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Richard Green Parker.

The national fifth reader: containing a treatise on elocution; exercises in reading and declamation; with biographical sketches, and copious notes. Adapted to the use of students in English and American literature online

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NATIONAL SERIES.— No. V



THE

NATIONAL

FIFTH READEE:

CONTAININO

A TREATISE ON ELOCUTION;

EXERCISES IN

READIXG AND DECLAMATION;

WITH

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES, AND COPIOUS NOTES.

ADAPTED TO THE USE OF STUDENTS IN

ENGLISH Ai\D AMERICAX LITERATURE.

BY

RICHARD G. PARKER, A.M.,

AND

J. MADISON WATSON.




NEW YORK:

A. S. BAENES & Co., Ill & 113 WILLIAM STREET,

(corner op JOHN STREET.)

tOU> BY BOOUXLLEBS, eXNKBALLT, TBB0U6II0UT THE TrNirXD BTATM.

kv

1867.



THE NEW EDITION OF THIS BOOK.



jdsA^ your bookseller for the New Edition of the
National Fifth Reader, printed from entirely New
Plates, co7itaining mav/y a7id great improvements in
arrangement^ and with man/y additional selections
of great value, while nea^^ly alt of the old inatter is
retained,

A.lt?iough thus improved the book is sold at the
same price, and, by means of a conve9iie?it index, can
be used readily in the same class with tlie Old Edi^
tion.



Entered, according to act of Congress, in the year 1S57, by

A. 8. BARNES & Co.,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States for the Southern
District of New York.



/^ c1mC« Tt)»^



Add to Ub«

GIFT



PREFACE.



1^61



IN the preparation of tin's volume, we have aimed to make il a
complete and sufficient work for advanced classes in Reading,
Elocution, and English and American Literature; to furnish, in
an available form, such an amount of biographical, historical,
classical, orthoepical, and miscellaneous matter, as to render it
highly valuable as a book of reference ; and to present a collec-
tion of pieces so rich, varied, perspicuous, and attractive, as to
suit all classes of minds, all times, and all occasions.

Part First, in two chapters, embraces a simple, complete, and
eminently practical Treatise on Elocution. The principles and
rules are stated in a succinct and lucid manner, and followed by
examples and exercises of sutBcient number and extent to enable
the student thoroughly to master each point as presented, as well
as to acquire a distinct comprehension of the parts as a whole.

In Part Second, the Selections for Reading and Declamation
contain what are regarded as the choicest gems of English lit-
erature. The works of many authors, ancient and modern, have
been consulted, and more than a hundred standard writers ol
the English language, on both sides of the Atlantic, have been
laid under contribution to enable the authors to present a collec-
tion, rich in all that can inform the understanding, improve the
taste, and cultivate the heart, and which, at the same time, shall
furnish every variety of style and subject to exemplify the prin
ciples of Rhetorical delivery, and form a finished leader and
elocutionist. These selections have been arranged in a regulaily
graded course, and strictly classified with regard to the nature o.
the subjects. Although we have not been studious of noveltv,
presenting only what we regarded as suitable, intrinsically excel-
lent, and most truly indicating the mode and range of thought -
of the writer, it will be seen that a large proportion of this col-
Itjction is composed of pieces to be found in no similar work.

' 374



/.



PKKFACK



Much care and labor have been devoted to tlie orthoepica!
department. The pronunciation of all words liable to be mis-
pronounced is indicated once iu each paragraph, or at the bottom
of the page where they occur. With respect to the words about
the pronunciation of which orthoepists diS'er, we have adopted
the most recent and reliable authority.

Classical and historical allusions, so common among the best
writers, have in all cases been explained; and if the authois
have not been deceived, every aid has been given in the note^,
that the reader may readily comprehend the meaning of the
writer. This has been done in a manner more full and satisfac-
tory than they have seen in any other collection, and in every
instance at the bottom of the page where the difficulty occurs,
so that the reader may not be subjected to the trouble of turning
to an index, or consulting a dictionary, — a work which, in general
if done at all, is done with extreme reluctance, even by advanced
pupils.

In order that the student may still more thoroughly under-
stand what he reads, and foi- the convenience of that large class
of readers who have not leisure to peruse voluminous memoirs
of distinguished men, and yet would be unwilling to forego all
knowledge of them, we have introduced concise Biographical
Sketches of authors from whose works extracts have been se-
lected, and of persons whose names occur in the Reading Exer-
cises. These sketches, presenting a clear and distinct outline
of the life, and producing a clear and distinct impression of thr
character, furnish an amount of useful and available information
rarely surpassed by memoirs of gieater extent and pretension.
Lists of the names of authors, both alphabetical and chronolog-
ical, have also been introduced, thus rendering this a convenient
text-book for students :n English and American Literature.



CONTENTS.



PART l.-ELOCUTION.



CHAPTER I.— ORTHOEPY.

rACB

Sbction T. — Articulation . lo

Definitions 15

Table of Oral Elements 17

Cognates 18

Alpliabetic Equivalents 19

Spelling by Sounds 20

Errors in Articulation 21

Exercises in Articulation 22

Section II. — Syllabication 25

Formation of Syllables 25

Rules for the Formation of Syllables 26

Exercise 27

Section III. — Accent 29

Words Distinguished by Accent 29

Accent Changed by Contrast 30

CHAPTER II.— EXPRESSION.

Section I. — E.mhhasis 31

Rules for the Use of Emphasis 32

Exercises 32

Section II. — Slur 35

Exercises 35

Section III. — Inflections 89

Rides for the Use of Inflections 41

Section IV. — Modulation 47

Pitch 47

Force ; 50

Quality 5i

Rate 5fi

Section V. — Monotonb 53

Exercises 5'.)

Sbotion VI.— Personation 60

Exercise 60

Section VII. — Pauses 61

Rules foi the Use of Pauses 61

Suspensive Quan tity 63

General Rule 64

Exercise 64



C ) N r K N 'J' 8 .

PART 11 -EXERCISES LN READING.

I. PIECES IN PROSE.

ptoa

1. The Months H. W. Beecher. G7

8. On Hesuling Edward Gibbon. 76

4. Never Despair 77

7. Maternal Artwtion Scrap Book. 84

8. Shaking Hands Edzvard Everett. 85

10 Peter Pounce and Parson Adams Jlenry Fielding. 92

11. Noble Revenge Tlionms Dt Quinc^y. 05

13. A Golden Coppersmith 99

1 4 The Hermit of Niagara Mrs. Sigoumey. 102

It). Broken Hearts Washington (rving. 109

17. Broken Hearts — concluded Ill

22. Selected Extmcts H. W. Beecher. 123

24. The Barbarities of War Tfrnnas Chalmers. 1 28

26. The Cost of Military Glory Sidiiey SmUh. 133

28. Biography of Jacob Hays William Cox. 138

5^0. The Uses of History Washington Irving. 143

31. Ancient and Modern Writers Oiarles Sumner. 145

33. Return of Columbus W. 11. Prescott. 148

35. (character of Louis the Fourteenth T. B. Macaulay. 153

36. Queen Elizabeth David Hume. 155

88. The Good Wife D. G. Mitchell. 160

89. Scene with a Panther C. B. Brown. 163

41. Work Thmm Carlyle. 168

43. Study Orville Dewey. 173

45. Wants J. K. Paulding. 178

46. Wants — continued 180

47. Wants— concluded 181

61. Letters D G .Mitchell. 197

64. Washington and Napoleon J T. I/eadle}/. 205

67. Rural Life in England in 1763 George limu-rqft. 210

68. Panegyric on England Edward Everett. 213

60. Sound and Sense Robert Chambers. 21 8

61. The Power of Words E. f Whipple. 221

63. Parallel between Pope and Dryden Samuel Johnson. 228

64. The Puritans T. B. Macaulay. 231

66. Advantages of Adversity to our Forefatherg Edward Everett. 233

69. Liberty Orville Dewey. 241

72. Influence of Home R. H. Dana. 249

74. The Widow and h(M- Son Washington Irving. 253

75. The Widow and lier Son — concluded 250

77 . Glory Francis Wayland. 262

79. Westminster Abbey Washington Irving. 267

80 Westminster Abbey— concluded 2t)9

82. Danit. Webster Ethcard Everett. 273

83. l);iniel Webster — concluded 275

84. From a Historical Address Dajiiel Web.<ifer. 277

87. Chai Lce ag.iinst Lord Byron Francis Jejf'rei/ 285

90. Vitw of tbe Coliseum Onullr Pcuo/ 2'.»3

93 Th.' b.atb of HamilU.n Eliph.dei Noit. 2!H'



CONTKNTS. 7

VAQM

96. Sklbct Passages in I'rose 800

1. Good Use <jf Memory. II. Injudicious Haste in Study —
Locke. III. Studies — Bacon. IV. Books — Channing.

V. Tlie Bible— 7/a/Z.

96. Buying Books. U. W. Beecher. 304

98. Select Passages in Prose 309

I. A True Uan— Scott. II. A True Woman— 5cott. III. The
Power of a Word — Latidor. IV. Moral Force of Ex-
ample — JuJye McLean. V. Law — Hooker. VI. Truth
and Falsehood — Milton.

99. Truth and Falsehood Dr. Johmm. 311

101 . Count Fathom's Adventure T. G. SmolleU. 316

102. Count Fathom's Adventure — concluded 318

104. The Rjittlesnake W. G. Simms. 325

109. Shakspeare Zh-. Johnson. 344

110. Hamlet's Instruction to the Players Shakspeare. 347

114. Paul Flemmiug Resolves U. W. L&ngJ'ellow. 356

116. Beauty R. W. Emerson. 360

118. Death of the Old Trapper J. Fennimore Cooper. 365

119. Death of the Old Trapper— concluded 369

121. The Poet and his Criti(»5 Washington Allston. 375

131. A Curtain Lecture of Mrs. Caudle Douglas Jerrold. 404

133. Blennerhassett's Temptation William Wirt. 412

136. Public Virtue Ileiiry Clay. 420

137. Washington's Sword and Franklin's Staff J. Q. Adams. 422

139. Forest Trees Washinyton Irving. 427

145. Speech of Sergeant Huzfuz Charles Dickens. 445

148. L!indsc:ii>e Beauty Francis Jeffrey. 459

151. Elements of the Swiss Landscape. G. B. Cheever. 4()8

153. Cicero at the Grave of Archimedes R. C. Winthrop. 473

157. Hymns //. W. Belcher. 48^

160. The St<.len Ritle Washinyton Irving. 49b

161. The Tomahawk submissive to Eloquence John Neal. 499

162. Marius in Prison Thomas De (^uincey. 501

164. Select Pas.sagks in Prose 505

I. The Stream of Life — Ifel>er. II. Life compared to a River
— Davy III. hleal Character of Life—/?. //. Dana.
IV. Mun's Glory passeth away — WatMtn. V. Evidence
of a Creator in the Structure of the World — Tillotxon.

VI. Nature pr»»cl!iinjs a IXnty — Chateaubriand. VII. The
Blessings of Religi()us Faith — Davy.

165. 'Y\\e Unbeliever Chalmers. 510

168. The Resurrection Bible. 514

170. Moral Progress of the American People W. II. Seward. 518

171. Selkct Pas.sages in Prosk 522

1. Onr Common Schools — Everett. II. What Youth should
Learn — Hare. III. What Youth should be Taught —
Lavdor. IV. Education of the Heart— Sco^<. V. Duty
— Dckens. VI. Air and Exercise — lAtndon Quarterly Re-
view. VII. Pampering the Body at tlie Soul's Ex|>ense
—Everett. VIII. The Nece.ssity of Mental Labor— &ot/.
IX. Aptitude of Youth 'or Knowledge — Brougfuaa.



8 CONTKNT8.

rxna

172. Tlie Schoolmaster and the CoiKiiieior fTennf nroiighum oL'S

176. 'I'he Poet .' //' />'. Wulla-t. 540

178. Dignity of Poetry J. h. Xuur.se. 545

181. Apostrophe to the Suu //. Li. W'oUace. 553

184. The Sea //A". HW/a<,-e. 558

V.)0. Milton 7' />'. MucauUty. 675

1S»1. Miitou — c:oucln<led 578

IHG. liie Knocking at the Gate, in Macbeth Thom/i.'i De f^umrry. 5'.>2

1U7. Lile 11. B. WuLUice. 5i>5

II. PIECES IN VERSE.

2 Hymn tf) the Seasons James Thomson. 71

5. l'<Minsy I vaiiia 7' li. Rectd. 79

b. Siil>l)atli Morning Jamen (rrahame. 81

9. '1 lie Uream of the Reveler CItarUs Muckay. 89

12. Life in the West G. I'. Morns. 97

16. Tlie Song of the Shirt Thomas Hood. 100

18. Lines relating to Curran's Daughter Thomas Mwre. 115

19. Thanatopsis W. C. IJr>/ant. 116

20. Euthanasia W. G. CUtrk. 119

21 . Sklkct Passages in Verse 121

1. Succession of Human Beings. II. Death of the Young
and Fair 111. A Lfidy Drowned — Procter. IV. The
Life of Man — Beaumont. V. Coronach — ScoU. \'l. Im-
mortality — R. II. Dana.

23. Fuller's Bird B. W.Procter. 127

25 liingen on the Rhine Mrs. Norion. loO

29 A Modest Wit 141

32. The Poetic Faculty Gold I'en. 147

34. Destiny of America Georye Berkeley. 1 52

37. The King and the Nightingales Charles Mackay. 157

40. Nature's Teachings Roltei-l I'ollok. 1 06

42. Now Charles Mackay. 171

44. The Power of Art Charles Spraym. 176

48 The Deserted Village Oliver Goldsr'nUh. 183

49. 'I he Deserted Village— continued 187

50 Ihe Deserted Village — concluded 1 91

62 The Settler A. B. Street. 200

63 The American Flag JR. Drake. 202

55. Napoleon and the Sphinx Charleys Mackay. 207

56. A Conipieror's Account of Himself W. B. I'riHier. 209

59, Language 0. W. Ilulmes. 21 6

62. F.\ tract from the Essjiy on Criticism Alexander I 'ope. 224

65. The RoiU of the Pilgrims G. P. Morris. 2;;3

67. 'I'he Orjivi's of the Patriots J. G. Perrival 'I'.'A

68 'Hje Anti(iuity of Freedom W. C. Bryant 230

70. Lady Clare Alfred Tennyson. 243

71 . Sklect pAs.«»AflR9 FN Vkr«*e , 246

1. The Beauties of Nature— /?«i//w. II. Beauty— C/av. HI. .

'YhvVoKit Sluik.speare. IV. Flowers — Hunt. V. Summer
\\\\ii\-—Bryant. Vi. '1 he Livst Rose of Sununer— .V.«>/<.

78. An OM Haunt Iluiu^ehold H'fW.v. 251

76. Piv^sinsr A wjiv . John IHerpoiU. 250

•78. The World for Sile, Ralyh lIoyL 264



CONTENTS. 9

PAG>

81. A Great Man Departed FJousehold Words. 272

8o. io the Evening Wind W. C. Bryant. 281

88. Lor.l Byron Robert Follok. 287

89. Midnii^ht — the Coliseum Lord Byron. 291

91. The liying Gladiator Lwd Byron. 294

92. The hi'iuiry Charles Mackay. 296

94. Pass (^n, Relentless World George LtirU. 298

97. The I^iron's Ltust Biiinjiiot A. G. Greene. o07

100. The Phantom Ship 314

103. Darkness L&rd Byron. 322

106. Ode to Adversity TImms Gray. 334

107. Parrhasius and tlie Captive. , N. P. Willis. 336

108. Ambition Gold Pen. 342

111. Cardinal Wolsey, on being cast olf by Henry VIII. . .Shak-fpeare. 349

112. National Song R. T. Paine 351

113. The Marseilles Hymn Rougel de Lisle. 354

115. Procrastination Edward Young. 359

1 17. The Closing Year G. D. Prentice. 363

120. The Holy Dead Mrs. Siyoumey. 374

122. To a Skylark P. B. SJielley. 378

124. Bernardo del Carpio Mrs. Henians. 384

125. Select Pas.s.agks in Vkrsb 387

1. Patriotism — SscoU. II. Ambition —5yron. III. Independ-
ence — Thomson. IV. The Captive's Dreams — Mrs. Ilem-
ans. V. William Tell— />Vv<zni. VI. Tell on Switzer-
land — Knonies. VII How sleep the Miave — Collim.
< VIII. The Greeks at Thermopy lie — Byron.

126. Greece Ijord Byron. 391

127. Sons? of the Greeks, 1822 Thaimus CampbeU. SiM

128. Marco P»ozz;iris FUz-Greene llalleck. 395

132. Select Passages in Veusb 407

I. Exhortation to Courage. II. Fame — Pope. III. Value
of Ucputiition — S]iukspeare. IV. Pleasure — Burns. V.
Pleasure — Voung. VI. 'lime never retmns. VII. In-
gratitude— iSA'/^.^Jft/rc. VIII. Severity and Gentleness
— Gobi I'en. IX. Mercy — Shakspeare. X. Man — Young.

134. Battle of Warsaw Th&nuis CampbeU. 415

138. A Forest Nook A. B. Street. 424

140 God's First Temples W. C. Bryant. 430

141 Trust in G(kI Wiiliam Wordrworth. 433

143. The Mus(|uit(j W. C Bryant. 441

144. A Tailor's Evening Soliloquy 0. W. Holmes. 444

146. Select Passages in Vkrsb. 449

I. Early Dawn — Shelley. II. Daybreak — Atlantic Monthly.
III. Daybreak — Shelley. IV. Sunrise in S. America —
Bowles. V. Dawn— IfiZZw. VI. Morning— JMon. VII.
Morning on the Rhine — Bowles. VIII. Morning Sounds
— Beattie. IX. Early Rising — Hurdis.

147 SELK<rr Passages in Verse 454

I. Invocation to Night — J. F: Hollings. II. Evening— OoZy.
III. W\)X.hi— II Coleridge. IV. Niffht at Corinth— Z?y /on.
V. A Summer's Night— P. J. Bailey. VI. Niirht aud
Death -/. B. White. VII. Kv^hi-^SheUey . Vlll. The
M(K>u- fViarlutte StrJtk. IX The Stars — Darwin.



10 0ONTKNT8.

PAflK

149. Kiliimnifljaro Bayard Taylor. 4G2

160. Mornitig H> imi to Mont Blanc S. T. Coleridge. 4G5

162. Alpine Scoutny Lord Byron. 470

164. Messiah Alexaiukr Pope. 477

166 Selkct Passages in Vekse 483

I. Voice of the Wind — Henry Taylor. II. Ministrations of
Nature — Vmeridge. III. Moonlight — Shakapeare. IV.
The Bell.** of Oatend— Bowles. V. Slusic — Shakspeare.
VI. Music — Shelley. VII. Pastoral Music — Byron.

158. The Passions William CoUins. 489

W,). Alexander's Feast John Dryden. 493

166. Hamlet's Soliloquy Sluikspeare. 510

167. Cato's Soliloquy Joseph Addvsm. 511

169 Hope Triumphant in Death Thomas Campbell. 516

173. The Famine H. W. Longfellow. 530

176. Address to the Indolent. James Thomson. 638

177. To the Spirit of Poetry Frances Osgood. 543

179. The Spirit of Poetry J. G. Percival. 547

180. The Bells Edgar A. Foe. 549

182. Apostrophe to the Sun J.G. Fercival. 554

183. The Ocean F. H. Dana, bbl

185. Apostrophe to the Ocean Lord Byron. 560

187. The Raven Edgar A. Foe. 565

192. Hymn of our First Parents MiUm. 581

1 94. Satan's Encounter with Death MiUm. 586

198. Elegy written in a Country Church-yard Thomas Gray. 697

III. DIALOGUES.

27. Lochlel's Warning Thomas Campbell. 134

86. Gil Bias and the old Archbishop Alain Le Sage. 282

106. Roger Ascham and Lady Jane Grey W. S. Landor. 330

123. Norval .John Home. 381

129. Conversations after Marriage R. B. Sheridan. 398

130. Conversations after Marriage — concluded 401

135. Scene — Hamlet and his Mother Shakspeare. 416

142. Scene from the Lady of Lyons E. B. Lytton. 436

155. Scene from Catiline George Croly. 479

163. Scene from King Richard III Shak)<penre. 502

174. Abraham and the Fire- Worshiper Household Words. 535

186. Brutus and Titus Nathaniel Lee. 562

188 The Saracen Brothers New Monthly Magazine. 569

189 The Saracen Brothers— concluded . . , 672

193. The Phrensy of Orra. . . Joanna BaiUie. 683

195. Murder 6 " King Duncac ... Sluikspeare. 688



ALPHABETICAL JSl OF AUTHORS.'



Adams, John Q., 422.

Addison, Joseph, 511.

Allston, Washington, 875.

Bacon, Francis, 301.

BA1I.KY, P. J., 456.

Baillie, Joanna, 583. *"

Bancroft, George, 210.

Beattie, James, 246, 452.

Beadmont, Francis, 122.

Beecher, H. W., 67, 123, 304, 486.

Berkeley, George, 152.

Bowles, W. L., 450, 452. 484-

Brougham, Henrt, 527, 523.

Bfown, C. B., 168.

Bryant, W. C, 116, 242, 248, 281,

889, 430, 441.
Burns, Robert, 408.
Byron, G. G., 291, 294, 822, 888, 891,

455, 470, 486, 560.
Campbell, Thos., 134, 894, 416, 516.
Carlyle, Thomas, 168.
Chalmers, Thomas, 128, 510.
Chambers, Robert, 218.
Channino, W. E., 802.
Chateaubriand, F. A., 509.
Cheever, G. B.,468.
Clam, Willis G., 119.
Clay, Henry, 420.
Coleridge, Hartley, 455.
Coleridge, S. T., 465, 488.
Collins, William, 890, 489.
Cooper, J. Fennimore, 865, 869.
Cox, William, 138.



Croly, George, 4.'>4, 479.

Dana, R. H., 128, 249, 506, 557.

Darwin, Erasmus, 459.

Davy, Humphrey, 506, 509.

De Quincey, Thomas, 95, 501, 592.

Dewey, Orville, 173, 244, 298.

Dickens, Charles, 445, 525.

Drake, J. R., 202.

Dryden, John, 493.

Kmkr-^on, R. W., 360.

Everett, Edward, 85, 213, 288, 273,

275, 522, 526.
Fielding, Henry, 92.
Gay, John, 247.
Gibbon, Edward, T5.
Goldsmith, Oliver, 188, 187, 191.
Grahame, James, 81.
Gray, Thomas, 834, 597.
Greene, Albert G., 807.
Hall, Robert, 803.
Halleck, Fitz-Grkenb, 895.
Hare, C. J. & A., 524.
Headley, J. T., 205.
Heber, Reginald, 505.
Hemans, Mrs., 884, 383. "
hollings, j. f., 454.
Holmes, 0. W., 216,444.
Home, John, 881.
Hood, Thomas, 106.
Hooker, Richard, 810.
Hoyt, Ralph, 264.
Hume, David, 155.
Hunt, Leigh, 247.



' The nnmbers here given refer to Selectiona
CbroBological List of Authors.



For Biographical 8keteh8&



12



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF ACTU(^R8.



FIuHDis, James, 458.

Ikvino, W., 109, 111, 148, 258, 256,

267, 2»i9, 427, 498.
Jkffrky, Francis, 285, 459.
J ERROLD, Douglas, 404.
Johnson, Samuel, 228, 311, 844.
K>fowLEs, J. S., 389.
J. AN DOR, W. S., 309, 830. 524.
liEK, Nathaniel, 562.
Le Sage, Alain, 282.
Locke, John, 300.
Longfellow, H. W., 856, 530.

LUNT, (lEORGE, 298.

Lttton, E. B., 436.

Macaulay, T. B., 158, 231, 675, .51 8.

Mackay, Chas., 89, 157, 171, 207, 296.

McLean, John, 310.

MiLT«.N, John, 311, 451, 581, 586.

Mitchell, D. G., 160, 197.

MouuE, Thomas, 115, 248.

i.\IoRnis, G. P., 97, 238.

Keal, John, 499.

Norton, Caroline E., 180. *"

Nt)TT, Eliphalet, 296.

Nouuse, J. D., 545.

Osgood, Frances S., 548.

Paine, R. T., 351.

Paulding, J. K., 178, 180, 181.

Percival, J. G., 236, 547, '854.

J'lEKPONT, John, 259.

P»>E, Edgar A., 549, 565.

PoLLOK, Robert, 166, 287

Pope, Alexander, 22^ 408, 477

Pbkntice. G. D., 868.



Prescott, W. H., 148, 239.

Procter, B. W., 121, 127, 209.

Read, T. Buchanan, 79.

RouGET DE Lisle, 854.

Scott, Walter, 122, 3()9, 887, 525, 527

Seward, William H., 518.

Shakspeare, Wm., 247, 347, 849, 408,

410, 416, 484, 485, 502, 510, 588.
Shelley, P. B., 878, 449, 450, 458, 485.
Sheridan, R. B., 898, 401.
Sigourney, Mrs., 102, 874.
SIMMS, W. G., 825.
Smith, Charlotte, 458.
Smith, Sidney, 183.
Smollett, T. G., 816, 818.
Sprague, Charles, 176.
Street, A. B., 200, 424.
Sumner, Charles, 145.
Taylor, Bayard, 462.
Taylor, Henry, 4S8.
Tennys^on, Alfred, 243.
Thomson, James, 71, 888, 588.
Tillotson, John, 508.
Wallace, H. B., 540, 558, 558, 595
Watson, Richard, 507.
Wayland, Fbancib, 262.
Webster, Daniel, 277.
Whipple, E. P., 221.
White, J. Blanco, 457.
Willis, N. P., 336,451.
WiNTHROP, R. C, 478.
Wirt, William, 412.
Wordsworth, William, 488.
Voc;iiG, Edward, 859, 409. 411.



CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF AUTIKRS.'



Hooker, KicHARD 310

Bacon, Francw 213

Bhakspeark, W iixiam 348

Bk/-jmont, Franois 122

Milton, John 582

TnxoTsoN, John 508

Dryden, John 497

Locke, John 213

Lee, Nathaniel 665

Le Sage, Alain 285

Addison, Joseph 513

Young, Howard .* 860

BeRKELKT, (iEORUK ' 152

Gay, John 247

Pope, Alkxander 227

Thomson, James 75

Fielding, H enry . . , 95

Johnson, Samuel 230

Hume, David.... 157

Gray, Thomas 835

Collins, William 4^2

Smollett, T. G 822

Home, John 884

Goldsmith, Oliver 196

Daijwin, Erasmus 459

Beattie, James 452

Gibbon, Edward 77

Watson, Richard 507

Smith, Charlotte 458

Sheridan, K. B 404

Burns, Robert 408

Kouget de Lisle 855



Bowles, "W. L 450

Baillie, Joanna 586

HcRDis, James 453

Hall, Robert 30?

Grahame, James 84

Adams, John Q 424

Smith, Sidney 1 34

Chateaubriand, F. A 509

Wordsworth, Willlam 4? 5

Scott, Walter t<'9

Brown, C. B 166

Coleridge, S. T 467

WlUT, W ILLIAM 414

Jeffrey, Francis 237

NoTT, Elipualet 29^

Paine, R. T 854

Landor, W. S....." 333

Campbell, Thomas 137

Clay, Henry 421

Davy, Humphrey 506

Paulding, J. K 183

Allston, Washington 377

Brougham, Henry 530

Chalmers, Thomas 130

Channino, W\ E 302

Moore, Thomas 115

White, J. Blanco 457

Webster, Daniel 280

Hkber, Reginald 505

Irving, Washington 114

Hunt, Leigh 247

Pierpont, John 26]



* The numbers here piven refer to Biographical Sketcliea, For Belectlona, set
Alphabetical List of Authors.



14



CHRONOLOGICAL LI8T OF AUTHORS.



Dk QuiNOKY, Thomas 97

Dana,R.H 251

Btron, G. G 292

Cooper, J. Fennimore 873

SiGouRNEY, Mrs 106

Sprague, Charles 177

Shelley, P. B 880

Hemans, Mrs 887

Bryant, W. C 118

Dewey, Orville 176

Everett, Edward 89

Neal, John 601

Percival, J. G 288

Procter, B. W 128

Halleck, Fitz-Greene 897

Drake, J. K 204

Croly, George 454

Carlyle, Thomas 170

Coleridge, Hartley 455

Knowles, J. S 889

PRESCOTT, W. H 151

Wayland, Francis 264

Hood, Thomas 109

McLean, John 810

PoLLOK, Robert 167

Taylor, Henry 483

Hare, C.J. & A 624

Bancroft, George 212

Chambers, EoBERT 220

HoLLiNOs, J. F. 454

Morris, G.P 98

Macauijiy, T. B 166

Seward, William H 6S2



Cox, William 141

Greene, Albert G 808

Prentice, G. D 865

Emerson, R. W 862

Jerrold, Douglas 407

LuNT, George 299

Bailey, P. J 456

Lytton, E. B 441

SiMMs, W. G 830

Willis, N. P 841

Cheever, G. B 470

Longfellow, H. W 858

Norton, Caroline E 132

Holmes, O.W 217

WiNTHROP, R. C 477

Clark, W^illis G 120

Tennyson, Alfre:^ 246

PoE, Edgar A 552

Sumner, Charles 146

Street, A. B 202

Dickens, Charles 448

HoYT, Ralph 266

Mackay, Charles 91

NouRSE, J. D 647

Osgood, Frances S 545

Beecher, H. W 71

Headley, J. T 207

Wallace, H. B 542

Whipple, E. P 224

Mitchell, D.G., 162

Read, T. Buchanan 81



Online LibraryRichard Green ParkerThe national fifth reader: containing a treatise on elocution; exercises in reading and declamation; with biographical sketches, and copious notes. Adapted to the use of students in English and American literature → online text (page 1 of 52)