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Srst term, recitation 2 hotu-s, practical work 3 hours, to the separate
i^roup of students pursuing the teacher-training course in agriculture.

>44 Olericulture or Market Gardening II

Senior year, second term, recitation 3 hours, laboratory 8 hours.

A continuation of preceding course. Hotbed construction and
•iianagement; growing vegetable plants for transplanting; various
cropping systems. Use of seed drills and cultivators; practice in vege-
::able growing in individual plots.

■^45 Olericulture or Market Gardening III

Senior year, first term, recitation 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

Detailed study of the culture of the various vegetable crops.
Systematic study of varieties. Forcing v^etables in the greenhouse.
Soil preparation; planting; harvesting; marketing. Practice in
mowing and in transplanting.

146 Olericulture or Market Gardening IV

Senior year, second term, recitation 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

Practical exercises in construction and management of hotbeds
and cold frames. Succession and companion cropping systems. Prac-
rice in vegetable growing in the field by assignment of individual plots.

347 Farm Field Machinery

Junior or senior year, first term, lecture 1 hour, laboratory 5 hours.

Basic principles of construction, proper care, adjustments, and
operation of farm field machines. Practice in assembling and dis-
sembling, with detailed study of complicated appliances. Farm gas
engines are briefly discussed.



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 147

548 Farm Power

Junior or senior year, second term, lecture 1 hour, laboratory
5 hours.

The internal combustion engine: construction, principles of opera-
tion, and everyday troubles with their remedies. Test of fuel con-
sumption. Farm transmission problems; water power; electric
lighting systems; tractors. Design of farm power plant required.

549 Research Thesis

Senior year, first term, laboratory 8 hours.

The study of some special agricultural problem. Students are
given opportunity to acquire proficiency in advanced laboratory
technique and to familiarize themselves with the literature on their
partictdar problem.

550 Research Thesis (continued)

Senior year, second term, laboratory 8 hours.

Teacher Training Courses

551 Teaching Vocational Dairying

Sophomore year, first term, lecttires 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

Includes study of secretion of milk, its composition and causes
of variation in composition; the Babcock test; separation; butter
making; and sanitary handling of milk.

552 Teaching Vocational Dairying (continued)

Sophomore year, second term, lectures 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

Dairy breeds; developing the dairy herd; care and management of
dairy cattle; feeding for milk production, and economic production
of market milk. Judging dairy cattle and practical work at dairy
bams.

553 Teaching Dairy Production

Senior year, lectures 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

Dairy breeds; care and management of dairy cattle; feeding for
milk production; composition of milk, its value as food; city milk
supply and its relation to public health; milk transportation, milk
ordinances, and milk inspection.



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148 RUTGERS COLLEGE

554 Soils, Fertilizers, and Farm Crops

Freshman year, first term, lectures 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

Principles of crop growth and culture, soil requirements and
adaptation, crop rotations and soil management, and maintenance of
soil fertility.

555 Soils, Fertilizers, and Farm Crops (continued)

Freshman year, second term, lectures 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

I

556 Farm Mechanics

Junior or senior year, first term, lecture 1 hour, laboratory 5 hours.

A general course presenting essential principles of everyday farm
construction and repair work, including carpentry, forging, concrete
work, and pipe fitting. Each student is assigned a separate project.

557 Farm Mechanics (continued)

Junior or senior year, second term, lecture 1 hour, laboratory
5 hours.

Graduate Courses

558 Farm Crops

Open to those who are prepared to take advanced crop work.
The course deals comprehensively with the so-called principles of
crops. Attendance at seminars is required.

559 Farm Management

Cost accoimting, farm organization, and farm surveys, with
study of efficiency factors in relation to different methods of farming
and types of farm. Attendance at seminars is required.

Prerequisites: cotu*ses in horticulture, crops, animal husbandry,
and dairy husbandry, the equivalent of the imdergraduate coiuses
offered in this field.

560 Microbiology of Soils

Lectures, seminars, field and laboratory research. Isolation and
study of bacteria, fungi, and protozoa prominent in cultivated soils.

561 Soil Bacteriology

Lectures, seminars, and laboratory research. Study of the mor-
phology and physiology of the important groups of soil bacteria; their
relation to scril fertility and crop production.



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 149

562 Soil Chemistry

Lectures, seminars, and laboratory research. Study of methods of
soil analysis, particularly of those for determining the inorganic con-
stituents of the soil.

563 Soil Fertility

Lecttures, seminars, laboratpry research, field and pot experiments.
The accumulation, transformation, and losses of plant-food in soils.
Tillage, drainage, liming, fertilization, and manuring as factors in soil
fertility.

564 Advanced Animal Husbandry

Special assigned problems in pork production and in the market-
ing of animal husbandry products.

565 Advanced Dairy Husbandry

A study of the methods used in investigational work in dairying,
including a review of the research work in progress at other stations.

566 Research Thesis in. Dairy Husbandry

The subject of the thesis is chosen by the student and approved by
the professor under whose direction it is prepared.

567 Advanced Poultry Husbandry

Special research in poultry breeding, poultry feeding, incubation,
and poultry management, th^stt subjects being offered as major prob-
lems only.

568 Pomology and Small Fruits

Many problems in connection with peach and small fruit produc-
tion are studied.

569 Olericulture

Various problems in growing vegetables, particularly the tomato,
^:gplant, pepper, and sweet potato.

570 Plant Physiology

Lectures on: retention of form; entrance of materials into the
plant; movement of materials within; exit of materials; metabolism;
growth tmder S3rmmetrical and asymmetrical conditions. Seminars.



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150 RUTGERS COLLEGE

PHYSIOLOGY

Professor Moore

Majors may be taken with physiology either in chemistry or
zoology.

571 General Physiology

Junior or senior year, first term, lectures 2 hours, recitation 1 hour,
laboratory 4 hours.

Dynamics of the organism, physiology of muscle and nerve, the
central nervous system, and special senses. Either Bayliss' General
Physiology or Howell's Textbook of Physiology may be used.

Prerequisites: zoology 581, 582; or chemistry 421, 422; also a
reading knowledge of French and German.

572 General Physiology (continued)

Junior or senior year, second term, lecture 1 hour, recitation
1 hour, journal club 1 hour, laboratory 4 hours.

Dynamics of the organism, continued; digestion; secretion;
excretion; circulation; respiration; fertilization.

573 Biochemistry

Senior year, first term, lecture 1 hour, seminar 1 hour, laboratory
5 or 8 hours.

Quantitative methods in the study of the carbohydrates, fats,
and proteins. (Haas and Hill's Chemistry of Plant Products)

Prerequisites: courses 571, 572; or chemistry 439, 440; also a
reading knowledge of French and German.

574 Biochemistry (continued)

Senior year, second term, lecture 1 hour, seminar 1 hour, labora-
tory 5 hours.

Preparation of lipins, proteins, enzymes; analysis of blood and
urine.

Graduate Course

575 Research in General Physiology and Chemical Biology
Investigation of problems in this field may be undertaken by

those qualified. Hours of work and credit are to be arranged with the
instructor.

Credit may be given for work carried out at the Marine Biological
Laboratory, Woods Hole, Mass.



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 151

ZOOLOGY

Assistant Professor Danforth, courses 582, 584, 585, 587, 591, 592,

594-596, 598
Assistant Professor Nelson, courses 581, 583, 586, 588-590, 593-

595, 597

Major in zoology and physiology — ^Junior year. 571, 572, 584-
586; senior year: 573, 574, 587, 588.

Minors may be chosen in physics, chemistry, botany, bacteriology,
psychology, education, and geology.

Courses 581, 582 are prerequisites of all other courses in zoology
except general ecology.

581 General Zoology

Sophomore, jimior, or senior year, first term, recitation and lectures
2 or 3 hours, laboratory 3 or 5 hoiurs.

An introductory course, covering elementary classification of
animals with dissection of type forms, and designed to give a thorough
grounding in invertebrate morphology.

582 General Zoology (continued)

Sophomore, junior, or senior year, second term, recitation and
lectures 2 or 3 hours, laboratory 3 or 5 hours.

The elements of embryology, heredity, and evolution, with dis-
section of vertebrate types.

583 Limnology

Sophomore year, second term, lectures 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

A combination course given by the departments of botany, ento-
mology, and zoology.

Primarily designed for students of sanitary science, this course
includes both systematic and intensive study of the fauna and flora
commonly living in water supplies. Methods of control of injurious
forms are tested.

584 Vertebrate Anatomy

Junior or senior year, first term, lecture 1 hour, laboratory 5 hours.

Critical examination of various theories of the origin of verte-
brates; comparative anatomy of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles;
several lectures on vertebrate paleontology; occasional field trips.
(Parker and Haswell, Wiedersheim, Ejngsley)



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152 RUTGERS COLLEGE

585 Vertebrate Anatomy (continued)

Junior or senior year, second term, lecture 1 hour, laboratory
5 hours.

The warm-blooded animals are thoroughly studied by laboratory
dissection and by field trips, special attention being given to the zoo-
logical history of the human body.

586 Anim(U Parasites

Junior or senior year, first term, lecture 1 hour, laboratory 3 hours.
A study of the parasitic Protozoa, round worms, flat worms, and
arthropods, and their relation to human disease.

587 Histology

Jimior or senior year, first term, recitation or lecture 1 or 2 hours,
laboratory 5 or 8 hottrs.

Microscopic anatomy of the vertebrate body, with methods of
histological technique. (Schafer, Lewis, Bailey; reference books on
technique — Guyer, Hardesty, Lee)

Prerequisites : courses 571,572 .

588 Embryology

Jimior or senior year, second term, recitation or lectures 1 or 2
hours, laboratory 5 hours.

Comparative vertebrate embryology, including the development
of the frog, chick, and pig. Special methods are introduced. (Prentiss,
Kellicott, Lillie, Keibel-Mall)

589 Animal Breeding

Junior or senior year, first term, lectiures 2 hours, laboratory
3 hours.

Genetics and experimental embryology including a careful study of
the literature on heredity, with laboratory experiments on insects
birds, and mammals. (Walter's Genetics)

590 Animal Breeding (continued)

Junior or senior year, second term, lecttires 2 hours, laboratory
3 hours.



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 153

591 General Ecology

Sophomore, junior, or senior year, first term, lectures 2 hours,
field exercises or laboratory 3 hours.

Primarily an outdoor course. Animals and plants are studied in
their natural environment and in relation to their geologic past. Special
training is given in observation in the field.

592 General Ecology (continued)

Sophomore, junior, or senior year, second term, lecture 1 hour,
laboratory 5 hoiurs.

The relations of animals to one another, to their plant environ-
ment, and to man; bird migration; domestic economy of the higher
vertebrates.

593 Economic MoUuscs

Jimior or senior year, second term, lecture 1 hour, laboratory
5 hours.

Detailed study of freshwater mussels, oyster, clam, and other
molluscs of economic importance. The covu-se includes 100 hotu-s of
field work in summer on the New Jersey coast in the identification
of larval forms.

[Given 1920-1921 and alternate years]

594 Thesis

Senior year, first term, laboratory 5 hours.

A thesis subject may be taken in physiology or zoology with the
approval of the instructor in charge.

595 Thesis (continued)

Senior year, second term, laboratory 5 hours.

Graduate Courses

596 Research in Histology

Lectures, conferences, and laboratory work.
Investigation of special problems in normal and pathological
histology.



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154 RUTGERS COLLEGE ,

597 Research in Embryology

Lectures, conferences/ and laboratory work.
Normal and experimental embryology.

Credit in this course is given for work done at the Woods Hole
Marine Biological Laboratory.

598 Research in Ecology

Lectures, conferences, and field work.
Investigation of special problems in animal ecology.



BOTANY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY

Professor Cook, courses 603-605, 611-614
Associate Professor J. P. Helyar, courses 601, 602
Assistant Professor Martin, courses 603-614

Major — ^Jimior year: 605-608; senior year: 609, 610, with two
courses in chemistry — or jtmior year: 605, 606, with two courses in
chemistry; senior year: 607-610.

Minors may be chosen in chemistry, zoology, physiology, and
education.

Courses 601, 602, or 603, 604, are prerequisites of all other cotirses
in botany.

60 1 A gricidtural Botany

Freshman year, first term, lectures 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours
in the course in agriculture.

An introductory course in coU^e botany dealing with the struc-
ture, development, and fimctions of plants. Emphasis is placed on
the botanical features of crop plants. (Cook's Practical Botany)

602 Agricultural Botany (continued)

Freshman year, second term, lectures 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours
in the course in agriculture.

603 Introductory Botany

Sophomore, junior, or senior year, first term, recitation 2 hours*
laboratory 3 hours.

An introductory course in collie botany. Morphology and
physiology of the higher plants. (Cook's Practical Botany)



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 155

604 Introductory Botany (continued)

Sophomore, junior, or senior year, second term, recitation 2 hours,
laboratory 3 hours.

Economic and cryptogamic botany. The place of plants and
plant industries in modem life, and a study of the types of crypto-
gams. (Cook's Practical Botany)

605 Plant Pathology

Jtmior or senior year, first term, recitation 1 hour, laboratory
3 or 5 hours.

Causal factors and symptoms of plant diseases. Principles of
disease control and preparation of fungicides.

(506 Microtechnic

Jtmior or senior year, second term, recitation 1 hour, laboratory
5 hours.

Methods of preserving and preparing plant material for study.
Fixing, embedding, cutting, and staining. (Chamberlain's Methods in
Plant Histology)

607 General Morphology

Jtmior or senior year, first term, recitation 1 hour, laboratory
5 hours.

Comparative anatomy and development of non-vascular crypto-
gams and a study of their relationships.

Prerequisites: cotu^es 601, 602, or 603, 604, or equivalent.

608 General Morphology (continued)

Jtmior or senior year, second term, recitation 1 hour, laboratory
5 hours.

Comparative anatomy, embryology, and phylogeny of pterido-
phytes and spermatophytes.

609 Mycology: Plant Pathology

Graduate and senior elective, first term, lectures 1 to 3 hours,
laboratory 3 or 8 hours, for advanced students.

Morphology, classification, and life history of the Basidiomycetes
and Phycomycetes. Collection and preservation of various types.



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156 RUTGERS COLLEGE

610 Mycology: Plant Pathology (continued)

Graduate and senior elective, second term, lectures 1 to 3 hours,
laboratory 3 or 8 hours. »

Ascomycetes and Fungi Imperfecti.

Graduate Courses

Graduate students in this department are expected to do certain
assigned reading and to meet at least one hour a week for the review
of current literature on botanical subjects.

611 Advanced Plant Pathology

Lectures and laboratory work. Studies on the life history and
morphology of organisms causing disease; the symptoms and treat-
ments of diseases.

612 Advanced Plant Pathology

Lectures and laboratory work. A course in microtechnique of
fungi and diseased plant tissues.

613 A dvanced Plant Pathology

Laboratory research. Work on an assigned problem.

614 Advanced Plant Pathology
Seminar 1 hour a week.



ENTOMOLOGY

Professor Headlee, courses 621, 622, 624, 626, 629
Assistant Professor Peterson, courses 623, 625, 627, 628, 630

The student intending to specialize in entomology should plan
to take courses 621-623.

621 General Entomology

Junior or senior year, first or second term; recitation 2 hours,
laboratory 3 hours.

The general anatomy and physiology of insects with special
reference to their relations to other animals and plants and to the ways
in which insect life affects human welfare.



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 157

622 Economic Entomology

Senior year, first or second term, recitation 3 or 4 hours, laboratory
8 or 10 hours.

The bearing of the insect world on human welfare. Recognition
marks, life history and habits, and methods of controlling the most
important of both the mjurious and the beneficial species of insects.

623 Taxonomic Entomology

Senior year, first or second term, recitation 3 or 4 hours, labora-
tory 8 hours.

Lectures and student reports on the characteristics of the main
groups and subgroups of insects, methods and ends of classification,
and taxonomic literattire.

624 Economic Entomology

Junior or senior year, first or second term, recitation 2 hours,
laboratory 3 hours.

An abbreviated form of 622.
Prerequisite: course 621.

625 Taxonomic Entomology

Junior or senior year, first or second tenn, recitation 2 hours,
laboratory 3 hours.

An abbreviated form of 623.
Prerequisite: course 621.

626 Medical Entomology

Junior or senior year, first or second term, recitation 2 hours,
laboratory 3 hours.

The student is expected to become familiar with the principal
insects that carry disease, the methods employed by them in this
work, and the ways in which their work may be prevented.

627 Morphology and Development of Insects

Senior year, second term, recitation 3 hours, laboratory 10 hours.
General principles of insect structure and development.



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158 RUTGERS COLLEGE

Graduate Courses

628 Taxonomic Entomology

Intended for students with sufficient preparation and experience
to undertake a more or less independent study of the fundamental
principles of insect classification. ^

629 Economic Entomology

Designed for students with sufficient preparation and experience
to pursue a more or less independent study of some phase of the rela-
tionship which insects bear to man.

630 Morphology and Development of Insects

The student is expected to become familiar with the general
principles of insect structure and development and to pursue a detailed
study of some specific phase of structure or development.



HYGIENE AND SANITARY SCIENCE

Professor Devan, courses 641-643

Dr. Leonard, course 644

641 Hygiene

Freshman year, first term, 1 hour; required in all courses.

642 Hygiene (continued)

Freshman year, second term, 1 hour; required in the liberal
courses and in the technical courses in agriculture and biology.

643 Pathogenic Bacteriology

Junior year, second term, lectures 2 hours, laboratory 3 hours.

644 Public Health Law and Epidemiology
Senior year, first term, lectures 2 hours.

Other courses in sanitary science are tabulated on page 72.



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 159

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS

Lieutenant-Colonel Greacen

Sergeants White, Siebert, and Krasowski

The ptarpose of the instruction in this department is not only to
give military training that shall fit young men to render efficient and
intelligent service to their country in time of war but also to spread
among the citizens of the state a thorough and accurate knowledge
of our military history, policy, and necessities.

The endeavor is to inculcate habits of discipline, obedience, loyalty,
self-control, order, and precision.

Military training improves the health and physique through the
habit of erect carriage, alert movement, and a certain amount of
incidental physical exercise. The student learns also what should be
done in case of injury, how to prevent disease and otherwise preserve
his health in camp and wherever else sanitary precautions are necessary.

The military instruction meets the requirements of the laws of
Congress for the state colleges organized under the act of July 2, 1862,
and also of the National Defense Act of June 3, 1916.

The Corps of Cadets is organized as a battalion of infantry forming
a unit of the "Reserve Officers' Training Corps." A student band
accompanies the battalion and takes part in its exercises on suitable
occasions.

The War Department details an officer of the R^ular Army as
Professor of Military Science and Tactics.

The course in Military Science and Tactics qualifies the student
who completes it: (1) for appointment in the "Officers' Reserve
Corps;" (2) for appointment, in time of peace, as temporary second
lieutenant in the R^;ular Army for further training; (3) for further
appointment to permanent commissions in the R^ular Army.

The course is required of all freshmen and sophomores, except
those excused on certificates of physical disability or by reason of
conscientious scruples. It is elective in the junior and senior years.

To be eligible for the Reserve Officers' Training Corps a student
must be a citizen of the United States and not less than fourteen years
of age. The following are ineligible: officers of the Army, officers of
the Reserve Corps, members of the Navy not completely discharged,
members of the States forces, and aUens.

Students who do not meet these conditions of eligibility, but are
physically able and not excused on account of conscientious scruples,
are attached to the Corps without being enrolled as members. They



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160 RUTGERS COLLEGE

are required to attend all its exercises, theoretical and practical, pro-
viding uniforms at their own expense.

The United States partly furnishes service uniforms to members
of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps and transportation and sub-
sistence to those members who elect to attend summer training camps.
(Paragraphs 45 to 66, General Order No. 49, Series 1916, War De-
partment.)

All students excused from military training for whatever reason
are required to devote an equivalent amount of time to exercise in the
gymnasium.

The instruction is both theoretical and practical, the former being
designated as military science and the latter as military tactics. A
progressive program of training is carried out, as follows:

Theoretical

Theory of target practice; military organization; map reading;
service of security; personal hygiene; general military policy of the
United • States as shown by military history; military obligation of
citizenship; service of information; combat, illustrated by small tac-
tical exercises; infantry drill regulations; camp sanitation; small
arms firing regulations; marches and camps; army regulations; minor
tactics; map maneuvers; company administration; military history;
elements of international law; property accountability; court-martial
proceedings; international relations of America; psychology of war;
general principles of strategy.

Practical

Physical drill; infantry drill, to include the school of the battalion;
preliminary instruction in target practice; gallery practice; nomencla-
ture and care of equipment; instruction in first aid; signaling; elements
of fortification; military sketching. f

651-654 Military Science and Tactics

Freshman and sophomore years, 3 hours equated as 1, required
in all courses.

May include functioning as cadet non-commissioned officer.

655-658 Military Science and Tactics

Jtmior and senior years, 5 hours equated as 3, elective in all courses.
Includes functioning as cadet officer.



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DESCRIPTION OF COURSES • 161


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