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Richard Green Parker.

Exercises in rhetorical reading : with a series of introductory lessons, particularly designed to familiarize readers with the pauses and other marks in general use, and lead them to the practice of modulation and inflection of the voice online

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Online LibraryRichard Green ParkerExercises in rhetorical reading : with a series of introductory lessons, particularly designed to familiarize readers with the pauses and other marks in general use, and lead them to the practice of modulation and inflection of the voice → online text (page 12 of 38)
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-l^l 1 Bleeding at | every | vein. 1 Ml Ml Ml |
^ His I few sur- | viving | comrades | ^'^ | saw ^ \
^ His 1 smile, | "^ when | rang their | proud ^ | hurrah, |



130



INTRODUCTOEY LESSONS.



And the | red ^ | field ^ | was | won ; ^ | ^^ |
Then | saw in | death ^ | ^ his | eyelids | close ^ |
Calmly, | as to a | night's re- | pose, ^ |

^ Like I flowers at | set of | sun. 1 | "Tl | IT |

741.
Come to the | bridal | chamber, | Death! ^ |

Come to the | mother, | ^ when she | feels, ^ |
T For the | first ^ | time, ^ | ^ her | first-born's | breath ; |
"^"^ I Come when the | blessed | seals *^ |
Which I close the | pestilence | ^ are | broke, '^ | ^^ |
^ And I crowded | cities | wail its | stroke ; — ^ | "*^^ |
Come in con- | sumption's ghastly | form, "^ |
^ The I earthquake | shock, ^ | ^ the | ocean | storm; — |
Come when the | heart | beats | high and | warm, ^ \

^ With I banquet | song, | ^ and | dance, and | wine, ^ |
^"^ I And I thou art | terrible ! — ^ the | tear, ^ |
^ The I groan, M the | knell, ^ | ^ the | pall, ^ | ^

the I bier, |
^ And I all we | know, | ^ or | dream, or | fear ^ |

-1 Of I agony, M are ] thine. Ml m |

742.
But to the I hero, | ^ when his | sword "^ |

^ Has I won the | battle | ^ for the | free, | ^^ |
^ I Thy voice ^ | sounds like a | prophet's | word, "^ | ^^ |
And in its | hollow | tones are | heard ^ |

^ The I thanks of | millions | yet to | be. ^ ^^ | ^^ |'
^ Boz- I zaris ! | ^^ M ^^^^ ^^® I storied | brave ^ \

Greece | nurtured | ^ in her | glory's time, '^ | ^^ |
Rest thee — | ^^ | there is | no | prouder | grave, |

Even in her | own ^ | proud ^ | clime. MT | ^^ |

^ We I tell thy | doom | ^ with- | out a | sigh ; ^ |
For thou art | Freedom's | now, ^ | ^ and | Fame's ; ^ H"! |
One of the | few, ^ | ^ the im- | mortal | names, | ^^ |

T That I were not | born to | die. ^ MT | ^1 |



INTRODUCTORY LESSONS. 131

743.
Antony's oration over CvEsar's body.

Friends, | ^^ | Romans, | ^^ | Countrymen! | ^^ |

Lend me your | ears; Ml | ^T |
^ I I come M to I bury | Caesar, | ^^ | not to | praise |

him. m m I

^ The I evil, | ^ that | men | do, | lives | after them ; H^ |
^ Jhe I good M is I oft in- | terred | ^ with their |

bones: | ^^ |
So let it I be n with | Casar! ^ H The | noble |

Brutus I
^ Hath I told you, | Caesar | ^ was am- | bitious. | ^^ |
If it I were so, | it was a | grievous | fault ; | ^"^ |
^ And I grievously | ^ hath | Caesar | answered it. | ^^ |
Here, | under | leave of | Brutus | ^ and the | rest, |
"^ (For I Brutus | ^ is an | honorable | man, | ^^ |
So are they | all, "^ \ all | honorable | men :) M'l |
Come I n to I speak H in | Caesar's | funeral, m MT |

744.
He was my | friend,* | ^"^ | faithful | ^ and | just to |
me: m |
^ But I Brutus I says | he was am- | bitious ; | ^^ |
>^^ I T And I Brutus | ^ is an | honorable | man. | ^^ |

He hath | brought | many | captives | home to | Rome, |
"^ Whose I ransoms | ^ did the | general | coffers | fill

Ml m I

^ Did I this n in I Cresar | seem am- | bitious? m m |
When that the | poor have | cried, | ^^ | Caesar hath |

"ept; m m I

^ Am- I bition | "^ should be | made of | sterner | stuff. |

T]\T\\

* See Number 528, page 77.



132 INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.

^ Yet I Brutus | says | ^ he | was am- | bitious; |
^T I ^ And I Brutus | ^ is an | honorable | man. | ^^ |

T\ I

"^ You I all did | see, | ^ that, | on the | Lupercal, |
"^ I I thrice pre- | sented him i "^ a | kingly | crown ; |
^^ I Which he did | thrice | "1 re- I fuse. | ^^ IT Was

this am- I bition ? | 11 I 11 I
*^ Yet I Brutus | says | he was am- | bitious ; | "^^ |
^ And I sure, | ^ he | is j T an | honorable | man. | ^^ [

745.

^^ I "^ I I speak not | ^ to dis- | prove | what | Brutus |

spoke; |
^ But I here | I am to | speak | what I do | know. | ^^ |

T] I

**] You I all did | love him | once ; | ^"^ | not without |

cause: | ^^ |
What I cause with- | holds you, | then, | "^ to | mourn |

for him? ni m I

O I judgment, | ^"^ | Thou art | fled to | brutish |

beasts, | ^^ |
^ And I men I ^ have | lost their | reason ! | H | H |

Bear with me : |
^^ I ^ My I heart ^ | is in the | coffin | there | ^ with

I Caesar; |
^^ I And I must | pause ^ | till it | come | back to me.

1 11 I 11 I

746.
^ But I yesterday, | "^ the | word of | Csesar | might |
^ Have I stood a- | gainst the | world ! | ^"^ | now | lies

he I there, |
"^^ I ^ And I none | so | poor | ^ to | do him | rever-

ence. Ml ^ |
O I masters ! | ^"^ | If I were dis- | posed to | stir |
^ Your I hearts and | minds | ^ to 1 mutiny and | rage, [



INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.



133



T should do 1 Brutus | wrong, | ^ and | Cassius | ^^ |

wrong; |
^1^ I Who, I ^ you I all | know, | ^ are | honorable | men.

\T\\T\\

^ I I will not I do I them | wrong; HT M^ | I | rather

I choose I
^ To I wrong the | dead, | "^ to | wrong my- | self | ^

and I you, |
Than I will | wrong | such ^ | honorable | men. | '^^ |

T\\

747.
^ But I here's a | parchment | ^ with the | seal of |

Caesar; |
^ I I found it I "1 in his | closet; | ^^ | 'Tis his | will:

m I

Let but the | commons | hear | ^ this | testament, | ^^ |
*^ (Which, I pardon me, | ^ I | do not | mean to | read,) |
*^^ I And they would | go | "^ and | kiss | dead | Caesar's

I wounds, I
^ And I dip their | napkins | ^ in his | sacred | blood ; |
^^ I Yea, I beg a | hair of him | "^ for | memory, |
^ And I dying, | ^^ | mention it | within their | wills, |
^^ I '^ Be- I queathing it | ^ as a | rich ^ | legacy, |
Unto their | issue. M^ MT |

748.
If you have | tears, | "^ pre- | pare to | shed them |

now. n-1 ni I

^ You I all do I know | this | mantle : | ^"^ | I remem-
ber I
T The I first | time | ever | Caesar | put it | on ; | ^^ |
'Twas on a | summer's | evening, | '^ in his | tent ; | ^"^ |
That I day I ^ he I overcame the | Nervii : M^ | "IT |
Look ! I ^ in | this | place | ran | Cassius' | dagger |

through! ni m 1

See what a | rent | ^ the | envious | Casca | made ! | ^'^



134 ENTRODUCTORY LESSONS.

Through | this | ^ the | well be- ] loved | Brutus | stabbed,

mi

^"^ I And as he | plucked his | cursed | steel a- | way |
^T I Mark ^ | how the | blood of | Caesar | followed it

Ml m I

749.
This I ^ was the | most un- | kindest | cut of | all ! |
^^ I ^ For I when the | noble | Caesar | saw | him | stab, |
"^ In- 1 gratitude, | "^ more | strong than | traitor's | arms, |
Quite I vanquished him : | "^"^ | then | burst his | mighty

heart; | ^^ \
And in his | mantle | ^^ | muffling up his | face, ] ^^ |
Even at the | base of | Pompey's | statue, |
^T I ^ (Which I all the I while | ran | blood,) | ^^ |

great | Caesar | fell. MT MT |
Oh ! what a | fall | "^ was | there, | ^ my | countrymen ! |

Ml nil

Then | I, | "^ and | you, H and | all of us, | fell | down, |
Whilst ^ 1 bloody | treason | flourished | over us. | ^^ |

T\ I

Oh ! I now you | weep ; | ^^ | ^ and I per- | ceive | ^ you

I feel I
^ The I dint of | pity ; | H | these | ^ are | gracious |

drops. ni m I

Kind I souls; | ^"^ | what, | weep you | ^^ | when you

but be- I hold |
T Our I Caesar's | vesture | wounded ? Ml I IT I Look

you I here! ^ MH
Here is him- | self, | ^^ | marr'd, | ^ as you | see, | ^ by

I traitors. Ml m |

750.
Good I friends, | sweet | friends, | ^^ | let me not |
stir you | up |
^ To I such a I sudden | flood of | mutiny. | ^"^ |



INTRODUCTORY LESSONS. 135

^^ I They that have | done this | deed, | ^ are | honor-
able: I

^"•^ I What I private | griefs | ^ they | have, | ^ a- | las !
I ^ I I know not, |

^ That I made them | do it: | ^^ | they are | wise, |
^ and I honorable, |

^ And I will, ^ I no I doubt, | ^ with | reason | answer
you. \T\\T\\



751.
*^ I I come not, | friends, | ^ to | steal away | ^ your |

hearts; | ^1"^ |
I am I no I orator, | ^ as | Brutus is ; |
^^ I But as you | know me | all, | ^ a | plain | blunt |

man, |
^ That I love my | friend ; | ^^ | ^ and | that | they |

know I full I well |
^ That I gave me | public | leave | ^ to | speak of him.

\T\\T\\

752.

For I have | neither | wit, | ^ nor | words, | ^ nor |

worth, n-| I
Action, I ^ nor | utterance, | ^ nor the | power of | speech, |
T To I stir I men's | blood. MT M I only | speak |

right 1 on: n-| I
^ I I tell you I that | "^ which | you yourselves | ^ do |

know; |
^"^ I Show you I sweet | Caesar's | wounds, | "^^ | poor, |

I poor I dumb | mouths, |
T And I bid I them | speak | for me. MT M^ | But

were | I | Brutus, |
^ And I Brutus | Antony, | ^"^ | there were an | Antony |
^ Would I ruffle | up your | spirits, | ^'^ | ^ and | put a

I tongue I



136 INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.

"^ In I every | wound of | Caesar, | ^\ that should | move |
"^ The I stones of | Rome | *^ to j rise in | mutiny. |

m ni I

The preceding examples, including both poetry and prose, it is
thought, will be sufficient to explain the principle embraced in this
lesson, entitled the Measure of Speech. The pupil should endeavor
in all bis reading exercises, to form the sentences, whether of poetry
or prose, into measures, for the purpose of reading with facility and
without fatigue. The pauses or rests which occur in the imperfect
measures, will afford him an opportunity of taking breath at such in-
tervals, that, in the words of Dr. Barber, " reading will cease to be
laborious, and the sense will be rendered clear, as far as it is depend-
ent on the capital point of the distribution of time, or measure." The
principle explained in this lesson, when well understood, and judi-
ciously applied, will make the pupil acquainted with the nature of all
the different kinds of versification ; for he will perceive that all the
varieties of poetry (or verse) are dependent upon the regular succes-
sion of the various measures of speech." *



LESSON XXXVI.

MANNER OF READING POETRY.



The division of poetry into verses, addressing themselves to the
eye, is often the cause of what is called a " singsong " utterance, which
it should be the study of every good reader to avoid. [5ee note on
page 122.]

In the last lesson, the attention of the pupil was drawn to the meas-
ure OF SPEECH — a subject, which, although it is very important in
prose, is doubly so in the reading of poetry or verse, as it determines
a question which has long been debated by teachers of the art of read-
ing, viz. whether a pause should be made at the end of every line.

It is maintained by a very respectable writer, that in reading ' blank
verse^^ " we ought to make every line sensible to the ear ; for what "
(it is asked by the writer) " is the use of the melody, or for what end
has the poet composed in verse, if, in reading his lines, we suppress his

* A greater variety of exercises for reading, divided into measures, may be
found ill Dr. Barber's Grammar of Elocution.

They, wlio have any curiosity to know the manner in which Garrick pro-
nounced Hamlet's Soliloquy on Death, are referred to Steele's Prosodia
Ralionalis, (edition of 1779, p. 40, et seq.,) where it is divided into measures,
and accented. Dr. Barber's method of dividing speech is identical with Mr.
Steele's.



INTRODUCTORY LESSONS. 137

numbers, by omitting the final pause, and degrade them, by our pro-
nunciation, into mere prose ? "

The remarks made in the previous lesson are a sufficient reply to
this question. It is there stated that all sentences tliat are, or can be,
read or pronounced, are divisible into measures ; and that the only
diUerence there is m sound between prose and verse is, that verse con-
sists of a regular succession of similar measures, while in prose the
difierent kinds of measure occur promiscuously, without any regular
succession. Now, if this be the case, as it undoubtedly is, there will
be no necessity of a pause at the end of the line, to render the melody
sensible to the ear. Indeed, it will be impossible for the reader, who
pays proper attention to the measures into which all poetical lines are
divided, to conceal the melody which the lines possess. The art of
the poet, so far as the harmony is concerned, consists in such an ar-
rangement of his measures, as to leave little for the reader to do, in
order to convey the melody to the hearer ; and those lines which re-
quire ' humoring^' in order that the music of the versification may be
distinguished, have little title to the name of verse.

The only direction, therefore, which it is necessary to give the
pupil in reading verse is, to endeavor to forget, or rather to disregard,
the division of the sentences into lines, and to read with the same in-
flections, accent, tone, emphasis, and expression, that he would use
in reading prose.

In addition to the remarks which were made in the last lesson in
relation to the pauses caused by imperfect measures of speech, it re-
mains to be observed that there is generally a pause, which belongs
exclusively to poetry, called the CjEsura,* or the Ceesural pause.
This pause must always be properly regarded ; and in studying a
reading lesson in verse, the pupil must be careful to ascertam where
this pause belongs. It is generally made after the fourth, fifth, or
sixth syllable in the line ; but it is sometimes found after the third or
tlie seventh, and occasionally even after the second or the eighth.

In the following lines, the place where the caesura, or the cajsural
pause, is to be made, is indicated by a figure, and the parallel lines || ;
and in reading them, the pupil will remember to make a slight pause
when he comes to the figure.

753.

The ccBsura after the Ath syllable.

The Savior comes, ^ || by ancient bards foretold.

754.

The ccBsura after the 5th syllable.
From storms a shelter, ^ \\ and from heat a shade.

* The word catsura means a cut, or division. An attentive observer will
not fail to notice that the beauty and grace of English versification depends
much upon the situation of the caesura. The poet has it in his power, by
diversifying its position, to give his numbers a grateful variety, which they
would not otherwise possess. They, who would see this subject more fully
discussed, will find some valuable remarks in the work of Dr. Carey, entitled
"Practical English Prosody," London ed, 1816, p. 59.

12*



138 INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.

755.

TJie ccDsura after the 6th syllable.

Exalt thy lofty head, 6 || and lift thine eyes.

756.

The ccBsura after the 3d syllable.

Exploring, 3 || till they find their native deep.

757.

The ccBsura after the 7th syllable.
Within that mystic circle "^ |1 safety seek.

758.

The ccBsura after the 2d syllable.

Happy, 2 11 without the privilege of will.

759.

The ccBsura after the 8th syllable.

In different individuals ^ 1| we find.

In some lines, besides the caesura, there is also what is
called the demi-ccBsura, or half caesura, at which the pause is
very slight, as in the following lines, in which the demi-cae-
sura is marked with a single accent, and the caesura with a
double accent.

760.
Warms' in the sun," refreshes' in the breeze,
Glows ' in the stars, " and blossoms ' in the trees ;
Lives ' through all life " ; extends ' through all extent,
Spreads' undivided," operates' unspent.

The pupil will recollect that no pause must be made, and es~
pecially that the falling inflection of the voice must not be used
at the end of the line, unless the sense requires it. In the
following extract, the pause, with the falling inflection, occurs
in that part of the line indicated by the grave accent. The
extract is from the description of the deluge in Paradise Lost.

761.
Meanwhile the south wind rose, and with black wings,
Wide hovering, all the clouds together drove



INTRODUCTORY LESSONS. 139

From under heaven : the liills, to their supply,
Vapor and exhalation dusk and moist
Sent up amain : and now the thickened sky
Like a dark ceiling stood ; down rushed the rain
Impetuous, and continued, till the earth
No more was seen ; the floating vessel swam
Uplifted, and secure with beaked * prow
Rode tilting o'er the waves.

A Simile, or Comparison, in poetry ^ should he slurred; f
that is, it should be read in a lower tone of voice, with less
force, and more rapidly.

In the following lines the simile is contained in Italic
letters.

762.
Tired nature's sweet restorer, balmy Sleep!
He, like the world, his ready visits pays
Where fortune smiles; the wretched he forsakes;
Swift on his downy pinions, flies from grief,
And lights on lids unsullied with a tear.

763.
Dear is that shed to which his soul conforms;
And dear that hill which lifts him from the storms;
And, as a child, whom scaring sounds molest.
Clings close and closer to his mother's breast,
So the loud torrent, and the whirlwind's roar.
But bind him to his native mountains more.

764.
The skies, like a banner in sunset unrolled,
O'er the west threw their splendor of azure and gold;
But one cloud at a distance rose dense, and increased
Till its margin of black touched the zenith and east.

Like a spirit, it came in the van of a storm !
And the eye, and the heart, hailed its beautiful form.
For it looked not severe, like an angel of wrath.
But its garment of brightness illumed its dark path.

* This word, by poetic license, must be pronounced as a dissyllable, beak-ed.
1 See Lesson Si, p. 1 13, of this volume, for an explanation of the slur.



140 INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.

765.
So live, that when thy summons comes to join
The innumerable caravan, that moves
To the pale realms of shade, where each shall take
His chamber in the silent halls of death,
Thou go not, like the quarry slave at nighty
Scourged to his dungeon ; but sustained and soothed
By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave.
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch
About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.

The word verse properly means a turning, and for this reason each
line in poetry is a verse. The divisions of a poem, whether they con-
sist of four, six, or any other number of verses or hnes, are called
stanzas. The pupil must be careful not to pause at the end of a
stanza, unless the sense is completed. The following are instances in
which, as the sense is not completed, the voice must not be suspended
at the end of the stanza.

766.
In what rich harmony, what polished lays.
Should man address thy throne, when Nature pays
Her wild, her tuneful tribute to the sky !
Yes, Lord, she sings thee, but she knows not why.
The fountain's gush, the long-resounding shore,
The zephyr's whisper, and the tempest's roar,
The rustling leaf, in autumn's fading woods.
The wintry storm, the rush of vernal floods.
The summer bower, by cooling breezes fanned.
The torrent's fall, by dancing rainbows spanned
The streamlet, gurgling through its rocky glen,
The long grass, sighing o'er the graves of men.
The bird that crests yon dew-bespangled tree,
Shakes his bright plumes, and trills his descant free,
The scorching bolt, that, from thine armory hurled.
Burns its red path, and cleaves a shrinking world;
All these are music to Religion's ear : —
Music, thy hand awakes, for man to hear.

767.
Oh, what is human glory, human pride?
What are man's triumphs when they brightest seem ?



INTRODUCTORY LESSONS. 141

What art thou, mighty one! though deified?
Methuselah's long pilgrimage, a dream;
Our age is but a shade, our life a tale,
A vacant fancy, or a passing gale

Or nothing ! 'Tis a heavy, hallow ball.

Suspended on a slender, subtile hair,

And filled with storm winds, thunders, passions, all

Struggling within in furious tumult there.

Strange mystery ! man's gentlest breath can shake it,

And the light zephyrs are enough to break it.

768.
Beneath the aged oak he sleeps ; —

The angel of his childhood there
No watch around his tomb-stone keeps ;

But, when the evening stars appear.

The woodman, to his cottage bound.
Close to that grave is wont to tread :

But his rude footsteps echoed round.
Break not the silence of the dead.

769.
The applause of listening senates to command,

The threats of pain and ruin to despise.
To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land,

And read their history in a nation's eyes, —

Their lot forb2.de : nor circumscribed alone
Their growing virtues, but their crimes confined; —

Forbade to wade through slaughter to a throne,
A.nd shut the gates of mercy on mankind 1



LESSON XXXVII.

MONOTONE.

In the previous parts of this book, the pupil has been made ac-
luaiuted with those modifications of the voice called the rising in-
lection, the falling inflection, and the circumflex.* There is another

*" See Lessons 1, 2, and 22.



142 INTRODUv,TORY LESSONS.

modulation of the voice, which, from its intimate connexion with the
reading of poetry of a solemn kind, has been reserved for explanation
in this place. It is called the Monotone, and consists of a degree of
sameness of sound, or tone, in a number of successive words or syl-
lables.

It is very seldom the case that there is a perfect sameness to be ob-
served in readmg any sentence or part of a sentence. But very
little variety of tone, or, in other words, a degree of the monotone, is
to be used in reading either prose or verse, which contains elevated
descriptions, or emotions of solemnity, sublimity, or reverence. This
monotone should generally be a low tone of the voice. Thus, in ad-
dressing the Deity, in the following lines, a degree of the monotone
is to be used.

770.

O Thou Eternal One ! whose presence bright
All space doth occupy, all motion guide ;
Unchanged through time's all devastating flight;
Thou only God ! There is no God beside !
Being above all beings! Mighty One!
Whom none can comprehend and none explore ;
Who fiU'st existence with Thyself alone :
Embracing all, — supporting, — ruling o'er —
Being whom we call God — and know no more.



The monotone is also to be used in the following extracts : —



771.

High on a throne of royal state, which far
Outshone the wealth of Ormus or of Ind ;
Or where the gorgeous East, with richest hand,
Showers, on her kings barbaric, pearl and gold,
Satan exalted sat.

772.

The sky is changed ! and such a change ! O Night,
And Storm, and Darkness, ye are wondrous strong,
Yet lovely in your strength, as is the light
Of a dark eye in woman ! Far along,
From peak to peak, the rattling crags among,
Leaps the live thunder! — not from one lone cloud,
But every mountain now hath found a tongue ;
And Jura answers, through her misty shroud,
Back to the joyous Alps, who call to her aloud 1



INTRODUCTORY LESSONS. 143

773.
And this is in the night : — most glorious night !
Thou wert not made for slumber ! let me be
A sharer in thy fierce and fair delight, —
A portion of the tempest and of thee !
How the lit lake shines, — a phosphoric sea —
And the big rain comes dancing to the earth !
And now, again, 'tis black — and now, the glee
Of the loud hills shakes with its mountain mirth,
As if they did rejoice o'er a young earthquake's birth.

774.
Sky, mountains, river, winds, lake, lightnings ! ye,
With night, and clouds, and thunder, and a soul
To make these felt and feeling, well may be
Things that have made me watchful : the far roll
Of your departing voices is the knoll
Of what in me is sleepless, — if I rest.
But where, of ye, O tempests ! is the goal ?
Are ye like those within the human breast?
Or do ye find, at length, like eagles, some high nest?

775.
And in the bright blaze of thy festal hall,
When vassals kneel, and kindred smile around thee,
May ruin'd Bertram's Pledge hiss in thine ear —
Joy to the proud dame of Saint Aldobrand,
Whilst his corse doth bleach beneath her towers !

776.
O crested Lochiel, the peerless in might.
Whose banners arise on the battlement's height.
Heaven's fire is around thee, to blast and to burn !
Return to thy dwelling ! all lonely return !
For the blackness of ashes shall mark where it stood.
And a wild mother's scream o'er her famishing brood.

777.
Oh, when he comes,
Rous'd by the cry of wickedness extreme,
To heaven ascending from some guilty land.
Now ripe for vengeance ; when he comes, array'd



144 INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.

In all the terrors of Almighty wrath, —
Forth from his bosom plucks his lingering arm,
And on the miscreants pours destruction down, —
"Who can abide his coming ? Who can bear
His whole displeasure ?

778.
In thoughts from the visions of the night, when deep sleep
falleth on men, fear came upon me, and trembling, which made
all my bones to shake. Then a spirit passed before my face ;
the hair of my flesh stood up : it stood still, but I could not



Online LibraryRichard Green ParkerExercises in rhetorical reading : with a series of introductory lessons, particularly designed to familiarize readers with the pauses and other marks in general use, and lead them to the practice of modulation and inflection of the voice → online text (page 12 of 38)