Robert Philip.

The life and opinions of the Rev. William Milne, D. D., missionary to China online

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lege School, Lennoxville, 1882-1888; rec-
tor of Londonderry, N.S., 1888-1886. In
Aagnst, 1885, our subject was appointed
by the Board of Ck>yemors of King's Col-
lege, acting president of that institution and
professor of oiTinity in the same. May 1st,
1886, he was installed as canon of St. Lake's
Cathedral, Halifax, N.S., by the late Bishop
of Nova Scotia, the Right Bey. Hibbert
Binney, D.D., and on Sie 8th of June of
the same year was made president of King's
College, which position he now holds. Canon
Brock is an intensely loyal Churchman, and
ever ready to defend and propagate the
principles of the English branch of the Holy
Catholic church. He married, in Dublin in
1855, Buby Boberta, eldest daughter of
Thomas Crawford Butler, of Carlow, Ireland,
and has issue living three sons and three
daughters. Canon Brock is known in the
theologioo-literary world by ayolume of ser-
mons, published in England, on the Apostles'
Creed, and which attracted considerable at-
tention. Since his arrival in Canada he has
also published several detached sermons
And addresses upon the following, amongst
other, subjects, viz. : — *^The English Befor-
mation," " The Two Becords ; or. Geology
and Genesis," *^The Modem Doctrine of
Force and Belief in a Personal God," *^ Apos-
tolical Succession," "The Anglican Doc-
trine of Holy Baptism." That Canon Brock
possesses peculiar fitness for the position
he now so worthily fills may readily be im-
agined, for, to profound scholarship he adds
a ripe experience, gained by contact with
a variety of classes of his fellow beings in
many (quarters of the British dominions.
The Umversity of King's College, of which
he is president, is the oldest university of
British origin in the colonial empire of our
<^een, being founded by the first Bishop of
Nova Scotia, the Bight Bev. Charles Inglis,
D.D., in AD. 1788, the year after the lat-
ter's consecration to the episcopate. Canon
Brock apparentiy has yet many years of
usefulness before him, being full of vigor
^nd gives promise of reaching a ripe old age.
DD



Foarnler« Hon. Telespliore, Otta-
wa, Judge of the Supreme Court of Canada,
was bom in St Francois, Bivi^re du Sud,
Montmagny county, P.Q., in the year 1823
He received his education at Nicolet Co -
lege, and was called to the bar of Lower
Canada in 1846. He practised his profee-
tion with success, having remarkable gifts,
not only as a speaker, but in the mental
grasp necessary to understand the bearings
of the law upon any case brought to lus
attention. He held the honorable position
of Batonnier of the Quebec bar, an office
which has been an object of ambition with
some of the greatest men the province has
produced, and afterwards was made presi-
dent of the general council of the bar of
the province of Quebec. In 1863 he was
made Queen*s counsel. Judge Foumier,
like so many of the politicians of Quebec,
had the traming, not only of a legal prac-
tice, but also of editorial experience. From
1856 to 1858 inclusive, he was one of the
editors of Le National newspaper, of Que-
bec, his writing attracting wide attention,
because of its clear, original thought and
vigorous method. In 1857, Mr. Foumier
was married, his bride being Miss Deniers,
of Quebec. He entered the arena of Do-
minion politics in August, 1870, when he
was nominated as the laberal candidate for
Bellechasse, on M. Casault, the sitting mem-
ber, being appointed a judge of the Supe-
rior Court of Quebec. No other nomina-
tions were made, and Mr. Foumier was re-
turned by acclamation. He continued to
represent the same constituency as long as
he remained in the House of Commons. Be-
ginning his parliamentary career before
dual representation was abolished, Mr.
Foumier held a seat in the Legislative As-
sembly of his native province while still a
member of the Dominion parliament. In
1871 he was elected to the Assembly for
Montmagny, and held that position until
7th November, 1873, when he resigned.
His resignation was made necessary by his
being ccdled to the Privy Council of the
Dominion as a member of the Hon. Mr.
Mackenzie's cabinet. He took first, the
portfolio of inland revenue, but on 8th July,
1874, was given a place of greater useful-
ness, to succeed the Hon. (now Sir) A. A.
Dorion on the appointment of that gentle-
man to be chief justice of Quebeo. As
minister of justice, he introduced and con-
ducted through Parliament the bill estab-



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lishing the Supreme Oonrt. This was no
light task, for the measure was attacked, not
onLj as being undesirable, but as being un-
oonstitutionaL In his defenoe of the mea-
sure, Mr. Founder exhibited remarkable
breadth of knowledge as well as great power
as a debater. The Insolvent Act of 1875,
one of the ablest efforts ever made to settle
the vexed and oomplioated question of deal-
ing with insolvent debtors, was also oon-
duoted through parliament bj him. Xn
Maj, 1875, he became postmaster general,
but resigned that office in October fol-
lowing to take a judgeship in the Supreme
Court. Judge Foumier is recognised bj
his colleagues and the public as one of the
ablest men on the bench. His wide and
accurate knowledge of the law of his native
province, makes him a particularly valuable
addition to the Supreme Court bench. He
does not feel the trammels of legal tradi-
tions so much as to cause him to regard
these rather than the ends of justice which
thej are intended to serve. At the same time,
his fine legal insight enables him to decide
upon broad grounds of principles or long-
established practice pointe which minds less
fullj trained could onlj deal with by slav-
ish foDowing of precedent.

■cHeDrjTy Donald €., M.A., Princi-
pal of the Cobourg Collegiate Institute, Co-
bourg. Out, was bom in Napanee, Out, in
1840. He is son of Alexander ICcHenrj
(from county Antrim, Ireland), and Ellen
Campbell, daughter of Archibald Campbell,
Adolphustown, county of Lennox, a de-
scendant of the Campbells of Argyleehire.
Mr. McHenry, senr., was for some years en-
gaged in the timber business on the Otta-
wa, but subsequently he was in the dry-
goods business in connection with his
brother-in-law, Alexander Campbell, Napa-
nee. He died in 1847, leaving a widow and
three children, the eldest, the subject of this
sketch ; a daughter, now Mrs. Alexander
Henry, Napanee, and Miss Nellie, still liv-
ing with her mother in their native town.
The father, about the time of his mar-
riage, united with the Wesleyan Methodist
church, of which he remained a faithful
memb^ until his death. Upon Mrs. Mc-
Henry devolved the arduous task of bring-
ing up her three children; and any success
they have attained, they are proud to say,
they largely owe to their devoted Christian
motiier. D. C. McHenry received his early
education in Napanee. When thirteen years



of age he went to learn the printing bnai-
nets, soon became fairly ao(|uainted with its
details, and rose to the position of foremaa
in the office of the Standard, The printing
office proved, indeed, a second school to him,
and his spare hours were given to reading
and study. He longed for a higher educa-
tion, and when about nineteen years of age,
he dosed the dxxa of the printing office to
open that of the academy, as an eager stu-
dent, under R Phillips, head master, a man
beloved by all who have ever been under
his instruction. After remaining hese a year
or two, he was induced to undertdce the
management of a new pi^)er started in Napa-
nee by the MoMullen Bros., of Picton. At
the end of one year the paper was removed
to Newburgh, seven miles distant, but aft^
eight months Mr. McHenry retuined to
Napanee. A vacancy having occurred in the
second position in the Qrammar school, he
was advised to apply for the appointment.
He did so, and was socm an occupant of a
teacher's chair, in the school where he had
lately been a pupil. The work of teaching
profed congenial, and he was soon fixed in
this as his probable life-work. His ambi-
tion led him to desire a university oonrse,
and with this in view he devoted himself
assiduously to>the study of classics, being
aided in Latin, but getting up his Greek
with very limited assistance. After six yean
of very succeesfol work in this positicn, he
resigned, in 1869, and left for Yiotoria Col-
lege, from which he graduated in 1873.
Hjs course was one of close applioatum and
uniform success — ^first-dass honours in clas-
sics and modems — ^receiving the second
Prince of Wales' medal for general profit
dency, and the scholarship for exoeUenoe
in modems. Five months prior to gradu-
ation he was offered, and accepted the classi-
cal mastership of Cobourg Collegiate Insti-
tute — a substitute being acce^^MMi in the
meantime. After one year he was promoted
to the prindpalship, which position he has
filled for the past thirteen years. It was
at this time (1874), that he was united in
marriage to Alice, daughter of John Grange,
of Napanee. His sdbool was, for many
years, about the only one that prepared sta-
dents for Victoria, and notwitiistuiding ihib
multitiplication of institutes (fn»n fbnr to
sighted), it has hdd its own, and sent up
for arts alone about two hundred and fiftj
during Mr. McHenry's thirteen years, be*
sides a large number for teachers* exami-



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nations, for law, mediome, theology, etc.
In regard to Mr. MoHenry's personal and
prof eeeional qualities, we quote from testi-
monials of well-known educationists : —

(1.) Kby. Ghanoellor Nkllks.— '* He is an ac-
oorate scholar, a gfood disciplinarian, and a moat
sucoessfol teacher, and, indeed, has few if any
equals in the general management of High sdiool
work."

(2.) Rev. Dr. Burwash.- " It is not too mnch
to SAT that in the teaching prof ession he has few
equalB in this province. Both as an editor of
classical^ literature and as a writer on the science
of teaching, he has proved himself a master in his
work ; while in the instmction of a class and in
the organization and government of a large school
he stands in the foremost rank of teachers. As a
Christian gentleman, his life and personal charac-
ter are a model for young men ; while his quiet,
dignified independehce and energy commend nni-
renal respect."

(3.) Dr. Haanil.— " His advice and counsel as
a xnemher of our senate has always been highly
appreciated as sound, and calculated to advance
real scholarship. Energetic and zealous in every
good cause, Mr. McHenry has long been an im-
portant factor in educational and social circles
here.*'

(4) Dr. Burks, Hamilton.—" One of the most
successful educators of our country. His scholar-
ship is broad and reliable. Although a compara-
tively youxig man, he has secured a status among
educators that he may well be proud of. His re-
cord is an exceedingly honourable one, both for
talent, success, and personal character. Socially,
he would be an acquisition to any circle."

Mr. MoHenrj's is one of those oases where
a boy or ^oung man has had the advan-
tages arising from being early thrown upon
his own resources. What he has aooom-
l^ished or attained is evidently the result
of p^sonal energy and self-relianoe.

- Allardy JTosepli Tictor, Berthieryiile,
Quebec, was bom at St. Cuthbert, county of
Berthier, 1st February, 1860. His father,
Prosper Allard, was a most successful agri-
cultiuist, who crnltivated his farm until 1884,
when he sold his rural belongings and re-
moved toBerthierville. His wife (the hon-
ored and beloved mother of 'the subject of
our sketch), Genevievre Aurez Laferriere,
died in 1881, when he married a second
time— 12th September, 1887,— the lady of
his choice this time being a most estinutble
lady, the widow of Captain Bomuald Fau-
teux, who himself had been a merchant at
BerUiier. Young Allard was educated at
L'AsscHnption College, receiving an excel-
lent classical training. From tiiere he en-
tered Laval University, Quebec, and in the
years 1878-9 passed his examination suc-
cessfully and took the degree of bachelor of
arts. In 1881 he entered on the study of



law at Sherbrooke and was called to the
Quebec bar in 1884. Mr. Allard is one of
the rising young men and a lawyer of re-
pute in the town of Berthierville. In re-
ligion he is a devout Roman Catholic ; in
politics he is a consistent Liberal-Conserva-
tive, and there is but little doubt that in the
future he will be found advocating the
cause of his party in the local legislature
or on the floor of the Dominion parliament.
He is the legal representative of the Legal
and Commercial Exchange of ^Canada for
the county of Berthier. On 21st January,
1885, Mr. Allard was married to Blanche
Doval, daughter of Alexandre Damase Doval
and Amili^ Lengendre. Mr. Doval in his
life-time was a weU-known advocate, as well
as inspector of schools for the counties of
L'Assomption, Berthier and Joliette. Mrs.
Allard is niece of our celebrated French-Can-
adian writer, Napoleon Lengendre, F.B.S.C.
DeMialleSy Georye Gasslmlr, St.
Hyacinthe, Quebec, President of the Bank
of St. Hyacinthe and of the St Hyacinthe
Manufacturing Company, and an enterpris-
ing citizen, was bom in St. Hyacinthe, on
the 29th of September, 1827. His father
was Jean Deesaulles, seigneur of St Hya-
cinthe, one of the founders of th^ place, a
member of the Lower Canada parliament
for years, and at the time of his death, in
1885, a member of the Legislative Council
of the province of Quebec. The father of
Jean Dessaulles was from Switzerland, com-
ing to Lower Canada in the latter part of
the last century. The mother of our sub-
ject was RosaUe Papineau, sister of the Hon.
Louis J. Papineau. She died in 1867. Mr.
Dessaulles was educated at the College of
St. Hyacinthe, taking a complete classical
course, and studied law, but never engaged
in its practice. His time has been largely
employed in looking after his seignorial es-
tate and other property, and attending to the
various municipal and other offices whidi he
has held, or still holds. He was councilman
for twelve ^ears, mayor of the city for ten
years, makmg twentjr-two consecutive years'
service in the municipality, and then declin-
ed the chief magistracy against the wishes
of the people; was a school commissioner at
one period; a justice of the peace, and the
second president of the bank of St Hya-
cinthe, taking that position in 1878. The
manufacturing companv, of which he is
president, is a large institution, and doing a
variety of business — carding wool, maau-



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faotnring flannels and cloths, flour for cus-
tom market, etc. It is such enterprises
as this that have helped to build up the
city of St Hjacinthe; and in efforts made
in that direction no man has done more
than the subject of this sketch, ^hose
energies and business tact and talent are
thoroughly devoted to the interests of his
native city. He is connected with the Catho-
lic church, and was at one time president of
the St. Jean Baptists Society. His moral
character is unblemished. Mr. Dessaulles
was first married, in 1867, to Emma Monde-
let, third daughter of the Hon. Dominic
Mondelet, of Three Bivers, she dying in
1864^ leaving one son and two daughters;
and the second time, in 1869, to Frances
Louise Leman, daughter of Jh, Dennis S.
Leman, an English physician, and by her
has two daughters and two sons.

La Roqne, Gedeon, M.D, Quebec.
Sergeant-at-Arms of the Legislative Assem-
bly of the Province of Quebec, is not only a
conspicuous contemporary figure in that
provmce, but a gentleman who has taken an
active part in its politics, and contributed in
no slight degree to the development of its
resources and material prosperity. He was
bom at Ghambly, in the province of Quebec,
on the 22nd December, 1881. He springs
from a stock as remarkable for its fruitful-
ness and attachment to the soil, as for the
eminent positions to which some of its mem-
bers have attained. Originally from France,
in the earlv days of the colony, and mostly
farmers, his ancestors were among the pio-
neers of settlement and civilization in Gham-
bly county, P.Q., locating along the banks
of the litUe river ** Montreal,** about a mile
from Chambly basin, tilling tJde soil, raising
large families, and laying the foundations of
what is to-day one of the most populous and
thriving agricultural communities in Lower
Canada. The family of Dr. La Boque*8 pa-
ternal grandfather, composed of eleven bro-
thers and three sisters, nearly aU occupied
adjoining farms in the parish of Chambly.
His uncle, the late Monseigneur Joseph
La Boque, formerly Boman Catholic coad-
jutor bishop of Montreal, and afterwards
bishop of the diocese of St. Hyanointhe,
who died in November, 1887, was the last
survivor of a family also composed of four-
teen members. Another deceased bishop of
St. Hyacinths, Monseigneur Charles La Bo-
que, previously for many years parish priest
of St John's, P.Q., was sdso a near relative



of the subject of this sketch. Both these
prelates were in their day men of high stand-
ing, great learning and marked ability, and
their names are stUl venerated as among iha
the most illustrious in the Lower Canadian
hierarchy. 1>. La Boque began his daasi-
cal education at Chambly College, so ably
presided over at the time by its sealoos
founder, Bev. P. Mignault, parish priest of
Chambly. Subsequently young La Boque
was entered at the St Hyaointhe C^l^pa,
where he continued and completed his stu-
dies under the- immediate eye of his unde,
Bev. Joseph La Boque, the superior of the
institution, and afterwards bishop of St
Hyacinthe. On leaving college he decided
to study medicine, and was accordingly in-
dentured for the purpose to another of his
uncles, Dr. Luc EujElebe La Boque, of St
Jerome, Terrebonne, P.Q., now the parisli
of Father Labelle, the great apostle of col-
onization in the province of Quebec. It was
while pursuing his medical studies that
young La Boque first became interested in
the cause of colonisation, to the advanoemexit
of which he has so patriotically devoted so
much of his subsequent career. His uncle.
Dr. L. E. La Boque, who had then bat
lately returned from the gold fields of CaH-
f omia, and who was one of the few surviv-
ors who had crossed (both ways) the deadly
swamps of the Isthmus of Panama, had be-
come largely interested in the settlement of
the wild lands in the upper part of theBiver
du Nord, in the county of Terrebonne, and
in the fall of 1851 young Oedeon La Boque
was despatched by him, in charge of a squad
of men, to open up a settlement at Lac d Ja
Truite, some forty miles from St Jeromeu
The youthful pioneer and his companions
only succeeded in reaching their destina-
tion, after enduring the greatest hardships
and suffering. It took tiiem two days to
accomplish t5e last twelve miles of their
fearful journey through the wildemeas, but
the result must be regarded as a fitting re-
ward of the heroism displayed on the occa-
sion. To-day the beautiful and populous
parish of St Agathe des Monts, in the
county of Terrebonne, surrounds the spot
where young La Boque and his men feUed
the first trees, and erected the first log hut
on the western shore of Lac A la Truite. To
the late Hon. A. N. Morin, then provincial
secretary for Lower Canada, under the newly
formed cabinet of Hincks-Morin, and Dr.
Luc Eusebe La Boque, undoubtedly belong-



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485



ed the honor of being the instigators of the
first great moTement of colonization in that
section of the country, but the credit of ac-
tnallj opening up the first settlement in the
township of Aberorombie (Terrebonne) must
be awarded to Gedeon La Boqne, who, after
this incident, reemned and completed his
medical studies at the School of Medicine
and Surgery at Montreal, finally passing as
a licentiate in medicine on the 9th October,
1855, before the College of Physicians and
Surgeons of Lower Canada, of which the
late Dr. Fremont was then president, Drs.
Landry and Pelletier, secretaries, and Dr.
Jcmes, actarum cttstos. After his admission.
Dr. Gtedeon La Boque settled down to prac-
tise his profession at Longueuil, opposite
Montreal, where he met with early and
gratifying success. By 1863 he had so
grown in the confidence and esteem of his
fellow citizens, that in that year he was
elected mayor of Longueuil, after a hard con-
test with Mr. F. X.Yalade, N.P., and was sub-
sequently re-elected three times to the same
office wi&out opposition. He also filled the
responsible position of warden of the county
Chambly during four years. At the time
of confederation, in 1867, Dr. La Boque was
pressed by his many friends to accept the
candidature of the county for the Quebec
Legislatiye Assembly, in the interests of
the Conservative party, but, though he de-
clined the honor tor himself, he worked and
secured the election, for the party, of Mr.
J. B. Jodoin, against Mr. F. David, who
was not only supported by the Liberal
party, but by his brother-in-law, Mr. L.
Betoumay, a man of great influence in the
county, and a member of the same legal
firm as the late Sir Qeorge E. Cartier (Car-
tier, PominviUe & Betoumay). At the gen-
eral elections of 1871, Dr. La Boque, being
again solicited by his friends to stand for
the county for the Local House, decided to
come forward, and was put in nomination
against Mr. P. B. Benoit, M.P. This was
before the abolition of dual representation.
Dr. La B^^ue was supported both by Con-
servatives and Liberals, and elected by a
large majority, his opponent resigning after
the close of the first day's polling. His par-
hamentary career was marked by much in-
dependence of thought and action, espe-
cially during the Chauveau and Ouimet
Administrations, when he spoke and voted
against the Ck>vemment on the questions of
the lease of Beauport asylum, dual repre-



sentation, and some matters concerning
teachers and education. After the so-called
Tanneries* scandal, and the resignation of
the Ouimet ministry, the member for Cham-
bly, believing that a vigorous railway policy
was essential to the opening up and deve-
lopment of the province, gave an unhesi-
tating support to the railway programme of
their successors the De BoucherviUe cab-
inet, and was invited • by the premier, Mr.
De BoucherviUe, to move the address in re-
ply to the speech from the throne, on which
occasion he was very ably sustained by the
member for Huntingdon, Dr. Cameron, as
seconder of the resolution. As a friend of
colonization. Dr. Larocque was an ardent
advocate of railway building, and as such
the proposals of the De BoucherviUe gov-
ernment in the house regarding the con-
struction of the Northern Colonization (so
caUed at the time) and the North Shore
Bailroads, not only met with his warm ap-
proval and active support, but during 1874
and 1875 he even gave his services as agent
to the contractors of the Northern Coloniza-
tion road, Messrs. McDonald & Abbott, in
order to purchase the right of way from
Biver des Prairies to Aylmer. On the 15th
June, 1876, a vacancy having occurred in
the position of Sergeant-at-Arms of the
Legislative Assembly, he was appointed to
fiU it, and this important and responsible
appointment he still continues to hold with
general acceptance, enjoying not only the
confidence and regard of succeeding minis-
ters and parliaments, but the respect of the
public as well, for his tact and firmness in
the discharge of the regular duties of his
office, as for the energy, ability and taste
with which he has at d^erent times super-
vised and carried out works that had to be
executed at short notice, including the fit-
ting up and decorating of both Houses of
the Legislature on such occasions of mark
as the receptions of the Marquis of Lome
and H. B. H. the Princess Louise, in 1878,
of the lieutenant-governors of the province,
of the speakers of the Legislative Ajssembly,
and last, but not least, of Madame Meroier,
wife of the premier of the province, on the
occasion of the Interprovincial Conference,
in October, 1887, and in honor of the dele-
gates to that important congress, of which
Dr. La Boque was also named accountant.
Another distinctive feature of his life-work,
and one which does infinite honor to his in-
telligence and patriotism, is the ardor which



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he has ever shown in endeaYOoring to ame-



Online LibraryRobert PhilipThe life and opinions of the Rev. William Milne, D. D., missionary to China → online text (page 96 of 164)