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History of Winnebago County, Wisconsin, and early history of the Northwest online

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GENEALOGY

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HISTORY


OF


IVIWEBAGO COUNT


WISCONSIN,


AND


^.ARLY History of the Northwest.


By RICHARD J. HARNEY.


OSHKOSH:


Allen & Hicks, Book Printers.
1880.



Entered according to Act of CongresB, in the year 1880, by B. J. Habnet, in the Ofl&ce of the Librarian of CongretB, at W^ashington, D. C.



INTRODUCTORY. 1149166



In this work the author has attempted to give the leading events in the early history of
the interior of the Continent; and the progress of that civilization, the course of which was on
the line of those great water-courses, of which the Fox and Wisconsin rivers were important
lines of communication,

The first portion embraces the French-Indian period of history, from the days of Jacques,
Cartierand Champlain, on the St. Lawrence, to the early days of the American occupation.

All students of the period of French Indian history are aware that its recital is fragment-
ary; that in order to learn it, recourse must be had to many volumes; and that to the average
inteUigcnt reader, the task requires too much time.

Our Fox River Valley was one of the principal scenes in that history which is here con-
densed into a comparatively small compass, through the most diligent and careful research
and labor.

Nearly fifty volumes of various works have been consulted in ascertaining the facts which
are recounted, and in many instances the original Indian treaties have been examined. Among
the works consulted are Charlevoix's History of New France, Schoolcraft's Indian Tribes,
Parkman's Works, Bancroft's History of the United States, Wisconsin State Historical Collec-
tions, Mrs. Kenzie's Early Day, Barber's History of the West, etc., etc.

Although the field occupied by this work has been partly gone over by others, the author
challenges the closest scrutiny in regard to plagiarism. The facts of history are not the exclu-
sive property of any writer — the method of telling them, of putting them together, the language
used in their recital and the style of expression is the work of the writer, and for which he
either merits praise or censure. In this work the most scrupulous care has been taken to give
credit for all that has been copied from the writings of others.

The discovery of the lead mines at Fevre River (Galena) in 1822, led to the so-called
American settlement of the country. This event was followed by the Winnebago outbreak
and Black Hawk war; after the close of which, American immigration poured in, the extinguish-
ment of Indian titles commenced and the old French-Indian occupancy of the country was
superseded by that of the Americans. A new historical era commenced in 1833, and in 1836
practically commenced the settlement of Winnebago County. From this period the history of
Winnebago County is given; from the days of the bark canoe, Indian wigwam and log houses
of the early settlers, up to its present highly civilized development, with all the details of its
progress.

The history of each city and town in the county is given separately, from the days of their
earliest settlement. In procuring this data each locality has been visited and hundreds of
persons, town and county records and files of newspapers consulted. This work has involved
great labor and expense; and but few people are aware of the time required and the difficulties
encountered in the accomplishment of such a task. The hope is indulged in that it will be
justly appreciated by the people of this county, whose interests are subserved by its publica-
tion, and that it will prove to be of enduring value.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



EARLY HISTORY OF NORTHWEST.

CHAPTER I.

PAOE8.

The Fox River Valley of Central Wisconsin. A Record of Two
CentxirieB, commeuciog with the First Explorations of the
Fox and Wisconsin Rivers, the Links connecting the Great
Water Com-ses of the United States. The Ancient Thor-
otighfare of the Frontier Traffic and Travel of the Great
West. Some of the tirst pages of American Civilization
found in the Early History of Central Wisconsin 9-11

CHAPTER II.
Samuel de Champlain, the Pioneer Explorer of the Interior of
the Continent, Founds Quebec. He forms an Alliance with
the Algonquius and Hurons .■ 11-13

CHAPTER III.
Indian Tribes. Divisions and Population. Location of the
various Nations. Green Bay and the Lake Winnebago and
Fox River Country the centers of large Indian Populations.
The Belligerent Iroquois ... 12-14

CHAPTER IV.



CHAPTER V.
The Policy of Frauce to Incorporate the Indian Tribes into a
French-Indian Empire. Alliance formed with the Algon-
qmn Tribes, for the purpose of Resisting the Raids of the
Iroquois. Attempt to t^hristianizethe Indians, as a Prepara-
tory Step to their CiviUzation. The Jesuit Missionaries 1.5- 16

CHAPTER VI.
The Land of the Hurons. ( hamplain's voyage to their Country
in 1615. A Journey through the Wilderness of Nine Hun-
dred miles. Champlain discovers Lake Huron. The first
White Men that ever paddled over its surface. Description
of the Country of the Hurons 16-19

CHAPTER VII.
Defenseless Condition of Quebec Piratical Attack on Quebec.
Its Surrender to the English flag. Restoration to the French
flag. Champlain Commandant of the Post for ten years
longer. His death in 1635. Quebec becomes the Commer-
cial Emporium of the Interior of the Continent. Its Trade
through the Labyrinth of Water Arteries branching from
the St. Lawrence to the Mississippi 19-21

CHAPTER VIII.
The Huron Missious . Arrival of the Jesuits . Their Journey to
the Hurons. The Bark Mission House. The Founding of
Montreal. The First Century in the History of the Interior
Like a Tale of Chivalry 21-26

CHAPTER IX.
Iroquois War. They Boast that they will Exterminate all the
other Indian Nations and the French. The Capture and
Sufiferings of Isaac Jouges. Building of Fort Richelieu. . . 2.5- 26

CHAPTER X.
Iroouois War. Invasion of the Huron Country. Destruction
of the Hurons and the Hviron Missions, Conflagration of
the Indian Villages and the Mission Houses. Bravery of
the Missionaries. Their Terrible Death. The Hurons and
Ottawas Abandon their Country and settle in the Northwest,
at Michilimackiuac, Satilt St Marie and Gi-een Bay 27- 30

CHAPTER XI.
Migration of the Algouq\Un Tribes to the South Shore of Lake
Superior and Green Bay. First Commerce of the North-
west. Allouez, Marquette and Dablou, Pioneers in Western
Discover}' and Settlement. First Western Settlements. The
Fox River Valley a Great Center of Indian Population.
Allouez and Dablon visit the site of Oshkosh and Butte des
Morts, and are Hospitably Entertained. Lovely Scenery
of the Lake Winnebago Coimtry. The Discovery of the
Upper Mississippi. Marquette's Death and Biu-ial 30- 36



CHAPTER XII. PAGES.

Count Frontenac and La Salle Secure the Head of the St. Law-
rence and set out to Establish a line of Communication
between Quebec and the Mouth of the Mississippi. La
Salle Builds Fort Frontenac at the Head of the St. Law-
rence aud another at Niagara Constructs the Griftin and
Launches her. The first Vessel on the Lakes Her trip up
the Lakes to Michilimackiuac and Greeu Bay. His voyage
to the Country of the Illinois. Massacre of the lUinois by
the Iroquois. La Salle organizts the Illinois and other
tribes taking the Leaderstiip. Builds a Fort on "StaiTe
Rock" on the Illinois River. Attempt to Found a Colony at
the mouth of the Mississippi. Assassination of La Salle.
Destruction of the Colony 36-43

CPAPTER XIII.

Hennepin Explores the Upper Mississippi. Captured by the
Sioux and taken to their Country. His Rescue and Arrival
at Green Bay 43- 44

CHAPTER XIV.

War Between the French and English Colonies. Frontenac
Ravages the Iroquois Country. That Nation sues for Peace
with the French. Detroit Founded. The French in Pos-
session of the Country from the St. Lawrence to the Gulf of
Mexico 44- 47

CHAPTER XV.
Fox River and Lake Winnebago Country. Traders and Voy-
ageurs Beautiful Scenery. The Channel of Aboriginal and
Frontier Life, Trade and Travel. Here occurred the First
Intercourse between the Indians of the West and the Whites.
Capt. Jonathan Carver at Doty Island in 1766. Siege of
Big Buttes des Morts bv De Louvigny in 1716 48- 53

CHAPTER XVI.

Battle of Little Buttes des Morts. Sanguinary Engagement
The most Populous Village of the Foxes Destroyed. The
Expulsion of the Foxes from the Fox River Valley. The
Menominees take Possession of the Fox Country. Tomah,
the Great Menominee Chief 53- 55

CHAPTER XVII.
Wisconsin the Border Ground in the Long Contest between the
Algonquins and Dacotahs. The Historic Ground of the
Northwest. The Souix the Original Inhabitants of Wiscon-
sin. The Sioux expelled by the Chippewas. The Winne-
bagoes, their villages and Chiefs 55- 60

CHAPTER XVIII.

The French Posts and Settlements in the West. The Conreuv
de Bois. His mode of Life and Canoe voyages. French
OflBcers trained in Forest Warfare in the Campaigns of the
Fox VaUey. De Beaujeu and Charles De Langlade, the
pioneer settler of Wisconsin, Defeat Braddock at the cele-
brated Battle of the Monongehela. Opening and Closiug
of the French-Indian War. Pontiac's War. Massacre of
the English Garrison at Michilimackiuac 61-65

CHAPTER XIX.
The early French Settlers. Judge Porlier and Griguons. Soci-
ety of Green Bay in the Early Day The New Comers, the
Americans. The Northwest in the War of 1812. Siege and
Surrender of the American Fort at Praii-ie du Chien , Mas-
sacre of the American Garrison at Chicago in 181'i. The
Rinzie family of Chicago



65- 73



CHAPTER XX.

The White Settlements in the Northwest at the close of the War
of 1812, The Americans first take Possession. First Amer-
ican vessel at Green Bay. The settlement of the Northwest
by the Americans virtually commenced with the working of
the Lead Mines in 1822. The Winnebago Outbreak in 1827 . . 73-76

CHAPTER XXI.
The Black Hawk War. Its Origin. Black Hawk's Statement,
The Battle of Sycamore Creek. Massacre of three Fami-
lies. Battle of the Wisconsin. Battle of the Bad Axe,
Capture of Black Hawk 7&- 78



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



CHAPTER XXII. PAGES,

The American Fur Company. Social Circles in the Early Bay.
Adventurous Journey from Fort Winnebago to Chicago by
a Lady on Horseback. Lost and nearly Famished. Relief
Found in an Indian Wigwam 78-84

CHAPTER XXIII.
Indian Boundaries and Extinguishment of Indian Titles in Wis-
consin 84- 86

CHAPTER XXIV.

The several Territorial organizations of the soil now included in

the limits of Wisconsin 87

CHAPTER XXV.

On Extinguishment of Indian title to aU the territory north of
Chicago and south and east of the Fox and Wisconsin Rivers
in 1833, Immigration to the new Purchase set in. Lines of
Steamers and sail Vessels are place'i on the Lakes, roads
begin to be used instead of Indian trails. Frink & Walker's
Line of Stages. First Land Sales. Wheat Shipments begin.
Wisconsin in 1^38 87-89

CHAPTER XXVI.

Madison selected as the site of State Government. First Sessions

of the Legislatiire, etc 89- 90

CHAPTER XXVII.

The Fox and Wisconsin Rivers Improvement. First Surveys
and Appropriations of Lands. Purchase of the Rights and
Franchises by the United States 90-91

CHAPTER XXVIII.

Early settlement of Winnebago Coimty. Its transformation
from a Wilderness to the abodes of Civilization. The first
Settlers. Beauty and Rich Resources of the Country. Sev-
eral of the Principal cities of the State cluster around these
water course's. Lake Winnebago and its Beautiful Sur-
roundings 92-94



WINNEBAGO COUNTY,

CHAPTER XXIX.
The Fox River Valley and Central Wisconsin. Its lovely Water
Scenery an Especial Feature. The Fox Valley a conjunc-
tion of three distinct types of country, with great Natural
Resources, and one of the chief Business Thoroughfares of
the State 94-95

CHAPTER XXX.



CHAPTER XXXI.
Early French Settlers. The Trading Post at Buttes des Morts.
L. B. Porlier. The Grignons. The Business Center of the
Upper Fox. Government Agency for the Civilizing of the
Indians Established at Winnebago Rapids, now Neenah, in
1835 97- 9K

CHAPTER XXXII.

First Permanent Settlers in Winnebago County. The Stanleys
and Gallups. The first Houses in Oshkosh. H. A. Gal-
lup's Interesting Narrative. New Accessions to the Popu-
lation 98-102

CHAPTER XXXIII.
Early Settlement of the County at Various Points. Harrison
Keed commences Operations at Neenah. Governor Doty
and Curtis Reed commence work at Menasha. L.M. Parsons
commences the Settlement at Waukau 103-106

CHAPTER XXXIV.
The only White Settlers in the County in 1842 were those in the
Vicinity of Oshkosh. Products of the Coimty in 1839.
Naming the Place. Post Office EstabUshed. Organization
of the County. First Roads. First Stores. First Village
Plat of Oshkosh. Large Immigration from 1846 to 1850.
The Villages of Neenah, Menasha, Waukau, Omro and Win-
neconne in 1848-'50 107-109

CHAPTER XXXV.

Wolf River Pineries. First Logging Operations. First Logs
cut on Rat River in 1835 . First Saw Mill on these waters
built at Shawanaw in 1843-''44. The Beginning of the Great
Lumber Industry and its Rapid Growth. First Flouring
Mills. First steamboats, the Manchester and Peytona.
First Boat through the Portage Canal. Bridges built
across the Fox. The County in 1850 109-110

CHAPTER XXXVI.

Incidents in the Early Days. Recollections of Early Settlers.
An old time Scrimmage at Omro between Traders and a
party of Winnebago Bucks. Doct. Llude, Captain Powell,
Saml. Clough, C . L Rich. The Lost Partridge hild ....'. 111-119

CHAPTER XXXVII.
Compilation of early Official Data of Winnebago County, com-
piled from the records and other authentic sources expressly
for this work. Organization of the County. First Elec-
tions. Proceedings of County Board. The Locating of the
County Seat 119-124



CHAPTER XXXVIII. pages.

Organization of Towns. Incorporation of the cities of this

County 124-126

CHAPTER XXXIX.
List of County Officers and C'ouuty Supervisors from the date

of Organization of County to 1879 ' 126-129

CHAPTER XL.

The Period from 1850 to 1860. The Cheapness and Abundance
of Building Material greatly Facilitates the L'onstruction of
Buildings. Progress in Improvement. Improved Methods
of Farming The Big Crop of 1860. The growth of Native
Timber that has sprung up since the Settlement of the
Country. Growth of cities and villages in the County 129-131

CHAPTER XLI.
War Times. Business prosperity after the close of the war.
Prices of tommodities. Manufacturing Stimulated by an
Increased Demand The progress in Improvements in all
parts of the ( 'ountry , New Factories and Mills constructed.
New Railroads. The Great Fires in Oshkosh in 1S74 and
1875. Big crops in 1875 . The County in 1879. Its Manu-
factures 131-137



HISTORY OF OSHKOSH.

CHAPTER XLII.
The Embryo City. First Settlers. First Houses. Stores and
HotPls. Description of the place in 1846 and 1849. First
Saw MiUs, Grist Mills and Steamboats. List of the Business
Firms in oshkosh in 1849-'50. "The Days of Auld Laog
Syne." Items from the Of'/ikosh Democrat in the Early
Day. Market Reports High Water, the Country Flooded.
A Historic Bell. Oshkosh becomes a city. Items from the
Oahknsli Courier. The Winnebago Railroad 137-144

CHAPTER XLIII.
Fires. Bonds issued to St. Paul & Fond du Lac Railroad. Osh-
kosh in 1856. Great Fire of 1859. Northwestern Railroad
built. Railroad Accident. Items ^rom the Northwestern.
War Times. Oshkosh Volunteers. The Draft and Filling
the Quota. The close of the War. Good Times , Progress
in Improvements. The Fire in 1866. Nicholson Pave-
ment. High School Building and other Structures erected.
Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. Northern Hospital for the
Insane built near Oshkosh. Gas Works constructed and
the city hghted 144-150

CHAPTER XLIV.
The Great Conflagrations of 1874 and 1875. Destruction of the
Business Portion of the City. Rebuilding of Oshkosh.
List of Structures erected in 1875 150-159

CHAPTER XLV.

The Business Firms of Oshkosh after the Fire in Board Shan-
ties. A new Impetus in Improvements and Progress. Pub-
lic and Private Enterprises in 1879. New Branches of
Manufacture. ( 'onstruction of the Grand Exposition Build-
ing. The Northern State Fair. Oshkosh market reports
from 1868 to 1879 159-162

CHAPTER XLVI.

The City of Oshkosh. Its Situation, Tributary Country, Sur-
roundings, Water and Railroad Communications. Descrip-
tion of the City. Its Manufactures, Business streets and
Elegant Residences and Grounds. Oshkosh a Summer
Resort and Watering Place The Yachting Center of the
Northwest. The Oshkosh Yacht <.'lub. Public Buildings. 162-165

CHAPTER XLVII.
Oshkosh Business Houses. Statistics of Manufacture. Import-
ance and Facihties of Oshkosh as a Manufacturing Center.. 165-169

CHAPTER XLVIII.

Notices of Manufacturing Establishments Illustrated in this

work and of Business Houses and Residences 169-182

CHAPTER XLIX.
City and County Officers, Courts and Judges, Fire and Police

Department in 1879. Schools, Churches and Societies 182-189

CHAPTER L.

History of the Newspaper Press of Oshkosh 189-'194

CHAPTER LI.
Municipal Finance. The several issues of Bonds by the < ity of
Oshkosh. Amount the City has Invested in Permanent
PubUc Improvements. Present Indebtedness . 194

CHAPTER LXXIV.

Oshkosh taking a new start in the Race of Progress. New Fac-
tories and Mills Erected in the Winter of 1879-80. Another
Large Sash and Door Factory Built Four more Saw Mills
Huilt. Another Machine rthop and a Flouring Mill erected.
The Oshkosh Carriage Works, a mammoth concern employ-
ing one hundred and fifteen hands started during the past
Year Two large Additional Buildings added to the Trunk
Factory. Other Factories enlarged and their capacities
Increased. Glazed Sash an industry of Immense Magni-
tude. Twenty-six car-loads of Glass Ordered, during one
Week, by the Glazed Sash Factories. Oshkosh the great-
est Sash and Door Manufacturing Center in the United
frtates 296t;)-296i//;



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



CITY OF NEENAH.

CHAPTER LII. PAGES

The Early History of Neenah. The Goverument Agency, for
the ( inUzing of the Menomiuees. A Mill, Shops aud Block
Houses built in ls;)5 aud 1836, at Wiunebago Rapids, the
present site of Neenah. Harrison Reed in 1844 purchases
the site from the Government. George Mansur and Family
arrive in 1843, aud become the First White Family I'erma-
nently settled in the present limits of Neenah. In 1845 Gov.
Doty builds his House on the Island. Gorham P. Vining,
George Harlow. Ira Baird aud the Rev. O. P. Clinton settle
in Neenah. First Birth, Marriage and Death. First Religi-
ous Serrtes. The Joneses become Proprietori!. More new
comers in 1847. a < ompany chartered for the Improvement
of the Water I ower. In 1847, the First Village Plat recorded
by Harrison Reed. In same year Mr. Ladd erects the Win-
nebago Hotel. The firm of J ones & Yale open a store.
1S48, the Kimberlys purchase property and commence
improvements. In 18.50, Board of Village Trustees elected.
Kimberly bmUs the Pioneer Flouring Mill, i anal Lock
I'ompleted. steamers Jennie Lind and Barlow built.
Another Flouring Mill completed. Saw Mill constructed.
Another Manufacturing Establishment iu Operation and
two more Flouring Mills. The Village Plats of Winnebago
Rapids and Neenah consolidated under the corporate name
of Neeuah. In 18S6 the hrst ) assage of a Steamer between
Lake Winnebago and Greeu Bay was made, the Aquilla
passing through Neeuah Lock 194-204

CHAPTER LIII,
The Chicago A Northwestern Railroad Constructed to Neenah.
Banks Established. The Seveuth Flouring Mill Built . Final
Settlement of the .Tones Estate. Additional Mills Built.
First I aper Mill Wisconsin t entral Railroad. ( ity of
Neenah Incorporated, List of t Ity Officers from Date of
Incoriioration. More Paper Mills. Hotels. Schools.

Churches 204-210

CHAPTER LIV.
Description of Neenah. Scenery, Location and Historical Asso-
ciations. Summer Resort. .Water and Railroad Communi-
cations. Manufactories. Business Houses. Illustrations
and Personal Notices 210-213

CHAPTER LV.
Town of Neenah. Early History. Physical Description. Organ-
ization. Early Settlers, Etc 213-215



CITY OF MENASHA.

CHAPTER LVI.
The Early History of the City of Menasha . Purchase of Site.
Commencement of Improvements, hirst House Built. First
School and First Religious Services First Birth. Rivalry
Betwen Neenah and Menasha for Location of State Canal.
Menasha Secures the Prize. Store Opened. Poetoffice Estab-
lished. Dam 1 ompleted. First Saw Mill iu Operation First
Grist Mill. More Manufactories Established. Steamboat
Built. Hank Road and Bridge Constructed. Government
Land Office EstabUshed at Menasha. The Village Incorpor-
ated. Distinguished Residents. ( aptain BlcKinuon's Blooded
Stock. Increased Transportation Facilities. Completion of
Canal Large Shipment of Freight by this Route from
Green Bay to Fond du Lac. John Kitzgerald Establishes an
Exchange Office. Another Flouring Mill Built In 1866
Dniiiterrupted Navigation Opened Between Lake Winnebago
and Green Bay 215-221

CHAPTER LVU.
Doty Island. Its Lovely Scenery. Chicago k Northwestern
Railroad. More Manufactories. The National Hotel Built
and Menasha Bauk Established iu 1870 Incorporation of
the City. List of t ity Officers from Date of Incorporation to
1879. The Wisconsiu Central Railroad and .Milwaukee &
Northern Railroad. History of Menasha Churches. Menasha
Public Schools . City Officials Civic Societies . Menasha
Newspaper Frees 221-226

CHAPTER LVIII.
Description of City of Menasha. Location. Historical Associa-
tions. Siuumer Resort. Water-Power and Water Commu-
nications. Manufactories and Resources for Manufacturing.
Statistics of Manufacture. Business Houses. Notices of
Illustrations 22fi-229



HISTORY OF TOWNS.



Blackvolf 279-286

Clayton .*. 271-273

Neenah 213-215

Nekimi 286-291

Nepeuskun 241-248

Menasha 230-231

Omro 294-296 (!)

OBhkosb 232-241

Poygan 277-279

BusMord 248-262

UUca 262-261



FAOBS.j

Vinland 269-271^

Winneconne 261-269'

Winchester 273-274

Wolf River 275-277



FARM DIRECTORY.



CLASSIFIED BUSINESS DIRECTORY.

PAGES.

City of Oehkosh 319-331

Village of Omro 333-335

City of Neenah 335-339

City of Meuasha 341-343

Village of W iuneconne 343-345

Village of Waukau .

Village of Eureka



ILLUSTRATIONS.

CITY OF OSHKOSH.

Residences of Philetus and Edgar P. Sawyer First Leaf

Street View, Oshkosh Opposite Title Page

Residence of L. M. Miller Opposite

" George Mayer "

" James L. Clark "

D. L. Libby

'* E. L and Geo. M, Paine "

Robert McMlllen *'

" A\ iUiam T. EUsworth "

" Judge D J. Fulliug "

** Andrew Haben , *'

" Geo.F. Strond *'

" Ossian < ook "

" S M Hay

" Petersilea Homestead "

" H. C. Jewell **

C. W. Felker "

" Doct. H. B. Dale "

" Tom Wall "

*' Peter Nicolai .' "

" Gen'l Thos. S. Allen **

" Doct. Frederick H. Linde *'

" H. C. Gustavus "

" Gustavus Tesch "

" Augustus Haight "

Sash and Door h'actory, K. McMillen & Co "

Sash and Door Factory, Foster a Jones ''

Sash and Door Factory, Geo. Williamson & Co ... "

Keystone Klouriug Mill, H O. Gustavus & Co - • "

Works, Storehouses and Docks of Cook, Brown & Co '*

Star Match Works, James L, Clark "

Dry Goods Store, Wm. Hill & Co *'

Trunk Kactory, Schmit brothers "

Geo Mayera' Jewelrj' Store .. . *'

Ferdinand Hermann's Block "

St. Vincent de Paul Church and Academy ... ... . . "

Kirst National Bank, Oshkosh "

High School Building, Oshkosh "

Court House, Oshkosh ... *'

Northern Hospital for the Insane *'

Regatta at Oshkosh, July, 1877 "

Keckwith House 342 and 179

Steam Boiler Works, Martin Battis opposite 180



Carriage Works, Parsons & Goodfellow.

CITY OF NEENAH.

Street View

Russell House

Riverside Park

High School Building

John Robert's Summer Resort

Residence of A . H, F. Krueger



" 296(^-)



CITY OF MENASHA.

Residence of E. L. Mathewson

School Building

Residence of R. M. Scott

Residence of A. J. Webster

Residence of Elbridge Smith

Hub, Spoke and Bent Work Factory, Webster & Lawson.

TOWN OF OSHKOSH.



Online LibraryRichard J HarneyHistory of Winnebago County, Wisconsin, and early history of the Northwest → online text (page 1 of 71)