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Robert Allen Campbell.

Phallic worship : an outline of the worship of the generative organs, as being, or as representing, the Divine Creator, with suggestions as to the influence of the phallic idea on religious creeds, ce online

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Purchased by the Mary Cheves Dulles Fund.



Di'vision



Section-



sec




The Hand op Illumination — The Divine Hand

The Shadow of which is Error and Impurity — The Devil.



PHALLIC WORSHIP

( DF






AN OUTLINE OF THE



WORSHIP OF THE GENERATIVE ORGANS,

As Being, or as Representing, the Divine Creator, with Suggestions as to the Influence

of the Phallic Idea on Keligious Creeds, Ceremonies, Customs

and Symbolism— Past and Present.



ROBERT ALLEN CAMPBELL, C. E.



ILLUSTRATED WITH 200 ENGRAVINGS.



In Science, Philosophy and Religion,

The truth, the whole truth, nothing but the truth.




ST. LOUIS:
R. A. CAMl'BELL & COMPANY.



Copyi-ighted by
R. A. CAMPBELL,

- 1887.



PREFACE.



THE aim of this work is simply to present a popular
sketch of the history, customs, and symbolism of
Phallic Worship — past and present — written in plain
English.

Most of the facts and illustrations given are already
in print. Some of them have come down by tradition
from the remote past. Many are taken fi'om modern,
and some from recent, publications. Without using
quotation marks, or announcing special credits in de-
tail, the author desires to say that he has quoted a truth,
culled a fact, borrowed an illustration, and adopted an
interpretation wherever found or by whomsoever before
stated — and often in nearly, or even exactly, the words
of the earlier writer. Those who are familiar with
Higgin's Anacalypsis and his Celtic Druids, Payne
Knight's Worship of Priapus and his Symbolic Lan-
guage, Furlong's Rivers of Life, Liman's Ancient
Faiths and his other kindred works, Lajard's Culte de
Venus, Dulaure's Divinites Generatrices chez les An-
ciens et les Modernes, Hargrave Jenning'sRosicrucians

(5)



G PEEFACE.

and his Phallicism, etc., will readily recognize the
sources from which much in this work has been culled.

All these works, while of the highest merit as to
scholarship and reliability, are not popular ; for they are
redundant with masses of minutia which, while impor-
tant and of essential necessity to the student making
an exhaustive examination of the subject, are burden-
some and confusing to the general reader. These
works, too, are plentifully interlarded with multitudin-
ous quotations, descriptions, and suggestions in foreign
or dead languages — thus veiling from all but the ac-
complished linguist much of interest and of importance
to a fair understanding of this subject.

This work is intended, then, for the honorable and in-
telligent general reader who desires a fairly full outline
of this interesting and important department of relig-
ious, social, and political knowledge — in English —
and without the constant veiling of socially tabooed
ideas, organs, and operations in other languages.

This work is not meant for the instruction of the
erudite and exhaustive student who wants a complete
catalogue of facts, dates, and names. Such readers are
referred to the works named above.

Kor is this book meant for the young, the ignorant,
or the evil-minded ; for it necessarily treats very fully,
and in very plain English, upon topics and natural



PREFACE. 7

operations that — in this day — are denied discussion in
a promiscuous assembly.

As to the importance and dignity of the theme, and
hence the propriety of its treatment — which some may
question ; and as to its purity, which many will ques-
tion — the author simply quotes Hargra\ e Jennings —
whose learning and purity no one who knows him
^vill question — and whose extensive and patient study
of this and kindred subjects renders his opinion valu-
able. He says : —

" It may be boldly asserted that there is not a relig-
ion that does not spring from the sexual distinction.
There is not a form, an idea, a grace, a sentiment, a
felicity in art which is not owing, in one form or another,
to Phallicism, and its means of indication, which, at
one time, in the monuments — statntesque or architect-
ural — covered the whole earth. All this has been ig-
nored — averted from — carefully concealed (together
with the philosophy Avhich went with it) because it was
judged indecent. As if anytliing seriously resting in
nature, and being notoriously everything in nature and
art (everything, at least, that is grand and beautiful),
could be — apart from the mind making it so — inde-
cent."



CONTENTS.



Preface,

Definitions,

Introduction,



Page.

3

13

21



The Pillar,
The Triad,
The Triangle,
The Cross,
The Serpent,



CHAPTEE I.

THE FIVE GREAT SYMBOLS.



49
66
62
69
76



CHAPTER II.



GENERAL DIFFUSIOX AND MODIFIED FORMS OF
PHALLIC SYMBOLS.

The Pillar, ....... 81

The Cross, . . . . . . 91

Serpent Symbols, . . . . . .101

Miscellaneous Symbols, . . . , . lOG

(5')



10



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER III.

PHALLIC CULTS AND CEREMONIES.

Page.
Phallism in India, ...... 121

Phallism in Egypt, . . . . . 141

Pliallism in Assyria, Phoenicia, Syria, Babylon, and Phrygia, . 151
Pliallisiu Among the Jews, .... 167

Greek and Roman Phallism, . . . . .174

Non-Phallic Zoroasterism, . . . . 191

Middle Age and Modern Phallism, .... 193



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



Figure.



Page.





Frontispiece.




2-9.


Pillar and Triadic Symbols,


61


10-19.


Yonic Symbols,


66, 67


20-31.


LiNGA-Yoni Symbols,


67


32-43.


YoNi-Linga Symbols,


. 68


44-49.


LiNGA-YoNi Symbols,


69


50-57.


Linga-in-Yoni Symbols,


71, 72


58.


The Cross, . . . .


73


59.


The Cobra de Capella,


. 78


60.


Stonehenge, England, ,


82


61-63.


Irish Round Towers,


. 82


64-65.


Newton Stone, Scotland,


82


66.


Rude Stone, England,


. 83


67.


Innis Mura Stone, Ireland,


83


68.


Pillar, Kerry County, Ireland,


. 83


69-71.


Phallic Monuments, Pompeii,


83


72.


Parthian Linga,


. 84


73-74.


Linga and Sun-stone, Figi Islands,


84


75.


Sivaic Shrine, India,


. 84


76-77.


Linga- Yoni Temples, India,


85


78.


Menhir Temple, Petrea,


. 85


79.


Rude Linga-in-Yoni, Gothland,


85





CONTENTS.


11


Figure.




Page.


80.


Sacred Hill, Karnak, Egypt,


. 85


81.


Linga-Yoni Picture, Rome,


86


82.


Liuga and Yoni Stones, Gozo,


. 86


83.


Pliallic Column, Ciizco,


87


84-85.


Phallic Shrines, Mexico,


. 87


86-87.


Ta-Akoa and Ta-rao, Polynesia,


89


88.


The Cross, .....


91


89-94.


Crux Ansata, ....


92


95-96.


Egyptian Crosses, ....


. 93


97.


Hindu Cross — simple, .


93


98.


Xaca Cross, ....


. 93


99-100.


Assyrian Crosses,


93


101.


Ancient Cross, Egypt,


93


102.


Ezekiel's Tau, ....


94


103.


Thor's Hammer, Norslaud,


94


104.


Original Greek Cross, . . ^ .


94


105.


Maltese Cross — Triadic, . . " .


. 95


108.


Greek Cross — Triadic,


95


107.


Latin Cross — Triadic,


. 95


108.


Templar's Cross,


95


109.


Linga-Yoni Cross — elaborate,


. 96


110-113.


Linga-Yi^ni Crosses,


96, 97


114.


Hindu Cross, Ancient,


. 97


115.


Cross and Crescent, Greek Church,


97


116.


Middle Age Cross,


. 97


117-118.


Hindu Crosses,


98


119-141.


Linga-in-Yoni Symbols, India,


98-100


142.


Impregnation of Mary — Catholic,


100


143.


The Serpent, ....


. 101


144.


Paternity, ....


102


145.


Wisdom, .....


. 102


146.


Rod of Life, ....


102


147.


Roman Standard, ....


. 103


148.


Tree of Life and Serpent,


103


149.


Staff of Salvation,


. 103


150.


Trident of Jupiter,


103


151.


Fire Pillar, ....


. 103


152.


The Temptation,


104


153.


Serpent Goddess — or "Witch,


. 104


154.


Serpent, Sun and Moon — Gem,


104


155.


Serpent and Pillar — Gem,


. 106


156.


Serpent, Tree, Pillar and Ark — Gem,


106



12



CONTENTS.



Figure.

157-161. Crozier — five forms,

162. Divining Rod, .

163. Indian Amulet,

164. The " Great Four " Emblem,

165. Staff of Isis,

166. The Arrow,

167. The Steering Oar,

168. The Hammer, .

169. The Staff in the Ring,
170-171. Tlie Sun and Moon,

172. The Crescent Moon,

173-177. Phallic Triads,

178-182. Phallic Triads — India,

183. Masculine Hand,

184. Triadic-Yonic Hand,

185. Horseshoe,

186. Vesica Picis — Hindu,

187. Another Form of same,

188. Vesica Picis — Catholic Picture,

189. Vesica Picis — Catholic Medal,

190. Yoni Worship,
191-192. Concha Veneris,

193. Cornucopia,

194. Feminine Hand,
195-196. The Eye,

197. Shekel, Seven-branched Palm, Jewish,

198. Time and Truth Worshiping Siva, India,

199. Maia Worshiping the Linga, India,

200. Temple of Peace, Thibet, .

201. The Masculine Hand, India,

202. The Yonic Charm Hand, India,
203-205. Linga-in-Yoni, India,

206. Ardanari-Iswari, India,

207. Addha-Nari, India,
208-209. The Tortoise, India,

210. Isis and Horus, Egypt, .

211-213. The Sistrum of Isis, Egypt,

214. The Grove,

215. The Worship of the Grove,

216. The Royal Collar,

217. Triune Design,

218. Babylonian Gem,

219. Ancient Gem,



DEFINITIONS



RELIGION AND WORSHIP.

RELIGION is man's worship of invisible power or
powers, or of an invisible bein^ or beings —
which he conceives of as like himself, bnt superior to
himself ; and which he usually denommates God — or
the gods — or the divine.

Worship consists of the adoration bestowed upon this
divine ; of thanks for favoi-s received and prayers for
favors desired from this divine, and of obedience offered
or rendered to the supposed requirements of this divine
power or person — conceived of by the worshiper — as
like himself, but superior to himself.

One's religion and worship will, therefore, depend
upon his conception of the attributes of the divine.
One's conception of the divine attributes will depend
upon the unfolding and development of his conceptions
of man and his attributes.

One cannot conceive of the divine with any attribute,
the germ at least of which he has not recognized in
man, any more than a blind man, who had never heard
of light or color, could conceive of a being endowed
with sensual vision.

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14 RELIGION AND WORSHIP.

Let the reader understand here, that this is not a
statement as to anything the divine is — or may be ; but
simply as to man's conception of the divine.

As tlie ancients did not conceive of an infinite divine
being, they naturally thought of a number of gods,
each greater and moi-e powerful than man, but still, like
man — swayed by like motives and subject to similar
limitations — each endowed with certain special powers,
and with evil as well as good attributes ; and always
sexed — masculine or feminine. When these evil attri-
butes were supposed to predominate in any god he was
feared and avoided ; and they called that being a demon.

All ancient cults — and most modern as well — recog-
nize one among the good gods as being especially
superior"^^ — the god of gods; and likewise one among
the evil gods as being especially malignant — the woret
of demons — a devil.

The earliest worshipers probably made or adopted
some physical entities which they regarded as gods.
As their ideas unfolded, these images were retained as
representing the conceived of, but invisible, powers or
persons which they came to think upon as divine.
Then symbols were introduced to represent the images,
as well as the unseen, but believed in, gods ; and the
gods were more fidly defined. That is, images were
replaced by definitions of the gods, and the statements
of the divines' attributes were formulated in dogmas ;
and these definitions and dogmas were taught and im-
pressed in ceremonies.

The religious world of to-day — even the Christian



RELIGION AND WORSHIP. 15

world — has not outgrown these conditions. The attri-
butes of the divine are still defined as those of a good,
mse, and powerful man — only complete in aggregate
and infinite in degree. God is defined as one, but there
is a polytheistic personalization of his attributes as
Father, Son and Spirit — each of whom have sj^ecial
and clearly defined characteristics, which are essentially
distinct, as ruler, advocate, witness — the offended king,
unyieldingly exacting justice — the merciful mai'tyr, by
works of supererogation, securiug the criminars par-
don — the enlightener, making this fact and its con-
ditions known to man. Each of these persons is in a
way considered supreme in his own domain ; but when,
i-egarded as compared with each other, the Father is the
head — Lord of Lords — God over all. God is defined
as infinite (as if infinity could be defined), still his
powers are clearly and definitely limited — not only in
each of the three personalized attributes, but as to the
aggregate. God is defined as masculine, and all his
names — Father, Son and Spirit — are of that gender.
Material images representing God are generally dis-
carded, and by most denominations denounced ; but
dogmatic definitions — man-made, verbal, or intellectual
images — of God are held as sacred and defended as
valiantly as ever pagans protected their idols. As it
is clearly illogical to define a perfectly good, wise, and
powerful God as having any evil or weak attributes,
these latter — which again are only those recognized in
man — are recognized as aggregated in evil spirits —
more wicked than men — or, as they are generally



16 RELIGION AND WORSHIP.

called, demons, and among whom the chief and ruler
is — the Devil.

This is not written in a spirit of adverse criticism ;
but simply to illustrate that — the peculiarities of man's
mind, which in early days multiplied gods — of compara-
tive rank — giving them each human characteristics,
good and bad — allotting to each one of them special
powers and performances in the creation of man and
matter — and striving, by imagery, material or verbal,
to describe them and their attributes — is still man's
peculiarity of mind in the foremost religion and civiliza-
tion.

By phallic religion in this book is meant any cult in
which the* human generative organs (male or female),
their use, realistic images representing them, or sym-
bols indicating them, form an essential or important
factor in the dogmas or ceremonies.

Phallic worship, in its origin and early use, was as
pure in its intent and as reverent in its ceremonies, as
far removed from anything then looked upon as trivial
or unclean in its symbolism, as is the worship and sym-
bolism of to-day. No people, however ignorant and
savage, would deliberately allow — much less designed-
ly introduce — any ceremony in their worship which
appeared in their eyes as degrading.

The dogmas entertained by the " poor heathen " of
primitive ages — which, to our enlightened minds, seem
absurd, and the ceremonies by them practiced — which,
in this day, would be immoral or indecent, were — to
those who believed in and practiced them — as dear and



RELIGION AND WORSHIP. 17

necessary as are now the modern creeds and ceremonies
to the more enlightened worshipers of to-day. They
could not then, as they cannot now, he dislodged hy de-
nunciations.

The only way to rectify the creeds and purify the
conduct and ceremonies of worship is by the enlight-
ened and earnest teacher leading the ignorant sec-
tarian to a higher development, so he can see the truth
in a clearer and broader light ; and, therefore, enabling
him to intei-pret his old dogmas anew or to form newer
and holier creeds — and hence modify and purify his
worship accordingly.

Divine truth, as man sees and interprets it, is the soul
of all worship — past, present, and future. As the
conception enlarges and clears, the forms change, but
divine love and truth, as man conceives of it, is the
everlasting spirit of all religion. Rites which, in our
eyes, are indecent, were doubtless practiced by a primi-
tive people with the greatest purity of intent.

Indeed, it probably never occurred to the minds of
these simple people that any work of nature — much
less its highest and holiest activity — producing its
crowning work of ci'eation — man — could be indeli-
cate — mnch less offensive or obscene.

Even the cynical and sarcastic philosopher, Yoltaire,
says, speaking of Pi-iapic worship : " It is impossible
to believe that depravity of manners would ever have
led among any people to the establishment of religious
ceremonies. On the contrar}^ it is probable that this
custom was first introduced in times of simplicity, and

2



18 RELIGION AND ^OKSHIP.

the first thought was to honor the deity in the symbol
of fife which it has given us."

And Mrs. Cliild — whose intelUgence, purity, and
modesty needs no one's indorsement — in speaking of
ancient Egy|)tian and Hindu rehgions and their sym-
bolism, says : '• The sexual emblems every where con-
s})icuous in the sculptures of their temples would seem
impm-e in desciiption, but no clean and thoughtful
mind could so regard them while witnessing the obvious
simphcity and solemnity ^vith which the subject is
treated.-'

In another place she says: "Let us not smile at
their mode of tracing the Infinite and Incomprehensi-
ble Cause throughout all the mysteries of nature, lest,
by so doing, we cast the shadow of our own gTossness
on their patriarchal simphcity."

When Abraham's servant laid his hand upon the
master's generative organs, in taking an oath, he was
simply following the custom of the times in taking a
solemn obligation. The intent was as pure, and the
appeal to their recognized creator as honest, and Avith
as little thought of indecency as in modern times we
have in swearing by the uplifted hand or kissing the
Bible. Jacob, just before his death, swore his son —
Joseph — in the same solemn manner ; and the same
custom is still used among some modern Asiatic and
Afncan tiibes.

The ancient matron who wore a phallic amulet, or
made a votive offering to the image of an erect lingam,
praying for children, was as earnest and as modest as



KELIGION AND WORSHIP. 19

the Jewish Sarah, Rachel, or Hannah who appealed to
Jehovah ; and she was as pure-minded as the modem
Christian who prays to the Holy Virgin or to the Father,
for Christ's sake, to give her the blessing of children.
The Babylonian woman, who, in obedience to the re-
quirements of her creed, gave herself to the embraces
of the stranger Avho first offered her money for the
temple treasury, was as earnest as any modern wor-
shiper, and will certainly compare favorably, in purity
and delicacy — to say nothing of moraUty — with mod-
ern wives, who would be shocked at such ornaments
and procedure, and who, while enjoying all the sensual
felicities of sexual congress, seek every known means
to prevent conception -— or to a1)ort it even — after
their preventative endeavors have failed.

Some people of our day profess religion in order to
gain social standing, enlarge their acquaintance, or even
increase their business ; many follow Jesus for the
"loaves and fishes;" and no doubt many in ancient
times were pious for the sake of the sensualities ; but
the mass of worshipers then — as now — must be
credited with pure and honest intent.

Then, as now, it was the pretenders — not those who
had faith in the dogmas and god worshiped — that
desecrated the rites, making them the excuse for selfish
and revolting practices.

The ancients, in their worship, were not only honest
in their convictions and j)ure in their intent, but they
were careful and extended in their observations, and
deliberate, as well as wonderfully discriminating in their



20 RELIGION AND WORSHIP.

conclusions. The foundations of essential principles
which they laid and the superstructure of dogma which
they erected thereon still remain in the greater part.

Only the vitality of essential truth would gi\'e such
enduring life. The foundations have been deepened,
broadened, and in every way improved ; the superstruc-
ture has been enlarged and beautified ; but the grand
and eternal essentials of their cults, were the germs
from which have been unfolded all that we have supe-
rior to them in religion. The worship of one's creator,
and the ruler of his destinies, was with them, as with
us, and as it must ever be, the life of all religion.



i:n^troductio]S".



THE nicasses of mankind, especially in relig-ious
dogmas, have always looked, as they now look,
to their recognized leaders for instruction and example.
These leaders have always been, as they are now, either
conservative or radical. The conservative and the rad-
ical are the natural developments of two fundamentally
diffei-ent orders of mind, and neither class is capable of
fully understanding or fairly appreciating the other
class. They are opposed in purposes, plans, and
methods of procedure ; and are, hence, always antagon-
ists in religion, philosophy, and politics.

Notwithstanding this continual conflict — nay, to
speak correctly — in consequence of this antagonism,
they are the essential and effective factors in the de-
velopment of the race. They are, as it were, the
centripetal and centrifugal forces in humanity. The
centripetal force alone would carry the earth directly
to the sun, and thus to immediate destruction by m-
stant conflagration ; while the centrifugal force alone
would scatter the earth into impalpable dust, and it
would be lost in the immeasurable frigidity of infinite
space. So, if minds were all conservative, there would
be unchanging stagnation — but no progress ; and the

(21)



22 INTRODUCTION.

race would wither and die out from lack of mental
nourishment and needed exercise. If minds were all
radical there would be incessant and grinding agita-
tion — but no stability; and the race would destroy
itself by constant and consuming friction. Yet both
these parties are essential to the existence, continuance
and betterment of the race ; for just as the coordinate
operations of the centripetal and centrifugal forces in
nature causes the planets to revolve and circle in their
courses around the central sun, so it is only by the
constant activity of the conservative and radical mmds,
in their opposite tendencies, and in their apparently
mutually destructive — but really cooperative — forces,
that humanity is developed in affection, intellect, and
power.

The conservatives, in religion, in their teachings,
appeal to authority, precedent, and the pronunciamen-
toes of that lamented past, when God — or the gods —
they say — walked the earth; and, standing face
to face with the wise and holy men of old, delivered
their celestial messages — which embodied all the truth
necessary, best, or possible for man to know. They
naturally formulate exact creeds, and reiterate in the
same formula of words the traditional revelations.
They insist that the time-honored ceremonies were in-
stituted by the wise and holy fathers as a means of
pleasing Grod — or the gods ; and thereby securing the
divine favor upon those who punctiliously and rev-
erently observe and perform these ceremonies. They
cling tenaciously to all the old symbols. They build



CONSERVATIVE AND RADICAL. 23'

monuments to the Holy Prophets of olden time — whom
their predecessors in conservatism persecuted as inno-
vators and blasphemers — but who are, now that their
teachings are accepted, canonized as inspired saints.
They appeal for instruction and guidance to that
lamented past, from which, they say, mankind has de-
generated. Their great object is, by constant reitera-
tion of the accepted revelation, and of the established
dogmas, by never flagging insistence upon the full and
frequent performance and observation of all the tra-
ditional ceremonies, and by the careful and effectual
suppression of all false teachings (and teachers) — as
they denominate all that tends in the least degree to
modify the ofiicial worship — to retard the terrible and
generally inevitable retrogression from the holiness and
wisdom of man's first estate; and gradually, though,
of course, slowly, regain, for the faithful and obedient
few, a return to paradisiacal peace. In short, they look
back, they say, to the glorious sunrise of the past for
enlightenment. By an unquestioning acceptance of
the dogmas then formulated, by a strict ol^edience of
the duties then enjoined, and by a full and constant


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Online LibraryRobert Allen CampbellPhallic worship : an outline of the worship of the generative organs, as being, or as representing, the Divine Creator, with suggestions as to the influence of the phallic idea on religious creeds, ce → online text (page 1 of 12)