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Ml !K A 1\ Y



UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA.



tsion








ADDRESSES AND SPEECHES.



ADDRESSES



AND



SPEECHES



ON VARIOUS OCCASIONS,



FROM 1878 TO 1886:



BY

EGBERT C. WINTHROP.



BOSTON:
LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY.

1886.



Copyright, 1886,
BY ROBERT C. WINTHROP.



UNIVERSITY PHESS:
JOHN WILSON AND SON, CAMBRIDGE.



TO

MY ONLY GRANDSON,

ROBERT MASON WINTHROP,

8T{jis Folume

IS AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED.



PREFATORY NOTE.



THIS is the Fourth of a series of volumes which have
appeared at long intervals under the same name and
bearing the common title of " Addresses and Speeches."
It need hardly be said that it will be the last.

In a friendly notice of one of the previous volumes,
an anonymous writer, many years ago, spoke pleasantly
of it as a an unconscious Autobiography." The present
volume contains quite as much as either of its prede
cessors of the sort of material to which such a designa
tion might perhaps not unjustly be applied. It certainly
furnishes a somewhat substantial idea of my way of life
during the years which it covers. But it has a far
higher value as supplying occasional notices of the lives
of others, and of important public events in which others
have been the actors.

The Orations, prepared by the order of Congress, on
the Centennial Commemoration of the Surrender at
Yorktown, and on the Completion of the National Monu
ment to WASHINGTON ; the Addresses at the Unveiling
of the Statue of Colonel Prescott on Bunker Hill, at the
Centennial Anniversary of the American Academy of
Arts and Sciences, and at the Celebration of the Hun
dredth Birthday of Daniel Webster ; the Memoir of



yiii PREFATORY NOTE.

Henry Clay ; the Tributes to Dr. Barnas Sears and to
General Grant; and the briefer Notices of Mignet
and Count Adolphe de Circourt, to name no others,
have a general interest, and I should have been un
willing to spare them from my collected works.

Miscellaneous Papers, mainly of an Historical charac
ter, make up the residue of the volume, and may at least
serve to recall the official relations which I have so long
sustained to Institutions and Societies, from many of
which age has now constrained me to withdraw.

The four volumes together, in which the earliest
title bears date 12 March, 1835, and the latest 22 Febru
ary, 1886, contain an abundant record of my sayings
and doings during more than fifty years.

Yet I should be sorry to have my two separate volumes
of the " Life and Letters of John Winthrop " (1588 to
1649) forgotten. They contain the account of a career
and character to which later generations of his family
can furnish no parallel, nil simile aut secundum.

The Heliotype facing the titlepage of this volume is
from the portrait in the Speaker s Gallery of the Capitol
at Washington, painted by Himtington, and most kindly
presented to Congress by Citizens of Massachusetts, as
described on page 354.



ROBERT C. WINTHROP.



90 MABLBOROUOH STREET, BOSTON,
12 May, 1886.



CONTENTS.



THE HUTCHINSON LETTERS.

PAGE

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

February 14, 1878 1

PEABODY EDUCATION FUND.

Address at the Annual Meeting of the Trustees, at New York,
October 2, 1878 11

WAYSIDE ANECDOTES.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,
November 14, 1878 13

WILLIAM G. BROOKS AND CALEB CUSHING.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

January 9, 1879 18

JACOB BIGELOW AND GEORGE S. HILLARD.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

February 13, 1879 23

SOUTHERN HISTORICAL SOCIETIES. JOHN ADAMS DIX.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

May 8, 1879 30

MASSACHUSETTS BIBLE SOCIETY.

Introductory Address on their Seventieth Anniversary, May 26, 1879 . 36

HENRY CLAY.

Memoir Prepared at the Request of the New England Historic Genea
logical Society, August, 1879 38

NOTE.

Welcome to Henry Clay in Boston, October 23, 1833 71



X CONTENTS.

FIRST SALEM CHURCH. ANCIENT GRAVE- YARDS. FUNEKAL OF
GOVERNOR WINTHROP IN 1649.

PAGE
Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

September 11, 1879 72

SOUTHERN SCHOOLS. DEATH OF GENERAL RICHARD TAYLOR.

Address at the Annual Meeting of the Trustees of the Peabody Edu
cation Fund, October 1, 1879 87

BOSTON PROVIDENT ASSOCIATION.

Address on Withdrawing from the Presidency after Twenty-five

Years of Service, October 8, 1879 93

NOTE.

Extract from the Annual Report of the Boston Provident Association,

October, 1879 97

LEXINGTON AND YORKTOWN.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

November 13, 1879 104



NOTE.

Memorial to Congress in Aid of the Proposed Monument at York-
town . 109



ERASTUS B. BIGELOW AND WILLIAM IVES BUDINGTON.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

December 11, 1879 Ill



ADOLPHE DE CIRCOURT.

Tribute to the Memory of Count Adolphe de Circourt, at a Meeting

of the Massachusetts Historical Society, January 8, 1880 . . . 116

RICHARD FROTHINGHAM.

Remarks at a meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

February 12, 1880 125

JAMES LENOX.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

March 11, 1880 . 128



CONTENTS. XI

WILLIAM ELLERY CHANNING.

PAGES

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

April, 1880 131

WASHINGTON MONUMENT.

Memorial Relative to the Completion of the Washington Monument,

April 29, 1880 134

JOHN WYCLIFFE.

Introductory Remarks at the Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts

Bible Society, May 24, 1880 146

CENTENNIAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND
SCIENCES.

Address at the Old South Meeting-House/ May 26, 1880 149

CALENDAR OF STATE PAPERS. SIR WALTER RALEIGH. DEATH
OF DR. BARNAS SEARS.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

September 9, 1880 161

TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE
SETTLEMENT OF BOSTON.

Speech at Faneuil Hall, September 16, 1880 166

CENTENNIAL OF THE CONSTITUTION OF MASSACHUSETTS.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

November 11, 1880 171

THE FIRST CHURCH IN BOSTON.

Speech on its Two Hundred and Fiftieth Anniversary, Novem
ber 18, 1880 175

WYCLIFFE AND OTHER COMMEMORATIONS.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

December 9, 1880 181

THE PURITANS AND THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND.

A Paper read before the Massachusetts Historical Society, Jan
uary 13, 1881 184



Xii CONTENTS.

PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF BARON VISCONTI.

PAGE

A Letter to the President of the American Antiquarian Society,

Boston, January 24, 1881 199

THE SERVICES RENDERED TO SOUTHERN SCHOOLS BY
DR. BARNAS SEARS.

Address at a Meeting of the Trustees of the Peabody Education

Fund, Washington, February 2, 1881 206

PUBLIC LATIN AND ENGLISH HIGH SCHOOLS.

Speech at the Dedication of the New Schoolhouse, February 22, 1881 223

JOHN C. GRAY AND GEORGE B. EMERSON.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

March 10, 1881 227

CHARLES HUDSON, HUGH BLAIR GRIGSBY, AND JOHN G. PALFREY.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

May 12, 1881 233

THE REVISED NEW TESTAMENT.

Introductory Remarks at the Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts

Bible Society, May 23, 1881 240

PORTRAIT OF JOHN HAMPDEN.

A Communication to the Massachusetts Historical Society, June

9, 1881 243

THE UNVEILING OF THE STATUE OF COLONEL WILLIAM PRESCOTT.

Oration Delivered on Bunker Hill, June 17, 1881 253

PRESIDENT GARFIELD AND DEAN STANLEY.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

September 8, 1881 278

THE PORTRAIT OF LAFAYETTE.

A Communication to the Massachusetts Historical Society, Septem
ber 8, 1881 287

MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE MECHANIC ASSOCIATION.

Speech at the Opening of their New Hall, September 13, 1881 . . . 292



CONTENTS. Xlll

PEABODY EDUCATION TRUST. GEORGE W. RIGG8.

PAGE

Introductory Remarks at the Annual Meeting of the Peabody Trustees

at New York, October 5, 1881 294

THE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE SURRENDER OF LORD
CORNWALLIS.

Oration delivered at Yorktown, Virginia, October 19, 1881 .... 296

NOTE.

Invitation and Answer 350

WELCOME TO THE FRENCH GUESTS.

Address at Bunker Hill, November 2, 1881 361

REV. DR. NEWELL AND HON. JOHN AMORY LOWELL.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

November 10, 1881 363

THE CENTURY BOX OF THE ANCIENT AND HONORABLE ARTILLERY

COMPANY.

Speech at Faneuil Hall, December 22, 1881 369

RICHARD H. DANA AND DELANO A. GODDARD.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society

January 12, 1882 371

WEBSTER CENTENNIAL.

Speech at the Banquet of the Marshfield Club, January 18, 1882 . . 375

ALEXANDER HAMILTON BULLOCK.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

February 9, 1882 381

THE CHARLESTON (s. C.) PORTRAIT OF WASHINGTON.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

March 9, 1882 384

NOTE.

Resolution of the City Council of Charleston, November 14, 1882 . . 388

GLEANINGS OF A FOREIGN TOUR.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

December 14, 1882 . . . .... 389



xiv CONTENTS.

THE BOSTON CHILDREN S HOSPITAL.

PAGE

Address at the Dedication of the New Hospital Building, December

26, 1882 399

GEORGE W. GREENE. NOTES BY THE WAYSIDE.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

February 8, 1883 402

PAUL A. CHADBOURNE AND NATHANIEL THAYER.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

March 8, 1883 411

JOHN RICHARD GREEN.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

April 12, 1883 414

THE BIBLE, AND THE FUNERAL OF DARWIN.

Introductory Address at the Anniversary of the Massachusetts Bible

Society, May 27, 1883 420

EDOUARD DE LABOULAYE.

Tribute at Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society, June

14, 1883 425

CENTENNIAL OF PEACE.

Address at the Annual Meeting of the Bunker Hill Monument Asso
ciation, June 17, 1883 . 431

PEABODY EDUCATION FUND.

Address at the Annual Meeting of the Trustees, New York, October

3, 1883 442

MISCELLANEOUS NOTICES. STATUE OF HARVARD.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

October 11, 1883 455

THE EXPANSION OF ENGLAND. GUSTAVUS VASA FOX.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

November 8, 1883 461

MARTIN LUTHER.

Introductory Address at the Commemoration of his Birthday, Novem
ber 10, 1883 . 4G7



CONTENTS. XV

EDUCATION IN SOUTH CAROLINA. OXFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY.

PAGE

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

December 13, 1883 .-.-.. . " . 471

INTERESTING GIFTS. HENRI MARTIN.* GEORGE DEXTER.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

January 10, 1884 476

MORE INTERESTING GIFTS- ELIZA SUSAN QUINCY.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

February 14, 1884 483

NOTABLE DEATHS. FRANCOIS A. MIGNET.

Address at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

April 10, 1884 487

CORRECTIONS OF " THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF THURLOW WEED."

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

June 12, 1884 497

PEABODY EDUCATION FUND.

Remarks at the Annual Meeting of the Trustees at New York,

October 1, 1884 509

SACKVILLE MANUSCRIPTS. STEPHEN SALISBURY.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

October 9, 1884 512

WATTS S PORTRAITS AT NEW YORK. MONUMENT TO COLUMBUS.

Communicated to the Massachusetts Historical Society, January

8, 1885 518

THE COMPLETION OF THE NATIONAL MONUMENT TO WASHINGTON.

Oration by Order of Congress, February 21, 1885 523

JOHN C. PHILLIPS AND ADMIRAL PREBLE.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

March 12, 1885 555

SOME NEW HISTORICAL WORKS.

Remarks at the Annual Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical

Society, April 9, 1885 558



Xvi CONTENTS.

REPLY TO TRIBUTES.

PAGE
On Withdrawing from the Presidency of the Massachusetts Historical

Society, after Thirty Years of Service, April 9, 1885 560

PEABODY EDUCATION TRUST. TRIBUTE TO GENERAL GRANT.

Address at the Annual Meeting of the Peabody Trustees, at New

York, October 7, 1885 566

THOMAS HANDASYDE PERKINS AND THE MONUMENT TO WASHINGTON.

Kemarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

November 12, 1885 578

FRANCIS E. PARKER.

Remarks at a meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

February 11, 1886 586

CRAYON OF DANIEL WEBSTER.

Remarks at a Meeting of the Massachusetts Historical Society,

February 11, 1886 588

WASHINGTON S BIRTHDAY, 1886.

Speech at a Festival of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery
Company, February 22, 1886

APPENDIX, LETTERS, ETC.

I. WELCOME TO GUESTS FROM THE WEST 597

II. PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION OF 1880 ... 598

III. WINTHROP CHURCH JUBILEE 599

IV. WASHINGTON MONUMENT DEDICATION 600

V. PORTRAIT OF WHITTIER 602

VI. WITHDRAWAL FROM THE PRESIDENCY OF THE BUNKER HILL

MONUMENT ASSOCIATION 603

VII. Two HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF CONCORD 605

VIII. AMERICAN HUGUENOT SOCIETY 606

IX. THE LYMAN FOUNTAIN 608

X. Two HUNDRED AND FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY OF THE FIRST

CHURCH AT CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 609



INDEX



613



[UFI7ERSIT7]



THE HUTCHINSON LETTERS.



REMARKS AT A MEETING OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY,

FEBRUARY 14, 1878.



ANOTHER Serial Number of our Proceedings is on our table
this morning. It forms the conclusion of a new volume, which,
thanks to the unwearied devotion of our Secretary, will soon be
forthcoming. There is nothing more interesting in this number,
nor, indeed, in any of the Serials or Volumes which have
preceded it, I think, than the " Extracts from the Journal of
Thomas Hutchinson, Governor of Massachusetts," containing the
record of his conversation with George III., in July, 1774, im
mediately on the arrival of Hutchinson in England, after he
was superseded in the Government of Massachusetts by General
Gage.

We are indebted for this valuable paper to our Honorary
Member, the historian BANCROFT, from whom it came to
Mr. Frothingham ; and the paper is verified by the signature
of Edward Everett, under whose direction while he was our
Minister at London the copy was made by his Secretary of
Legation, Mr. Francis R. Rives, in 1843.

The dialogue between the King and Hutchinson is most
characteristic of them both, and gives a very agreeable impres
sion of the personal amiability of His Majesty, as well as of the
discretion and good temper of Hutchinson. The Governor s
house in Boston had been torn down in 1765, and many of his
precious historical papers destroyed, or trampled in the mud,
by as ruthless a mob as that which destroyed Lord Mansfield s
library in London, in 1780. And now his letters to Whately
had been seized unceremoniously, to say the least, and sent over

1



2 THE HUTCHINSON LETTERS.

to the patriots here in Boston, to convict him, justly or unjustly,
of being the prime mover and instigator of all the oppressive
measures against which they were about to take up arms. Yet
no word of bitterness seems to have escaped him in this conver
sation with the King, and he tells the story as dispassionately
as if he were a mere witness. This dialogue, certainly, adds
to the impression of general fairness and moderation which
characterizes the third volume of Hutchinson s History of
Massachusetts, dealing with the same period ; and leaves us
little disposition, in this connection, to say any thing harsh
about the author. Even in regard to the Letters, he accuses
no one ; but, when the King puts the question, " Could you
ever find, Mr. Hutchinson, how those letters came to New
England?" he simply replies, " Doctor Franklin, may it please
your Majesty, has made a public declaration that he sent them,
and the Speaker [Mr. Gushing] has acknowledged to me that
he received them." In further response to the King s inquiry,
Hutchinson gives the names of the six persons to whom
alone these letters (as he says) were to have been confiden
tially shown. They were "Mr. Bowdoin, Mr. Pitts, Doctor
Winthrop, Doctor Chauncy, Doctor Cooper, and the Speaker
himself."

Franklin s injunctions, however, allowed them also to be seen
" by the other gentlemen of the Committee of Correspondence,"
of whom the Speaker was one, and John Adams, James Otis,
and Samuel Adams, I believe, among the others.

The affair, as we all know, took a direction and assumed pro
portions entirely beyond the contemplation or intention of any
of those concerned in it. It is plain from the whole history of
the proceeding, that the original exhibition of the letters to
Franklin and others in London was only to convince them, by
ocular proof, that Hutchinson was the instigator of the oppres
sive measures of the Ministry. Franklin thought it important
that the patriots in Boston should have similar proof, but was
at first disposed to send copies only. When he was allowed by
the person from whom he received them to send the originals,
it was with strict injunctions of confidence, and with the under
standing that the letters should " not be printed ; that no copies



THE HTJTCHINSON LETTERS. 3

should be taken of them ; that they should be shown only to a
few of the leading people of the Government; and that they
should be carefully returned." They had been exhibited for
influencing public men and public measures in London ; and he
thought it fair that they should be used in the same way on this
side of the Atlantic. " They were not," he says, " of the nature
of private letters between friends. They were written by pub
lic officers to persons in public stations, on public affairs, and
intended to procure public measures; they were therefore
handed to other public persons, who might be influenced by
them to produce those measures." 1

The publication of the letters seems clearly not to have been
in the original contemplation of Franklin or any one else, and
was, perhaps, not in conformity with the intentions of the gen
tlemen to whose examination they were at first restricted. But
the news of their having been transmitted soon leaked out ; and,
as the Speaker told Hutchinson, and Hutchinson told the King,
44 the people abroad compelled their publication, or would not
be satisfied without it."

As we review the whole story of the transaction at this day,
in cool blood, we can hardly understand how it occurred ; and
there are those on the other side of the ocean, if not on our own
side, who fail to perceive how it could have been justified, as it
was, by so many of our calmest, wisest, and most conscientious
patriots. For, certainly, the men who were intrusted with the
letters were second to none in Massachusetts for integrity and
principle. Chauncy and Cooper, as we all know, were Doctors
of Divinity, who would hardly have been invited to take part
in an unworthy act. Doctor Winthrop very remotely con
nected with myself, and of whom I may therefore speak without
delicacy was the foremost man of science at Harvard Univer
sity, a member, too, of the Royal Society, and a gentleman of
the highest character. And Bowdoin, who stands first on the
list, would have been singled out among all the patriots of that
period as a man of the greatest moderation, of inflexible prin
ciple, and of the nicest sense of honor. Yet Bowdoin, in a
letter to Franklin of Sept. 6, 1774, calls the sending of the

i Sparks s Franklin, vol. iv. p. 435.



4 THE HUTCHINSON LETTERS.

letters " that most meritorious act ; " and I am not aware of
any other view of the affair having been expressed, at the time
it occurred, by him, or by any other of our Revolutionary
Fathers.

Franklin himself did not condescend to notice the insolence
of Wedderburn before the Privy Council, but he told Dr.
Priestley, who breakfasted with him the next morning, that
" he had never before been so sensible of the power of a good
conscience ; for that if he had not considered the thing for
which he had been so much insulted, as one of the best actions
of his life, and what he should certainly do again in the same
circumstances, he could not have supported it." 1

John Adams has stated that " he was one of the first persons
to whom Mr. Gushing communicated the great bundle of let
ters," and that he was " permitted to carry them with him
upon a circuit of our Judicial Court, and to communicate them
to the chosen few." "They excited," he adds, "no surprise,
excepting at the miracle of their acquisition."

It must be kept in mind, however, that it was a period of
great commotion, when the Stamp Act and the Revenue Acts,
and the bringing over of British troops, followed by the " Bos
ton Massacre," and other similar events, had already roused the
Colonies, and our own Colony especially, to a pitch of indig
nation and resentment closely bordering on resistance and
rebellion ; and when, too, all the ordinary safeguards as to
correspondence between England and America were disregarded
or defied on both sides. Not a few of the letters between the
Colonies and the mother country crossed the ocean at that time
without signatures, lest they should be seized in transitu, and
their writers betrayed. I hold one such in my hand at this
moment, addressed to Bowdoin anonymously, and dealing with
some of the considerations arising out of this very transaction.
I forbear from reading it, as it was communicated by me, and
printed in our Proceedings, in December, 1864.

Franklin, in vindicating himself for this proceeding, says,
among other things : " The writers, too, had taken the same
liberty with the letters of others, transmitting hither those of

i Sparks, ir. 452.



THE HUTCHINSON LETTERS. 5

Rosne and Auchmuty in confirmation of their own calumnies
against the Americans ; copies of some of mine, too, had been
returned here by officers of Government. Why, then, should
theirs be exempt from the same treatment ? " In another place,
he adds: "I am told that Administration is possessed of most
of my letters sent or received on public affairs for some years
past ; copies of them having been obtained from the files of the
several assemblies, or as they passed through the post-office"
Mr. Vaughan, then in London, in a letter quoted by Sparks,
says that Hutchinson himself, "before the arrival of Dr. Frank
lin s packet in Boston, sent over one of Dr. Franklin s own
* private letters to England ; expressing some little coyness,
indeed, upon the occasion, but desiring secrecy, lest he should
be prevented from procuring more useful intelligence from the
same source." All such acts may be classed among what Mr.
Burke so well called " irregular things done in the confusion of
mighty troubles;" not to be drawn into precedents or justified
upon principles, but to find such apology as they may in the
excitements and exigencies which provoked them.

As to these Hutchinson Letters, " the miracle of their acqui
sition," as John Adams called it, has been a subject of specula
tion from that day to this ; and is one of the questions like
the "authorship of Junius," or the " Man in the Iron Mask,"
or the Dauphin of France, or the destroyers of the Tea in our
own harbor which is found "still beginning, never ending,"
and which remains as full of mystery and perplexity as at the
first. As long ago as 1850, I had some correspondence with
Mr. Bancroft on the subject, and found that his historical re
searches had resulted in a clearer conviction of the course of
this affair than I had obtained from any other source. More
recently, within the last year or two only, my attention was
again called to the subject ; and at my request Mr. Bancroft
sent me a minute of the views which he had long entertained
in regard to it. I have thought it due both to Mr. Bancroft and
to History that this minute should go upon our records ; and
the "Dialogue between the King and Hutchinson," just printed
in our Proceedings, seems to afford the appropriate occasion for
presenting it. It is as follows :



6 THE HUTCHINSON LETTERS.



Whence came the Papers sent by Franklin to Gushing in his Letter of
December 2, 1772?

The Commission of Revenue for America was instituted by George
Grenville. John Temple, who was connected with the family of Lord
Temple and Grenville, returned to Boston under their auspices as Sur
veyor-General of the Customs in America. He was a politician, devoted
to the Grenvilles ; praised George Grenville in the Boston newspapers,
pointed out his claims to be considered a liberal statesman, and was at



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