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Richard Green Parker.

The national fifth reader : containing a complete and practical treatise on elocution, select and classified exercises in reading and declamation, with biographical sketches, and copious notes : adapted to the use of students in literature online

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THE



NATIONAL



FIFTH EEADEE:



CONTAINING

A COJl luxUTE AND TRACTICAL TREATISE ON ELOCUTION;

SELECT AND CLASSIFIED EXERCISES IN READING AND

DECK\MATION ; WITH BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES,

AND COPIO JS NOTES : ADAPTED TO THE USE

OF STUDENTS IN LITERATURE.



By EICHAKD GKEENE PAEKEE

AND

J. MADISON WATSON.




A. S. BAENES &: COMPANY,
NEW YORK AND CHICAGO.

1872.



)



LIBRARY

UNf?VER.-fTY OF I



^HJE jMy\TiONyM. ^EF^Iflg Of l^Ey\DEf^3.

COMPLETE IN TWO INDEPENDENT PARTS.



I.

THE NATIONAL READERS.

By PARKER & WATSON,

No. 1. — National Primer, . . . . . ei.pp., 7Cmo.

No. 2. — National First Reader, . . ^3s pp., / tmo.

No. 3. — National Second Reader, . 32ipp., ^emo.

No. 4. — National Third Reader, . . sss pp., f^mo.

No. B. — National Fourth Reader, . los pp., fsmo.

No. 6. — National Fifth Reader, . . goo pp., f2wo.

THE INDEPENDENT READERS.

By J. MADISON WATSON.

The Independent First Reader, . . so pp., /omo.
The Independent Second Reader,, yeo pp., /omo.
The Independent Third Reader, . 24^0 pp., fomo.
The Independent Fourth Reader, . 204. pp., f2mo.
The Independent Fifth Reader, . . s.'io jyp., fsmo.
The National Fifth Reader, .... ceo pp., fsmo.

III.

NATIONAL SPELLING BOOKS.

By J. MADISON WATSON.

National Klementary Speller, . . . feopp., fGmo.
National Pronouncing Speller, . . fsspp., f2mo.



*;(.* The Readers constitute two complete and entirely dis-
tinct series, either of -which are adequate to every \\'ant of
the best schools. The Spellers may accompany either Series.

Entered according to Act of Conp;ress, in tlie year iS66, by

A . S . BARNES & CO.,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern District

of New York.
N. 5th. Q)UQ

PSYC!

• LfBr
Add'l



P

PREFACE. -n'r^



IN the preparation of this volume, we have a^ned to make it a com-
plete and sufficient work for advanced classes in Reading, Elocution,
and English and American Literature ; to furnish, in an available form,
such an amount of biographical, liistorical, classical, orthoepical, and
miscellaneous matter, as to render it highly valuable as a book of ref-
erence ; and to present a collection of jjieces so rich, varied, perspicuous,
and attractive, as to suit all classes of minds, all times, and all occasions.

Part First, in two chapters, embraces a simple, comj)lete, and emi-
nently practical Treatise on Elocution. The princiijles and rules are
stated in a succinct and lucid manner, and followed by examples and
exercises of sufficient number and extent to enable the student thor-
oughly to master each point as presented, as well as to acquire a dis-
tinct comprehension of the parts as a irJigle.

In Part Second, the Selections for Reading and Declamation contain
what are regarded as the choicest gems of English literature. The
works of many authors, ancient and modera, have been consulted, and
more than a hundred standard writers, of the English language, on both
sides of the Atlantic, have been laid under contribution to enable the
authors to present a collection, rich in all that can inform the understand-
ing, improve the taste, and cultivate the heart, and which, at the same
time, shall furnish every variety of style and subject to exemplify the
principles of Rhetorical delivery, and form a finished reader and elocu-
tionist. These selections have been arranged in a regularly graded
course, and strictly classified with regard to the nature of the subjects.
Although we have not been studious of novelty, presenting only what
we regarded as suitable, intrinsically excellent, and most truly indica-
ting the mode and range of thought of the writer, it will be seen that
a large proportion of this collection is composed of pieces to be found
in no similar work.

Much care and labor have been devoted to the orthoepical department.
The pronunciation of all words liable to be mispronounced is indicated
once in each paragraph, or at the bottom of the page where they occur.
With respect to the v.ords about the jDronunciation of which ortlioe-
pists differ, v;e have adopted the most recent and reliable authority.

Classical aud historical allusions, so common among the best vrriters,
have in all cases been explained ; and, if the authors have not been de-

907



iy P KEF ACE.

ceived, every aid has been given in the notes, that the reader may readily
comprehend the meaning of the writer. This has been done in a manner
more full and satisfactory than they have seen in any other collection,
and in every instance at the bottom of the page where the difficulty
occurs, so that the reader may not be subjected to the trouble of con-
sulting a dictionary, or other books of reference, — a work which, in
general, if done at all, is done wdth extreme reluctance, even by ad-
vanced pupils.

In order that the student may still more thoroughly understand what
he reads, and for the convenience of that large class of readers who
have not leisure to peruse voluminous memoirs of distinguished men,
and yet would be unwilling to forego all knowledge of them, we have
introduced concise Biographical Sketches of authors from whose works
extracts have been selected, and of persons whose names occur in the
Reading Exercises. These sketches, presenting a clear and distinct
outline of the life, and jDroducing a clear and distinct impression of
the character, furnish an amount of useful and available information
rarely surpassed by memoirs of greater extent and pretension. Lists
of the names of authors, both alphabetical and chronological, have
also been introduced, thus rendering this a convenient text book for
students in English and Ameacan Literature.

The imj^rovements made in the revision of this work are numerous
and important. The Treatise on Elocution has been carefully elabora-
ted, involving the introduction of phonetic exercises, a more critical
orthoepical notation, and many most apt and interesting examples for
illustration. Several of these examples under each section are left wi-
marJced, thus affording students opportunities to exercise their judg-
ment, taste, and discjimination.

The collection of Reading Lessons has been greatly improved by
judicious omissions, and the substitution of new dialogues, ballads,
dramatic lyrics, and other rhetorical pieces that are more varied and
inspiriting, and better adapted to elocutionary readings, both public
and private. The classification of these lessons is more systematic and
thorough than that ever before attempted in any corresponding work.
They are divided into formal sections, in each of which only one lead-
ing subject is treated, or one important element of Elocution rendered
prominent. All practical aids are furnished by more copious notes,
new indexes, etc.

New Yokk, June, ISMw



CONTENTS.



I. ELOCUTIOIT.

I. ORTHOEPY.

PAGB

Articulattox . 20

Definitions 20

Oral Elements 23

Cognates 24

Alphabetic Equivalents 24

Oral Elements Combined 26

Errors in Articulation 28

Words 29

Analysis of Words 29

Rules in Articulation 32

Exercises in Articulation 33

Phonetic Laughter , . 35

StLL ASICVTION 36

Definitions 36

Formation of Syllables 36

Rules in Syllabication 37

Exercises in Syllabication 38

Accent 40

Definitions 40

Exercises in Accent 40

Words Distinguished by Accent 41

Accent Changed by Contrast 43

II EXPRESSION.

Emphasis , 43

Definitions 43

Rules in Emphasis 44

Exercises in Emphasis 44

Slur 47

Exercises in Slur 47

Inflections 50

Definitions ^ 53

Rules in Inflections , , 54

Exercises in Inflections 50



vi CONTENTS.

pagk

MoDULATIo:^T 58

Pitch 58

Force GO

Quality 63

Rate C5

Monotone , G7

Exercises in Monotone G8

Personation , C9

Exercise in Personation TO

Pauses TO

Definitions TO

Eules for Pauses Tl

Suspensive Quantity , T3

Exercises in Pauses ........ c T3



II. READINGS.

I. PIECES IN PROSE.

Section 1 77

1. The IMonths Henry Ward Beecher. T7

Section II 85

3, Never Despair 85

5. A Golden Coppersmith 89

G. Noble Revenge Thomas de Quincey. 92

7. Beauty Ralph Waldo Emerson. 94

Section III 97

9. Maternal Affection 100

10. The Good Wife Donald G. Mitchell. 101

11. Influence of Home Richard Henry Dana. 103

13. The Widow and her Son— Part First Washington Irdng. 106

14. The Widow and her Son — Part Second 110

Section IV , 113

15. Biography of Jacob Hays William Cox. 113

16. Peter Pounce and Parson Adams Henry Fielding. 117

19. A Curtain Lecture of Mrs. Caudle.. Douglas Jerrold. 126

Section V 129

22. Broken Hearts — Part First Washington Irving. 134

23. Broken Hearts— Part Second 136

27. Selected Extracts Henry Ward Beecher. 144

Section VI 1 47

29. The Barbarities of War Thomas Chalmers. 1-18

33. The Siege of Leydcn John Lathrop Motley. 157

Section VII 1G4

37. Christopher Columbus W<t.s]iington Irving. 165

38. Return of Columbus William H Prescott. 166

39. The Revolutionary Alarm George Bancroft. 170



C N T E N T S . vii

PAOR

Section VIII 180

44 Wants — Part First James Kirke Paulding. 180

45. Wants— Part Second ,183

40. Wants— Part Third 184

Section IX 198

51. Work Thomas Caiiyle. 109

53. Study OrciUe Deicey. 204

Section X 207

. 54. Letters D. O. Mitchell. 207

55. Select Passages in Prose 210

I. Good use of Memory. II. Injudicious Ilaste in Study —
Locke. III. Studies — Bacon. IV, Books— Channing.
V. The Bible— iZ«./^.

56. Buying Books Ilenry Ward Beecher 214

57. Selected Extracts Thomas de Quincey. 217

Section XI 221

59. The Poet and his Critics Washington Allston. 224

Section XII 230

01. Ancient and Modern Writers Charles Sumner 230

63. Sound and Sense Robert Chambers. 234

64. The Power of Words E. P. Whipple. 237

66. Parallel between Pope and Dryden Dr Samuel Johnson. 243

Section XIII , 247

67. Charge against Lord Byron Francis Jeffrey. 247

70. View of the Coliseum Orville Deicey. 255

Section XIV 257

72. Scene with a Panther Charles Brockden Broini. 257

73. Count Fathom's Adventure— Part First 2\ G. Smollett. 2G1

74. Count Fathom's Adventure— Part Second 263

76. The Rattlesnake William Gilmore Simms. 270

Section XV . . 275

77. Irving and Macaulay — Part First Wm. M. Thackeray. 275

78. Irving and Macaulay — Part Second 277

70. The Puritans Thomas B. Macaulay 280

82. Advantages of Adversity Edward Everett. 284

85. Liberty ... Orville Bewey. 201

Section XVI. 203

87. The Death of Hamilton Eiiphalct Nott. 204

90. Glory , Br. Francis Wayland. 209

Section XVII , . 304

92. The Stolen Rifle. Washington Irving. 304

93. The Tomahawk submissive to Eloquence John Neat 305

96. Marius in Prison Thomas de Quincey. 311

Section XIX 338

107. Daniel Webster— Part First Edward Everett. 330

108. Daniel Webster— Part Second 341

109. From a Historical Address Baniel Webster 343



viii C O N T E N T rf .

PAGB

110. Public Virtue Henry Clay. 346

111. Wasliington's Sword and Franklin's Staff /. Q. Adams. 043

Section XX 350

113. Paul Flemming Resolves Henry Waclsworth Longfellow. 353

115. Life Horace Binney Wallace. 357

Section XXI 359-

IIG. Blennerhassett's Temptation William Wirt. 359

Section XXII 370

119. Character of Scott William H Prescott. 370

120. Scene from Ivanhoe .Sir Walter Scott. 373

121. Sliakspeare Br. Johnson. 378

Section XXIV 400

130. Our Honored Dead Henry Ward Beecher. 403

132. Death of the Old Trapper— Part First. ... . .James F. Cooper. 406

133. Death of the Old Trapper— Part Second ... 410

Section XXVI 436

140. Scenes from Pickwick — The Dilemma Charles Dickens. 436

141. Scenes from Pickwick — Speech of Sergeant Buzfuz 440

142. Scenes from Pickwick — Sam Weller as Witness 448

143. My Oratorical Experience Nathaniel Haicthorne. 447

Section XXVII 450

145. Forest Trees Washington Irving. 452

147. Landscape Beauty Francis Jeffrey. 458

149. Elemsnts of the Swiss Landscape George B. Cheevcr. 4G3

Section XXX 485

157. Character of Hamlet William Hazlitt. 485

Section XXXI 505

162. Society the Great Educator Orville Dewey. 505

163. The Schoolmaster and the Conqueror Henry Brougham. 507

164. Intellectual Power James H. Hammond. 509

165. Moral Progress of the American People Wm. H Seicard. 511

Section XXXII 515

168. Hymns , Henry Ward Beecher. 521

Section XXXIII 532

173. Select Passages in Prose 535

I. Evidence of a Creator — Tillotson. II. Nature Pro-
claims a Deity — Chateaubriand. III. The LTnbeliever —
Chalmers. IV, Blessings of Religious Faith — Davy.
Section XXXIV 543

175. The Poet H. B. Wallace. 543

177. The Influence of Poetry William E. Channing. 547

Section XXXVII 575

183. Milton — Part First Tliomas Babbington Macaulay. 575

187. Milton— Part Second 577

Section XXXVIII 583

191. The Knocking at the Gate, in Macbeth. . Thomas de Quincey. 587
Section XXXIX 5!)0

193. Omniprosoncc nnd Omnisdonce of Go<l AdiHaon. 5d3



CONTENTS. ix.

IL PIECES IN VERSE.

PAGB

Section 1 77

2. Hymn to the Seasons James Thomson. 81

Section II 85

4. Now Charles Mackai/. 87

Section III 97

8. Sabbath Morning James Grahame. 97

13. An Old Haunt 105

Section V 129

20. Thanatopsis William Cullen Bryant. 129

21. Euthanasia Willis Oaylord Clark. 132

24. Lines Relating to Curran's Daughter Thomas Moore 139

25. The Bridge of Sighs Thomas Hood. 140

2G. Select Passages in Verse 142

I. Succession of Iluman Beings. II. Death of the Youngs
and Fair. III. A Lady Drowned — Pi odor. IV. Life of
Man — Beaumont. V. Coronach — Scott. VI. Immortal-
ity — it. R. Dana.

Section VI ., 147

28. Fuller's Bird'. Bryan Walter Proctor. 147

SO. Bingcn on the Rhine Mrs. Caroline Norton. 150

82. Battle of Waisaw Thomas Campbell. 155

34. The Happy Warrior William Wordsworth. 160

35. The Conqueror's Grave William Cullen Bryant. 162

Section VII 164

36. Destiny of America Oeorge Berkeley. 164

40. The Revolutionary Rising Thomas Buchanan Read. 172

41. The Settler Albert B. Street. 174

42. The Star-Spangled Banner Francis Scott Key. 177

<3. The American Flag Joseph Rodman Drake. 178

^?ECTI0N VIII 180

47. The Deserted Village— Part First Oliver Ooldsmith. 185

48. The Deserted Village— Part Second 189

49. The Deserted Village— Part Third 192

Section IX 198

50. The Power of Art Charles Sprague. 198

52. Address to the Indolent James Thompson. 202

Section XII 230

62. Language Oliver Wendell Holmes. 232

65. From the Essay on Criticism Alexander Pope. 240

Section XIII 247

68. Lord Byron Robert Pollok. 249

69. Midnight — The Coliseum Lord Byron. 258

71. The Dying Gladiator Lord Byron. 256

Section XIV . .* 257

75. Darkness Lord Byron. 267



X CONTENTS.

PAGB

Section XV 275

80. The Pilgrim's Vision Olicer Wendell Holmes. 282

81. The Rocb of the Pilg-rims George P. Morris. 283

83. The Graves of the Patriots James Gates Perchal. 287

84. Antiquity of Freedom William Cullen Bryant. 289

Section XVI 293

86. The Inquiry Charles Mackay. 293

88. Pass On, Relentless World George Lunt. 295

80. The World for Sale = Rev. Ralph Hoyt. 207

91. Passing Away Rev. John Pierpont. COl

Section XVII C04

94. The Baron's Last Banquet Albert G. Greene. 307

95. Bernardo del Carpio Mrs. Felicia Ucmans. 309

Section XVIII 313

97. The Annoyer Nathaniel Parker Willis. 313

98. The Palm and the Pine Bayard Taylor. 815

99. Fair Ines Thomas Hood. 317

100. Love Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 318

101. Lady Clare Aljred Tennyson. 321

103. Maud Muller John Greenleaf Whiitier. 324

103. The Dream— Part First Lord Byron. 327

104. The Dream— Part Second SCO

Section XIX 338

108. A Great Man Departed 308

Section XX 350

113. Procrastination Edward Young. 350

114. Ode to Adversity Thomas Gray. 355

Section XXI 359

118. Parrhasius and the Captive Natha-dcl I arker Willis. 365

Section XXIII 390

125. Select Passages in Verse 390

L Patriotism — Scott. II. Ambition- -Byroi. III. Indepen-
dence — Thomson. IV. The Car/tive's Dream — Mrs. F.
Hemans. V. William Tell— Bryant. VI. Tell of Swit-
zerland — Knowles. VII. How Sleep the Brave — Collins.
VIII. The Greeks at Therm'-.pylce — Lyron.

126. Greece Lord Byron. 394

127. Song of the Greeks, 1823 Thomas Campbell. 396

128. Marco Bozzaris Fitz-Greene Hallcck. 398

Section XXIV 400

129. The Closing Year George D. Prentice. 400

131. The Holy Dead Mrs. L. H. Sigourney. 405

134. Elegy in a Country Church-Yard Thomas Gray. 414

Section XXV 417

135. The Phantom Ship 417

136. The Drowned Mariner Elizabeth Oakes Smith. 419

137. The Diver SchUler. 42-2



CONTENTS. Xi

PACB

138. Morte d Arthur Alfred Tennysm. 42(3

139. The Skeleton in Armor U. W. Longfellow. 434

Section XXVII ' 4o0

144. A Forest Nook .Albert B. Street. 430

14G. God's First Temples William Cullen Bryant. 455

148. Morning Hymn to Momit Blanc Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 4C1

150. Alpine Scenery Lord Byron. 4GG

Section XXVIII 400

151. Select Passages in Verse 4U0

I. Early Dawn^Shelley. II. Dayhreak—Longfelloic. III.
DsLyhreak— Shelley. IV. Sunrise in South America —
Bowles. V. Dawn— Willis. VI. Uormng— Milton. VIL
Morning on the Rhine— Boicles. Vlll. Morning Sounds
^Seattle. IX. Early Rising— i7«?'(?i5.
153. Select Passages in Verse 473

I. Invocation to Night— J! F. Hollings. II. A Twilight
'Pictmc—Whiiticr. III. Evening— (7r(?^3/. IV. Night—
Coleridge. V. Night at Corinth — Byron. VI. A Sum-
mer's Night — Bailey. VII. Night and Death — White.
VIII. mg\\t— Shelley. IX. The ^loon— Charlotte Smith.
X. The Stars — Darwin.
Section XXIX ; 479

153. Lochinvar's Ride Sir Walter Scott. 47

154. The King of Denmark's Rido Mrs. Caroline Norton. 480

155. Sheridan's Ride Thomas Buchanan Read. 483

156. The Ride from Ghent to Ais Bohcrt Browning. 483

Section XXXII 515

IGG. To a Skylark Percy B. Shelley. 515

107. Select Passages in Verse 513

I. Voice of the Wind — Henry Taylor. II. Ministrations of

Nature — Coleridge. III. Moonlight — Shakspcare. IV.

The Bells of Ostend — Bowles. V. Music — Shakspcare.

VI. Music — Shelley. VII. Pastoral Music — Byron.
100. The Passions William Collins. 524

170. Alexander's Feast Johii Drydcn. 527

Section XXXIII 533

171. Hamlet's Soliloquy Williayn Shakspcare. 533

172. Cato's Soliloquy Joseph Addison. 533

174. Intimations of Immortality William Wordsworth. 537

Section XXXIV 543

17G. To the Spirit of Poetry Francis S. Osgood. 544

178. To the Poet .' William Cullen Bryant. 540

Section XXXV 551

179. The Bells Edgar A. Poe. 551

ISO. The Cry of the Human Elizabeth B. Broicning. 5.")5

181. The Raven Edgar A. Poe. 558.



xii CONTENTS.

Section XXXTII 5,5

188. Satan's Eucounter with Death John Milton. 580

189. The Dying Christian to his Soul ...Alexander Pope. 583

Section XXXIX 590

192. Messiah Alexander Pope. 590

194. God J.n. Derzhaun 59G



III. DIALOGUES.

Section IV ! . 113

17. Conversations after Marriage— Part First. . . .R. B. Sheridan. 120

18. Conversations after Marriage — Part Second 123

Section VI 147

31. Lochiel's Warning Thomas Campbell. 153

Section XI " 221

53. Gil Bias and the Old Archbishop Alain Le Sage. 221

GO. The Sensitive Author R. B. Sheridan. 227

'Section XVIII 313

105. Scene from the Lady of Lyons. .Sir Edward Bulwer Lytton. 333

JSection XXI 359

117. Roger Ascham and Lady Jane Grey W. S. Landor. 382

Section XXII 370

122. Scene from King Richard III William Shakspeare. 381

123. Norval John Home. 384

124. Scene from Catiline George Croly. 387

Section XXX 485

158. Scenes from Hamlet — Part First Yiilliam Shakspeare. 487

159. Scenes from Hamlet — Part Second 493

160. Scenes from Hamlet— Part Third 498

. 161. Scenes from Hamlet — Part Fourth 501

Section XXXVI 562

182. The Saracen Brothers— Part First 562

183. The Saracen Brothers — Part Second 565

184. Brutus and Titus Nathaniel Lee. 568

85. The Phrensy of Orra Joanna Baillie. 571

Section XXXVIII 583

190. Murder of King Duncan WiUiam Shakspeare. 583



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF AUTHORS."



Adams, John Q., 348.
Addison, Josepu, 533, 593.
Allston, Wasuington, 224.
Bacon, Francis, 211.
Bailey, P. J., 476,
Baillte, Joanna, 571.
Bancroft, George, 170.
Beattie, James, 472.
Beaumont, Francis, 142.
Beeciier, H. W., 77, 144, 214, 403,

521.
Berkeley, George, 164.
Bowles, W. L., 470, 472, 519.
Brougham, Henry, 507.
Brown, C. B. 257.
Browning, Robert, 483.
Browning, Elizabeth B., 555.
Byrant, W. C, 129, 102, 289, 392,

455, 549.
Byron, G. G., 253, 256, 267, 327, 391,

394, 406, 475, 520.
Campbell, Thomas, 153, 155, 396.
Carlyle, Thomas, 199.
Chalmers, Thomas, 148, 536.
Chambers, Robert, 234.
Channing, W. E., 212, 547.
Chateaubriand, F. A., 536.
Cheever, G. B., 463.
Clark, Willis G., 132.
Clay, Henry, 340.
Coleridge, Hartley, 475.
Coleridge, S. T., 318, 461, 518.
Collins, William, 393, 524.
Cooper, J. Fenimore, 406.
Cox, William, 113,



Croly, George, 387, 474.

Dana, R. H., 103, 143.

Darwin, Erasmus, 478.

Davy, Humphrey, 537.

De Quincey, T., 92, 217, 311, 587.

Derzhavin, G. R., 596.

Dewey, Orville, 204. 255, 291, 505.

Dickens, Charles, 436.

Drake, J. R., 178.

Dryden, John, 527.

Emerson, R. W., 94.

Everett, Edward, 284, 339.

Fielding, Henry, 117.

Gibbon, Edward, 95.

Goldsmith, Oliver, 185.

Grahame, James, 97.

Gray, Thomas, 355, 414.

Greene, Albert G., 307.

Hall, Robert, 213,

Halleck, Fitz-Greene, 398.

Hammond, James H., 509.

Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 447,

Hazlitt, William, 485.

Hemans, Mrs. F., 309, 392.

Hollings, J. F., 473,

Holmes, 0, W„ 232, 282.

Home, John, 384.

Hood, Thomas, 140, 317.

HoYT, Ralph, 297.

Hume, David, 237,

Hlt^dis, James, 473,

Irving, W., 106, 134, 105, 304, 452.

Jeffrey, Francis, 247, 458,

Jerrold, Douglas, 126,

Johnson, Samuel, 243, 378.



^ The numbers here given refer to Selections. For Biographical Sketches,
see Chronological List ot Authors.



XIV



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF AUTHORS.



Key, Francis Scott, 177.

Knowles, J. S., 392.

Landor, W. S., 362.

Lee, Nathaniel, 568.

Le Sage, Alain, 221.

Locke, John, 210.

Longfellow, H. W., 352, 434, 469.

LuNT, George, 295.

Lytton, E. Bulwer, 333.

Macaulay, T. B., 280, 575.

Mackay, Charles, 87, 293.

Milton, John, 471, 580.

Mitchell, D. G., 101, 207.

Moore, Thomas, 139.

Morris, George P., 283.

Motley, John L., 157.

Neal, John, 305.

Norton, Caroline E., 150, 480.

NoTT, Eliphalet, 294.

Osgood, Francis S., 544.

Paulding, J. K., 180.

Percival, J. G., 287.

PiERPONT, John, 301.

PoE, Edgar A., 551, 558.

Pollock, Robert, 249.

Pope, Alexander, 240, 583, 590.

Prentice, George D., 400.

Prescott. W. IL, 166, 370.

Proctor, B. W., 142, 147.

Read, T. Buchanan, 172, 482.

Schiller, J. C. F. von, 422.



Scott, Walter, 143, 373, 390, 479,
Seward, William H., 511.
Shakspeare, Wm., 381, 487, 518,

519, 532, 583.
Shelley, P. B., 409, 470, 477, 515,

520.
Sheridan, R. B. 120.
Sigourney, Mrs., 405.
SIMMS, W. G. 270.
Smith, Charlotte, 478.
Smith, Elizabeth Oakes, 419.
Smollett, T. G., 261.
Sprague, Charles, 198.
Street, A. B., 174, 450.
Sumner, Charles, 230.
Taylor, Bayard, 315.
Taylor, Henry, 518.
Tennyson, Alfred, 321, 426.
Thackeray, William M., 275.
Thomson, James, 81, 202, 391.
Tillotson, John, 535.
Wallace, H. B , 357, 543.
Wayland, FrxVncis, 299.
Webster, Daniel, 343,
Whipple, E. P., 237.
White, J. Blanco, 477.
Whittier, John G., 324, 474.
Willis, N. P., 313, 365, 471.
Wirt, William, 359.
Wordsworth, William, 160, 537.
Young, Edward, 350.



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF AUTHORS.'



PAGE

Bacon, Francis 211

Shakspeare, William 383

Beaumont, Francis 142

Milton, John 582

TiLLOTsoN, John 535

Dryden, John 531

Locke, Joun 210

Lee, Nathaniel 571

Le Sage, Alain 224

Addison, Joseph 534

Young, Edward 351

Berkeley, George 165

Pope, Alexander. .. 243

Thomson, James 85

Fielding, Henry 120

Johnson, Samuel 24G

Hume, David 237

Gray, Thomas 350

Collins, William 526

Smollett, T. G 267

Home, John 387

Goldsmith, Oliver 196

Darwin, Erasmus 478

Beattie, James 472

Gibbon, Edward 95

Derzhavin, G. R 598

Smith, Charlotte 478

Sheridan, R. B 126

Schiller, J. C. F. von ' 426

Bowles, W. L 470

Baillie, Joanna 574

HuRDis, James 473

Hall, Robert, 213

Grahame, James 99



Adams, John Q

Chateaubriand, F. A....
Wordsworth, William.,

Scott, Walter



Online LibraryRichard Green ParkerThe national fifth reader : containing a complete and practical treatise on elocution, select and classified exercises in reading and declamation, with biographical sketches, and copious notes : adapted to the use of students in literature → online text (page 1 of 53)