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reappeared.

This time another dairy was implicated, an overwhelming proportion of the
invaded houses being supplied from the same source. Every endeavour was made
by the sanitary authorities to ascertain how the milk became infected, and every
assistance to that end was afforded by the dairyman and the cow-owner, but
without effect. A communication appeared in the local journal on January 1,
advising that all milk should be boiled, and the last case that I am acquainted
with was on January 3. Since then I am glad to be able to say no fresh cases
have come to my knowledge. In the first outbreak there were 12 cases and two
deaths, and in the second 44 cases and nine deaths, but one case having com-
menced in the new year is not included in the returns for the past year.

1881.

The deaths registered in 1881 from all causes were 100, as compared with
141 in 1880.

The births were 244, comprising 132 boys and 112 girls; the birth-rate is
consequently 25-9 per 1000, which is very low.

I have noticed throughout the year the cleanly condition of the roads and
paths, showing that much attention is bestowed upon them, and would also
remark satisfactorily on the efforts at carting away the snow after the memorable
storm in the middle of January, and again on the sweeping up of dead leaves
throughout the district.

1882.

During the year 1882 the number of deaths registered in the district was 121.
From these must be deducted the deaths of three persons brought from elsewhere
for treatment in the Surbiton Cottage Hospital. This will leave 118 deaths for
Surbiton itself.

The births numbered 246, of whom 117 were males and 129 females, giving
a birth-rate of 24-6 per 1000.

Hospital for non-pauper cases of infectious disease. — A meeting of representa-
tives of the Sanitary Authorities within the Kingston Union was summoned
early in the year, at the instance of the Rural Sanitary Authority, to consider the
advisability of joint action in providing such a hospital. The meeting was fully
attended, and Dr. Thome Thome was present from the Local Government Board
to give all information and explanations. However, after some discussion the
proposal fell through, joint action seeming to find but little favour. Since then
nothing seems to have been done, but the need of such a place still continues,
and is at times felt very severely. Every year in the report this subject has been
reverted to, and now again that there is ample evidence of the want of such
accommodation it is a matter for regret that the prospect is no brighter than
when, in my annual report for 1880, it was alluded to as follows : " The need of
this — a home or hospital for infectious cases — for the safety of the public and to



APPENDIX. 125

prevent serious losses to individuals — is shown by the requirements under the
Dairy and Cowsheds Eegnlations, which must remain almost a dead letter or
inflict great injury on individual dairymen, as, for instance, a case of scarlet fever
occurring in a daiiyman's house used, perhaps, as a milk-shop means either the
removal of the patient, or else the closing of the business, or the carrying of it on
to the danger of the community."

It is satisfactory to notice an increase in the number of houses that have
shafts introduced for the ventilation of the house-drains, but it is worthy of
remark that those people newly taking a house are the most anxious to have
ventilators and everything else done that seems necessary, while only too many
of the older residents are quite content to let matters go on as they are, believing
apparently in the immortality of a drain-pipe or trap, and the desirability of
leaving well alone. These householders would do wisely if they cut off connec-
tion with the drains of bath, sink, waste and rain water pipes, and not wait till
they find typhoid fever or diphtheria in their houses.

The new building for the cottage hospital is now finished, and will be
opened for the reception of patients in April. The more recent improvements
in house sanitation have been adopted there, and a visit of inspection will be of
interest to those who are unacquainted with the subject, and wish to see for
themselves what may serve as a model for possible contemplated alterations in
their own homes.

1883.

The total number of deaths registered during 1883 was 113, but as the deaths
in public institutions of persons non-resident have to be deducted, two such
deaths in the cottage hospital must be taken into account; this will leave 111
as the mortality for Surbiton for last year.

The population at the census of 1881 was 9416, and for purposes of cal-
culation was estimated in 1882 at 10,000, and now for last year at 10,250,
which must be within the probable number. This will give a death-rate of
10"8 per 1000 for the year. The rate for London is 20*4, and for England and
Wales 19*5. This is an exceedingly low rate, but it is not an exceptional one ;
for last year it was 11*8, and the year before that 10*6. It may be cited as
valuable and partial evidence of the healthiness of the place as a residential
neighbourhood.

1884.

During 1884 the total number of deaths within the district was 129. From
this the deaths of four persons in the cottage hospital, being those of non-
residents brought from elsewhere for treatment, must be deducted. This will
leave 125 as the mortality for Surbiton for last year.

The population of the district is now estimated to be 10,500, and taking
that number as a basis for calculation, the death-rate will be 11*9 per 1000 per
annum. Last year the rate was 10"8, and the year before 11*8, so it is eminently
satisfactory to find that the reputation of being the most healthy of the London
suburbs is well deserved and maintained. The rate for England and Wales for
the same period is 19*6.

That the hygienic or sanitary conditions of a locality exercise a favourable
influence or otherwise in determining the virulence of an outbreak of disease is



126 APPENDIX.

undoubted, and to our local surroundings in that respect — though not by any
means perfect — may be ascribed, perhaps, the fact that zymotic diseases when
occurring are almost invariably of a mild and favourable character.

The vast importance of pure water in our dwellings cannot be over-estimated,
but it is remarkable the fondness with which owners and users of wells cling to
the use of the water they are accustomed to — most unwilling to believe there
can be danger when no tangible sign of it exists. Analysis almost invariably
shows well water in this district to be polluted and to be dangerous in a greater
or lesser degree, and it cannot be too well understood that the condition of any
water is subject to alteration, and probably very quickly, as for example after
heavy rains, when the shallow well fills up with water freshly drained through
an impure soil, possibly saturated with sewage, or in times of dry weather, when
the water, being less in quantity, becomes more concentrated. I refer to this
matter because during the past year serious results have followed the use of
impure well water in more than one instance. If analysis shows that the water
of a well is at all suspicious — and by that is meant contaminated with organic
matter — that well ought to be closed at once, for it is most certainly only a
question of time, sooner or later, when the water will be dangerous and disease
be caused by its use. Temperance and sanitary measures working hand-in-hand
combine to produce healthy folks in healthy homes, and are, I am persuaded,
beginning to make their influence felt as factors in the reduction of illness,
prevention of disease, and prolongation of life.

1885.

Excluding two cases that occurred in the cottage hospital of persons brought
from elsewhere for treatment, the total number of deaths registered was 104,
which represents the mortality for Surbiton for 1885.

The numbers for 1884 and 1883 were respectively 125 and 111, giving death-
rates of 11*9 and 10*8, the population in those years being estimated at 10,500
and 10,250. For the year just past it may be estimated that there is an increase
of 200, which is probably well within the mark, taking into consideration that,
besides new houses, for some years the births have never been less than 120
in excess of the deaths. Taking that to be the population, the death-rate for
Surbiton will be 9*7 per 1000 per annum, the lowest ever recorded here. The
rate for England and Wales is 19.

All the bakehouses, ten in number, have been specially inspected, their
systematic inspection now devolving on the medical of&cer of health.

Hospital for non-pauper cases of infectious disease. — For some years past atten-
tion has been drawn in this report to the fact that such a desirable institution
is non-existent in this district. Possibly the examples set elsewhere, and which
are now becoming numerous, may induce some action to be taken towards pro-
viding the means of isolation of cases of infectious disease.

1886.

Consequent upon the favourable nature of the returns from the registrar, and

the fortunate absence of any outbreak of illness, or of serious individual cases

due to imperfect sanitary arrangements, the report is a very brief one. Not

that perfection or anything near it has been attained, but house sanitation,



APPENDIX.



127



sewage, and water supply having for some time past received much more care
and consi(leration at your hands, it is gratifying to feel assured that the continued
good health of the district is in some measure owing to this attention.

Excluding cases of non-residents brought to the cottage hospital for treat-
ment, the total number of deaths registered was 123, which represents the
mortality of Surbiton for 1886. The population of the district is now estimated
to be 10,700, and taking that to be the basis for calculation, the death-rate will be
11*4 per 1000 per annum. Last year the rate was 9'7, and the year before 11-9,
so the healthy character of the neighbourhood is well deserved and maintained.

The births were 206, of which 103 were boys and 103 girls. The number
is decreasing annually ; it was highest in 1878, when there were 255, and the
population then nearly 2000 fewer. The birth-rate is only 19*2 per 1000.

For comparison with previous years the following tables are drawn up : —

Table A.

Summary of Births and Deaths and Mortality from certain Classes of Disease for ten years.





1877.


1878.


1879.


1880.


1881.


1882.


1883.


1884.


1885.


1886.


Zymotic diseases . . . .


18


8


5


20


7


18


4


15


4


8


Total deaths


114


112


114


141


100


118


111


125


104


123


Death-rate


12-6


12-4


126


14-3


10-6


11-8


10-8


11-9


9-7


11-4


Mortality from phthisis


11


15


14


18


8


5


12


10


12


7


„ other lung






















diseases


14


26


22


31


16


9


15


27


16


27


„ heart diseases


12


11


11


6


11


14


14


14


12


8


„ cancer . .


1


5


10


5


6


5


2


1


2


3


„ violence


2


6


6


5


4


1


1


1


1


4


Total births


251


255


241


253


244


246


236


221


222


206


Birth-rate


27-8


28-3


26-7


25'8


25-9


24-6


23-0


21-0


20-7


19-2



Table B.
Deaths from seven chief Zymotic Diseases for ten years.



Small- pox
Measles . .
Scarlet fever . .
Whooping-cough
Diphtheria
Fever, typhus

„ enteric
Diarrhoea
Deaths from seven chief

zymotic diseases
Death-rate from seven

chief zymotic diseases
Total death-rate . .

„ „ London . .

„ „ England &

Wales . .

„ birth-rate England

and Wales




8
2
2


2
4

18

20
12-6

21-5
20-3
36-0



1873.



0-9
12-4

23-1
21-6
85-6



1879.



0-5
12-6

22-6
20-7
34-7






5
10

2
3

20

2-0
143

21-7
20-6
343



0-8
10-6

21-2
18-9
33-9



1-8
11-8

21-3
19-6
33-7



0-3
10-8

20-4
19-5
33-2





4
6
4


1

15

1-4

119

20-3
19-6
33-5



046
9-7



19-0
32-5



0-74
11-4



19-3
32-4



128 APPENDIX.

Speaking generally, last year was a healthy one ; there are no outbreaks of
illness to record, and cases of the eruptive fevers when occurring v^ere few in
number and mild in type.

The chief sanitary measure of the year is undoubtedly the sealing of an
agreement for the joint disposal and treatment of the sewage of Surbiton and
Kingston. The removal of so great a factor in the pollution of this part of our
river is a thing to be thankful for.

All the bakehouses have been regularly inspected and reported on, and are
now in a fairly satisfactory condition.



XI.

SUEBITON COTTAGE HOSPITAL.

The following statement as to the rise and progress of the cottage hospital
is taken principally from the annual reports of the committee. The idea of a
cottage hospital for Surbiton originated with Mrs. Frederick Howell, in the early
part of the year 1870. At an initiatory meeting held at Mr. Howell's house, at
which were present — Eev. Charles Burney in the chair, Messrs. A, W. Jones, H.
F. Shebbeare, I^eonard Wakefield, and John Loxley, it was decided to establish
the hospital, and Mr. Loxley was appointed honorary secretary ; and at a meeting
held in October, 1870, the following were nominated as the first committee,
viz. : Eev. Charles Burney, Eev. Edward Garbett, Messrs. B. Hinds, C. L. Luck,
L. Wakefield, Ehodes Cobb, Maddock, Bruce, L. W. Cave, H. F. Shebbeare,
F. Howell, C. H. Clayton, and J. Loxley, who continued to act as honorary
secretary and honorary treasurer. Mr. E. Cock and Dr. Kershaw were named as
honorary consulting surgeon and physician ; Dr. Price Jones as honorary acting
surgeon; and Mrs. Frederick Howell as lady-superintendent. The name of
Mr. Arthur Benthall shortly afterwards was added to the committee.

After some difficulty in obtaining a house, York Villa, near the west end of
the north side of the Victoria Eoad, was rented. Although wanting in many
essential requirements for the purpose, it was the best the committee could
obtain, and it was opened for the reception of patients in October, 1870.

The institution has for its object the benefit of persons residing in Surbiton,
Kingston, and the surrounding neighbourhood, who are engaged in the industrial
occupations of life, and who, when overtaken by sickness or accident, are unable
to obtain in their own homes the accommodation, care, and attention they require.
The funds are raised by voluntary contributions and by payments of the patients
and their friends.

During the first twelve years and a half, 470 cases were admitted for treat-
ment, and during nearly the whole of that time the domestic arrangements were
under the charge of Miss Eaymond. Dr. Price Jones, with Dr. Owen Coleman



APPENDIX.



129



and other medical gentlemen, acted as honorary medical officers. A building
fund was formed, for the nucleus of which the institution is largely indebted
to Mr. Loxley, the sum of £500, part of a legacy left by the late Mr. Allenby,
having been acquired by his influence. From time to time — by special donations
and church collections, a legacy of £50 bequeathed by Miss Margaret Lenox, a
like sum contributed by Mrs. Kirkup, in memory of her husband — additions
were made, so that in 1881 a sum of £1650 had been accumulated and invested.
It was felt that the time had arrived for erecting a permanent building, and
early in that year a building committee was formed; the present site in St.
James's Eoad was secured for £1150, and, after competition, the plans of Mr.
Ernest Carritt were adopted. The foundation-stone was laid by the Ven. Arch-
deacon Burney, on Saturday, April 20, 1882, and on Saturday, April 21, in the
following year, the building, fully equipped and free from debt, was opened for
the reception of patients.

The outlay for the building, etc., was as follows : —



Actual cost of the building and attendant expenses

Furnishing

Cost of the site



£3,450

400

1,150

£5,000



This sum of £5000 was provided by the accumulated building fund and sub-
scriptions raised principally in the neighbourhood.

An endowment fund was established in 1882, and in the summer of 1887
it amounted to £250 New 2^ per Cent. Bank Annuities. This has since been
increased by £289 8s. lOd., being the surplus of the Jubilee Fund.

The names of the officers and others connected with the hospital, from its
formation, in 1871, up to 1887, are given in the accompanying table. Miss Eay-
mond resigned the post of matron in 1885, and Miss Jessie A. Cunningham was
appointed in her place.

The number of patients treated during the year 1886 was 123 for 3641 days
in hospital. The endowment fund at the end of the year consisted of £250 New
2^ per Cents., and the receipts during the period were —



Subscriptions

Donations . .

Collections on Hospital Sunday and money-boxes

Patients' payments

Interest on investments



£


8.


d.


342


10





103


10





218


13


4


62


7





6


1






£733 1 4



130



APPENDIX.



SURBITON COTTAGE HOSPITAL.
Names of Pbesidekt, Vice-Pbesidents, and Officers, pbom 1871 to 1887.





1871.


1875.


1879.


1882.


1885.


President ....


H. W. Peek, M.P.


Sir H. W. Peek,


Sir H. W. Peek,


Sir H. W. Peek,


Sir H. W. Peek,






Bart., M.P.


Bart., M.P.


Bart., M.P.


Bart., M.P.


Vice-Presi-


Rev. C. Bumey.


Rev. C. Bumey.


Rev. C. Buraey.


Ven. Archd. Burney.


Ven. Archd. Bumey.


dents


Rev. E. Garbett.


Rev. E. Garbett.


Rev. J. W. Bardsley.


H. Harrison.
B. Hinds.
Captain Lukis.
Rev. J. W. Bardsley.
Rev. E. H. Rogers.
H. F. Shebbeare.
Edward Till.


B. Hinds.
F. B. Morten.
Rev. W. H. Ranken.
Rev. E. H. Rogers.
H. F. Shebbeare.
Edward Till.


Tmstees.....


Rev. C. Bumey.


Rev. C. Burney.


Rev. C. Bumey.


Ven. Archd. Bumey.


Ven. Archd. Buraey.




Lewis W. Cave.


Lewis W. Cave.


Lewis W. Cave


Frederick Howell.


Frederick Howell.




W. H. Walton.


Sir W. H. Walton.


Sir W. H. Walton.


Colonel Surtees.


Colonel Surtees.


Committee...


Thomas Barker.


Thomas Barker.


C. H. Clayton.


Ven. Archd. Burney


Ven. Archd. Bumey




Emil Beckh.


Arthur Benthall.


George Clowes.


(chairman).


(chairman).




Arthur Benthall.


George C. Bruce.


Rhodes Cobb.


T. S. Borradaile.


R. S. Bond.




John Boodle.


H. Bidgood.


W. H. Dickinson.


T. H. Bryant.


T. S. Borradaile.




E. Browne.


Lewis W. Cave.


C. W. Eglington.


James Case.


Wilberforce Bryant.




George C. Bruce.


C. H. Clayton.


John Galsworthy.


C. H. Clayton.


James Case.




Lewis W. Cave.


George Clowes.


Frederick Gould.


Rhodes Cobb.


C. H. Clayton.




C. H. Clayton.


Rhodes Cobb.


Bernard F. Harris.


Frederick Howell.


Rhodes Cobb.




George Clowes.


W. H. Dickinson.


H. Harrison.


F. B. Morten.


Captain Cundy.




Rhodes Cobb.


C. W. Kngelbach.


J. S. Hill.


Samuel Page.


Frederick Howell.




John Galsworthy.


John Galsworthy.


Benjamin Hinds.


W. Parkes.


Samuel Page.




Frederick Gould.


Frederick Gould.


W. F. Hodgson.


R. B. Perkin.


R. B. Perkin.




Benjamin Hinds.


J. S. Hill.


Frederick Howell.


C. H. Walton.


C. H. Walton.




W. F. Hodgson.


Benjamin Hinds.


John Loxley.




(And the ex-officio




Henry Home.


W. F. Hodgson.


Charles L. Luck.




members.)




Frederick Howell.


Frederick Howell.


Captain Lukis.








Alex. W. Innes.


G. Lee.


F. B. Morten.








John Loxley.


John Loxley.


W. C. Sargeaunt.








Charles L. Luck.


Charles L. Luck.


E. F. Scaley.








Captain Lukis.


Captain Lukis.


H. F. Shebbeare.








John Parry.


F. B. Morten.


H. Shrubsole.








Rev. T. Pyne.


John Parry.


J. G. Smith.








W. C. Sargeaunt.


W. C. Sargeaunt.


Colonel Surtees.








H. F. Shebbeare.


E. F. Scaley.


Sir W. H. Walton.








John Shrubsole.


H. F. Shebbeare.










W. C. Venning.


H. Shrubsole.










W. H. "Walton.


E. P. Stringer.










L. C. Wakefield.


Sir W. H. Walton.








Hon. Consult.


Edward Cock.


Edward Cock.


Edward Cock.


Edward Cock.


Edward Cock.


Med. Officers


Dr. Kershaw.


Dr. Kershaw.


Dr. Kershaw.


Dr. Kershaw.


Dr. Kershaw.


Hon. Acting


Dr. Price Jones.


Dr. Price Jones.


Dr. Price Jones.


Owen Coleman.M.D.


Owen Coleman, M.D.


Med. Officers




.




C. C. Gibbes, M.D.
W. Price Jone8,M.D,
G. Farr- White,
F.R.C.S.


C. C. Gibbes, M.D.
G. Farr-White,
F.R.C.S.


Lady-Supt. . . .


Mrs. F. Howell.


Mrs. F. Howell.


Mrs. F. Howell.


Mrs. F. Howell.


Mrs. F. Howell.


Hon. Treasurer


John Loxley.


John Loxley.


John Loxley.


John Loxley.


John Loxley.


Hon. Secretary


John Loxley.


John Loxley.


John Loxley.


R. Escombe, jun.


R. Escombe, jun.



In 1872 Mr. H. Bidgood took Mr.
Wakefield's place on the committee.

In 1873 Mr. Venning left, and
Messrs. C. W. Engelbach, J. S. Hill,
and F. B. Morten were added to the
committee.

In 1874 Messrs. Boodle, Browne,
Home, Innes, Pyne, and John Shrub-
sole left, and Messrs. G. Lee, E. P.
Stringer, and H. Shrubsole were
added to the committee.

In 1876 Mr. E. Beckh left the
committee.

In 1877 Messrs. Benthall, Brace,
Cave, Stringer, and Bidgood left,



and Mr. Bernard F. Harris joined
the committee.

In 1878 the Rev. J. W. Bardsley
succeeded the Rev. E. Garbett as a
trustee ; Mr. Bruce left, and Messrs.
J. G. Smith, H. Harrison, and C. W.
Eglington were added to the com-
mittee.

In 1880 Messrs. W. H. Dickinson
and H. Shrubsole ceased to be mem-
bers of the committee.

In 1881 Sir W. H. Walton ceased
to be a trustee and member of the
committee.

In 1883 Messrs. Harrison, Lukis,



and Bardsley ceased to be, and Mr.
Engelbach and the Rev. W. H. Ran-
ken became, vice-presidents. The
treasurer, secretary, and acting
medical officers became members
of the committee (ex-officio).

In 1884 Mr. Wilberforce Bryant
succeeded Mr. T. H. Bryant on the
committee.

In 1886, on Mr. Loxley's retire-
ment as hon. treasurer, and Mr. Es-
combe's as hon. secretary, they were
added to the committee, and Mr.
Rhodes Cobb became hon. treasurer,
and Mr. C. R. Elderton hon. secretary.



APPENDIX. 131



XII.

KINGSTON PEOVIDENT DISPENSARY.

The objects of this institution are to ensure medical attendance and medicine
during sickness or the confinements of married women, or after accident, to the
working classes and poor persons, their wives and children, all being members,
living in Kingston-upon-Thames or its neighbourhood, who, not receiving parish
relief, are, nevertheless, unable to defray the ordinary cost of professional medical
attendance. Payments to commence while in health, and to be continued
monthly in advance, at the rate of one halfpenny if under twelve years of age ;
one penny over, but not exceeding threepence per week.

The number of members on the books of each district at the end of the year
1886 were as follows ■ —



Kingston . . , .

Surlsiton

Norbiton

St. Paul's, Kingston Hill



Men.


Women.


Children


274


520


616


109


211


246


250


38i


583


160


279


298



793 1,391 1,743



The income of the Dispensary during 1886 was £604 12«, ; and the committee
and officers in that year were —

Committee — C. W. Bardswell, Esq., honorary member (chairman) ; Messrs.
C. H. Cameron, E. Cock, Langdon Down, M.D., E. S. Phillips, F. J. Van Der
Pant, ex-officio ; Mr. E. S. Bond, Eev. A. Cornford, Messrs. F. J. Hayward, P. Jones,
G. Lee, Eev. A. Letchworth, Messrs. J. Loxley, H. J. Pattison, E. L. Thynne,
Eev. G. Wright, Eev. A. S. W. Young, honorary members ; and Messrs. Baker,
Blackmore, Compton, Petley, Stringer, and White, provident members.

Hon. Physician — Langdon Down, Esq., M.D.

Hon. Surgeon — E. Cock, Esq., J.P.

Hon. Dentist — F. J. Van Der Pant, Esq.

Medical Officers— E^. M. Shirtliff, Esq., M.E.C.S., E. Bayley, Esq., M.E.C.S.,
0. Coleman, Esq., M.D.

Hon. Secretary — C. H. Cameron, Esq.

Hon. Treasurer — E. S. Phillips, Esq.

Secretary and Collector — Mr. J. W. Sowden.



k2



132



APPENDIX.



XIIT.

KINGSTON-UPON-THAMES— CHAKITIES.



Name of Charity,


Endowment
(including approximate acreage).


Annual Income.


Trustees.


Free Grammar School




£ s


. d.




Illizabeth Brown


'\







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