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Richard Green Parker.

Exercises in rhetorical reading : with a series of introductory lessons, particularly designed to familiarize readers with the pauses and other marks in general use, and lead them to the practice of modulation and inflection of the voice online

. (page 38 of 38)
Online LibraryRichard Green ParkerExercises in rhetorical reading : with a series of introductory lessons, particularly designed to familiarize readers with the pauses and other marks in general use, and lead them to the practice of modulation and inflection of the voice → online text (page 38 of 38)
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15 Mr. Sampson ? — this is waur than ever ; ye '11 really do
yoursell some injury wi' these lang fasts, — naething sae
hurtful to the stomach, Mr. Sampson. If you would but
put some peppermint draps in your pocket, or let Barnes cut
you a sandwich."

20 " Avoid thee ! " quoth the dominie, his mind running
still upon his interview with Meg Merrilies, and making
for the dining-parlor. — " Na, ye need na gang in there ;
the cloth 's been removed an hour ago, and the colonel 's at
his wine ; but just step into my room ; I have a nice steak

25 that the cook will do in a moment." — " Exorciso te ! " said
Sampson, — " that is, I have dined."

" Dined ! it 's impossible I Wha can ye hae dined wi',
you that gangs out nae gate ? " — " With Beelzebub, I be-
lieve," said the minister. — " Na, then he 's bewitched for

30 certain," said the housekeeper, letting go her hold ; " he 's
bewitched or he 's daft, and ony way the colonel maun
just guide him his ain gate. Waes ine ! Hech, sirs ! It 's
a sair thing to see learning bring foil? to this I " and with
this compassionate ejaculation, she retreated into her own

35 premises.

The object of her commiseration had by this time en-
tered the dining-parlor, where his appearance gave great
surprise. He was mud up to the shoulders, and the natural
paleness of his hue was twice as cadaverous as usual,

40 through terror, fatigue, and perturbation of mind. " What
on earth is the meaning of this, Mr. Sampson?" said
Mannering, who observed Miss Bertram looked much
alarmed for her simple but attached friend.

" Exorciso — " said the dominie. — " How, sir ? " — "I



430 PARKER'S EXERCISES IN [eX. CXV.

crave pardon, honorable sir ! but my wits " — " Are

gone a wool-gathering, I think. Pray, Mr. Sampson, col-
lect yourself, and let me know the meaning of all this."
Sampson was about to reply; but finding his Latin
5 formula of exorcism still came most readily to his tongue,
he prudently desisted from the attempt, and put the scrap
of paper which he had received from the gypsy into Man-
nering's hand, who broke the seal and read it with surprise.
" This seems to be some jest," he said, " and a very dull

10 one."

" It came from no jesting person," said Mr. Sampson. —
" From whom, then, did it come ? " — The dominie, who
often displayed some delicacy of recollection in cases where
Miss Bertram had an interest, recollected the painful cir-

15 cumstances connected with Meg Merrilies, looked at the
young ladies, and remained silent. " We will join you at
the tea-table in an instant, Julia ; I see that Mr. Sampson
wishes to speak to me alone. — And now they are gone,
what, in Heaven's name, is the meaning of this ? "

20 " It may be a message from heaven," said the dominie,
" but it came by Beelzebub's postmistress. It was that
witch, Meg Merrilies, who should have been burned with
a tar-barrel twenty years since, for a harlot, thief, witch,
and gypsy." — "Are you sure it was she?" said the colonel,

25 with great interest. — " Sure, honored sir ? the like o' Meg
Merrilies is not to be seen in any land."

The colonel paced the room rapidly, cogitating with
himself. " To send out to apprehend her — but it is too
distant to send to MacMorlan, and Sir Robert Hazlewood

30 is a pompous coxcomb; besides, the chance of not finding
her upon the spot, and the humor of silence that seized her
before may again return ; — no, I will not, to save being
thought a fool, neglect the course she points out.

" Many of her class set out by being impostors, and

35 end by being enthusiasts, or hold a kind of darkling conduct
between both lines, unconscious almost when they are
cheating themselves or when imposing on others. — Well,
my course is a plain one, at any rate ; and if my eflx)rts are
fruitless, it shall not be owing to over-jealousy of my own

40 character for wisdom." With this he rung the bell, and
ordering Barnes into his private sitting-room, gave him
some orders, with the result of which the reader may be
made hereafter acquainted. — Sir Walter Scott.



INDEX.

INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.



Luton.

1. The

2. The

3. "

4. "
6. "

6. '•

7. The

8. The



Period,

Inierrontion Point or Cluettion,



26

cont'd, 27

27

28



The
The



9

lu
II
u. "

13. "

14. The

15. "



Rzclamation Point,

Period, Interrogation *nd Ezclama-

>n united,

Comma,

" continued,

Semicolon

" continued, .



40



Colon,

" continued,

16. The Parentbeaii, CrotcheU and Bracket!

17. The Da»h



The
The
The
The
The



44

46
48
51
60

psia, 60

Apostrophe, Quotation and Dliereiii, 63
Asterisk, Obelisk, Double Obelisk,



Hyphe
Ellipsi



Letton. Pagi.

Section, Parallels, Paragraph, Index, __
Caret, Breve and Brace,
23. Accent,
Empha



24. Primary and Secondarjr Emphaaia,

25. Distinctness of Articulation,

26. Manner or Eipression,

27. Pitch of the Voice, .

28. Transition,

29. Elliptical Sentences, .

30. Antithesis, ....

31. Enumeration,

32. Ironv,

33. Analogy, ....

34. The Star, ....

35. Measure of Speech, .

36. Manner of Reading Poetry,

37. Monotone, ....

38. Analysis, ....

39. Blending' of Words, produced by

ed Force, . . . . ,

40. Improvement of the Voice,



73
76
79
86
94
96
99
IU3
105
109
110

lis

119
136
141
144

151
152



INDEX OF THE EXERCISES.
[The Italic letters indicate those Exercises which are in verse.]

Eitrcite. Authors. Page.

1. Structure of Animals, Spectator, 157

2. Philosophy Thomson, 160

3. Scale of Beings Addison, 161

4. Tmchinss of Nature, Pollock, 164

Enslish Pdliienes.s described by a Native of China, . .Goldsmith, 165



Pletisnres of Melancholy T. Warton,

Amiable Character of the Patriarch Joseph, • . . . . Blair,

The Rm'nbote Campbell, . . .

Immortality of the Soul, Addison, . . . .

Wi)iter Thomson, . . .

Sabbath Exercises Abbott, . . . .

The Des>:Tted Village Goldsmith, . . .

The Journey of a Day ; a Picture of Human Life, ... Dr. Johnson, . .

A Summer Morning, Thomson, . . .

Parable of the Ewe Lamb, Bible

16. Metlitntion, Thomson, . . .

17. The Planetary and the Terrestial WorldSj Addison

18. Q,iiarr€l between Roderick Dhu and Fttz James, . . Sir Walter Scott,

19. Schome.s of Life often Illusory, Dr. Johnson,. . .

20. A Dream, Bryant, . . . .



166
167
170
172
.174
175
178
188
192
194
195
197
199
210
213

21. Ortogml ; or, the Vanity of Riches, Dr. Johnson, 214

22. Summer Hp^, Thomson, 216

23. Omniscience and Omnipresence of the Deity, Addison, 217



Summer Bathing, Thomson,

Scene after a Thunder Shotcer, "

Domestic Employment, Mrs. L. H. Sigoumey,

Scene from the Tragedy of King John, Shakspeare, ....



220
221
222
223
225



Character of Addison as a Writer Dr. Johnson, 231

Ehgy ivritten in a Country Churchyard, Gray, 2.12

Filial Reverence, Mrs. Farrar, 235

Autumn Thomson, 237

The First and the Last Dinner, Anonymous, 2.39

I)".!/. — A Pastoral Cunningham, 241

Dombey's Introduction into a Fashionable School, . . . Dickens, 244

Same subject continued. —The Dinner Hour, " 251

Orator Puff. Moore, 254

Solilwjuy of Dick the Apprentice Anonymous, 254

Fncr'tous Hintorif of John Gilpin Cowper 265

Dep-triureof the (Sypsies from EUangowan, Sir Waller Scoit, , . .258

Snring Thomson 261

Ad(In;ss to President Washington, 263

Trout Fishing Thomson, -265

C.mtenlmcnt, Addison, 267



432 INDEX.

Exercise. Authors. Page.

46. Araf»/'s Daughter, Moore, 270

47. The fiill of Science Aikin, 271

48. T/ie Passions. — An Ode, . .Collins 274

49. Adaptation of Christianity to the Wants of Man, . . Pres. Hopkins, .... 276

50. Hymn on the Seasons Thomson, 278

51. The Blind Man re.<itored to Sicht, St. John's Gospel, . . . 281

52. Picturf: of a Distinguished Poet, Pollock, 283

63. Grotto of Antiparos Goldsmith, 287

54. T/ie Past, Bryant, 290

' 55. Extract from an Oration at Washington, Hon. R. C. Winthrop, . 291

56. Winter Scenes, Thomson, 294

57. Punishment of a Liar, Bible, 299

58. 'Rejections occasioned by a Man's perishing in a

Snow-storm, Thomson, 301

59. Call isthenes' Reproof of Cleon's Flattery of Alexander, Q. Curtius, 303

60. Rural Felicity, Thomson, 301

61. Rolla's Address to the Peruvians, Sheridan, 306

62. Oft in the Stilly Night Moore 307

63. Extract from a Speech in the British Parliament in 1770, Lord Mansfield, . . . . 308

64. Address to the Deity, Young, 309

65. Causes of DiflFerences of Opinion, Abbott, 311

66. The Last Rose of Summer, Moore, 312

67. Importance of Order in the Distribution of Time, . .Blair, 313

68. The Katydid, Dr. O. W. Holmes, . . 314

69. Conclusion of an Address to President Washington, . Fisher Ames, 316

70. The Frost, Hannah F. Gould, . . .317

71. Character of Lord Chatham, Grattan, 318

72. B'laiosue — Cardinal Wolsey and Cromwell, . . . Shakspeare, 319

73. On the Resurrection, St. Paul, 322

74. Selfshness Reproved, Pope, 325

75. Extract from an Address before the N. E. Society, . Hon. R. C. Winthrop, . 326

76. Description of Mab, Queen of the Fairies, .... Shakspeare, 3.35

77. Progress of Freedom, .' . . ' W. H. Prescott. . . . 335

78. The Meeting of the Waters Moore 338

79. Extracts from an Inaugural Address, Hon. John P. Bigelow, . 339

80. Adam's Description of his first State of Being, . .Milton, 342

81. Character of Lord Halifax, Macaulay, 342

82. Descriptionof Eve's first finding herself on Earth, Milton, 345

83. The Cant of Criticisrn, Sterne, ... ..... 346

84. Hotspur's Description of a Fop, Shakspeare 347

85. Extract from an Address. Hon. R. C. Winthrop, . 348

86. Soliloquy of Claudius, Hamlet's uncle, Shakspeare, ..... 354

87. Cliarity St. Paul, 355

88. Farewell Moore, 356

89. English Travellers, W. H. Prescott, ... 357

90. Speak Gently • Anonymous, 365

91. . Extract from a Speech in the Senate of the U. States, . Hon. Rufus Choate, . . 366

92. The Bird let loose, Moore 368

93. The Prodigal Son, St. Luke, 369

94. Go where Glory waits thee Moore, 370

95. Hamlet's Advice to the Players, Shakspeare, 371

96. Milton's Lamentation for the Loss of Sight, . . .Milton 372

97. Intellectual Improvement, Abbott, 374

93. The World Compared to a Stage, Shakspeare, 377

99. Woman, Geo. B. Emerson, . . .378

100. Passing Away Pierpont, 380

101. Association of Ideas, Taylor, 382

102. The Lighthouse Moore 338

103. Aqueous Agencies, David Page, 338

104. Soliloquy of Hamlet on Death, Shakspeare 394

105. Hotspur's Sohloquy on the Contents of a Letter, . . " 395

106. Cataract of Lodore, Southey, 396

107. Power of Custom, "Z . . .Addison, 393

108. The Contrast, Pollock, 400

109. How to Remember what we Read, Pycroft 403

110. Happiness equally distributed, Goldsmith, 408

111. Character of Francisco Pizarro, W. H. Prescott, . . . 409

112. Virtuous Love, Thomson, 416

113. Shakspeare Price 41b

114. The Chameleon, Merrick 421

115. Dominie Sampson's Encounter with Meg Merrilies, . Sir Walter Scott, . . 422



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Online LibraryRichard Green ParkerExercises in rhetorical reading : with a series of introductory lessons, particularly designed to familiarize readers with the pauses and other marks in general use, and lead them to the practice of modulation and inflection of the voice → online text (page 38 of 38)