Robert Harborough Sherard.

My friends the French, with discursive allusions to other people online

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THEfRENCH



MY FRIENDS
THE FRENCH




PAUL VERLAINE: His Life His
Work.

By EDMOND LEPELLETIER. Illustrated. 2is. net.

THE LIFE OF OSCAR WILDE.

By ROBERT HARBOROUGH SHERARD. Illustrated.
i2s. 6d. net.

OSCAR WILDE.

By LEONARD CRESSWELL INGLEBV. 125. 6d. net.

THE COURTSHIPS OF CATHE-
RINE THE GREAT.

By PHILIP W. SERGEANT, B.A. Illustrated.
6s. net.

THE LAST EMPRESS OF THE
FRENCH.

Being the Life of the Empress Eugenie, Wife of
Napoleon III. By PHILIP W. SERGEANT, B.A.
las. 6d. net

THE BURLESQUE NAPOLEON.

Being die Story of the Life and Kingship of
Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte, youngest brother of
Napoleon the Great. By PHILIP W. SERGEANT,
B.A. Illustrated. los. 6d. net.

THE LOVE STORY OF EMPRESS
JOSEPHINE.

By JAMES ENDELL. 40 Illustrations. 125. 6d. net.

THE LOVER OF QUEEN ELIZA-
BETH.

Being the Story of the Life of Robert Dudley,
Earl of Leicester. By Mrs AUBREY RICHARDSON.
Illustrated. 125. 6d. net.

LOLA MONTEZ.

An Adventuress of the Forties. By E. B.
D'AUVERGNE. Illustrated. i2S. 6d. net.




ROBERT HARBOROUGH SHERARD.



Frontispiece.



MY FRIENDS THE
FRENCH



WITH DISCURSIVE ALLUSIONS
TO OTHER PEOPLE



BY

ROBERT HARBOROUGH SHERARD

Author of " Twenty Years in Paris," etc. etc.



ILLUSTRATED



LONDON

T. WERNER LAURIE

CLIFFORD'S INN






TO

IRENE OSGOOD

DEAREST AND BEST OF FRIENDS

THIS BOOK
IS DEDICATED



CONTENTS



CHAPTER I

Place aux Dames" Husbands ! Oh ! la ! la ! n In the
Divorce Court Judges as Peacemakers Dwarfs
as Mascots Purveyors of Happiness Daudet's
Experiments Daudet and the Dogs The Im-
morality of " Sappho n Cruelty to Animals Shall it
remain unpunished ? An amiable Minister The
Husband and the Kodak On the Pleasure of Feeling
Important In a Minister's Antechamber French
Freedom of Speech Monsieur de Goncourt rebuked
English Reticence Morality or Hypocrisy A
Diversion on Poets Rogers and his Court Dress
Tennyson and Swinburne Tennyson, his Times
and his Pipe :



CHAPTER II

Illegitimacy Difference of French Attitude The Gravest
Insult in England And in France Prejudices of
English, and of French Readers Two publishing
Experts Monsieur Pierre Laffitte On Magazines
in France Monsieur Jean- Joseph Renaud Literary
Earnings The Hero and the Horse In the Divorce
Court Hope, Eternal Monsieur, Madame, and
Monsieur Jules Marriage, Divorce and Free Union
More liberal Treatment of Wives in France
Monsieur's Weekly Allowance French Housewifery
Injustices towards English Wives Cottons and
Cleanliness Woollens and Washing The Jews in
Warsaw 16



CHAPTER III

French Frugalities Parsimony and Pills A Gift Ex-
Coupon Hereditary Instinct My Friend Mignon
and the Basque Peasant Woman Sugar a Luxury
v

256617



VI



CONTENTS



Chapter iii. continued. PACK

Beetroots and Brandy Bonbons Anglais A Breton
Grocery Twisting Paper Bags Alcoholism in
Brittany The Three Barrels " Grande Fine
Champagne " A la Mode de Bretagne Chez Jules
Massenet Absinthe and Absinthism Cider and
Lunacy In a Normandy Inn " Strangling
Parrots "A Waif of the " Quartier "Made-
moiselle Marguerite How she " Made an End u . 30



CHAPTER IV

The Hypersensitiveness of Marguerite " La Belle F "

Marriage in France Women who object to marry
As in Jamaica " Make an Honest Man of me "
Divorce a I 'amiable The Cost in France Marriage
as a Business Proposition A Matter-of-fact Young
Man " No Dowry, no Son-in-Law " A happy
Sequel A Normandy Wooing Alphonsine's
Suitor The Bridegroom's Expectations A suc-
cessful Alliance An Algerian Boarding - house
Keeper " With or without Bulbul " Inter-
national Marriages Dumas and the Suffragettes
Marie-Louise and her Spouses Dumas' Misad-
venture His Diplomacy 46



CHAPTER V

Duelling in France The Aggrieved Party Scholl as Arbi-
trator Two Social Conventions The Feeling in
England Jerome Napoleon and Empress Eugenie
Whistler and George Moore George Moore in
Dublin His Objection to Flaubert How Moore
works Literature and the Middle Class Words-
worth's Descent Wordsworth and Quillinan A
Poem composed under Difficulties High Descent
The Crossing Sweeper and the King The Irish
Literary Movement The Contemporary Club Mr
Oldham, William Butler Yeats Syng and the King
of the Blasketts The Fenian O'Leary Padraic
Colum and the American Maecenas Professor
Dowden and De Quincey's Proofs ... 59



CONTENTS vii



CHAPTER VI

PAGE

The Cost of a Duel An unearned Notoriety Coulson
Kernahan warned Robert Barr and Henry Harland
as Seconds Anonymity a Preventive Preparing for
an Encounter A prudent Landlord Dodging the
Police Alan Breck and the Chevalier Johnson
Paul de Kock as a Duellist And as a Writer
D'Artagnan redivivus Swashbuckling on the
Cheap John Barlas, Poet Carrier Pigeons and
Marconigrams John Davidson and the Goloshes of
Fortune 78



CHAPTER VII

Journalism and Literature Richard Whiteing and John
Davidson Self-Advertisement, how considered in
France Commercialism in Literature Keats'
Letters as " Goods " Barbey d'Aurevilly Eccen-
tricities unremunerative Ernest Lajeunesse and
his Work Working in Cafe's Mr Crawford,
Eugene Sue, Timothy Trimm The Cafe Napolitain
Catulle Mendes as a "Ghost" George Courteline
as a Bureaucrat Jean Moreas ; Zola's, Mendes' and
Verlaine's Opinions on him The Ca// Habit The
Old Man in the Rue Vicq d'Azir Henner on Wine
Drinking Mr Loubet's Bottle of Beaune Messrs
Stevenson and Osbourne's Bottle of Roussillon
John Keats' Bottle of Claret " The Wrecker " and
the Quartier Henner and Bismarck on Beer
Beer Drinking in France A Parisian Beer King
A Note on Chartreuse . 101



CHAPTER VIII

Ruins at Sixpence Authors and Second-hand Booksellers
Marmier's Bequest A modest Trouvaille Mary
Queen of Scots' Prison Reading Anatole France on
the Quays How he discovered Moreas Anatole
France in the Avenue Hoche His placid Anarchism
Property, Theft Pierre Louys and " Aphrodite "
Jean Lorrain and the Roman a clef Paul



viii CONTENTS

Chapter viii. continued^. PAGE

Adam and his Work Meredith and the Interviewer
Meredith and Daudet Meredith's Claret
Sienkiewicz's Mineral Water How " Quo Vadis ? "
was conceived Red Ink and Violet Bernard Lazare
and Dreyfus The Dreyfus Interviewer Jules
Huret " The King of Interviewers " A Wife's
Tribute Huret's Journalistic Records His
" Inquiries " Spuller and Huret Monsieur
Couteaux Economist and Chef Litvre & la Roy ale
The Professor and the Chop . . . .121



CHAPTER IX

George Du Maurier and an Interviewer W. H. Wilkins,
Author and Journalist A Contributor's Physiog-
nomy Jules Huret outdone An Interview under
Difficulties Monsieur Bis, Rentier The Legatee
and the Officials The Pare aux Chats Cats and
Men of Letters Paul de Kock and Frontin
Baudelaire and Monsieur Brunetiere Posthumous
Animosities An Author's Pets and his Neighbours
A Peasant and his Trespassers The Land of Dune
and Pine Capbreton Wine The Messages of the
Pumpkins The Vegetarian in the Kitchen Garden
New Wine for Old Barrels A Masterpiece for a
Canvas 147



CHAPTER X

A Great Sale Millet's " Angelus "Tout-Paris and Some
Others Meissonier and the " Slump " Some
Prices obtained " No. 63 " The Beginning of the
Fight How I bought " The Angelus " Incidents
Dollars and Francs A Faiisse Sortie The Second
Auction The Frenchmen's Premature Triumph
An incredulous Cabman Old Masters Edison's
Opinion of Same The Thatched Cottage at Bar-
bizon A Specialist in Thatched Roofs Monsieur
Fallieres and his Salary " Me for the Mazuma ! "
A Peasant's Comment 167



CONTENTS



CHAPTER XI

PAGE

Success and hard Work Carnot at the Elysee Napoleon's
Vigils Count Ismael de Lesseps Still a Lieu-
tenant My Visit to the Panama Canal Forty
Thousand Lives for One How de Lesseps is re-
membered A Letter never to be written How
Madame de Lesseps Died Her Last Words De
Lesseps' Indifference to Money How shared by
French Savants Chevreul, Moissan, Marey
French Indifference to Outside Matters " Qui $a,
McKinley ? l ' j What the Frenchman reads On
Serial Stories How advertised The Gangs of
" Barkers " English Authors and French Publishers
Stories of Evil Inns Two Women and their
Father On the Calais Highroad Monsieur Carter
of The Graphic The French Patriot's two Guns . 186



CHAPTER XII

A Merchant of Human Hair Darthial on Hugo Heads as
Crops Hair as the Thermometer of Prosperity
The Travelling Buyers As to the Bretonnes Hair
from Abroad Nothing doing in England Monsieur
Darthial's Workshop The Secrets of the Trade-
Various Lines and Various Prices Curls, Fronts,
Topknots, Bangs and Transformations The Taste
in America Gruesome Details The Hyaenas of
Naples An Old Woman's Tragedy A Maker
of Saints How a Model is designed The Realisms
of Monsieur Pacheu The Humours of the Trade-
Degrees of Popularity The Illusions of the Store-
room Literature and Hair "There's 'Air 1 " 204
Tolerance in France



CHAPTER XIII

Edmond Rostand His Home in the Rue Alphonse de
Neuville De Rubempre redivivus Early Successes
Le Gant Rouge, Les Pierrots Les Musardises
A Reading at the Com6die Franaise Refused
Les Romanesques Monsieur Clare tie's Keys Re$u,
a Correction Too long How Rostand works



x CONTENTS

Chapter xiii. continued: PAGE

His " Enormous Weakness " for Shakespeare La
Princesse Lointaine A First Night at the Fran$ais
" Ca y est " Rostand and William Archer Folie de
la Persecution A Sonnet to Sarah La Samaritaine
Cyrano de Bergerac No Cyrano but Coquelin
Sarah and the Due de Reichstadt Rostand's Love
of Solitude The Coquelins ..... 229



CHAPTER XIV

The Barber and Monsieur Barr6s Both Academicians
The Violet Ribbon How it is distributed The
Dessert at a Foyot Dejeuner Rostand at the
Academy Why he left Paris" Oh ! Oh ! C'est
une Imperatrice ! " Fauteuil 1 3 Rostand's Costume
A Byronic Touch Rostand's Muse Tou jours
Sarah Bernhardt A Literary Masterpiece
Rostand's Histrionics M. de Vogue's Tribute
Those who were Missing Jules Verne Tears and
Kisses Catulle Mendes Saint Germain-en-Laye
An old Retainer Ernest Dowson and the Yellow
Butterfly The Castle, the Concierge , and the Cats . 252



CHAPTER XV

Criminals in France Pickpockets Why the Artful
Dodger dodges France Housebreaking v. Burglary
The Cambrioleur and the Burglar Where the
French hide their Money The Gang of " Polishers "
Acts of Kindness to Strangers How One was not
forgotten The Confidence Trick Blackmailers in
Paris The Spanish Prisoner How the Trick
originated Mie Prigione Arrested as a Pickpocket
For defending the Queen Jean Hiroux and
Monsieur St Clair A Tramp's Philosophy of Life
On the Brink of Black Maria An Enemy to the
Rescue On avoiding unpleasant Experiences An
American Pupil Finis ..... 276



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

ROBERT HARBOROUGH SHERARD . . . Frontispiece
JEAN JOSEPH- REN AUD .... To face page 17

JULES HURET 17

ERNEST LA JEUNESSE 104

FACSIMILE OF LETTER FROM ERNEST LA JEUNESSE ,, 112

FACSIMILE OF LETTER FROM PIERRE LOUYS . 129

PAUL ADAM ,,132

MEMORIAL CARD TO FERDINAND DE LESSEPS . 186

FACSIMILE OF LETTER FROM THE LATE COUNTESS

DE LESSEPS 190

FERDINAND DE LESSEPS ON HIS DEATH-BED . 191

THE CHATEAU DE LA CHESNAYE ... 191

FACSIMILE OF NOTE FROM ETIENNE JULES MAREY ,, 192

IRENE OSGOOD (Mrs ROBERT HARBOROUGH SHERARD) 224

Two VISITING CARDS FROM FRENCH AUTHORS 253

JULES VERNE 268

HENRI DE REGNIER 268

IRENE OSGOOD, WITH "CAHIR" AND " SWIPES" 289

Two OF IRENE OSGOOD'S DOGS ... 289
xi



MY FRIENDS THE FRENCH



CHAPTER I

Place aux Dames " Husbands ! Oh ! la ! la ! " In the Divorce
Court Judges as Peacemakers Dwarfs as Mascots
Purveyors of Happiness Daudet's Experiments Daudet
and the Dogs The Immorality of ! Sappho '- Cruelty to
Animals Shall it remain unpunished ? An amiable Mini-
ster The Husband and the Kodak On the Pleasure of
feeling Importance In a Minister's Antechamber French
Freedom of Speech Monsieur de Goncourt rebuked
English Reticence Morality or Hypocrisy A Diversion on
Poets Rogers and his Court Dress Tennyson and Swin-
burne Tennyson, his Times and his Pipe

" ANOTHER husband ! No, thank you ! I have just
had some. Je sors d'en prendre, des mavis \ Husbands !
Oh ! la ! la ! "

And the pretty little woman who said these things
shook her head most decisively, and laughed more
than once, with scorn. Each time her laughter was
twice echoed, once from a group of women who were
collected at the far end of the passage, just outside
the judge's door, and again from the thick body of men
who filled the corridor right up to the head of the
staircase.

In the laugh of the women there was indignant
repudiation, while the men gave a note of incredulous-
ness to their guffaw.

Contemptuous glances were exchanged between the
two sexes.

It was in that gloomy and malodorous passage in



: 2 : M *FRXENDS THE FRENCH

the Palais de Justice on to which opens the cabinet or
chamber of the judge who officiates in the prelimin-
aries to divorce suits. This passage is reached by a
staircase which leads up from the extreme end of the
Salle des Pas Perdus, or great hall. At the bottom
of the staircase to the right is the very room in which
the Revolutionary Tribunal sat, where Marie
Antoinette faced with queenly dignity the rabble of
her persecutors.

A notice painted on the wall indicates that by this
staircase may be reached the Cabinet des Conciliations,
that is to say, the Room of Reconciliation. The
French law ordains that before a husband or wife may
sue for divorce the judge shall endeavour to reconcile
them. It is in the Room of Reconciliation that the
attempt is made. One has heard of cases where the
words of the judge have been effective, and where two
angry spouses, softened by judicial eloquence, have left
the cabinet des conciliations arm in arm, determined
to make a fresh start.

In France the husband or wife who wishes to
divorce applies through an avoue, who draws up a
petition to the president of the tribunal. In this
petition the various grievances complained of are set
forth. The French law considers many offences as
sufficient justification for divorce. Violent abuse, acts
of brutality, incompatibility of temper even, are
sufficient grounds for demanding a dissolution of the
marriage bond. The same injustice marks in France
still the relative treatment accorded to the two sexes.
The laws made by the males will, I suppose, always
favour the males. A woman can be divorced for
adultery under any circumstances : a man can only
be divorced for adultery by the wife to whom he has



MY FRIENDS THE FRENCH 3

been unfaithful if his infidelity has been committed in
the "home," in the domicile conjugal, as the French
law styles it.

The man who drew up the divorce law and steered
it against Catholic opposition through the two cham-
bers was a hunchback and ill favoured. He had not
much success with women, and I think that when
he drew up his bill he remembered the fact, and
made his law as hard on women as possible. I used
to see him often in the company of General Boulanger,
whose supporter and admirer he was, and I have
heard him discussing the question of divorce. He
looked impish, and somehow he always used to remind
me of the boy who was seen stoning an unfortunate
reptile while repeating : " I'll learn ye to be a toad."
He seemed to say that he would " learn " women to
be women.

A thing that this legislator particularly hated in
women was their superstitiousness. In France it is a
superstition that to touch a hunchback's hump brings
good luck, and whenever the man went out he used
to feel people's hands passing over his protuberance.
It used to rouse him to Quilplike and malignant
anger. He declared that it was almost always women
who touched him for luck, and I have seen him foaming
at the mouth with indignation at being used as a
fetich. I do not think, however, that he ever went
as far as did another very famous Parisian hunchback
of my acquaintance, who had needles so arranged
above his hump and under his coat that people
patting his back, with a view to advancing their private
interests, got badly pricked in the hands.

I cannot say that I understand this resentment. It
seems to me that some people might feel flattered



4 MY FRIENDS THE FRENCH

to pass as a mascot. It would be delightful, I used
to think, to feel that one could bring luck to a fellow-
being, and I could quite imagine how, if I were hump-
backed, I should enjoy my walks abroad. Fancy
seeing a poor, unhappy woman gliding up to one,
furtively touching one's back, and then going away
radiant and full of hope. It would enable one to
realise what Alphonse Daudet used to say would be
his ideal on earth : to keep a shop of human happi-
ness. " I want to set up," he used to say to me, " as
marchand de bonheur, dealer in happiness. People
would come into my shop and tell me their troubles
and I would give them just what they wanted to make
things right."

Poor Daudet tried to carry into effect his benevolent
schemes. As far as human ills can be remedied by
money gifts he did more than any but the professional
philanthropists. At one time he used to place on the
mantelpiece of the study in which he held his weekly
receptions a bowl, which was filled with silver coins,
and it was understood that if any one of the Bohemians
of letters who came to see him needed a little financial
assistance he could go to the bowl and help himself.
The experiment naturally failed. There were those
who came to the receptions only for the sake of the
bowl ; there were those who put too liberal an in-
terpretation on the mute invitation extended to them.

" I used to see fellows pocketing the coins by hand-
fuls," Daudet told me, " and in the end I had to
abandon the practice."

But he was ever liberal with his money. It was a
joy of his, if he happened to see in the streets of Paris
some mournful and woebegone wayfarer, on whose
pale cheeks Famine had imprinted her stigmata, to



MY FRIENDS THE FRENCH 5

brush hastily by the person and to press a five-franc
piece into his hands. He used to call this " playing
practical jokes on people." He was a very kind-
hearted man, but curiously enough he had a peculiar
and characteristic hatred of animals. Now people
who hate animals are often very selfish. It is true that
a great many animal lovers are abominably selfish. I
was once at a dinner party at which GustaveLarroumet,
at that time Director of Fine Arts, discussed horses
with Alphonse Daudet, and I was surprised and pained
to hear them speaking of these animals with disgust
and hatred. Daudet said that horses filled him with
terror, while Larroumet insisted on the ugliness of the
horse's mouth. He said that the aspect of a horse's
mouth always filled him with nausea. Daudet had
a strong detestation of dogs and asserted that this
terror of them arose from the terrible scares which he
had had as a child in the country round Nimes, where
mad dogs abound. I well remember how he described
these terrors to me.

"My foster-mother/' he said, "was an innkeeper,
whose name was Garrimon, which is Provengal for
Mountain Rat. There's a splendid name for you,
Sherard. Why did I never use it in one of my stories ?
The drinking-rooms in Garrimon's inn were on the
first floor of the house, whilst the room where I slept
was a storey higher. I remember how I used to hear
the brigandlike, black-hearted, dark-eyed, long-
haired men stamping up the wooden stairs that led
to the taproom, as I lay awake of nights. Gradually,
mon ami, their voices would swell into a tumult
such an excitable race are we Provenaux stimulated
by each other's talk and by draughts of harmless
lemonade. No ; they rarely drank anything stronger



6 MY FRIENDS THE FRENCH

than limonade or orgeat, for we don't drink in the
South. We are born drunk there, drunk with vitality,
drunk with the sun. Sometimes I used to hear the
clash of steel, and then I would rise from my bed and
peep out of the window. I could see the wild-looking
yet most inoffensive villagers all armed to the teeth,
one with a scythe, another with a rusty cutlass, another
with an old-fashioned flintlock, and some with flails or
bludgeons. Then I knew that a mad dog was out and
about, and I used to hurry back to bed all trembling
with fear. I used to draw the bedclothes over my
head and yet I strained my ears to hear what was
being said downstairs. And every time that the words
' Kin foil ' rose above the tumult of voices, the
clinking of glasses and bottles and the clatter of arms,
I used to start with affright. I used to tremble all
over as I thought of the Kin foil (the mad dog) and
of the terrible weapons which the men carried because
they, strong, blackbearded men, were just as much
frightened of him as was the little, quaking wretch
who shivered at every sound that the wind made in
the eaves of the old house. At times my imagination
would be so worked upon, and my fear grow so great,
that I used to jump from my cot and run screaming
to N6no Gammon, my foster-mother, and cling to
her skirts for protection.

" And on one occasion, I actually met the Kin foil
a meeting which brought my horror to a climax and
left an ineffaceable impression on my mind. It was
on a summer evening, and I was walking home,
carrying a little basket, along a path, white with dust,
which led through thickly foliaged vines. Suddenly
I heard a violent outburst of wild cries : ' Aou kin
foil I Aou kin foil ! ' followed by a discharge of fire-



MY FRIENDS THE FRENCH 7

arms. Mad with terror I jumped into the vines,
rolling head over heels in the dust and, as I lay there,
unable to stir a finger, I heard the rush of the mad dog
as it whirled by, as though a hurricane were passing,
stones flying to the right and to the left of it, and a
great cloud of white dust in the air above it ; heard
too its furious panting and saw the horrid gleam of
its devouring eyes. My heart stopped beating in a
paroxysm of terror, and I have never, never forgotten
the violence of the alarm which overwhelmed me.
Since that day I have always held dogs in an absolute
horror, and this horror indeed extends itself to almost
all animals. I quite admit that it is strange that a
poet should feel so about any of Nature's works, but
there it is. I am unable to master this hatred. It is a
hatred in which I am quite uncompromising. I consider
animals the most ugly and vilest part of creation, cari-
catures of what is basest and most loathsome in man.
All my children have inherited my horror for them."
I thought of this the other day when I met Leon
Daudet, who has now grown into a very big man,
walking about pensively in the Jar din des Plant es.
Perhaps the same reason took him there which has
often taken me to the Zoo : to see if among the animals
I could find one as ugly and as degraded as, well, as
the enemy of the moment. Leon Daudet was one of
the sons to whom Daudet dedicated ' ' Sappho .' ' Paris,
by the way, paraphrased the text of that dedication.
It will be remembered that Daudet wrote : " Pour mes
fits lorsqu'ils auront mngt ans " (For my sons when they
shall be twenty years old). Paris said what Daudet
meant to write was : "Pour mes fils lorsqu'ils auront
mngt francs " (For my sons when they shall have
twenty francs). The implication was that Sappho



8 MY FRIENDS THE FRENCH

was a venal person, and that the story of her should
warn the young men of the dangers of such associa-
tions. Unfortunately an extraordinary idea reigns
both in England and in America that " Sappho " is
such an immoral book that its publication should be
interdicted. I remember speaking to Leon, who is
a very old friend, about this, and he expressed the
greatest indignation that his father should ever have
been suspected of writing an improper book. He told
me that Alphonse Daudet was and this I knew
most particular to avoid in his writings any suggestion
of coarseness. " I always read over to him what I
had written," said Leon, " and if by any chance there
was anything even suggestive of what is not quite . . .
you understand he used to pull me up. He would
be very indignant if he could know what is being said
about his book." That is of course obvious from the
work itself. The strangest thing is that a play adapted
from this strong story formed the basis of a prosecu-
tion in New York, in which my friend Mr Marcus
Mayer, the famous impressario, was one of the defend-
ants. It is worth a good deal to hear the old gentle-
man relate his experiences as a prisoner at the bar.
It should form one of the plums in his long-promised
book of memoirs. He was acquitted, but none the


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Online LibraryRobert Harborough SherardMy friends the French, with discursive allusions to other people → online text (page 1 of 22)