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14 And when the hiding squirrel's nest

They sought, far up the hills,
They bathed their reeking foreheads cool

Among the mountain rills/'

Childebn in Exilr, p. 186.



THE



NATIONAL



THIRD READER:



CONTAINING

A SIMPLE, COMPREHENSIVE, AND PRACTICAL TREATISE ON
ELOCUTION; NUMEROUS AND PROGRESSIVE EXERCISES
IN READING AND RECITATION; AND COPIOUS
NOTES, ON THE PAGES WHERE EXPLA-
NATIONS ARE REQUIRED.



By RICHAED GREENE PARKER

AND

J. MADISON WATSON.




A. S. BARNES AND COMPANY,

NEW YORK AND CHICAGO.

1873




EDUCATION DEPI*






y



COMPLETE IN TWO INDEPENDENT PARTS.



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pf New York.



PREFACE



IT has been our purpose, in the preparation of this vol-
ume, to furnish the facilities necessary for the cultivation
and improvement of the voice, and the acquisition of skill
in Beading and Delivery. Though constituting one of a
Series of Headers, this work will be found complete in
itself.

The Introductory Lessons' in Part First present, in a
simple, comprehensive, and practical form, all the most
important principles of Elocution, embracing Sections on
Articulation, Syllabication, Accent, Emphasis, Slur, Inflec-
tions, and Punctuation.

Part Second contains one hundred and twenty-five Exer-
cises for Heading and Recitation. In the collection and
preparation of these Exercises, great pains have been taken
to exclude pieces not suited to the standing of the pupils
for whom they are designed, and to retain only those that
will be found intelligible, not only from the nature of the
subjects, but also from the style and manner in which they
are written.

It has been our aim to present such lessons as would
amuse, interest, and instruct the pupil, and at the same
time furnish examples illustrating the more important prin-
ciples of Rhetorical Delivery. As an almost indispensable
auxiliary for the accomplishment of this desirable object,
we have introduced numerous dialogues and pieces of a
conversational nature.

It is a collection strictly graded from first to last Com-

W451G5



Vi PREFACE.

mencing with lessons more simple than those at the close
of the "Second Beader," the pupil will gradually and
almost unconsciously overcome difficulties as he proceeds,
and at its close will be thoroughly prepared for the suc-
ceeding volume.

The pronunciation of words liable to be mispronounced
is indicated in all cases ; and notes explanatory of words
and phrases not supposed to be fully understood by the
pupil, appear at the bottom of the pages where they occur.

The improvements made in the revision of this work are
many and important. The addition of a thorough though
simple Analysis of Words and of Phonetic Exercises to the
section on Articulation, and the introduction of new sec-
tions on Slur and Inflections, as well as the marked changes
in general, have rendered the Introductory Lessons all that
can be desired for intermediate classes.

The collection of Beading Lessons has been greatly im-
proved by judicious omissions, and by the introduction of
a number of the most interesting and deservedly popular
recent productions, both in prose and verse. The classifi-
cation of these Lessons is more systematic and thorough
than that ever before attempted in any corresponding work.
The pieces are divided into formal sections in each of which
only one leading subject is treated, or one important ele-
ment of Elocution rendered prominent. It is confidently
believed that all practical aids are furnished by the orthoep-
ical notation, the index to words defined and words pro-
nounced, the superior wood-cuts, and the copious notes.

New Yokk, August, 1865.



CONTENTS



I. INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.

PAGE

Articulation 13

Definitions 13

Oral Elements 15

Cognates 17

Alphabetical Equivalents > 17

Oral Elements Combined 19

Errors in Articulation 21

Analysis of Words 22

Rules in Articulation 23

Exercises in Articulation 24

Syllabication 25

Exercises in Syllabication 25

Accent 26

Exercises in Accent 27

Emphasis 27

Exercises in Emphasis 27

Slur 28

Exercises in Slur 29

Inflections §0

Exercises in Inflections i 31

Marks Used in Printing 32

General Exercises 35

II. KEADINGS AND EECITATIONS. .

I. PIECES IN PROSE.

Section 1 39

1. A Gentleman ....T.S. Arthur. 39

2. True Riches Mrs. L. H. Sigourney. 40

3. God i3 Everywhere T. S. Arthur. 43

4. The Willow, Poppy, and Violet Mrs. L.H. Sigourney. 44

5. The Good are Beautiful T. S. Arthur. 46

Section III - 54

10. The Tortoise and the Swallow 54

12. The Horse and the Goose r : 57

14. Class Opinions 60

Section IV PI

15. The Beggar and the Good Boy Mrs. Goodwin. 61

17. The True Secret of Happiness— Part First T. S. Arthur. 66

18. The True Secrerof Happiness — Part Second 67

20. The Pilgrim and the Rich Knight Mrs. St. Simon. 71

Section V 72

22. The Summer-time 73



Viii CONTENTS.

PA6B

Section VI 78

25. The Twin Sisters Mrs. L. H. JSigaurney. 78

26. Emulation without Envy Miss Edgeworth. 80

27. How to be Happy — Part First 81

28. How to be Happy— Part Second 83

29. Knock Again— Part First 84

30. Knock Again — Part Second 86

31. Sir Edmund Saunders Emma G. Embury. 88

32. Counsels to the Young Horace Mann. 90

33. The Whistle Dr. Franklin. 92

Section VII. ... 93

35. Chase of the Pet Fawn Miss Cooper. 95

38. The Child is Dead 8.1. Prime. 103

Section VIII , 108

41. Disobedience 108

42. The Two Schoolmates 110

43. The Foster-Child— Part First. ...... . .Mrs. L. H. Sigourney. Ill

44. The Foster-Child— Part Second. 113

46. An Eastern Fable 116

Section X " 123

51. The Half is Better than the Whole 123

52. The Boy who Kept his Purpose— Part First 126

53. The Boy who Kept his Purpose— Part Second 128

54. Anecdote of Frederick the Great 130

55. Humanity Rewarded Emma C. Embury. 131

56. The Basket-Maker 132

57. Work Proclaims a Workman 134

Section XI 136

59. The Daisy and the Lark — Part First Hans. C. Andersen. 137

60. The Daisy and the Lark— Part Second. 130

Section XII 143

63. The Mocking-Bird 144

65. Birds of Australia — Part First William Howitt. 147

66. Birds of Australia — Part Second 150

67. The Buzzard Comstock. 153

Section XIII 156

68. Thanksgiving Story Fanny Fern, 156

Section XIV 163

72. Ingenuity and Industry Rewarded Berquin. 163

73. Planting Trees Newcomb. 166

Section XVII 188

84. Honesty the Best Policy 188

85. The Truthful Little Persian 190

86. Two Ways of Telling a Story— Part First H. K. Oliver. 192

87. Two Ways of Telling a Story— Part Second 193

88. A Man is a Man Toliver. 195

Section XVIII 196

92. The Flax ; or the Story of a Life— Part First ...H.C. Andersen. 200

93. The Flax ; or the Story cf a Life— Part Second 203

Section XIX 206

94 Autumn 206

Section XX 21 1

97. Two Neighbors and the Hens 211



CONTENTS. ix

PAGE

Section XXI 217

101. The Observing Judge— Part First 217

102. The Observing Judge— Part Second 219

103. The Observing Judge— Part Third 221

Section XXIII. 253

117. The Snow-Storm— Part First Altered from Wilson. 256

118. The Snow-Storm— Part Second 258

119. The Snow-Storm— Part Third 261

Section XXIV 265

121. The Little Man in Black — Part First Washington Irving. 267

122. The Little Man in Black— Part Second 273

II. PIECES IN VERSE.

Section II 47

6. The Voice of Spring Mary Howitt. 47

7. Spring H.F.Gould. 48

8. Spring Rain 50

9. The Rain-Lesson Mrs. L. H Sigourney. 52

Section III 54

11. The Rook and the Lark 56

13. The Bee, Clover, and Thistle H. 1 Gould. 58

Section IV 61

16. The Beggar-Man Lucy Aikin. 63

19. The Complaints of the Poor Southev. 70

Section V 72

21. The Child's Wish in June Mrs. Gilman. 72

23. The Wheat-Field H F. Gould. 75

24. Summer Woods Mary Howitt. 76

Section VII y3

34. We are Seven William Wordsworth. 93

36. Lucy Gray William Wordsworth. 98

37. The Little Boy that Died J. D. Robinson. 101

39. Eva's Home Altered from Lytton. 105

40. The Child and the Mourners CMrles Mackay. 106

Section VIII 108

45. The Crop of Acorns Mrs. L. H. Sigourney. 115

47. The Old Oaken Bucket Samuel Woodworth. 118

Section IX 120

48. Delay From the German of Weisse. 120

49. One by One 121

50. Now, To-day Adelaide A. Procter. 122

Section XI 136

58o Children in Exile J. T. Fields. 136

Section XII 143

62. The Mocking-Bird Hannah F Gould. 143

64 Birds in Summer Mary Howitt. 145

Section XIII 156

69 The Sale of the Pet Lamb Mary Howitt. 157

70. Cleon and I Charles Mackay. 160

71. The Heritage J. R. Lowell, 161



3C CONTENTS.

t>AGB

Section XIV 163

74 The Planting of the Apple Tree Wm. Cullen Bryant. 168

Section XV 171

75. The Brook Alfred Tennyson. 171

76. Little Streams Mary Howitt. 178

77. The Wind and the Stream William Cullen Bryant. 175

78. The Bird and the Fountain Charlotte Young. 176

Section XVIII 196

89. The Stranger on the Sill T. Buchanan Bead. 196

90. I Remember, I Remember Thomas Hood. 198

91. Little at First, but Great at Last diaries Mackay. 199

Section XIX 206

95. Cornfields Mary Howitt. 208

96. To Autumn John Keats. 209

Section XX 211

98. Trade and Spade Charles Mackay. 212

100. The Battle of Blenheim Bobert Southey. 215

Section XXI , 217

104 The King and the Cottager John G. Saxe. 224

107. Wisdom Unapplied Elizabeth Barrett Browning. 235

Section XXII 244

110. The Mountain Boy Uhland. 244

1X1. Excelsior H. W. Longfellow. 245

112. The Color-Sergeant 247

113. The Boy in the Wilderness George H Boker. 249

114. Song of Marion's Men William Cullen Bryant. 251

Section XXIII 253

115. Winter and Spring Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 253

116. The Snow-Shower William Cullen Bryant. 254

Section XXIV 265

120. Youth and Sorrow Charles Mackay. 265

123. The May Queen— Part First Alfred Tennyson. 277

124 The May Queen— Part Second 279

125. The May Queen— Part Third 282

III. DIALOGUES

Section XI 136

61. The Adopted Child Mrs. Felicia Hermans. 141

Section XVI 177

79. Who is Greatest— Part First Altered from Arthur. 177

80. Who is Greatest— Part Second 179

81. Rain-Making Altered from Livingstone. 181

82. The Evil Adviser— Part First Goodrich. 184

83. The Evil Adviser— Part Second 185

Section XX 213

99. Things by their Right Names 213

Section XXI 217

105. Hasty Judgment— Part First 227

106. Hasty Judgment — Part Second 232

108. Eyes, or no Eyes— Part First Dr. Aiken. 237

109. Eyes, or no Eyes— Part Second . , 241




INTRODUCTORY LESSONS.



I. ARTICULATION.



DEFINITIONS.

ARTICULATION is the distinct utterance of the oral
elements in syllables and words.

2. Okal Elements are the sounds that, uttered separately
or in combination, form syllables and words.

3. Okal Elements are produced by different positions
of the organs of speech, in connection with the voice and
the breath.

4. The principal Organs op Speech are the lips, the
teeth, the tongue, and the palate.

5. Yoice is produced by the action of the breath upon
the larynx. *

6. Oral Elements are divided into three classes:
eighteen tonics, fifteen subtonics, and ten atonics.

7. Tonics are pure tones produced by the voice, with but
slight use of the organs of speech.

8. Subtonics are tones produced by the voice, modified
by the organs of speech.

1 Larynx. — The upper part of the five gristly pieces which form the
trachea or windpipe, consisting of organ of voice.



U NATIONAL THIRD READER.

9. Atonics are mere breathings, modified by the organs
of speech.

10. Letters are characters that are used to represent 01
modify the oral elements.

11. The Alphabet is divided into vowels and consonants.

12. Vowels are the letters that usually represent the
tonia elements. They are a, e, i, o, u, and sometimes y. x

13. A Diphthong is the union of two vowels in one sylla-
ble j a.-:, ou in our.

14. A Digraph, or Improper Diphthong, is the union of
two vowels in a syllable, one of which is silent ; as, oa in
loaf, ou in court.

15. A Triphthong is the union of three vowels in one
syllable ; as, eau in heau, ieu in adieu.

16. Consonants 2 are the letters that usually represent
either subtonic or atonic elements. They are of two kinds,
single letters and combined, including all the letters of the
alphabet, except the vowels, and the combinations ch, sh,
wh, ng ; th subtonic, and th atonic.

17. Labials are letters whose oral elements are chiefly
formed by the lips. They are b, p, w, and wh. M may be
regarded as a nasal labial, as its sound is affected by the
nose. F and v are labia-dentals.

18. Dentals are letters whose oral elements are chiefly
formed by the teeth. They a>rej, s, z, ch, and sh.

19. Linguals are letters whose oral elements are chiefly
formed by the tongue. They are d, I, r, and t. N is a nasal-
lingual ; y, a lingua-palatal, and th, a lingua-dentaL

20. Palatals are letters whose oral elements are chiefly
formed by the palate. They are g and Jc. NG i» a nasal-
palatal.

1 W not a Vowel. — As w, stand- combinations because they are rarely

ing alone, does not represent a pure used in words without having a vow-

or unmodified tone in the English el connected with them in the same

language, it is nci here classified syllable, although their oral elements

with the vowels. may be uttered separately, and with-

' Consonant. — The term conso- out the aid of a vowel. Indeed, they

riant, literally meaning sounding frequently form syllables by them-

tiUfi, is applied to these letters and selves, as in fechlc (W), taken (kn\



ORAL ELEMENTS. 15

21. Cognates are letters whose oral elements are pro-
duced by the same organs, in a similar manner ; thus, / is
a cognate of v ; h of g, &c.

22. Alphabetic Equivalents are letters, or combinations
of letters, that represent the same elements, or sounds ;
thus, i is an equivalent of e, in pzque.

II.
OEAL ELEMENTS.

IN uttering the tonics, the organs of speech should be
fully opened, and the stream of sound from the throat
should be thrown, as much as possible, directly upward
against the roof of the mouth. It is important to produce
the subtonics and atonies with great force, prolonging the
sound sufficiently to give it a full impression on the ear.

The instructor will first require the pupils to pronounce
a catch-word once, and then produce the oral element rep-
resented by the figured vowel, or italic consonant, four
times — thus ; age, — a, a, a, a ; ate, — a, a, a, a : at,— -a, a, a,
a ; ash, — a, a, a, a, &c. He will exercise the class until
each pupil can utter consecutively all the elementary sounds
as arranged in the following

TABLE OF ORAL ELEMENTS.











I.


TONICS.










a


or a, 1


as in


age,


ate.






a,


as in


all,


ban.


a


or a,


u


at,


land.






a, 2


a


bare,


care.




a,


u


art,


arm.






V


«


ask,


glass.



1 Long and Short Vowels.— Alphabetic sound, modified or soft

The attention of the class should be ened by r. In its production, th3

called to the fact that the first ele- lips, placed nearly together, are held

uient, or sound, represented by each immovable while the student tries

of the vowels, is usually indicated to say, a.

by a horizontal line placed over the 3 A Sixth. — The sixth element

letter, and the second sound by a represented by a, is a sound interme-

curved line. diate between a, as heard in at, and

3 A Fifth. — The fifth element, or a, as in arm.. It is produced by pro

t)ound, represented by a, is its first or longing and slightly softening a.



16



NATIONAL THIRD READER.



e or e,


as in he,


these.


6 or 5, a


as in on,


fr&t


e or S,


" elk,


end.




o,


" d«,


pr6ve.


V


" Mr,


ve'rse.


u or u, 3


? cube.


cure.


i or I,


" ice,


child.


u or ii,


" bud,


hiish.


i or I,


" Ink,


inch.




*,


" full,


push.


6 or 6,


" 61d,


home.




on,


" OUT,


house.






n. SUBTONICS.






h, as in


babe,


or5.-


r,«


as in


rake,


bar.


d, «


did,


dim..


fh,


«


this,


with.


9, "


9*0>


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

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