IN AFRICA

Anxious days at Tsau Receive offer of Governorship of the
Windward Islands Keeping the peace Golf at Tsau
The Makoba Arrival of Matibi at Tsau Installation of
Matibi Dramatic scene with a witch doctor " Good-bye,
people of the Batawana "Crossing the Botletlie The
Mababe Flats " How do you find your way ?" A success-
ful journey The Chobe marshes Linyanti A fine lion
Arrival at Kazingula Crossing the Zambesi Arrival at
Victoria Falls for the third time Find myself gazetted
Governor of the Windwards Good-bye to Bulawayo
A happy homecoming Lord Selborne's greeting Fare-
well to Mafeking Sekgoma and the Habeas Corpus An
escape from the minions of the law Leave South Africa
for probably the last time . . . . .345



CHAPTER XXIV

PREPARATIONS FOR THE WINDWARD ISLANDS

An interview with Lord Elgin Mr Winston Churchill The
Colonial Office and its methods Why not amalgamate?
The rubber stamp Sir Francis Hopwood Preparations



xx CONTENTS



for the West Indies Duties of a Private Secretary
" Tommy Fitzherbert "The Royal Mail Generous recep-
tion at Barbados Grenada Successful Education Act
St Vincent St Lucia The great St Lucian folly . . 361



CHAPTER XXV

THE WINDWARD ISLANDS

The St Lucia Riots of 1907 The striking coal-heavers
Street fighting Midnight landing at St Lucia A morning
stroll Wild scenes in the market-place The attack on
Cul-de-sac Shooting the rioters Scenes at Roseau
Frustration of a concentrated attack on Castries Arrival
of the GeldertandWild ride to Dennery " Obey the
orders of the Governor ! " " Have you got a whisky and
soda among you" Arrival of relief from Barbados Belated
arrival of H.M.S. Indefatigable "What an anticlimax"
An anonymous letter and its results Appreciation of the
Colonial Office "A Reminiscence of the St Lucia
Riots" A visit to Trinidad The Stars and Stripes-
Recalled to Grenada by attempted murder of the
Treasurer West Indian newspapers and their ways
Honoured by the King To England on leave Lord
Crewe Back to the Windwards Appointed Governor of
Newfoundland Last days in Grenada" Be firm, Robert,
be firm " . . . . . 379



CHAPTER XXVI



NEWFOUNDLAND

Preparations for Newfoundland Arrival in Newfoundland
Hearty welcome Local option A warm-hearted people
" It/s a fine job yeVe got anyway" A self-governing
Colony Sir Edward Morris and Sir Robert Bond Politics
in Newfoundland The spoils to the victors Newfound-
land electors Meagre salaries of officials The Royal
prerogative Denominationalism paramount To the devil
with the sewing-machine A loyal people . , . 404



CONTENTS xxi

CHAPTER XXVII

NEWFOUNDLAND continued.

PACK

The Newfoundland Fisheries Question The case with France
A Colony bartered away Lord Lansdowne's Treaty
Newfoundland gets its own again The case with America
The Hague Arbitration Sir Robert Reid and his sons
Short-sighted prejudice A noble gift to the people The
partition of Labrador Canada and Newfoundland Con-
federation It is not a plank in any political platform
Would destroy the last practical link which binds Canada
to the Mother Country The great Northcliffe paper-
mills Lord and Lady Northcliffe Mr Albert Reed My
A.D.C. Captain Gale Salmon fishing in the Codroy
Valley Hints on salmon fishing The American " sport "
A cruise in the Government steam yacht Fiona A
lovely coast-line Visits to the outports . . .418



CHAPTER XXVIII

NEWFOUNDLAND continued.

Dr Grenfell and his Deep-Sea Mission His headquarters at
St Anthony Brilliant surgeons and gentle ladies A
wonderful community Esquimaux dogs Battle Harbour
A cruise up the coast of Labrador Major Cartwright
Our burning train The tercentenary of John Guy in
Conception Bay The death of King Edward I proclaim
the accession of King George Great Coronation doings
The King lays the foundation-stone of a Seaman's Institute
in St John's on his Coronation day by electric communica-
tion On leave to England A happy motor tour A
week-end at Balmoral The King and Queen Return
to Newfoundland for the last time Second cruise in the
Fiona,) thus completing the circuit of the Island Visit
Toronto in May 1912 Visit Halifax in July in H.M.S.
Sirius Commander Peary and the North Pole Departure
from Newfoundland Arrival in England Received by
the King The Motherland and the Colonies Conclusion 434

INDEX ... .... 449



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS



Sir Ralph Williams, K.C.M.G. (Photogravure) . . Frontispiece

PAGE

South Africa, showing the Author's Journeys of 1883-84 and

1906 . . . f . . . . . xxiv

PACK PAOK

Aber Rectory ....... 14

The Author, aged 21 . . . . . .28

Venus, a faithful companion to the Victoria Falls . . 88

Return of the Author and his Wife and Son from the Victoria

Falls, 1884 . . . . . . .110

The Grange, Gibraltar . . . . . .196

Lady Williams ....... 204

Head Quarter House, Mafeking . . . . . )

The Commissioner of Bechuanaland starting on tour (p. 304) . J

Cecil Rhodes' Funeral in the Matoppos . . . .288

Cecil Rhodes ....... 290

Chief Khama ....... 328

Government House, Windward Islands .... 370

Grenada ........ 374

Government House, Newfoundland, in Summer and in Winter 408

The Governor arriving at Grand Falls as the guest of Lord

Northcliffe ....... 426

Miss Dean Salmon-fishing in Newfoundland . . . ^

Government House Party going a-fishing . . . J

Mr Fitzherbert, Private Secretary ; Captain Gale, A.D.C.
A burnt train in Newfoundland



;} 438



zxiii



\ Shoshong

P R T E...C ..T..O...R..A\T E

A K W E N A ''



Zeff.ru st

S^ (

Lichtcnburg



Klerksdorp
Bloemhof



SOUTH AFRICA

Showing ihe Author's Journeys

of 1883-84 and 1906.

Miles




xxiv



HOW I BECAME A GOVERNOR

CHAPTER I

ANCESTRY AND BOYHOOD

WHAT an interesting life yours must have been.
Why don't you write something about it ? So say
one's friends; but has it been interesting? That
is the question.

Life is made up of trifles so light that it would
almost seem idle waste to jot them down. I have
never been prosaic enough to keep a diary. Except
as a record that is sometimes convenient for reference,
a diary has always seemed to me but a dreary tale of
lost opportunities serving to remind us of our half-
wasted days. But, despite this lack and of long
strings of useful facts, memories come back now
and again, and from those memories I will try and
tell the story of my life, and how I passed from the
old country rectory in Wales to the Government
Houses of the Protectorates and Colonies, in which it
has been my lot to serve and ultimately to govern.
Every self-respecting Welshman has a pedigree.
Most of us remember the story of our countryman
who, finding the Ark over full and Noah unable to
carry him, called out, "If you can't take me, for
heaven's sake take my pedigree."

The Welsh Princes Llywarch ap Bran and Hedd
Molwynog may both claim me as their descendant,
and family records show that this claim is founded
upon a good and reasonable basis.

A



2 ANCESTRY AND BOYHOOD

The family of Williams of Treffos in Anglesey to
which I belong- cannot go farther back than a certain
John ap Rhys, whose son William John ap Rhys was
a substantial yeoman of the parish of Pentraeth in
Anglesey. I remember many years ago hunting for
some papers in the diocesan registry at Bangor
and accidentally coming across the original note of a
' 'faculty" for his pew in the parish church of
Pentraeth being granted to William John ap Rhys,
yeoman, my great, great, great, great-grandfather,
a faculty being a possession which in old days
indicated a considerable amount of importance in
the holder.

His son was Humphrey Williams, the prefix
" ap " for the first time dropping out. Old Humphrey
was a large yeoman farmer and lived to the age of
ninety-four. We have his family Bible still, and the
quaint marginal notes made by him about the time
of the famous (or infamous) Gates and Bedloe
plot indicate his intense Protestantism, for page
after page contains the assertion, "The Church of
Roum is not the trew Church."

He had a son Owen, who married Jane Lloyd, the
heiress of Treffos, which place and property ultimately
became my father's.

These two, Owen and Jane Williams, were the
common ancestors of the Williamses of Temple
House (General Owen Williams and his well-known
brother Hwfa and their equally well-known sisters)
and ourselves.

Old Owen had two sons, Tom and John, both
remarkable men in their way the elder a solicitor,
the younger a parson.

Tom, known far and wide throughout Wales as
"Twm chware teg " Anglice " Fair Play Tom" from
whom come the Williamses of Temple House, amassed
very great wealth, and the accident of his doing so
was curious. He owned a piece of land near Amlwch
in Anglesey which constituted a part of a small hill



THE PARYS MINES 3

known as "Parys Mountain," and on that land
he found copper of what he believed to be extra-
ordinary richness. The adjacent land was owned
partly by the Pagets (now Marquises of Anglesey)
and by a parson named Hughes. Old Tom
succeeded in getting- these two owners to join him,
and started the Parys Mine, he being the largest
owner and the working partner.

So rich was the mine that I have heard my
grandfather say that in one year the partners
shared a profit of half a million sterling, a truly vast
sum in those days.

Old Tom started smelting-works in Swansea and
a bank (long known as the old Bank of Messrs
Williams & Company) in Chester and some of the
Welsh towns.

It is interesting to remember that the well-known
family of Hughes of Kinmel come from this Welsh
parson.

A former squire of Kinmel was created Lord
Dinorben, an honour which local gossip used to say
was given to him in return for the privilege accorded
to the old Duke of Sussex of spitting on the
drawing-room carpet at Kinmel. This peerage died
out in the second generation.

Old Tom bought very large properties in Wales
and in Berkshire and went into Parliament, and my
grandfather has told me that at one time he controlled
eight seats in the House of Commons. He had a
son Owen, and ultimately a grandson Tom, Colonel
Williams, who was for many years " Father of the
House of Commons." Colonel Williams himself was
a remarkable man, with many peculiarities, one of
which was to keep his clocks at sun time, and it is
stated that when railways were first started he
always arrived at the station a quarter of an hour



Online LibraryRalph E WilliamsHow I became a governor → online text (page 1 of 38)