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AN



Autumn Tour in Spain



IN THE YEAR 1859.



BY THE



Rev. Richard jRoberts, B.A.,

TRINITY COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE,
VICAR OF MILTON ABBAS, DORSET.




LONDON:

SAUNDERS, OTLEY, AND CO.,

50, CONDUIT STREET, HANOVER SQUARE.

1860.



(The right of translation is reserved.)



LONDON : PRINTED BY WOODFALL AND KINDER,
ANGEL COURT, SKINNER STREET.




"R.5



TO

THE RIGHT HONOURABLE

THE EAEL OF PORTAKLINGTON,

IN MEMORY OF MANY HAPPY DAYS SPENT TOGETHER,

BOTH AT HOME AND ABROAD,
DURING A FRIENDSHIP OF MORE THAN TWENTY YEARS,

THIS VOLUME

IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED.






NOTICE.



THE Author takes the present opportunity of
acknowledging his obligations to C. Clifford,
Esq., 13, Calle de Las Infantas, Madrid, who,
with great kindness and liberality, has permitted
the use of his admirable Photographs to illus-
trate this Volume.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTEK I.

PAGE

START from Paris French Kailways Pretty Country
Fine old Chateaux Tours Cathedral Quaint
Buildings Medieval Hostelry Staring Natives
Ubiquitous Waiter Poictiers Bordeaux Cathe-
dral Tokens of Approach to Spanish Frontier
Bordeaux to Bayonne The Landes Hotel St.
Martin Bayonne Its Beauty Basque Population
Riding en cacolet Road to Biarritz Its Sea-view
Villa Eugenie Extreme Heat Change of Plan 1

CHAPTER II.

Sea-bathing at Biarritz Strange Scene Fine Breakers
An inverted Shower-bath The Emperor, Em-
press, and Prince Imperial Church-service in a
salle-a-manger Return to Bayonne Emphatic
Post-master The Marquise and Coquette Route
to Pau Its Situation From Pau to Cauterets
Lac de Gaube Pyrenean Characteristics Luz to
Gavernie The Cirque Ascent of the Pic du Midi
de Bigorre Glorious View Good-bye to Pyrenees 16



viii Contents.

CHAPTER III.

PAGE

Preparations for Spain A <^asi-Courier Spanish
Consul Bayonne Cathedral A faithful Nurse . 36

CHAPTER IV.

Change of Temperature Isle des Faisans Spanish
Sentry Custom-house Harbour of Passages St.
Sebastian Pastoral Scenery Tolosa Spanish Inn
Tiny Mendicant Spanish Cookery Soup and
Chick-peas Pork Population The Basques,
Butts of the Peninsula 41

CHAPTER V.

Cambour Old Family-mansions Good Fishing-
country Church at Mon dragon Spanish Posting
Difficulties of a Start An old Jew Vittoria
The Sorrows of an English Groom hi Spain Dese-
crated Church 51

CHAPTER VI.

Vittoria to Burgos Absence of Lakes in Spain
Poplar-avenues Spanish Beggars Formula for
getting rid of them Miranda Atmospheric Effects
Pancorvo Archbishop's Turn-out Briviesca
Scarcity of Milk Fine Sunset . . . .60

CHAPTER VII.

Burgos Hotel Swarms of Cats Cathedral Its Ex-
terior Peculiar Arrangement of Spanish Cathe-



Contents. ix

PAGE

drals Capilla del Condestable Its Tombs and
Sculpture Magnificent Iron-work The Cimborio
Convent at Miraflores Retablo and Eoyal Tomb
Desolation of the Convent Spanish Bell-ringing
Instruction in Manners A Compatriot . .68



CHAPTER VIII.

Hotel-bill Value of Civilities in Spain A Friend
in Need Furious Landlady Cambour and the
Black-strap Scenery Brilliancy of Spanish Dye-
ing Castillejo Inhospitable Landlady Taking
Beds by Storm Clever Appeal No Milk Pass of
the Somo Sierra Icy Blasts Chaotic Wild
Nightfall Enter Madrid 82



CHAPTER IX.

First Impressions of Madrid Its modem Air Puerta
del Sol Fonda Peninsulares The Royal Cortege
Spanish Reverence for Carriages The English Em-
bassy Table-d'hote Unhealthiness of Madrid An
Englishman's Funeral 93



CHAPTER X.

The Museo ... -102

CHAPTER XL

A Bull-fight . -118



x Contents.

CHAPTER XII.

PAGE

Armeria Real Royal Stables A Protestant in the
Stud 136

CHAPTER XIII.

Visit to the Escorial 146

CHAPTER XIV.

Escorial continued, and concluded . . . .153

CHAPTER XV.

Leaving Madrid Provisions for the Road Toledo ;
its Aspect ; narrow Streets Carriages seldom seen
Buildings ; Synagogues ; Alcazar San Juan de
los Reyes Cathedral Carving Retablo Mozara-
bic Chapel and Liturgy Painted Glass Lodgings
and Landlady 167

CHAPTER XVI.

Setting out on a Riding- tour Start under Difficulties
Scenery Mid-day Halt A Ride in the Dark
St. Ollala Posada Short Commons the Rule in
Spanish Inns . . . . . . . 183

CHAPTER XVII.

Rainy Ride to Talavera French Equestrian Roman
Remains Talavera Ware Deplorable-looking



Contents. xi

PAGE

Town Eoute to Oropesas Fine Eange of Moun-
tains Guardia Civil The Brigand's Vow Con-
fines of Estremadura Ilex Forests Estremenian
Pigs Oropesas Primitive Posada Castle Tipsy
Landlord Settling Accounts Advantages of bar-
gaining beforehand . . . . . .192



CHAPTEK XVIII.

Difficulty of getting accurate Information Road to
Cuacos Romantic Scenery San Benito Scant
Hospitality and its Consequences Wet Morning
A Spanish Cura Latin Conversation . . .201

CHAPTER XIX.

Set out for Cuacos Incidents of the Forest Cross-
ing the Tiedar The old Mastiff seeking his For-
tune Change of Scenery Vile Roads A moun-
tain Bridge A providential Escape Steady
Horse 200

CHAPTER XX.

Xarandilla ; its Climate and Fertility Charles V.'s
Sojourn Nightfall Disappointment Arrival at
Cuacos Wretched Posada Cura's Hospitality
Accommodation for Servants Their Good-humour
and Cheerfulness . 217



CHAPTER XXI.

Yuste ; its Situation and general Aspect Present Con-
dition Charles V.'s Coffin Proposed Restoration



xii Contents.

PAGE

of Buildings The Emperor's Haunts Chat with
the Cura English Prayer-book Betum to Cuacos
Curiosity of Natives Charles's Neighbours
Origin of the Name 222



CHAPTER XXII.

Cuacos to Placentia Beautiful Scenery Autumnal
Tints Passaron Polemical Cura Dehesas and
Despoblados 231

CHAPTER XXIII.

Placentia ; its Lack of Comestibles Primitive Posada
Shopping Expedition and its Results Bedroom
Plenishing Charming Situation of Placentia
River Xerte Pleasant Ramble Grand Funcion
Irreverent Behaviour of Clergy Sermon Cathe-
dral Roman Remains Aqueduct Spanish Shep-
herds Autumnal Migration Shepherds' Watch-
dogs Visit to a College Appearance of Students
Parting Incident Case of Wife-stabbing . . 236

CHAPTER XXIV.

Early Carousals Route from Placentia to Trujillo
Nature left to herself Puerta de la Serrana Lair
of Brigands Bowers of Arbutus Approach to the

Tagus Puente del Cardenal Concert of Cicalas

Execrable Road Torrejon el Rubio Night Quar-
ters Late Dinner Batterie de Cuisine Cleanli-
ness of Spanish Peasantry Vultures and other
birds Park-like Scenery Early Days of Pizarro
Incidents in Natural History ..... 248



Contents. xiii

PAGE

CHAPTER XXV.

Trujillo Good Inn Pleasant Eencontre Lionizing
Pizarro's Mansion Old Houses Towers Gate-
ways Labyrinthine Streets Bad Weather Storm
Prognostics Eoad to Montanches A Down-pour
Hospitable old Couple Abundance of Linen De-
ceptiveness of Distances in Spain Montanches
Hams Disappointment Curas House Singular -
Reception Montanches' Hospitality and Native
Courtesy Kind old Dame Dining in Public
View from the Castle Scenery Enter Merida by
Moonlight 261



CHAPTER XXVI.

Merida Indifferent Posada Casa de Ptipillos Ro-
man Remains Ford's Description of them Pre-
sent Condition of Aqueduct Fine View of Merida
General Character of Neighbourhood The Com-
missariat A Present of Wine Its Destiny . . 274



CHAPTER XXVII.

Merida to Andramalejo Uninteresting Country A
large Village Night Scene at a Posada Route to
Zafra A Group of Water-nymphs Eencontre with
Muleteers Warm Afternoon Todos los Santos
Zafra Excellent Lodging-house A good Dinner
Importance of attending to the Provend in Spain
A Cafe A good-natured Vigil The old Castle
Tauromachy and Agriculture A Draper's Patio
Spanish Highways 281



PAGI:



xiv Contents.

CHAPTER XXVIII.

Monasterio A Municipal Secretary Indifferent Ac-
commodation followed by a Long Bill Turning of
the Waters Lovely Scenery Glorious Sunset
Ronquillo Sierra Morena Disenchantment En-
trance into Seville . .....



CHAPTER XXIX.

An Unwonted Addition to the Breakfast-table Various
Reasons for going to Seville Hotel de Londres
Cold Weather A young Hungarian The Cathedral
Its Solemnity and Grandeur Spanish Ecclesi-
astical Art The great Church-building Age of
Spain 300



CHAPTER XXX.

Seville Continued Matinees Musicales The Opera
Dead-alive Audience Inexpressiveness of Spanish
Physiognomy, Male and Female Lacquais de Place
Hispano-English Advertisement The Alcazar ;
Its Beauty The Gardens Paucity of Worshippers
in Cathedral Procession in Honour of the Virgin
War with Morocco Its Motive Shyness of the
Spanish Character Absence of Drunkenness
Murillo's Paintings Merced Gallery; Due de
Montpensier's Private Collection Caridad Houses
at Seville Casa de Pilatos An Organ-ic Adventure
Post Office Excursion to Alcala de Guadaira
Tapia Walls . . .311



Conic nl x. xv



CHAPTER XXXI.

PAGE

Renewal of Engagement with Marcos and Tomas ; ac-
count of them Bad Weather Cordova Arrival by
Night First Impressions by Daylight Position of
Town Mezquita Court of Oranges Sanctuary
General blankness and want of ornamentation
Metal-work Palace of Zahra Cordovan Leather
Filigree Dismal Hotel Clerk of Diligence-office
An Afternoon Walk Landscape in the Neighbour-
hood superior to Seville Bad Weather A Change
and a Start . 332



CHAPTER XXXII.

Recommence our Journey Beautiful Day and Fine
Country Bactrian Dromedary Olive-harvest
Fernan Nunez Hill-forts Montilla Cold Nights
Route to Cabra Aguilar Weather-tokens Lunch
al fresco New Scenery Mountain Glen in Autumn
Cabra Advent Sunday Names of Posadas-
Moorish Remains Rainy Morning Cross Landlady
Rude Population Desecration of the Lord's Day
Hair-cleaning . . . . . . .351



CHAPTER XXXIII.

Mountain-ride to Priego Autumnal Tints Traffic on
the Way Connection between Bad Roads and
Fine Scenery Forest Scene 364



xvi Contents.

CHAPTER XXXIV.

PAGE

Priego Crowd of Loungers Search for Lodgings
under Difficulties Mistaken for Bagmen Religious
Enthusiasm Spanish Figure of Speech Beautiful
Fountain A Levee An Early Walk and Lovely
Landscape 367

CHAPTER XXXV.

Mountain-roads Death-memorials Incapable Guide
Torrent-path Mid-day halt First View of Sierra
Nevada Associations of the District Demoralized
Donkeys March in the Dark Shepherds' Watch-
fires Casa Lope Ride to Granada Bridge of
Pinos The Vega Execrable Road Entrance to
Granada 376

CHAPTER XXXVI.

Granada Cathedral Capilla de los Reyes Reja
Tombs Vault Altar-Carvings Conversion of the
Moors Interesting Relics Clerical Dandyism . 392



CHAPTER XXXVII.

Our Lacquais de Place, Ximenes Alhambra Gate of
Justice Place of the Cisterns Charles's Palace
Exterior of Alhambra The Alberca Hall of Am-
bassadorsCourt of Lions Hall of the Abencer-



Contents. xvii

PAGE

rages Bloody Stains Hall of the Two Sisters
Sala de Justicia Tocador de la Reina " Tales of
the Alhambra" Torre de la Vela Panorama
Abundance of Water Assassination Spanish In-
difference to Human Life Its Origin, the Bull-fight
Universal love of the Sport .... 401



CHAPTER XXXVIII.

Victoria Hotel Garlic-loving Pepe Season for visit-
ing Granada Its Summer-attractions Bad news
Generalife An Upland Walk A stroke of business
San Jeronimo Moorish Houses CasaChapis
Casa del Carbon Wood-carving Image -worship
Effects of water in Spain 427



CHAPTER XXXIX.

Farewell to Granada Drive to Loja Santa Fe Loja
Barbarossa's progress A new aquaintance, and
an old Threatening weather Woodland Scenery
Last sight of Barbarossa His end Archidona
A Lover's Leap A Night Scene . . . 439



CHAPTER XL.

Antequera Posada An unexpected Ally Dental
Surgery Startling Spectacle Antequerian do-no-
thingness Scenery Salt lake Campillos A
Family Group Unsettled weather Unearthly bell-
ringing Teba Absence of Farm buildings

b



xviii Contents.



Threshing-floors Spanish Straw A profitable spe-
culation Ostler Sinecurists Geological Speci-
mens . 448



CHAPTER XLI.

Tenacious ways Tremendous Quarrel Triumph of
legitimate authority Way-side flowers Aerial delu-
sions Trials of patience Moonlight Ride Honda
Bargaining Mauvais Sujets Ronda and its inha-
bitants Smuggling Changed circumstances A
Chip of the old Block Robber Lairs Ronda
" Lions " Alameda Tajo Moorish Mills . . 460



CHAPTER XLII.

Tricks upon Travellers Female dodges A lost
Faja 470

CHAPTER XLIII.

The Valley of the Guadairo River-scenery Cat's
C ave Rudeness on the road River-side Venta
Questionable invitation La Himera Bed-begging
Cottage-interior Public cooking Village Barber
Spanish Meg Merrilies Unseasonable gifts Fire-
side group Blood-letting 474



CHAPTER XLIV.

Vanity of early-rising Moonlight View Part with the
Barber Cortes Change of Scenery Quit the
Guadairo 485



Contents. xix



PAGE

CHAPTER XLV.



Philology Gaucin Boca deLeon An Error Steep
Pull Its Eeward First Sight of Gibraltar Unex-
pected Eencontre Compatriots A Chat in the Road
Difficulties A trail Guide Venta de Guadairo
Destitution Consequences of our Indiscretion
A Quintett Midnight Ride Cork- wood . . 489



CHAPTER XLVI.

San Roque Hot Coffee Gun-fire Parting Reflec-
tions Environs of Gibraltar Entrance . 502



CHAPTER XLVII.

Gibraltar Letters Toilette Sunday Dress Gibral-
tar Cathedral Contrast with Spanish Cathedrals
Misplaced Economy 507



CHAPTER XLVIII.

Welcome Arrival Muleteers' Adventures Their
Temperance Victoria Hotel Gibraltar Sights
Masquerade of Nations Our Steamer Settling Ac-
counts Winding-up of Affairs Final Measures
Good-bye to Marcos and Tomas Their safe Arrival
at Toledo Midnight Expectation Bang ! Light
Sleepers and heavy Purkiss' final Appearance in
Character .513



xx Contents.

PAGE

CHAPTEK XLIX.

Moment of Departure Ragged- Staff Stairs Roman-
tic Incidents Narrow Escape Spanish extortion's
ultimatum .521



CHAPTER L.

First Impressions of our new Home Unwonted
Breakfast Eating and Drinking How we spent
the Day on board the " Ceylon " Early tea Break-
fast Luncheon Dinner Tea Preparations for
the Night An Anomaly Passengers An Invalid
Pastoral work Sunday Worship on board Se-
dentary Prayers Painful Subject Change the
Subject Weather The Channel Restlessness
Breaking up A white World Custom-house
Parting End 523



ERRATA.

Page 106, line 7, for its portraits read his portraits.
,, 107, line 21, for 16 read 116.



AN

AUTUMN TOUR IN SPAIN



CHAPTEK I.

LEFT Paris on Monday morning, September
19th, 1859, at ten, arriving at Tours,
where we proposed staying the night, soon after
two. It is quite a pleasure to travel by any of
the principal railways in France, so punctual
and well-managed are they ; and the brief halt
of five or ten minutes, occurring every fifty or
sixty miles, might be introduced with advantage
on this side the Channel. With a long journey
in prospect, it is worth a traveller's while to
remember, that the Guards are quite open to
conviction, when argument takes the form of a
couple of francs, in consideration of which they
will at once conduct him to a comfortable seat,



2 Tours.

and he thus escapes detention in the crowded
waiting-room, and the final scramble for places,
when the doors leading to the platform are at
length unlocked.

Much of the country along the Bordeaux line
is very pretty, and scarcely a village is passed,
that does not recall some historical incident ; but
the portion of the famed Touraine we tra-
versed is sadly deficient in attraction for English
eyes, being little else than a vast monotonous
plain, which frequent inundations of the Loire
have converted in many places into a desert of
sand and debris. Several fine old chateaux came
into sight from time to time, among which
Chambord, Chaumont, and Amboise were most
conspicuous, the hasty glimpses we caught of
their high - pitched roofs, and sharply - defined
gables, making us long for a nearer and more
lengthened inspection.

I had always promised myself, in case I ever
chanced to be at Tours, the gratification of visit-
ing Plessis, the well-known scene of Quentin
Durward's earlier adventures, and as it is not
more than a mile and a half from the town,
it seemed feasible enough. But there are few
occasions when good intentions are more easily
frustrated than upon a journey, and, from



Tours. 3

various causes, I was unable to accomplish my
little pilgrimage to Plessis les Tours, one of the
myriad shrines consecrated by the genius of
Scott.

Tours disappointed us, exhibiting, in conse-
quence of modern improvements, very little of
the antique quaintness of an old French city,
which occupied so distinguished a position in
mediaeval history; nor did the cathedral, with
its debased western fagade, and bare, unadorned
nave glaring with whitewash, harmonize with
the associations called forth by a scene so famous
in the annals of the Grallican Church, as the See
of St. Martin and Gregory. The choir, how-
ever, contains some painted glass of exquisite
beauty, which must have been in no slight
peril at the Eevolution, when the vast cathedral
of St. Martin was destroyed. The Hotel Grouin
is a very pretty specimen of a Eenaissance man-
sion, enriched with sculptured coats of arms,
scroll-work, fruitage, and other characteristic
ornaments, though its recent restoration, and the
perfect freshness of the fine-grained stone, unre-
lieved by weather-stain and lichen, made it
difficult to believe we were looking at a building
of the sixteenth century. Several of the back
streets and alleys contain exceedingly curious

B 2



4 Tours.

old dwellings, of the rudest construction, in
wood and stone, somewhat after the fashion of
the black and white houses so common in
Chester and Shrewsbury ; one of them being a
cobbler's abode, of such scanty dimensions, that,
for aught I know to the contrary, it may be
the identical stall immortalized in the well-
known rhyme.

Just opposite the two towers, which alone
remain to give the present generation some idea
of the old cathedral's size and grandeur, I dis-
covered a glorious hostelry, not mentioned by
Murray, dating apparently from the thirteenth
century. I never saw so perfect an example of
a mediseval inn, which looks quite venerable in
its dirt and untidiness, unaffected by the lapse of
time ; and as I stood inside the court-yard, with
every external object shut out by the embattled
gateway, save the majestic forms of the Tour de
St. Martin and Tour de Charlemagne, I should
hardly have been surprized had Quentin Dur-
ward, or his uncle, Le Balafre, ridden in at the
head of a company of Scottish archers. Feeling
very proud of this discovery, which I made in a
ramble before breakfast, I took Lord Portarling-
ton to see it in the course of the morning, and
he was even more delighted with it than myself.



Tours. 5

In no part of France, wherever either of us
had any time been, east, west, north, or south,
did we meet with such inveterate starers as the
people of Tours, who, in other respects, do not
appear to be as civilized as their central position
and large intercourse with the world would lead
one to expect. One individual, however, a
waiter at one of the cafes near our hotel, must
be excepted from this charge. From the mo-
ment of our arrival, he seemed to take us under
his special protection, turning up continually on
every emergency in the most mysterious man-
ner, as if he possessed the faculty of divining
our intentions, and knew exactly where we
wanted to go. If we ever chanced to be in
doubt as to our way, a circumstance that hap-
pened several times, he was instantly at hand,
and, having set us right, vanished again, almost
before we were aware of his presence. I fear he
must have sadly neglected his customers that
morning, though why he should take so unwea-
ried an interest in our proceedings, and put him-
self to such trouble for our convenience, remains
to this day as great a mystery to us, as his
talent for appearing at critical moments. We
became at last positively nervous about looking
around us anywhere in his neighbourhood, for



6 Poictiers.

fear of causing further trouble to our good-
natured ally.

Our Hotel, L'Univers, by no means came up
to Murray's recommendation, which, classes it
among the first in Prance, and we found there
neither " the English conveniences " vaunted in
the handbook, nor the pleasant spaciousness of
the old-fashioned French inn.

Leaving Tours at two P.M. we reached Bor-
deaux soon after ten, after an agreeable journey,
some portions of which, in the well-watered and
richly-timbered pastures, reminded us of many
an English landscape. Poictiers, from the
beauty of its position, and the interesting
churches and other buildings with which it is
enriched, must be a charming place to stay at,
had time permitted us Notre Dame alone, with
its glorious array of sculpture on the west front,
being sufficient to repay a visit.

It was dark long before we entered Bordeaux,
so that we missed the effect of a first impression,
which may account for my being somewhat
disappointed with the general appearance of the
place. The bridge and r quays are certainly
magnificent; while the Garonne, then brimful
with a turbid flood 2000 feet wide, presents a
very different aspect from the Seine at Paris,



Bordeaux. 7

which looks sometimes as if it were all quay and
no water.

The plan of the cathedral is unusual, having
a nave 56 feet wide and nearly 200 feet long,
without aisles. This circumstance, though in
itself interesting, as another instance of the ma-
nifold elasticity and power of adaptation, so
characteristic of pointed architecture, yet dwarfs
the apparent elevation of the nave, and di-
minishes the general effect of the interior. The
choir exhibits far more points of resemblance to
English churches than I have generally noticed
in France, a peculiarity accounted for by its
erection during our possession of Bordeaux.
The north transept is surmounted by two very-
elegant spires, each 150 feet high the only
example, it is said, of such an arrangement, in
the whole of France. Our unfortunate Eichard
II., surnamed after the town, was baptized in
this cathedral.

The various diligence offices here reminded
us of our increasing proximity to Spain, by an-
nouncing conveyances to all parts of the Penin-
sula; while many a window, instead of the
Parisian shopkeepers' stereotyped notice, "Eng-
lish spoken here," held out to the Spaniard a
promise that within he might do business



8 Bordeaux.

through the medium of his own mother tongue.
Lord Portarlington having some intention of
taking a short run into Spain, we thought it
advisable to get a copy of " Ford's Handbook "
before leaving Bordeaux. Well indeed it was
we did so, as that intention, which at the most
scarcely contemplated even a hasty visit to
Madrid, developed ultimately into a journey
which extended from Bayonne to Gibraltar;
through Madrid, Toledo, Plasencia, Seville, and
Granada, the greater part of that distance being
accomplished on horseback. That expedition
forms the substance of the present publication ;
and if the narrative succeeds in imparting to
the reader only a small portion of the enjoyment
we derived from the scenes I have here attempted
to describe, he will not, I hope, think his time
altogether thrown away.

We left Bordeaux without regret, finding the
climate damp and oppressive, and feeling anxious
to reach our destination, Biarritz, without delay.
The rail to Bayonne runs right through the
Landes, which precisely resemble the extensive
tract of unenclosed country at the back of
Bournemouth, on the confines of Hampshire
and Dorset, with the same soil, heath, and
timber. Everything, however, is on a larger



The Landes. 9

scale, and the climate, of course, much warmer,
the heat and dust making our trajet anything
but agreeable. It was too provoking, that we
did not see a single specimen of the shepherd
on stilts, peculiar to this district, our only relief
from the monotony of the scene being an occa-
sional glimpse of some outlying point of the
Pyrenees, which begin about midway to show
their graceful forms, curving in purple folds
gently down to the Atlantic.

Instead of going direct to Biarritz, we drove
from the Bayonne station to the Hotel de St.
Martin, the very model of an old-fashioned
French inn, standing in quiet and shady retire-
ment within a spacious courtyard its staircases,
corridors, and apartments being all on a large
airy scale, in pleasant contrast to the cramped
dimensions of modern hotels, and imparting, in a
southern climate, with the thermometer at 82
degrees indoors, such a delicious sense of cool-
ness and repose.

I have seldom seen a town more to my mind



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