Robert Keith.

The history of the affairs of church and state in Scotland : from the beginning of the Reformation in the reign of King James V. to the retreat of Queen Mary into England, anno 1568 : taken from the public records and other authentic vouchers (Volume 2) online

. (page 1 of 95)
Online LibraryRobert KeithThe history of the affairs of church and state in Scotland : from the beginning of the Reformation in the reign of King James V. to the retreat of Queen Mary into England, anno 1568 : taken from the public records and other authentic vouchers (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 95)
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f PRINCETON N . i





ADDIROK f



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DA 784 .K44 .
Keith, Robert,
The history of
of church and



1681-1757.
the affairs
state in



HISTORY

OF TUE

AFFAIRS OF CHURCH AND STATE
SCOTLAND,

FKOM THE BEGINNINa OF THE REFORMATION

TO THE YEAR 1568.



RIGHT REV. ROBERT KEITH.

PRIMUS OF THE SCOTTISH EPISCOPAL CHURCH,



WITH

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH, NOTES, AND INDEX,

BY

JOHN PARKER LAWSON, M.A,



IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOLUME IL

EDINBURGH:

PRINTED FOR THE SPOTTISWOODE SOCIETY

M.DCCC.XLY.



ALEX. LAURII AND CO. PBISTER3 TO HER MAJESTY.





PREFACE TO VOLUME SECOND

BY THE EDITOR.



those who are interested in the pubhc and
private life of Queen Mary of Scotland, the
present volume, comprising Bishop Keith's
" Second Book" of his original folio, will be
peculiarly acceptable. The details here given of the unfor-
tunate Queen's eventful career, after her return from France
and assumption of the Government till her compulsory
abdication of the Crown and her flight into England,
her unhappy marriages to Darnley and Bothwell, and the
plots and murders which continually succeeded each other,
in connection with the known character of the perpetra-
tors and their associates, have more the aspect of a romance
than a reality ; and the deeds of blood were so bold, daring,
and extraordinary, that, were it not for their undoubted
authenticity, we arc almost induced to view them as terrible
fictions, or exaggerated delineations of human depravity.
As the truth, however, cannot be questioned, the succession
of crime here recorded is a sad memorial of the dreadful
state of Scotland in the sixteenth century.

The Editor in this volume has endeavoured to make it as
complete as the limits admitted. Ho has followed Queen
Mary in all her progresses and transactions with the utmost
minuteness, and a large extent of new matter is introduced
in the form of original notes, or of additions, explanations,
and corrections, to tliose of Bishop Keith. Many facts dig-



l\ KDITOK ft rREKACE.

covercnl uincu hJH time are prominently introduced, to which
the DiMhop had no acceHx, or were then unknown ; the defici-
eneioM in our HiHtorian'H narrative are supphed ; and alto-
g«»ther this volume i» o« nuich a new W Ork in tlie Notes as it
is a rf»print of the Text. The authorities are also in every
caiM* inMtrtcHl, that the reader may be sati.^fied as it respects
the uourceH of information. In short, it has been the object
of the Editor to render the Notes an ample commentary on
Hishop Keith's '* History.*"

In eiliting a Work such as this, the researches of Mr
ClialnuTH, in hin elaborate '' Life of Mary Queen of Scots,''
an<l more recently of Mr Tytler, in his " History of Scotland,"*'
are of the most essential importance, and the only regret is
the partizanship of the former, an<l th^ inaccuracy, in many
instances, of the dates of the latter, which are too numerous
to bo typoi^raphical mistakes. Thus, in Mr Tytler's first
cnlition of his '' History" we have the birth of James VI.,
wliieh was in 1500, and most of the events of that year, nar-
ratetl as occurring in l.ldo. Some of the publications of the
Bannatyni-:, Aijbotsford, and Maitland Cllbs, and the
WoDKOW Society's edition of Caldorwood's " Historic of
the Kirk of Scotland," to a MS. of wliich Bishop Keith
had acccHH, are most valuable in elucidating the events of
the time, a^* they were chiefly written by contemporaries,
some of whom were intimately associated or acquainted w ith
the {Mirties.

In the Preface to the '' Historie and Life of Kin<f James
the Se-xt," printed for thelJANNATYNE Clib, and edited by
Thomas Thomson, Ks(|. Advocate, Hishop Keith is censured
for not •' plainly th-nouncing the historical inHdelity'' of David
Crawfunl of Drumsoy '' in the broad and un(pialitied terms
which he must have known it to have merited." This alludes
to tho Work, published in 1700, entitled—'* Memoirs of
the Affairs of Scotland, containing a Full and Impartial



EDITOR S PREFACE.



A ccount of the Revolution in that Kingdom, begun in 1597 ;
faithfully published from an authentic MS. By her Majesty's
Historiographer for Scotland." The avowed object of the
said Mr Crawfurd of Drumsoy, the ostensible Editor of this
Work, was to counteract the tendency of Buchanan's History,
the then popularity of which in Scotland is greatly deplored
by Queen Anne's Scottish Historiographer. The reader is
referred to the Preface of the genuine narrative, printed for
the Bannatyne Club in 1825, for an account of the various
jMSS. of the now unknown contemporary author, the parties
in whose possession they still are, and for an exposure of the
grossest literary fraud ever attempted to pervert the genuine
history of Scotland, in the form of " Memoirs" which were
received by the public as the genuine production of a con-
temporary writer, and as such most unsuspectingly quoted by
Hume, Robertson, Goodall, Tytler, and Whittaker, though
the real character of the Work did not altogether escape de-
tection and observation even by Bishop Keith. " That in-
dustrious person," says the Editor of the collated MS. printed
for the Bannatyne Club, " appears to have had access to
one of the MSS. of the Life of James the Sext ; and in a
copy of the printed Memoirs still preserved he has pointed
out a great many interpolations and falsifications, though
by no means the whole, in terms of unequivocal reprobation ;
and it may now be regarded as matter of surprize that the
extent of this author's ' variations' from his alleged original,
as Bishop Keith has courteously characterized them, should
not sooner have deprived the Work of every pretension to
credit."

A more serious charge has been recently brought against
Bishop Keith. In a note in the first volume (p. 22G) of
" Queen Elizabeth and her Times, a Series of Original
Letters," edited by Thomas Wright, Esq. M. A. of Trinity
College, Cambridge, 8vo. London, 1838, our Historian is



VI EDITOR 8 PREFACE.

accUHcd of inlfuUt/ suppressing a letter from the Earl of
Bedfonl ami Thomas Kandolph to the Council of England
on the murder of Kiecio, dated JkTwick, 27th of March
1.5C0. The letter is inserted by Mr Wright, who says —
" This interesting and circumstantial letter redounds very
little to the credit of the (Jucen of Scots, and therefore
apparently it was not printed by Keith/' But this is alto-
gether gratuitous, for Mr Wright cannot prove that Bishop
Keith was aware of the existence of such a letter. The
nature of the document may be inferred from Mr Wright's
observations. — " The imprudence with which Mary, in her
passion, avows and justifies her criminal connection with
Riccio, and the brutal and at the same time contemptible be-
haviour of Darnley, form a picture of wickedness and cruelty
such, as Von Raumer with reason exclaims, that ' few
scenes in the history of the world can be compared with it.' ""
After such strong language by Mr Wright, who is a most
determined enemy to Queen Mary, we would naturally expect
8omo very disgusting and indelicate disclosures by Bedford
and Randolph; but instead of Queen Mary "avowing and
justifying" criminal connection with Riccio, which is too
monstrous to be credited for a moment, the whole occupies
only a few lines in a letter of nine closely printed octavo
pages, and merely details an alK'ged scene of angry recri-
mination between the Queen and Darnley, iniinediately after
Riccit) had been nmrdered, almost in her presence, in
Holy rood Palace. The reader will find this and the parti-
culars of Riccio's nmrder amply discussed in the note,
J.. 414-117 «>f the present volume; and a careful examina-
tion of IkMlford's and Riindolph's letter, which Bishop Keith
is most unfairly and most i>resumptuously accused of wilfully
suppressing, nuist satisfy the most fastidious that it contains
no ovidence whatever of such an outrageous intercourse as
that imputed to Queen Niarv without the lea^t foundation.



EDITOR S PREFACE. Vll

In referring again to Mr Tytler's " History of Scothxnd/'
it is to be regretted that he has followed the former Scottish
writers, and invariably printed the Regent Moray's name as
Murray. Now, it is well known that such was the vulgar
mode of pronouncing and writing Moray as if it was the
patronymic or family name of Murray — the name of four
Noble and of a number of ancient and distinguished Scottish
families. Moray was always the title of the Earldom, as it
has invariably been of the province or county of Moray or
Elgin, and the Earls of Moray, the lineal descendants of the
Regent, never were addressed or signed themselves Murray.
Bishop Keith, like his predecessors and contemporaries,
wrote the Regent's title as Murray^ which is corrected in
the present edition, but it is singular that Mr Tytler adopted
this erroneous orthography throughout, and in this he has
been followed by the Russian Nobleman, Prince Labanoff,
in his voluminous collection of Queen Mary's letters ; by
Miss Strickland in her collection of the same ; and by an
eminent antiquarian, William Turnbull, Esq. Advocate,
in his abridgement of Prince Labanoff 's collection of letters,
pubHshed in one volume in 1845. Prince Alexander Laba-
noff, in his seven volumes of the Letters of Queen Mary
collected by him, and published in 1844, acknowledges some
of those which he reprinted from Bishop Keith's Work ;
but Miss Strickland never mentions our venerable and
industrious Historian. It is not surprizing, therefore, that
we find the following inaccuracy in her notice of a personage
eminent in Scottish history in her " Letters of Mary
Queen of Scots" (vol. i. p. 7). Referring to some of the
Queen's proceedings after her return from France, Miss
Strickland writes — " Mary appoints James Murray^ her
natural brother, and Maitland, her prime ministers." Miss
Strickland ought to have known that James Stuart — not
James Murray — was the name of the future Regent, and



vlii editor's preface.

that he was always designated Lord James Stuart before
he was created Earl of Mar in 1561-2, which title he relin-
quished for the Earldom of Moray in 1562, his mother's
family having the right to the Earldom of Mar. There
are other mistakes which this lady commits in her chrono-
logical notes which w^e would gladly overlook, but we feel
obliored in fairness to take notice of some of them, lest
they mislead ordinary readers. Miss Strickland says —
" August 19, 1561 — Mary disembarks at Leith. Having
made a short stay at the Ahhei/ of Lislelourg, she pro-
ceeded to Edinburgh'' (Letters of Mary Queen of Scots,
with an Introduction, vol. i. p. 7)- Now, the proper
Ahheij of nisUhourg is the Abbey of Holyroodhouse, to
which the Queen repaired immediately after she landed
at Leith, and L'lslebourg was the French name of Edin-
burgh ; but Miss Strickland, who evidently never consulted
Bishop Keith's History, in which this fact is twice stated,
and several letters of the French ambassador Le Croc
are inserted, dated at L'lslebourg^ otherwise Edinburgh^
writes as if the Abbey of Lislebourg had been somewhere
between Edinburgh and Leith. Again — " July 3, 1565 —
The conspirators endeavour to seize the Queen near to the
church of Beith, on the road between Perth and Callenderr
Miss Strickland is not aware that Callender House near
Falkirk, the residence of the then Lord Livingstone, to
which the Queen was journeying, and not a town called
Callendar, is the proper locality, and that the parish church
of Beath in the west of Fife, where this exploit was to be
attempted, is not " on the road between Perth and Callender"
House, near Falkirk — tlie other Callendar, a large village
and extensive parish in the south-west of Perthshire, on the
borders of Stirlingshire, forming part of the romantic dis-
trict of the Trosachs. Miss Strickland informs us that the
Duke of Argyll presided at Bothwell's mock trial, whereas



EDITOR S PREFACE. IX

the Dukedom of Argyle was not created till 1701, and
Archibald fifth Earl of Argyll, then Hereditary Lord
Justice- General, presided at that trial. Miss Strickland
has discovered that, after the surrender of Mary at
Carberry Hill, which is most erroneously designated a
hattle^ though not a sword was drawn, the Queen was
taken " to the KirJc-at-Field^ and shut up in the house
where her husband's corpse had been carried after his
murder, and had laid till his buriar (vol. iii. p. 28), and we
are gravely told this in defiance of the well-known facts
that the house of the Kirk-of- Field was demolished by
gunpowder on the morning of the murder of Lord Darnley,
and that the Queen was first taken from Carberry Hill to
the house called the Black TurnpiJce in the High Street of
Edinburgh, then the residence of Sir Simon Preston of
Cragmillar, the Lord Provost. Miss Strickland assures us
that Bothwell was " turned of fifty, coarse and ugly"
(vol. iii. p. 124). Now, though the date of BothwelFs
birth is not assigned in the Peerage lists, he was served
heir to his father the third Earl on the 3d of November
1556, and it is now decided that Bothwell was little more
than thirty years of age when he married Queen Mary.
Instead of being " coarse and ugly," if Miss Strickland
had examined the history of the time carefully, she would
have found that Bothwell was the very reverse, and even
Walsingham describes him as a " glorious, rash, and
hazardous young man."

It only remains to notice two very extraordinary traditions
maintained by the Presbyterians and the Roman Catholics
respecting Queen Mary's domestic life, which completely
refute each other. Wodrow, as stated in a note towards
the end of the present volume (p. 789), asserts, on the
authority of " old Mr Patrick Simson," that Queen Mary
soon after her escape from Lochleven bore a son to George



X EDITOR S PREFACE.

Douglas, an<l that son was the fathLr of Mr Robert
Douglas, a connpicuous Covenanting preaclier in the reign
of Cliark'H I. wlio preached tho sermon at the Cove-
nantintr coronation of Charles II. at Scone in IGol, and who
survived till after the Restoration. Bishop Burnet says —
** It 18 certain that Mr Douglas was not ill pleased to have
this Btory pafw. He had something very great in his
countenance; his looks shewed both nuicli wisdom and
great thoughtfulness, but withall a vast pride. He was
generally verv' silent ; I confess I never admired any thing
ho said." The Covenanting Presbyterians believed this
incre<iible story, forgetting that only eleven days intervened
between the escape of the C^ueen from Lochleven and tho
battle of Langside— that her flight into England after that
battle was almost innnediate — and that eveiy day can be
accounted for from the evening the Queen left Lochleven to
tho day of her execution in Fotheringay Castle. Though
nothing is accurately known of the real parentage of Robert
Douglas, it is stated on the authority of Bishop Keith's friend,
Mr Robert Myln, whose Collections are in the Library of tho
Faculty of Advocates at Edinburgh, that George Douglas,
who assisted tho Queen to escape, had an illegitimate son
wlio became tutor to Laurence Lord Oliphant, and was tho
father of the noted Covenanting preacher.

It is nevertheless certain that Mary at one time believed
herself to \)v pregnant while she was in Lochleven Castle.
Wv have numerous announcements of tliis in Utters and
tlocunients of the period, and the Queen's conviction that
she w,is i„ Huch a state was the chief inducement for her
resisting every advice to repudiate Bothwell, which, she
imagined, would illogitimatize lur child. This introduces
us to th(, Roman Catholic story, for so it may properly be
designated, as emanating from the members of'that Church,
ami assert..! bv its s„p,u„ i.,.. that in danuarv or Fcbruarv



EDITOR S PREFACE. XI

1568, upwards of nine months after the Queen married
Bothwell, she was delivered of a daughter, who was taken
to France, and afterwards became a Nun at Notre Dame
de Soissons. Accordingly Prince Labanoff enlightens us
with the following information and his own reflections on this
subject, which are thus chronicled by Miss Strickland : — " Dr
Lingard having repeated in his History of England the state-
ment of the pregnancy of the Queen of Scotland, which had
been refuted in 1782 by Dr Gilbert Stuart, I have thought it
right to adopt the version of Le Laboreur, a very respectable
historian, who makes mention of it in his additions to the
' Memoirs of Oastelnau, vol. i. p. 610, edit. 1731.' Be it
recollected that the author whom I quote held a post of
confidence at the Court of France (he was Councillor and
Almoner to the King), and that he had opportunities of
learning many particulars which were long kept secret.
Besides, it was easy for him, when he published his Work,
to examine the Register of the Convent of Soissons, and to
ascertain whether the daughter of Mary Stuart had been a
Nun there.""

If this story has any truth, it completely explodes the
Covenanting tradition of ascribing a royal though illegitimate
descent to Mr Robert Douglas. Here we have the state-
ment that Mary was delivered of a daughter in Lochleven
Castle in January or February/ 1568, who must have been the
offspring of her husband Bothwell ; and we have the opposite
Presbyterian allegation that the Queen v/as delivered of a
son in May that year, during the interval between her
escape from Lochleven and the battle of Langside, which
was fought on the 13th of that month. Setting aside,
therefore, the latter story, it is equally impossible that such
an eveiit as the birth of a daughter in Lochleven Castle
could have occurred, and yet be unnoticed by contemporary
historians and writers, when we consider that such a



XIV KbITOR S PREFACE.

the (^iicoii iiKnlv Ulitced herstlf in a peculiar condition
while in I^>chleven (Jastlu.

The cclchratetl ca«ket, in which Queen Mark's pretended
love-letters to IJothwell were alleged to have been found in
KdinhurLdi Castle, is now in Hamilton Palace, in whicli is
another valuable memorial of that age — the harquebuss
with which Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh assassinated the
Regent Moray at Linlithgow.

The extent of this Volume precludes the insertion of our
Historian's Appendix of Documents to his Second Book,
which will bo found in Vo]. III. concluding the present
edition.

JOHN PARKER LAWSON.

Kl»I!«BI Ron, NoVKMHRR \^'t.



CONTENTS OF VOLUME SECOND.



BOOK II.

PAGE

CHAP. I. — CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF STATE AFFAIRS,
FROM THE CONVENTION OR PRETENDED PARLIAMENT IN
THE MONTH OF AUGUST 1560, UNTIL THE ARRIVAL OF
THE QUEEN FROM FRANCE IN THE MONTH OF AUGUST

15G1 ..... 1

CHAP. II. A CONTINUATION OF STATE AFFAIRS, FROM THE

queen's ARRIVAL IN SCOTLAND IN THE MONTH OF
AUGUST 1561, TILL THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR

1561-2 63

CHAP. III. A CONTINUATION UNTIL THE END OF THIS

YEAR ..... 109

CHAP. IV. — CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF AFFAIRS, FROM
THE BEGINNING OF THE YEAR 1561-2, UNTIL MIDSUMMER
THE SAME YEAR .... 138

CHAP. V. — CONTAINING MATTERS OF STATE, FROM MID-
SUMMER IN THIS YEAR 1562, UNTIL THE IST OF APRIL
IN THE NEXT YEAR 1563 . . . 154

CHAP. VI. — CONTAINING MATTERS OF STATE FROM THE
1st OF APRIL 1563, UNTIL THE ARRIVAL OF THE EARL
OF LENOX IN SCOTLAND, IN THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER
OF THE FOLLOWING YEAR 1564 . . 195

CHAP. VII. — CONTAINING MATTERS OF STATE FROM THE
ARRIVAL OF THE EARL OF LENOX IN SCOTLAND, IN THE
MONTH OF SEPTEMBER 1564, UNTIL THE ARRIVAL OF
HIS SON THE LORD DARNLEY IN THE MONTH OF
FEBRUARY 1564-5 .... 231

CHAP. VIII. CONTINUATION OF STATE AFFAIRS FROM THE

ARRIVAL OF THE LORD DARNLEY INTO SCOTLAND IN THE
MONTH OF FEBRUARY 1564-5, UNTIL THE MARRIAGE OF
THIS LORD WITH THE QUEEN OF SCOTS, IN THE MONTH

OF JULY 1565 . . . . 263



IV CONTENTS.

I'AOK

( IIAP. IX. C'ONTAINIXO STATE AFFAIRS FKOM THE (^L'EEN's

MAHRVINQ THE LORD DARXLEY IN THE END OF JULY
l')(r), TILL THE BIRTH OF THE PRINCE IN THi: MONTH
OF JUNE IjCA) .... 1344

CHAP. X. CONTINUATION OF STATE AFFAIRS FROM THE

BIRTH OF THE PRINCE OF SCOTLAND, AFTERWARDS KING
JAMES VI., ON THE IOtU OF JUNE 15G0, UNTIL THE
MURDER OF THE KINO ON THE IOtH OF FEBRUARY

ir>(j<;-7 ..... 4:r>

<HAr. XI. CONTINUATION UF STATE AFFAIRS FROM THE

kino's MURDER ON THK 1(>TII OF FEBRUARY 1500-7,
UNTIL THE (queen's MARRIAGE WITH THE EARL OF
BOTHWELL <»N THE ISlH OF MAY IN THE SAME YEAR

loG7 ..... r)io

CHAP. XII. — CONTAINING STATE AFFAIRS FROM THE QUEEN's
MARRIAGE WITH THE EARL OF BOTHWELL ON THE lOTH
OP MAT 15G7, UNTIL THE EARL OF MoRAY's ACCEPTATION
OF THE RE(}ENCY IN THE MONTH OF AUGUST THE SAME
YEAR ..... 581

CHAP. XIII. CONTAINING MATTERS OF STATE FROM THE

EARL OF Moray's acceptation of the regency in
THE month of august 15<)7, till the queen's retreat

INTO ENGLAND IN THE MONTH OF MAY 1508 750



THE



HISTORY



OF THE AFFAIRS OF



CHURCH AND STATE IN SCOTLAND.



BOOK II.



CHAPTER I.

CONTAINING AN ACCOUNT OF STATE AFFAIRS, FROM THE CON-
VENTION OR PRETENDED PARLIAMENT IN THE MONTH OF
AUGUST 1.5G0, UNTIL THE ARRIVAL OF THE QUEEN FROM
FRANCE IN THE MONTH OF AUGUST 1561.



N the preceding Book we have seen great and
surprising alterations in the ancient poHty
both of our Church and State ; the first
totally subverted, the latter only not quite
extinguished. In this Book we shall meet
with events no less, and perhaps the more surprising, that
the new form of the pure and immaculate spouse of Jesus
Christ^ shall be found to be no check sufficient to restrain




1 See the Black Acts, Pari. I. Kinq; James VI. Act xii. — [See notice of
the Collection called the " Black Acts," in the account of the Public
Records of Scotland, vol. i. of the present edition, Biof^raphical Sketch,
p. Ix. This reference to the first Parliament of James VI. is by antici-
pation, as that Parliament was not held till December 1507, and was under
the Earl of Moray's Regency. See the Act " Anent the Jurisdiction of the
Kirk," Dec. 20, 1567, in Acta Pari. Scot, folio, vol. iii. p. 24, which is the
twelfth Act in that Collection. See also the Acts " Anent the Abolishing
of the Pope and his Usurpit Authoritie," Ibid. j). 14 ; " anent the annulling
of the Actes of Parliament maid aganis Goddis Word and Maintenance
of Idolatrie in ony times bypast," Ibid. ; " anent the Messe abolishit, and
VOL. II. 1



2 THK lIIST<»iiY «<r THE AFFAIR.^ [15G0.

the now modcllors from tlio committing of 8ucli enormities
as will ever rtuiain a ntain upon the p* rpetrators of them. ^
Hv the Treaty of Accord between the deputies of the
KiuLC Jin^l ^?i»eon, and their subjects in Scotland, it is declared
(Number xvii.) - — '' That the Nobility of Scotland have en-
gaged, that in the ensuing Convention of Estates, some
persons of <|uality shall be chosen for to repair to their
Majesties, ami lay before them the state of their affairs, &c.
— at which time they shall get delivered to them the ratifi-
cation done by their Majesties,"" &c. In some soil of con-
formity to which Article, after the rising of the Parliament, or
Convention of Estates, in the month of August anno IdGO,^
we are informed by Mr Knox and Mr Buchanan,^ two his-
torians then alive, that Sir James Sandilands^ was directed



puniHc-hinf]^ of all that hciris or sayis tlie Siimin," Ibid, p, 22 ; " anent the
Trcw and Haly Kirk, and of thaiuo that are declarit not to be of the
samin," Ibid. p. 23. See also the Acts a^inst the Jurisdiction of the
l*o|K«, " Idolatry and all Acts contrair to the Confession of Faith publist
in this rarliamont," and the Mass, Ibid. p. 36. — E.]

' [ This is stronj; lan^iape, but at the same time quite just. The " pure
and immaculate spouse of Ji'sus Christ" seems rather an irreverent
exprejvsion, but our Historian apjdies it ironically to the "new form" set
up by the " new modellers," and the crimes and disasters which ensued,
tis forming a sinpdar contrast to their extraordinary pretensions to reli-
giou.<< purity.— K.j

■ [The Bcvonth article in the " Treaty of .\ccord" between those French
deputies and the Scottish nation.— E.]

' [This wa.H after the 24th of Aupist, on whicli day Acts were passed
al>olishin^ the r(>jK''H jurisdiction, the Muss, and what was desi;^iated
** Idol.it rif^." with '^all Acts contrair to the Confession of I'aith publLsht in
this r Acta Turl. Scot, folio, vol. ii. p. 634, 535. The Records

of th.r it are now lost.— E.]

* ( Kiiu.v'n lli.storie of the Hefonuation of Relipoun in Scothmd, folio,



Online LibraryRobert KeithThe history of the affairs of church and state in Scotland : from the beginning of the Reformation in the reign of King James V. to the retreat of Queen Mary into England, anno 1568 : taken from the public records and other authentic vouchers (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 95)