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that Pawcatuck bridge is out of repair ; —

It is thereupon voted and resolved, that Capt. William Pen-



1747.] AND PKOVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. 199

dleton, be, and he is hereby appointed to repair this govern-
ment's part of said bridge, at the charge of the colony.
God save the King.



Proceedings of the General Assemhl?/, held for the Colon?/ of Bhode
Island and Providence Plantations, at Providence, the Qth day
of January^ 174 6-7.

The Hon. William Greene, Governor.

The Hon. Joseph Whipple, Deputy Governor.

With the assistants and deputies from the several towns.

Report of the Commissioners on the Eastern Boundary Line.

Whereas, Messrs. James Honeyman, Jr., Gideon Cornell,
George Brown, George Wanton and Walter Chaloner, were by
the General Assembly, appointed commissioners, to mark out
the bounds of the colony towards the Province of the Massa-
chusetts Bay, agreeably to the late determination of the King,
in council, who have perfected the same, and made report to
this Assembly, of their proceedings as followeth :

We, the subscribers, appointed commissioners by the General Assembly of the
colony, aforesaid, to mark out the bounds of the said colony eastwards, towards the
Province of the Massachusetts Bay, agreeably to His Majesty's royal determination
in council, the 28th day of May, 1746, did, in pursuance thereof, on the 2d day of
December last past, meet at Pawtucket Falls, in expectation of meeting with com-
missioners that might be appointed by the Province of the Massachusetts Bay, for
the purpose, aforesaid ; and after having there tarried till the after part of said day,
and no commissioners in behalf of the said Province appearing, we proceeded to run
a due north line from Pawtucket Falls to the south boundary of the aforesaid Prov-
ince of the Massachusetts Bay, in manner following, viz. :

From a certain point on the southern side of Pawtucket Falls, where we erected
a monument of stones, with a stake thereon, we run a meridian line, which directly
passed through said falls, to a walnut tree on the northerly side of said falls ; then
to a pitch pine tree ; then to a small white oak ; then to a grey oak ; then to a small
bush ; then to another small bush, with stones about it ; then to a heap of stones,
with a stake thereon ; then to a black oak tree ; then to another black oak ; then
to a small pitch pine ; then to a black oak ; then to a large white oak, near the



200 KECORUS OF THE COLONY OF RHODE ISLAND [1747-

river, called Abbott's Run ; then to a poplar tree ; then to a heap of stones, -with a
stake thereon ; then to a large rock, with stones thereon ; then to a small black oak
tree ; then to a walnut tree ; then to a black oak ; then to divers other marked trees,
in the said course, to the extremity of the said line ; and when we came near the
termination of the said line, made a monument of stones, there being no noted south
boundary of the said Province, near the said line ; and therefore, for the discovery
of the south boundary of the said Province, upon the best information we could ob-
tain, proceeded to Wrentham Plain, at or near the place where was formerly erect-
ed a stake, called Woodward's and Saffery's Stake, as one remarkable south boun-
dary of the said Province ; and from thence, run a west line, making an allowance
of eight degrees and an half, as the west variation of the magnetic needle from the
true meridian ; it being the course of the south line of the said Province, according to
their charter, (as we apprehended ;) and we then extended the said north line from
the aforesaid monument, till it intersected the said west line ; and upon the point of
its intersection, erected a monumentof stones, with a stake thereon, as the north-east
boundary of that tract of land, commonly called the Gore ; after which, we proceed-
ed to Bullock's Neck, and on the south-west corner thereof, erected a red cedar
post, marked with the letters I H C R, with the figure of an anchor thereon; and
from thence, running a line north-east, making the same allowance for the varia-
tion, aforesaid, to a black oak tree, marked with the letters G C C R ; then to a large
white oak, marked with the letters G B C R ; then to a white oak post, set in the
ground, with a heap of stones around it, marked with the letters G W C R, with
the figure of an anchor thereon ; being three miles distant from Bullock's Neck,
aforesaid ; after which, we proceeded to the north-easternmost part of the bay, on
the west side of Rumstick Neck ; and from a point where a locust post was erected,
ran a line three miles north-east, with the same allowance for the variation ; and at
the extremity of the said line, erected a monument of stones ; from which we run a
line to the north-east extremity of that line, drawn from the south-west corner of
Bullock's Neck, aforesaid ; the course whereof, being west thirty-eight degrees
north, according to the magnetic needle, the distance nine hundred and fifty-
five rods, (marking trees and making other boundaries in the course of said line ;)
after which we proceeded to the north-east corner of Bristol harbor, and from high
water mark, which was some rods distant north-east from the bridge, leading to Swan-
scy Ferry, we run a line three miles north-east, still making the same allowance for
the variation ; and at the extremity of which line, we erected a monument of
stones ; then we run a line from the north-east extremity of the line drawn from
Rumstick, aforesaid, the course whereof being south twenty-five degrees east, till it
met with the termination of the line drawn from Bristol harbor, aforesaid ; the dis-
tance whereof, being nine hundred and twenty-seven rods ; and from thence, a
straight line to the bay, at Sowoset Neck, (making proper boundaries in the course
of said line ;) after which, we proceeded to the eastern side of the Narragansett
Bay ; and on the easternmost part of a cove in the said bay, which is southward of
Nancquastkett, run a line three miles east, (still making the same allowance for the
variation) ; at the extremity whereof, we marked a gray oak tree, with the letters
C R, with the figure of an anchor thereon ; after which, we proceeded to the mouth
of Fall River, and from thence, measured four hundred and forty rods southerly, on
the shore, as the said shore extended itself from the mouth of said Fall River ; and
from the point where the said four hundred and forty rods reached, (being east
thirty-five degree? south of the southernmost point of Shawomet Neck, we run a



1746.] AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. 201

line, three miles east, with the same allowance for the variation ; in the course)
whereof we marked divers trees, and came to a large pond ; on the west of which,
was a small oak, between two large rocks ; and from thence, measured over the said
pond, to a bunch of maples, two, whereof, we marked with letters land F, standinfr on
a place called Ralph's Neck, being the extremity of the said three miles ; from
thence, we run a line south twenty degrees west, two thousand one hundred and
twenty-three rods, (making proper boundaries in said line, till we met the termina-
tion of the three mile Ime ran from the cove, southward of Nancquaskett, aforesaid •
after which, we proceeded to a place called Church's Cove, in said bay, and ran a
line three miles east, making the same allowance for the variation, aforesaid ; and
at the extremity whereof, and near to the sea, we erected a monument of stones •
and from thence ran a line north, two degrees and a quarter east, one thousand and
nine hundred and forty-one rods, till it almost met the termination of the said line
drawn from the first mentioned cove, as aforesaid, making proper boundaries in
the course of said line.

The aforegoing is a just account of our proceedings, and report the same,
accordingly.

J. HONEYMAN, JR., GIDEON CORNELL,

GEORGE WANTON, GEORGE BROWN.

And it is voted and resolved, that the said report be, and it
is hereby accepted by this Assembly.

Whereas, the committee of war, in pursuance of an order
of the General Assembly, made a report to this Assembly, of
their transactions and proceedings, in respect to sending to An-
napolis Koyal, the troops raised in this colony, for the intended
enterprise upon Canada ; and also an acount of their transac-
tions and proceedings with regard to the colony's sloop, &c.j
which said report being duly considered ; —

It is voted and resolved by this Assembly, that the same be,
and it is hereby accepted.

Voted, that His Honor, the Governor, be, and he is hereby
requested to procure of Sir William Pepperell, a certificate of
what number of soldiers was received from this colony, into the
garrison of Louisbourg ; of the time of their arrival there, and
discharge from thence ; as also, how long the colony's sloop Tar-
tar was employed in the expedition against Cape Breton.

And His Honor, the Governor, is hereby also requested to
procure all such other vouchers and certificates, as can be ob-
tained in this colony, and arc necessary for proving the account
of the charges the colony has been at in assisting and forward-
ing the reduction of Cape Breton, &c., and to transmit the

VOL. V- 20



202 RECORDS OF THE COLONY OF RHODE ISLAND [1746.

whole to the colony's agent in Great Britain, as soon as
possible.

And it is also voted, that Stephen Hopkins, Esq., be, and he
is hereby appointed to wait on Sir William Pepperell, in or-
der to get the certificates by the government desired of him.

Voted, that the captains of the several companies raised in
this colony, for the intended expedition against Canada, be, and
they are hereby empowered to give furloughs to such of their
soldiers as desire the same, and can be trusted for any space of
time, not exceeding a fortnight, at one time ; at the end or ex-
piration of such furlough, the said soldier or soldiers, so fa-
vored, shall be obliged to appear before his captain, or some
other officer of his company, at such place as his said captain
shall appoint.

And it is also voted, that such soldiers as the captains, afore-
said, cannot confide in, nor think them fit to be trusted with
furloughs, or so many of them as the committee of war shall
think proper, shall be kept at Fort George, with one of the of-
ficers of said companies, who is to take the entire care of them
there ; where they shall be maintained oat of the colony's
stores ; and when any of the said soldiers shall return, upon
the expiration of their furloughs, he or they, shall have and re-
ceive what the government allows for his or their subsistence ;
and the lieutenant colonel is hereby empowered to appoint an
officer to take care of such soldiers as shall be kept at Fort
George, from time to time ; and that the captains of each re-
spective company do render to the lieutenant colonel an ac-
count of the circumstances his company is in ; and the lieu-
tenant colonel to the committee of war, once a fortnight.

God save the Kintr.



1746.] AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. 203



Gov. SUrley to Gov. Greene.

Boston, November 4th, 1746.
Sir: — I have now the pleasure of informing Your Honor of the French fleet's
quitting the coast of Nova Scotia, and going off' to the West Indies, and the Cana-
dians breaking up their camp before the garrison at Annapolis Royal.

But notwithstanding this, as service of the greatest importance remains yet to be
done in Nova Scotia, viz. : taking or destroying all the enemy's magazines of warhke
stores and provisions, at Minas and Chicknecto ; taking all the grain in the country,(ex-
cept what is wanted by the inhabitants for their present use,) for His iMajesty's ser-
vice, and the same with respect to their cattle ; by which means, all the inhabitants
and Indians might be disarmed ; and the latter, together with the Canadians, (in case
they should return next spring,) be without subsistence, from the country ; driving
off the Canadians, designed to winter in Minas or Chicknecto, and distressing the
Indians there ; among whom, a very bad sickness prevails, which has already swept
o(F hundreds of them ; visiting Chebucto, and seeing what footsteps the French have
left there ; calling the malcontents, who are the most obnoxious among the French
inhabitants, to an account for their joining or open correspondence with the enemy>
and destroying the settlements of such of them as shall abscond ; and perhaps re-
covering some of the prize vessels and goods taken from the English.

By all which means, the Canadians would be discouraged from renewing
their attempts next spring ; the friends to His Majesty's government in that Prov-
ince confirmed in their fidelity, the abettors of the French interest diminished, and
deterred from open or even secret acts of hostility, and the Indians very much har-
rassed and disabled from giving the enemy the usual assistance ; so that if the Can-
adians should repeat their visit in the spring, they would not be able to make any
progress in the country, to the disadvantage of the garrison.

I say as all these services, which have so plain a tendency to settle the lasting se-
curity of the Province, remain yet to be done ; and this fall is the only opportunity
for doing it ; and I am informed by persons well acquainted with the seasons in
Nova Scotia, that the winter is not yet too far advanced, for doing this with a prob-
able prospect of the men's returning afterwards, this winter.

I have determined to send the reinforcement of five companies, which I proposed
before my receiving the last advices ; some of which, are already sailed, and others
o-o to-day, and the rest in two days, at farthest ; and I hope Your Honor, if your
three companies are not already sailed, will order them to proceed forthwith.

If our endeavors are attended with success at this critical conjuncture, as I hope
they will, it will be a most beneficial service for His Majesty and the colonics.

1 am iu haste ; the post waiting.

Your Honor's most obedient humble servant,

W. SHIRLEY.

To Governor Greene.



204 RECORDS OF THE COLONY OF RHODE ISLAND [1747-



Proceedings of the General AssemUy, held for the Colony of Rhode
Island and Providence Plantations, at Providence, the 21th day
of January, 1746-7.

The Hon. William Greene, Governor.

The Hon. Joseph Whipple, Deputy Governor,

With the assistants and deputies from the several towns.

An Act for incorporating the inhabitants of the lands lately
taken into this colony, by the settlement of the eastern boun-
daries, into five townships.

Whereas, His Majesty has been graciously pleased by his
royal determination, to settle the eastern boundaries of this
colony, whereby several large tracts of land, and a great
number of inhabitants are taken under the jurisdiction of this
government ; and it being absolutely necessary for the well
governing the said people, that the said tracts of land, with the
inhabitants thereon, be set off and incorporated into townships,
and the same being conveniently situated for the making of
five townships ; —

Be it therefore enacted by the General Assembly, and by
the authority of the same, it is enacted, that the aforesaid
tracts of land, with the inhabitants thereon, be set off and in-
corporated into five towns in the following manner, viz. :

All that part, which heretofore has been called Bristol, with
the inhabitants thereon, be set off and incorporated into a town-
ship, by the name of Bristol ; and that that part which was
heretofore [known] as part of Tiverton, with a part of Dart-
mouth and Freetown, adjoining thereto, be incorporated into a
township, by the name of Tiverton ; and that part which has
heretofore been a -part of Little Compton, and a part of Dart-
mouth, thereto adjoining, be incorporated into a township, by
the name ■.£ Little Compton j and that the line wlii.li formerly



1747.] AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. 205

divided Tiverton from Little Compton, be extended easterly,
to the colony line, and the whole to be dividing lines between
said towns ; and that part which has heretofore been a part of
Swansey and Barrington, with a small part of Rehoboth there-
to adjoining, with the inhabitants thereon, be incorporated into
a township, by the name of Warren ; and that part which has
been commonly called and known by the name of the Gore of
Land, with the inhabitants thereon, be into a township, by the
name of Cumberland ; and that the inhabitants of each respec-
tive town, for the time being, shall have and enjoy equal liber-
ties and privileges with the other towns in this colony, agreea.
bly to our charter.

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that a
special justice of the peace, be chosen and appointed in each of
the above mentioned towns, to keep Ilis Majesty's peace ; and
to call the inhabitants of the respective towns together, by a
warrant, to meet on the second Tuesday in Februrary next, to
choose such town officers as are directed by the laws of this
colony ; and also deputies, to represent said towns at the ad-
journment of this Assembly.

And that the said justices bo commissionated by His Honor,
the Governor, and to continue till the next session of the As-
sembly; and that the general treasurer furnish each of the
above mentioned towns with a colony law book ; and that the
secretary send to each of the said towns a copy of the late act
of Assembly, directing the manner of making freemen, and
regulating the method of voting ; and that said law books and
copies of said act, be delivered to the above mentioned justices
as soon as conveniently may be.

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that
every man, inhabiting within the above mentioned towns of
Bristol, Tiverton, Little Compton, Warren and Cumberland,
who is possessed of lands or real estate, sufficient by the laws
of this colony, to qualify him for a freeman, and the eldest
sons of all such freeholders, be, and they are hereby declared
freemen of the respective towns, and also of this colony ; and



20G RECORDS OF THE COLONY OF RHODE ISL.VND [1747.

to govern themselves in voting, agreeably to the laws of this
colon3^

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that
the following persons be, and they are hereby chosen and ap-
pointed special justices of the peace, for the above mentioned
towns, viz. :

Jonathan Peck, Esq., for the town of Bristol ; John Man-
chester, Esq., for the town of Tiverton ; William Richmond,
Esq., for the town of Little Compton ; Matthew Allen, Esq., for
the town of Warren ; and Job Bartlett, Esq., for the town of
Cumberland.

God save the King.

Governor Slihicy to Governor Greene.

Boston January, 5, 1746-7.

Sir : — This will be delivered you by Lieut. Wilkinson, from whom, as well as by
a letter from Col. Kinnicutt, I am sorry to learn that the levies of your jjovernmcnt
are at length, by a train of cross accidents and disasters, prevented from going upon
His Majesty's service to Annapolis Eoyal ; for which, both your government and
the troops have shown so ready a disposition ; I can't say but that I think after
having been so greatly weakened, and reduced by sickness and deaths, as I under-
stood the three companies are, that your officers judged right in not venturing them
upon a passage to Annapolis in so extreme and wintry a season as the present has
proved ; since, in all probability, it would have destroyed many of the soldiers, and
the few that had survived it, might have been rather a burthen than of service, to the
garrison ; I heartily wish those of them, who are sailed for Newport, a safe arrival
there ; and that the sick among them, and those left at Martha's Vineyard, may
recover.

Mr. Wilkinson informs me that some deserters from your levies are suspected to
be concealed in this government ; if there is any possibility of getting at them, I
will take care the}' shall be secured for you, upon my being apprised when any of
them may be apprehended.

I took the first opportunity of laying before the Assembly of this Province, the copy
of His Majesty's order in council, for settling the boundary line between the Prov.
incc and colony, together with the act of your government, appointing commission-
ers to join with those of this government, in running and marking the line accord-
ingly; and of recommending to them forthwith to choose commissioners for that
purpose ; which 1 hope they will readily do. When it is done, I shall transmit you
the first notice of it, that I can.

I .ini, with dill' regani sir,

Your Honor's olxdi. nl hiimblc servant,

To His Excellency, Gov. Greene. W. SHIRLEY.



1747.] AND PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS. 207

P. S. I hope that eight hundred of the Massachusetts levies arc all, long before
this, safely arrived at Annapolis, with a great quantity of snow shoes ; as also the
two New Hampshire companies ; and that they may be a force sufficient for the
pui'poses of His Majesty's service there.



Proceedings of the General Assemhl// held for the Colon?/ of Rhode
Island and Providence Plantations^ at Providence, the 17 th
day of February, 1746-47.

The Hon. William Greene, Governor.

The Hon. Joseph Whipple, Deputy Governor.

With the assistants and deputies from the several towns.

Thomas Ward was chosen secretary, for the remaining part
of the current year, in the room of the late James Martin,
Esq., deceased, and engaged, according to law.

His Honor, the Governor, presented two letters from His
Excellency, William Shirley, Esq., Governor of the Massachu-
setts, for the consideration of this Assembly ; who having duly
weighed the same, are of opinion, that (notwithstanding they
are desirous of contributing every thing in their power for His
Majesty's service,) this colony cannot, as the case is circum-
stanced, comply with His Excellency's request, for sending the
troops of His Majesty, now in this government, to Hudson's
River, to join the other troops there assembled, in order to
make an attempt against Crown Point, because the colony has
no provision or stores on said river, and the navigation thereof,
is impracticable at this season of the year ; neither can the
troops be sent to Annapolis Royal, as desired by His Excel-
lency, ill His second letter, because the time by him proposed
for their arrival there, is so very short, that it is impossible to
procure transports, provisions, stores, &c., timely ; and also, the
colony's sloop is much out of repair, and no hands belong to
her, the late crew being discharged ; so that the troops, if
sent, must go without convoy ; moreover, the troops them-



208 RECORDS OF THE COLONY OF RHODE ISLAND [1747.

selves, are in uo capacity of going, being greatly enfeebled,
and lessened=-= in numbers by sickness and desertion, in the late
attempt to go to Annapolis.

An Act incorporating the towns of Bristol and Warren into one
distinct county, and for establishing a court of general ses-
sions of the peace, and inferior court of common pleas, in
said county, and ascertaining the times and places of holding
the same.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of this colony, and
by the authority of. the same it is enacted, that the towns of
Bristol and Warren, be, and they are hereby incorporated and
made a county ; and shall be called and known by the name
of the county of Bristol; and Bristol shall be the county
town.

And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, that
there shall be held and kept yearly and every year, for said
county, in the town of Bristol, on the first Tuesday in July,
and first Tuesday in January, a court of general sessions
of the peace, by the justices of the peace, of said county, any five
of whom shall be a quorum ; and an inferior court of common
pleas, by five skillful persons, to be annually appointed by the
General Assembly ; any three of whom, shall be a quorum ;
said courts to be held in the same manner, and to have the
same power in all respects, as the other courts of general ses-
sions of the peace, and inferior courts of common pleas in this
colony have.

And be it furtlier enacted by the authority, aforesaid, that
the town of Bristol shall send to the said court of general ses-
sions of peace, seven grand jurors ; and to both said courts, six
petit jurors; and tie town of Warren shall send six grand ju-
rors to the said court of general sessions of the peace, and six
petit jurors, to both said courts.



* On the 10th February, Gov. Shh-ley, wrote to Gov. Greene, that the government of
New York liad determined not to send an expedition against Crown Point tliis winter, an



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