Copyright
Robert Barnwell Roosevelt.

Superior fishing; or, The striped bass, trout, and black bass of the northern states. Embracing full directions for dressing artificial flies with the feathers of American birds; an account of a sporting visit to Lake Superior, etc., etc., etc online

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Online LibraryRobert Barnwell RooseveltSuperior fishing; or, The striped bass, trout, and black bass of the northern states. Embracing full directions for dressing artificial flies with the feathers of American birds; an account of a sporting visit to Lake Superior, etc., etc., etc → online text (page 18 of 18)
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crisp.

The same directions apply to bacon, and both
should be cut exceedingly thin.

Stewed, Baked, and Bkoiled Meats.

Meat may be stewed, baked, and broiled, much
as has been heretofore directed for fish. In stew-
ing, the great point is to proceed slowly, and in
broiling to close the pores by burning the outside
shghtly on the start ; and the next point is to sea-
son sufficiently, as both pepper and salt lose their
strength in the presence of heat.

Soups

Are made by boiling a fish or a piece of meat very
slowly ; if salt meat is used, it must have been
boiled previously in a different water ; remove the
scum till no more rises, add any vegetables, and
boil till done. Use a quart of water to every pound

4



296 COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN".

of meat, and keep the pot well covered, ^^apid
boiling throws off the volatile portions of the meat
in steam.

Roast Duck.
Dip a duck or other large bird, neither cleaned nor
picked, m water so as to wet the feathers, and throw
him on the fire or into the hot coals. When tlie
feathers are pretty well singed, be is done, and the
skin, feathers, and dirt may be peeled off together.
A duck needs little more than a thorough heating.
Small birds may be rolled in oiled paper and roasted
in the ashes, or a bird picked and cleaned may be
suspended by a string near the fire, and made to re-
volve by twisting it up occasionally.

Beans
Should be soaked over night, and then well boiled.

Rice.
A cupful of rice is thrown with a pinch of salt
into enough boiling water to cover it well, and boiled ,
for fifteen minutes. It must be soft, but tlie grains
should be separate. The water is poured off, and it
is dished up hot.

Gkavy.
White gravy is made as already directed for fish.
For brown gravy, a little flour is heated in a frying-
pan, and stirred till it is brown. It can be kept in a
bottle, and is added in small quantities to thicken
the juice of meat or soups.



COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN. 297

Tough Meat.

Scalding vinegar may be poured over loiigh meat,
which is left to stand over night ; next day the meat
is to be cut into small pieces and stewed with season-
ing, and a few slices of potatoe and carrot.

Vegetables

Must be placed in boiling water with a pinch of
salt, and are done when they sink ; they must be
taken up immediately.

Water Sought
Is made by stewing fish cut into small pieces with
chopped parsley and onions, and some pepper and
salt. It may be poured over toast and thickened
with flour and butter.

Potted Fish.

Small fish, cleaned and seasoned, and placed with
a little mace in a pot lined with paper, are covered
with melted butter, pressed, down, and baked four
hours with a weight on them.

Boiled Salmon.

Bleed the fish the moment it is taken by cutting
its gills, and across its sides, in a slanting direction
at every two inches. Hold it by the tail for a few
minutes in the stream, moving it so as to encourage
the flow of blood. Put the pot, filled with cold
spring water, on a brave fire, so that it may heat
while you are cleaning and scaling the fish. Divide



298 COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN.

into slices through the backbone, where the slashes
have already been made. When the water boils,
add a large bowlful of salt, and when it has re-
covered its heat and is screeching hot, throw in the
pieces of salmon, the largest first, allowing the water
to recover its temperatm-e after each. For fish un-
der nine pounds, allow ten minutes, and one minute
more for every additional pound. Serve with a lit-
tle of the brine strengthened with anchovy sauce,
or make a white gravy of flour and butter, as here-
tofore directed. Save the brine for future use.

Trout on First Principles.

Catch your trout, put a pinch of salt in his mouth,
roll him up in a few folds of newspaper, dip the
swaddled darling in the water, light a fire, and place
him in the embers. When the paper chars, take him
out and eat him at once, rejecting the entrails.

Kippered Salmon.

Divide the fish down the back and remove the
bone ; rub him with equal quantities of sugar and
salt, and a little pepper ; dry him in the sun or
smoke. Cut into thin streaks, and broiled, he will
be found good and appetizing.

Daniel Webster's Chowder.

Four table^spoonfuls of onions fried with pork.
One quart of boiled potatoes well mashed.
One and one-half pounds of ship-biscuit broken.
One tea-spoonful of thyme.



COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN. 299

One tea-spoonful of summer savory.

One half bottle of mushroom catsup.

One bottle of port or claret.

One-half nutmeg grated.

A few cloves, mace, allspice, and slices of lemon,
and some black pepper.

Six pounds of sea-bass or cod, cut in slices.

Twenty-five oysters.

The whole to be put in a pot, covered with an
inch of water, cooked slov^ly and stirred gently.

LiVEE.

Pieces of deer-liver may be impaled on a red cedar
skewer, w^ith a slice of pork on top, and set up round
a fire, near enough to cook slowly ; the pork mil
melt and baste the rest.

Geiddle Cakes

Are made by thickening flour with milk or wvater,
and adding an egg or .two, together with a pinch of
salt. They are poured in ladlefuls on a hot griddle
or frying-pan that has been well greased. Rice that
has been boiled and left over, or corn-meal that has
been scalded, may be mixed with the other articles,
and makes rice or Indian cakes,

CoEN Beead.

■ Two cups of Indian meal and one cup of wheat
flour are mixed with two tea-spoonfuls of cream of
tartar, to which is added one pint of sour milk or
of sweet milk in which one tea-spoonful of soda has



800 COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN.

been dissolved, beaten up with two eggs. The whole
is to be baked one hour. Cream of tartar is always to
be mixed with the flour, and soda with the milk, so
that when these are subsequently bi'ought in con-
tact, gas is evolved and the bread is rendered light.

Scott's Chowder.

The following recipe was furnished by Mr. Genio
C. Scott to the New York Spirit of the Thnes^ and
is doubtless equal to the reputation of the author : —

" The old-fashioned iron pot is the best to make it
in, but in lieu of it a copper-bottomed saucepan, as
deep as it is wide, will answer. First take your fish
— ^alraost any kind will answer — but cod and sea-bass
are the best ; clean and scale your fish, and cut them
into i^ieces two inches square ; parboil a few onions ;
peel a few potatoes and quarter them ; cut up some
salt pork into the thinnest possible slices, and cover
the bottom and sides of your pot with it to prevent
your chowder from burning ; place upon the pork a
layer of fish, and season it with salt and a little black
pepper. (Since I read 'My Peninsular Medal,' I
have been very chary of black pepper, for that
authority states that it inflames the stomach without
stimulating it, while the cayenne pepper stimulates
without inflaming; but a dash of black pepper is
useful for its fragrance.) Next, a layer of the par-
boiled onions quartered ; next, a layer of potatoes,
and season the layers ; next, a layer of ripe tomatoes
sliced and seasoned (tomato requires more salt than
other vegetables) ; next, a layer of cracked sea-bis-



COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN. 301

cuit ; next, a layer of fish ; then sprinkle this layer
with infinitesimal pieces of salt pork, but sparingly ;
then your layers of onions, potatoes, tomatoes, and
sea-biscuit, with proper seasonings of each layer;
pour water enough to cover the contents of the pot,
but no more ; cover the pot and place it on a slow
fire where it will simmer or boil slowly for an hour
and a half; a half hour before dishing the chowder,
pour upon it a bottle of Burgundy or claret.

" In seasoning the difierent layers of the chowder,
tomato catsup will answer where ripe tomatoes can-
not be had. Sauces are also introduced sometimes,
and in case the party has been used to highly-sea-
soned food, either Soyer, Harvey, or Worcestershire
sauces may be used sparingly. Many prefer to sea-
son with a greater variety of spices and condiments.
I often season with allspice; but camp chowder
should be simple, and composed of edibles easily
obtainable.' Clam chowder is made in the same
manner."

Fish-House Punch.
One-quarter of a pint of lemon juice, one-quarter
of a pound of white sugar, and two pints and a half
of water. One-quarter of a pint of peach brandy ;
the same of Jamaica rum, and a half pint of cognac ;
the three latter ingredients mixed separately.

Pineapple Punch.
One slice of pineapple which has stood a day
covered with sugar, two bottles of port, one bottle
of champagne, and plenty of ice.



802 COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN.

PoETO Rico Punch.
Black tea and Porto Rico rum, mixed half and
half, and sufficient sugar, lemon-peel, and ice.

Nondescript Punch.
One bottle of claret, three-fourths of a tumbler of
brandy, a claret glass of Jamaica rum, one bottle of
champagne, ice and sugar.

Arrack Punch.
Eight tumblers of Jamaica rum, one and a half of
arrack, and one of lemon juice, which together with
the rind of three lemons, is to be allowed to stand
for ten minutes, when sugar is to be added, and
water to twice the amount of the liquor.

Champagne Punch.
One bottle of brandy, one of Jamaica rum, and
one of arrack ; three and a half pounds of sugar, but
no water, four lemons and twelve oranges cut in
slices, a large lump of ice. Add champagne to suit
the taste immediately before drinking.

Regal Punch.

Peel twenty-four lemons; steep the rinds for
twelve hours in two quarts of Jamaica rum. Squeeze
the lemons on three and a half pounds of loaf sugar ;
add two quarts of dark brandy and six quarts of
water. Mix all together ; add two quarts of boiled
milk, stir until the mixture curdles, strain it through
a jelly-bag until clear; bottle and cork.

This I have not tried, but give it on good authority.



COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN. 803

Fkank Forester's Punch.

The rind of a dozen lemons, two tumblerfuls of
finely powdered sugar, three pints of pale cognac,
two quarts of cold, strong, green tea, strained clear,
two flasks of Curacao, abundance of ice, and a half
dozen of champagne. This is an admirable liquor,
even without the champagne.

Venison Stew.

Make a sauce by melting a lump of butter with
two mustard-spoonfuls of mustard, two table-spoon
fuls of mushrot>m catsup, and one of sauce, mango
sauce being the best ; add the juice of half a lemon,
one wine glass of sherry, and one of claret. Heat
the mixture as hot as possible, and rub in two table-
spoonfuls of currant jelly till the whole is perfectly
smooth; then take the venison cut in steaks, and
previously either roasted or broiled, and warm it
thoroughly in the sauce to which the juice of the
meat, if any, has been added. Cold meat is redeemed
by this process.



And now my friends, if you are ever fortunate
enough to have the Superior Fishing I have de-
scribed, or if the author's good-will may avail even
better, and, after the delight and triumph of success,
the well-earned prize is brought up properly upon
the table, either in the rough woods or the elegant
dining-room, and is flanked by such appropriate
dishes as circumstances permit, and laid to rest in the



804 COOKERY FOR SPORTSMEN.

best liquor that can be obtained ; then your mind,
filled with present complacency, must travel back
over these pages, and forgetting the faults and par-
doning the errors, acknowledge that if in them you
have not found an instructor, you have found a
brother sportsman ; and, for the sake of the bond
that binds all members of the gentle craft together,
if you cannot conscientiously praise the manner or
the matter of these pages, you will utter no word to
discourage an effort that, while pointing out and
dwelling upon the beauties of nature in our wonder-
ful country, and the pure attractions it offers to the
lovers of our art, has principally been to maintain
the healthy and ennobling nature of field-sports ; to
urge the protection, at proper seasons, of the game
that still lingers in our woods and waters ; and to
elevate to a proud standard of honorable, generous,
and merciful rivalry the sportsmanship of America.



THE END.



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Online LibraryRobert Barnwell RooseveltSuperior fishing; or, The striped bass, trout, and black bass of the northern states. Embracing full directions for dressing artificial flies with the feathers of American birds; an account of a sporting visit to Lake Superior, etc., etc., etc → online text (page 18 of 18)