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Rindge (N.H.).

Annual reports of the officers of the town of Rindge, N. H. : for the year ending .. (Volume yr.1880) online

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3 1833 03068 6122

Gc 974.202 R47s 18S0

Rindge (N.H.)

Annual reports of the

I officers of the town of



ANNUAL REPORTS



OFFICERS



TOWN OF RINDGE, N. H.,



K()l{ TUK YEAH KNOIXci



nvn^K/Oia: i, leso,



INVOICE AND TAXES



-A.:PI^IXJ 1, 1880.



KKENE :

SKNTINEL PRINTING COMPANY, HOOK ANI> JOB PHINTKRS.
1H«().



T -n S*^^









ANNUAL REPORTS



OFFICERS



TOWN OF RINDGE, N. H,



FOR THE YEAR ENDING



ivdZ-AJROH: 1, 1880,



INVOICE AND TAXES



J^DPE-IXj 1, 1880.



KEENE :

SENTINEL PRINTING COMPANY, BOOK AND JOB PRINTEEIS,

1880.



SELECTMEN'S REPORT.



TOWN OFFICERS.
Paid Selectmen's services from Feb. 28, to Mar. 8, 1879
Jason B. Perry, 5 da^'S,
George W. Stearns, 2 ^ days,
Joel Wellington, 2 ^ days.
Auditors for March 8, 1879,
Moderator, March 11, 1879,

Supervisor's services, first year :
Martin L. Goddard, 2 J days,
Harrison G. Rice, 2 days,
James B. Robbins, 2 days.

Selectmen's services from March 11, 1879,
to March 1, 1880:
Jason B. Perry, 27^ days,
George W. Stearns, 58 days,
Joel Wellington, 37 days,
Jason S. Perry, School Committee, 31 days,
Warren W. Emory, Town Clerk,
W. W. Emory, Town Treasurer,
Ned Thrasher, Collector,
Julius A. Stearns, ringing the bell,

Julius A. Stearns, digging 11 graves and attending funerals,
E. S. Kimball, Constable, March 11, 1879, and notifying

juryman,
W. W. Emor}', notif3'ing jurors,
Zebulon Converse, Overseer, 10^ days,

$430 75
Since Feb. 29, Jason B. Perry has spent 5^ days, George W.
Stearns 4 days, and Joel WeUington l| da3's, in service of the
Town.

SCHOOL MONEY.

Dist.

3, Sharon, Charles E. Miller, $- 24 12

2, Chester O. Hale, 141 95

3, Willis M. Rice, 158 37

4, Moses Cudworth, 121 32

5, Addison Todd, 258 75

6, Frank D. Converse, 153 03

7, George J. Maxwell, 113 GO



$ 7


50


3


75


3


75


3


GO


2


GO


3


75


3


00


3


00


41


25


87


GO


55


50


46


50


20 GO


25


GO


35


00


25


00


44


00


2


00


4 00


15


75



8, Willard W. Smith,

9, Elijah Bemis,

10, Joshua C. Towne,

11, Jonas Wood,
Liberty M. Jewell,

10 Maps of New Hampshire,



CLAIMS FOR BACK YEARS PAID.

John E. Wood, damage on road in 1877, voted by town,



$165 68

118 53

139 25

47 92

8 08

50 00



ng road, 1878,



Charles H. Danforth, repair:
Willard C. Bingham,
F. E. WeUington,
Addison Todd,
C. C. Converse,
Uriah Lawrence,



NON-RESIDENT HIGHWAY TAXES.

Dist.

1, Charles Hale,

2, Willard G. Jones,

3, Howard P. Lamb,

4, Oliver Hale,

5, Benjamin F. Danforth, jr. ,

6, Calvin Allen,

8, Henry A. Wetherbee,

9, William E. Robbins,

10, Joshua C. Towne,

11, Joshua Fletcher,

12, James B. Robbins,

13, S. Warren Kimball,

14, George W. Stearns,

15, Alonzo W. Gibson,

16, Z. F. Whitney,
18. George F. Teague,
19^ Willard C. Brigham,

20, Daniel C. Hall,

21, Liberty M. Jewell,

22, Moses Cudworth,
24, C. C. Converse,

26, Timothy Cudworth,

27, John E"; Wood,

28, WilUara Hogan,
Ned Thrasher, Collector,

$207 39
Which is the amount assessed for April 1, 1879, excepting Sam'l
Hayward's tax of $4.60, in Dist. No. 25, which is not settled.



$1,500 00


$5


25


1


80


5


40


6


85


10


48


24


68


30


00


$84 46


$ 7 07


2


39


5


57


2


08


10


78


1


10


11


24


13


46


13


69


3


91


34


27


3


41


7


36


5


42




06


8


47


9


66


9


25


4


72


4


45


13


80


5


99


4


14


7


73


17


37



BREAKING ROADS IN 1879,

IN ADDITION TO ^ OF THE HIGHWAY TAXES OF 1878
Dist.

1, George E. Kimball,

2, Frank E. Wellington,

3, Albert A.. Eraor}^

4, Julius A. Hale,
11, Addison Todd,

9, William E. Robbins,
15, Jason S. Peny,

18, George F. Teague,

19, Willard C. Brigham,

20, Daniel C. Hall,

28, William Hogan,

30, Henry L. Lovejoy's estate,

29, Charles H. Danforth,
Warham Rand's estate,



REPAIRING ROADS AND BRIDGES.

Dist.

5, B. F. Danforth, jr., repairing bridge,
17, R. R. Converse, 1254 ft. plank,
24, C. C. Converse, repairing bridges,

E. LaClair, repairing roads,

A. C. Hale, repairing road.



BONDS PAID.
Warren W. Emory,

TAXES PAID.
W. W. Emory, State tax,
W. W. Emory, County tax.



INTEREST PAID.
W. W. Emor3% interest on bonds,
W. W. Emory, interest on the Jones fund,
G. W. Stearns, interest on money advanced for the
Town's use,



SUPPORT OF PAUPERS.

Paid Zebulon Converse, Overseer :
County Paupers,
Town's Poor,



$ 3


20


16


13


8


86


14


78


11


55


6


45


5


20


22


56


3


77


10


57


5


37


7


50


19


35


1


02


8136 31


$ 9


56


12


54


35


30


6


75


1


28


$65


43


$800 00


51,196


00


988


00


52,184


00


$234 00


6


00


6


68



$246 68



$141 40
204 61



$346.01



OVER ASSESSMENTS.
John F. Hale, poll tax, $ 90

Levi Russell, poll tax, 1878, 1 10



$2 00
TAXES FOR 1878, ABATED BY THE SELECTMEN.

Paid Ned Thrasher, Collector, viz: Homer Alger $1.10,
Frederick P. Cutler $1.10, George Dore $1.61,
Joshua T. Hunt $4.40, Byron D. Leighton $1.41,
Louis Popple, $1.10, James Pipler $1.10, Levi W.
Wetherbee $1.10. $12 92

TAXES FOR 1878, REFUNDED BY THE SELECTMEN.

Paid Ned Thrasher, Collector, viz : Andrew C. Robertson
$1.39, Charles Towne $1.10, Mrs. Charles Towne

$3.70, $6 19

SHEEP ORDER.

Benjamin F. Danforth, $12 00

MISCELLANEOUS PAYMENTS.

George J. Maxwell, damage to horse on road,

voted by town,
H. A. Watson, returning births and deaths,
L. C. Brown, for Decoration day,
G. W. Stearns, funnel for Town hall,
G. W. Stearns, new bell rope,
G. W. Stearns, printing Town and School reports, and

Collector's bills,
J. S. Perry, school house tax, Dist. 7,
J. B. Robbins, school house tax, Dist. 10,
W. W. Eraor3s new Town safe, with the old one at $50,
W. W. Emor}-, 1 record book,
Stephen Hale, work in cemetery,
H. L. Lovejo3''s estate, ^ cord wood for hall,
W. W. Emor}', cash expenses paid by the Committee to

buy a new Town safe,
J. A. Stearns, repairing bell irons,
G. W. Stearns, expenses of Selectmen out of town,
Z. Converse, expenses of Overseer out of town,
G. W. Steai-ns, bounties on 9 hawks and 1 fox,
J. B. Perry, postage and stationery,

J. B. Perry, bills, blanks, highway books and record book,
J. B. Perry, lock for pound, oil and chimneys,
G. W. Stearns, retaining fee, Faulkuers & Batchelder,

$520 15



$10 00


3


75


25


00


11


39


3


56


40


00


103


85


25


51


200


00


4


00


16


00


2


30


17


50


1


00


14


55


20


24


2


30


5


94


6


61




65


6


00



RECAPITULATION.

Town officers, $ 430 75

School money, 1,500 00

Claims for back years, 84 46

Non-resident highway taxes, 207 39

Breaking roads in 18*79, 136 31

Repairing roads and bridges, 65 43

Bonds paid, 800 00

Taxes paid. State and County, 2,184 00

Interest paid, 246 68

Support of Paupers, 346 01

Over Assessments, 2 00

Taxes abated, i 12 92

Taxes refunded, 6 19

Miscellaneous payments, 520 15

$6,542 29
The foregoing Report is respectfully submitted to the considera-
tion of the Town, bv

JASON B. PERRY,
GEORGE W. STEARNS,
JOEL WELLINGTON,

Selectmen of Rindge.
Rindge, March 5, 1880.



Rindge, March 5, 1880.
The subscribers have carefully examined the foregoing Report of
the Selectmen, and find the same correctly cast, and properly
vouched.

ARBA S. COFFIN,
WILLARD C. BRIGHAM.

Auditors.



The Selectmen recommend the following sums as necessarj' to be
raised by taxation for the present year. :

To pay the State tax, $1,188 00

To pay the County tax, 988 00

For Schools, including literary fund, 1,400 00

To defray Town expenses, 600 00

A highway tax of 1,000 00

Wholly to be worked out on bare ground the present season.



EEPOET OF OYEESEEES OF THE POOE.



Paid towards the Suppoi't of the Town's Poor :
G. W. Stearns & Co., goods for Mrs. 8. Smith,
B. F. Danforth, Jr., boarding Mrs. Sarah P. R. Smith

from March 1, 1879, to March 1, 1880.
G. W. Stearns & Co., 2 cords wood for Land Whit-

ney, $7 50

E. Adams, sawing 2 cords wood for Land Whitne}', 2 50



W. W. Emery, goods for Geo. W. Cragin, 30 63

G. W. Stearns & Co., goods for Geo. W. Cragin, 26 00
Stearns & Sargent, house rent for Geo. W. Cragin, 24 00



Total,
Paid towards the Support of County Pauperi
Mary E. Todd, boarding Leonard Cutler 52 weeks

\o October 14, 1879,
Herbert E. Wetherbee, goods for L. Cutler.

Mrs. Fairbanks, robe for Mrs. C. Carley,

H. Peck, coffin for Mrs. C. Carley,

H. A. Watson, medical attendance Mrs. C.

F. B. Thayer, goods for Jerry St. John, 24 98

R. Ramsdell & Co., goods for Jerry St. John, 1 66

Eben Lashuay, moving Jerry St. John and family to

Winchendon, ' ' 2 00





^90 00
3 62


Carley.


2 00

8 00

, 9 14



Total, $141 40

Received of Town Treasurer on Selectmen's orders :
For support of town's poor, $204 61

For support of County paupers, 141 40

Received of County on pauper account and paid over to

Town Treasurer, 182 31

There is now due from the County the sum of 28 64

Respectfully submitted to the Town by

ZEBULON CONVERSE,

Overseer of the Poor.

We, the subscribers, have examined the foi'egoing account and
find it correctly cast and well vouched.

ARBA S. COFFIN,
WILLARD C. BRIGHAM,

Auditors.
Rindge, March 6, 1880.



REPORT OF THE TOWN TREASURER.



Cash in Treasury March 1, 1879, $951 78

Rec'd principal and interest on Wm. M. Lamb note, 139 84

" '' '* Congregational Society note, 252 67

" " '•'' D. H. Sargent

" " " Joel Wellington

" '' " Zebulon Converse

" " "■ E. H. Converse

" " " Elijah Beinis

" Interest on Dana S. Walker note,

" County, on County claims,

" County, abatement on County tax,

" State, abatement on State tax,

" '• Railroad tax,

" " Savings Bank tax,

" " Literary fund,

" " Bounty on hawks and foxes,

" For hay sold from cemetery,

" Samuel S. Jewett, rent on Smith place to Dec. 1,
1878,

'' J. A. Stearns, old bell rope,

" For one town history sold,

" Ned Thrasher, Collector, bal. 1878 taxes,

" " " " Interest on 1878 taxes,

" " " " State, county, town, school,

school-house, dog and non-resident highway taxes
for 1879, 4,600 00

" Ned Thrasher, Collector, interest on taxes, 11 94



" 138


84


" 211


50


" 356


29


" 73


82


'' 33


75


46


50


182


31


82


60


100


00


6


89


1,097 85


67


34


5


50


12


00


30


00


1


00


4


00


650


00


14


41



Total, S9.070 83

Paid out on two sheep orders drawn by the Selectmen for

the year ending March 1, 1879, $ 16 00

Paid out on 132 orders of the Selectmen, 6,542 29



Total,



Received,
Paid out.



Balance in treasury,
2



$6,558 29

$9,070 83
6,558 29

$2,512 54



10

There is due the town the following sums :
Dana S. Walker, note dated March 17, 1874,
County,

Ned Thrasher, Collector, uncollected taxes,
Add cash in treasury',

Total assets,
There is due from the town for bonds sold :

Payable. To whom sold. No.



50 to 55 inclu
56, 57
41 to 48
31 to 38
22 to 29
13 to 15



1880. Sallv Conant,
1880. Daniel W. Pierce,

1881.
1882.
1883.
1884.

Total.
Also, note dated March 18, 1876, Jason B. Perry, agent
of Jones fund,

Making the indebtedness of the town,
Balance in favor of the town, $314 11.

Number of town histories sold the past year, 1.

Number of copies now on hand, 285.

- There is now in the treasuiy of the literary fund S67.34, which

is included in the above report.

The foregoing report is respectfully submitted by

WARREN W. EMORY, Town Treasurer.



S775


00


28


64


597


93


2,512


54


13,914


11


$600 00


200


00


800


00


800


00


800


00


300


00


$3,500 00


100


00


$3,600 00



The subscribers have carefully examined the foregoing Report of
the Town Treasurer, and find the same correctl}' cast and vouched.
ARBA 8. COFFIN,
WILLARD C. BRIGHAM,
Rindge, March 5, 1880. Auditors.



11



EEPOET OF SCHOOL COMMITTEE.



Felloiv Citizens: The closing of my official year brings again the
duty of reporting to you the condition of our schools. It is ex-
pected that in connection with an estimate of our position and pro-
gress some suggestions, either in general terras or in the more
minute particulars of school system and management, should be
presented to you for your consideration.

I shall, as previously, refrain from a particularized report of each
school and teacher ; it is not deemed profitable to marshal before
you individual excellence or defects, nor to afford room for invidious
distinctions or fulsome praise. However, I may depart sa far from
this rule as to mention some instances of especial merit or note-
worthy progress, this, as to a matter of imperative importance, as-
punctual and constant attendance. And here let me express my
satisfaction upon the result in this direction, a pleasure that I know
will be si.ared by you. since it is so indicative of awakened interest
upon the part of pupils and the faithfulness of teachers.

The number of names upon the Roll of Honor as returned in the
school registers is large. We find such proportions as eleven among
fourteen, the whole number of scholars, who have not been absent
or tard}' during the term. In another school, a very small one,
though one of the best, the names of four-fifths of its pupils were
entered upon this honorable record ; and it ma}' be added that of
these, two from one family had the same standing in the preceding
year. In most of the Districts there has been an encouraging gain
in this respect.

It appears that the smaller, more remote and scattered districts
show a better attendance tlian do the village schools.

Perhaps the disadvantage connected with small schools has been
over-estimated ; certain it is that grant them equal opportunities in
the way of teachers and length of terms, and the larger schools
cannot afford to rest upon their laurels. These hints are thrown
out in the hope tliat a generous rivalry ma}- be awakened which can-
not fail to accrue to the interests of all.

It is apparent that the Prudential Committees have been earnest
in a determination to employ the best talent within their reach, and
their endeavors have in such a large degree been crowned with suc-
cess that I cannot forbear the expression of ni}' congratulations.

The teachers having the charge of our schools have ranked high ;
none have failed, none but have achieved reasonable success. Many
of those in your employ were such as had, by years of experience,
established a reputation which words of mine can neither add to or
detract from, and yet it would be strange indeed if all should be
beyond criticism at every point.



12

Teachers are often not sufBcientl}' prompt in arranging and elassi-
f3-ing their schools. No time should* be lost here. It is expected
that the teacher will take this responsibiHty and at once ascertain
(if a stranger) the position and scholarship of each pupil, and so
grade the different classes that there be no loss of profit from stu-
dents using hooks which thej- cannot understand, or pursuing studies
for which previous attainments have not fitted them. In this mat-
ter, as in others involving the teacher's authority, their judgment
must be decisive. Children are not to dictate for themselves, nor
are pai-ents to interfere or assume control always, of course, recog-
nizing the right of protest, in lawful and proper manner. And al-
low me to say that the whole question of the teacher's authority'
ought to be better understood. In placing your children in the
public schools 3-ou relinquish for the time being your immediate con-
trol over them ; and, as regards their government, their studies and
training, they are in the hands of the State, and for parents to in-
termeddle with the management of, or to disturb the school, is to
render themselves liable to incur the penalty of law.

I speak plainly, for I have observed cases where great injury has
been done by parents taking sides with their children as against the
teacher, and this even before they had correctly informed them-
selves as to the merits of the case.

The child has been corrected for some perhaps trifling indecorum,
unused to control or restraint, he is impudent and rebellious, and
this requires further discipline. The instant the hour of dismissal
arrives the scholar runs home, burning with bitterness, having the
hope, often too well grounded, that he will find an advocate in the
parent. His story is told and listened to, and the usual judgment
is formed that "■ the teacher is not fit to keep school." Having ar-
rived at this conclusion, he goes forth with unrestrained denuncia-
tions, and will be found during the remainder of the term with
far more earnestness in the work of destruction than we could ever
hope for in a bettei' cause. These practices, contemptible as they
appear, are not uncommon.

A word in relation to the condition of the school-houses may not
be amiss. During the past year one house has been remodelled,
and one, with work done in the preceding year, has been much im-
proved, and some others have received slight repairs. The house
in No. 11 needs attention; the school building in No. 5, which for
years has been an ''abomination of desolation, standing where it
ought not" finds not at length " a generous friend or pitying foe,"
and before another year, will be numbered with the things of the
past.

In my last report, I laid much stress upon the importance of the
teaching of reading in our schools. I feel impelled to again call the
attention of teachers to this matter. Some who have carried their
pupils forward rapidly and satisfactorily in all other studies have
failed, in some degree, in this. In these cases I readily perceived
that reading had not been made a study in the proper sense of the



13

word. Evidence of drill and training of the voice were not appar-
ent. Sometimes the scholar was allowed to assume an incorrect
position, and habits of carelessness and inattention went nnrebuked.
As the result of these defects the reading was, in a few instances,
inexcusably poor.

Perhaps, conscious of no great degree of perfection in the art
themselves, the teachers have been unwilling to instruct their pupils
in the almost only practical way, that is, by example.

These remarks apply only to a few. In most of the schools the
efforts in this branch were in proportion to its importance, and the
results most satisfactory — in some instances exceedingly so. I sup-
pose it to be the duty of the committee to demand a higher stand-
ard of qualification upon the part of teachers in this department.

The pernicious effects of an ill-taught and ill-goveined school are
so evident that all will, I think, agree that to employ a teacher,
perhaps an entire stranger, as an experiment in the hope that all
will be well, is a needless folly. It is the duty of the Prudential
Committee to ascertain the standing and reputation of their appli-
cants, so far as possible, before they are actually hired. I suspect
that there is an unnecessary delicacy in regard to tliis. It is simply
a matter of business, and should be so considered.

It has become fashionable in some quarters to decry the school
system of our State ; but we maj' safely say that there can be no
plan whif'h will, as some seem to suppose, turn out a manufactured
product of educated men an
2


1


7




1


o

S


2


8


13


111^




10


8


$3 00


$2 50




3


10


10


17


1


3


16


8


2




11


3 50


2 50




4


8


6


5.7




1


5


4


2


1


11


2 50


2 00




5


11


28


24.8




14


21


7


2




12


5 00


2 50




6


10


11


9.8


5


6


2


3


2


2


6


3 00


2 00




7


8


10


8.6


1


17


6


4


2




5


2 50


2 50




8


10


18


16.9




12


11


5


2


2


9


4 00


2 50




9


8


5


5




1


4


5


2


2


7


3 00


2 00




10


9


12


11.1




1


8


3.


2


2


15


3 50


2 50




11


11


13


10.13






11


2


2




16


3 50


2 50





WINTER TERM.



12


18


16.9




8


13


7


2


2


10


$4 50


13


22


19




1


21




3


1


14


4 00


14


6


5.21






6




2


1


13


3 00


12


34


32.4




78


17


11


2




23


12 00


12


15


14.23


5


17


9




2


2


7


4 00


6


7


6.9


1


8


4




2


2


3


3 00


11


22


19.5


3


41


6




2


1


4


5 00


13


7


5.8




2


6


5


2


2


24


3 00


9*


14


13.9






14


11


2


2


17


4 50


13


13


11.63




11


8




2




12


3 50



Sharon

Liberty M. Jewell,

State Maps,



S3 00


$141 95


2 50


158 37


2 80


121 32


3 00


258 75


2 75


153 03


2 25


113 00


3 00


165 68


2 00


118 53


3 00


139 25


2 00


47 92




24 12




8 08




50 00




Sl,500 00



15



TEACHERS.



SUMMER TERM.

No. 2, Ida L. Jones. Rindge.

3, Ilattie L. Pettengill, Peterborough.

4, Emma A. Jones, Rindge.

5, S. Jennie C. Todd, Mont Vernon.

6, Ida M. Bennett, Rindge.

7, Semantlia L. Gibson, Rindge.

8, Hattie E. Winship, Greenville.

9, Abbie A. Brigham, Rindge.

10, Annie I. Smith, Rindge.

11. Evelyn H. Foster, Ashb}-, Mass.

WINTER TERM.

No. 2, Annie I. Smith, Rindge.

3, Hattie L. Pettengill, Peterborough.

4, Emma A. Jones, Rindge.

5, George W. Todd, Mont Vernon.

6, Gertrude D. Kilbourne, Ashburnham, Mass.

7, Jennie L. Ellis, "

8, Clifford W. Stickney, Townsend, Mass.

9, Abbie A. Brigham, Rindge.

10, Alice S. Goodhue, Hancock.

11, Evelyn H. Foster, Ashby, Mass.

PRUDENTIAL COMMITTEES.



Dist. No. 2, Chester O. Hale.
3, Willis M. Rice.
"• 4, Moses Cudworth.
" 5, Addison Todd.
•' 6, Frank Converse.



Dist. No. 7, George J. Maxwell.
8, Willard W. Smith.
" 9, Elijah Bemis.
" 10, Joshua C. Towne.
" 11, Jonas Wood.



TEXT-BOOKS LEGALLY IN USE.

Franklin Readers ; Eaton's Arithmetics and Algebra ; Cornell's
Geography ; Green's Grammar ; Quackenbos' Philosophy' and His-
tory ; Webster's Dictionary.

JASON S. PERRY,

Rindge, March 9, 1880. School Committee.



16

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING MARCH 9, 1880.
Warrant read by N. L. Goddard, Supervisor.
Article 1. Moderator— Ezra S. Stearns.

Prayer by Kev. Ezra J. Riggs.


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Online LibraryRindge (N.H.)Annual reports of the officers of the town of Rindge, N. H. : for the year ending .. (Volume yr.1880) → online text (page 1 of 3)