S. Millet Thompson.

Thirteenth regiment of New Hampshire volunteer infantry in the war of the rebellion, 1861-1865: a diary covering three years and a day online

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The crushing blows this fearful war has dealt !
Our land was filled with mourning as the grave
Received its thousands of the young and brave.

" The price was costly, but the glorious end
Will to all coming time the means commend.
Our Country's life, with all her future good,
Was cheaply purchased with the nation's blood.
Naught else less precious could make good its place,
Bequeath such treasures to the human race ;



REUNION OF 1887. 703

For not to us alone shall these fruits be,
But every land shall share the legacy.
For, under God, what blesses us, we find
The seed to disenthrall and bless mankind.
The world itself shall know a better life
For what we suffered in that fearful strife.

" How little thought we then, we e'er could boast,
Our little band, of all the Union host.
The first to enter Richmond, and to show
The dear old Flag to the rebellious foe !
Not trailing in the dust, nor spit upon in scorn,
But highest honored ; and by victor Veterans borne.
The Flag that was from thence, henceforth to be.
To them and us, the emblem of the free.
Its glorious stars, as pure as Heaven's own.
Reflect the justice that surrounds God's throne, —
Its consecration came anew in slavery's fall.
And now it means : ' Protection true to all.' "

Lieut. Staniels related the incident occurring at the surrender of Rich-
mond, which he afterwards supplied for the History, and which is entered
on page 568. He was followed by Sergeant Woods, Capt. Farr, Lieut.
Thompson, Corporal Card, Lieut. Kittredge, and others, with very brief
remarks, of which no notes were taken.

Adjutant Taggard then read a paper, written by him, as follows :

" The organization of the non-commissioned staff of the Thirteenth was :
Rank. Original. Subsequent.

Sergt. Major. William J. Ladd. Charles C. Favor, James M. Hodgdon.
Qr-mr. Sergt. Mortier L. Morrison. Charles A. Ames.
Comm. Sergt. George H. Taggard. George W. Ferguson, George Burns.
Hosp. Steward. J. J.Whitteraore. R. B. Prescott, D. W. Butterfield.
Prin. Musician. C. C. Hall. Manson S. Brown.

'' In the limited time allotted I can hardly do justice to these men, but
am very glad of an opportunity to give expression to the respect and
esteem with which I remember them. I will speak of them in the follow-
ing order.

" C. C. Hall was a quiet, unassuming, conscientious man, whose great-
est anxiety was lest he should not discharge his whole duty ; and still his
duties were so done as to secure for him the respect and good will of the
men under his command, and the cordial commendation of his superior
officers. He had been a Corporal in Company F, and was promoted for
merit. His death in the service, on Jan. 22, 1865, was deplored by all
his comrades.

'■ Manson S. Brown, who carried the knapsack containing the medical



704 THIRTEENTH NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT.

supplies, provided for the Thirteenth while marching or fighting, was a
man whose physique was such as to make him our heau-ideal of a ' Drum
Major,' as seen in the volunteer militia of ante-bellum days. His every
qualification enabled him to fill the position chock-full ; and we shall
never forget his genial face and cheerful voice.

" John J. Whittemore was a whole-souled, jovial fellow, who made the
life of every company, and was a prime favorite with all. An experienced
Pharmacist he bid fair to be a most valuable factor in the medical de-
partment ; but his physical system was not equal to the changed condi-
tions, and the hard racket of army life. An early and very severe sick-
ness was soon followed by his discharge for disability. His uprightness
of character, and business ability, coupled with his genial spirit, secured
for him a reasonable success in business, and great popularity in social
life. He died several years ago, mourned by his friends and lamented
by all.

" Daniel W. Butterfield, the last to hold the position, was in the hos-
pital corps during his whole term of service. He had a slight limp in
his gait — and a more pronounced one in his speech when laboring under
excitement. There was never discovered any halt, however, in his efforts
to smooth the feverish pillow or to relieve the aching wound of his un-
fortunate comrade. He discharged all his duties with the full measure of
his ability, and for his kindness to them he will be long remembered by
his comrades in the Regiment. He came home with us, and filled an
honorable position in the community where he resided ; but the hardships
of the service resulted in ruined health and a broken constitution. He
ultimately found quarters in the Soldiers' Home, at Hampton, Va., where
he was finally mustered out, and now is with the majority.

" George Burns was the last to hold the position of Commissary Ser-
geant. His round, cheery face, and frank, cordial manners made a loud
call, upon all who met him, for their friendship. His association with the
boys had given him a complete knowledge of their wants. His generous
nature was in sympathy with them ; his energy and force of character was
always exerted in their behalf, and through his efforts I think they always
received their full share of the best of the supplies. He came home with
us, and I ho])e may live long and prosper.

" George W. Ferguson, the immediate successor of Burns, was a man
whose character and manners were a happy medium between ' grave and
gay,' always dignified, always cheerful, his companionship a pleasure,
his influence good. He earned his higher promotion by faithful services.
He also has gone to answer the Roll-call above ; his memory is sacred
in the hearts of widow and children, and we to-day mingle our tears with
theirs.

" Charles A. Ames was a scholarly young man, in whose bosom the
fires of patriotism burned so brightly that the peril of his country drew
him from the fields of learning to the fields of strife. He left college,
his books, and the hope of success in the patlis of peace for a suit of blue,



REUNION OF 1887. 705

scant rations, a bed on the ground, a knapsack, a gun, and a fight. The
responsible duties of the position he was called to fill were faithfully,
ably and well done. He has since the war turned his attention, with suc-
cess, to milling and mining in the far West.

" James M. Hodgdon was tall and slim, with a quick, active step and
movement, and the air of a man born to command. We all remember
his incisive voice, and the snap with which he brought the color-guard into
line for Dress-parade. We remember, too, his cheerful, happy spirit and
manner — a detail for fatigue or picket lost half its disagreeables by the
way in which he made it, and if the boys growled the sound of the growl
was lost in a laugh. Where his post of duty was, there we always found
him. That he was brave goes without saying. Look him in the face, and
you will see, in the track there made by the rebel bullet, that he has faced
even death without flinching. The duties that he so faithfully did, the
suffering he has so patiently endured, and the scar he so honorably wears,
prove him the hero of the Non-commissioned staff.

" Charles C Favor preceded Hodgdon. He had apparently been fa-
vored with the influences of polite society, and had received such impress
therefrom that he could not, or did not, readily become assimilated with
the unconventional surroundings of camp and army life. With a some-
what haughty manner it was but natural that he should only slightly at-
tract men to himself. He probably did not enjoy his army associations
and experience. He early received a commission, and after a limited
service returned to civil life, and died many years ago.

" William J. Ladd came among us in an elegant uniform, and had an
air of nicety about him that led some of us to be a little shy of him for a
while, but we soon learned that he was every inch a soldier, cordial, gen-
tlemanly and a good fellow. His military instincts and qualities soon
gained him a commission ; his abilities and bravery won rapid and mer-
ited promotion. The scars he wears prove his fidelity and courage ;
they are his badges of service, and we all heartily unite to do him honor.

" Mortier L. Morrison had an individuality all his own ; was large of
frame, strong of limb, and possessed great force of character ; and an
intimate and close acquaintance with him developed the fact that he had
a very large heart, and as tender as a woman's ; while the strength and
firmness of his friendship was only equaled by the strength and firmness
of his character. He was early promoted to regimental Quarter-master,
and every officer and man will attest the remarkable energy and success
with which he discharged his arduous duties. His reputation and popu-
larity were not confined to the Regiment and Brigade in which we served,
but were universal, and were to us all a source of pride.

" Royal B. Prescott was probably the most scholarly man on the staff,
at any rate he was undeniably the most studious. Many and many an
hour that the rest of us spent in ' simple sociability,' he spent in poring
over books on flesh and bones. Nor were his studies confined to medical
science, but extended to literature and art. We well remember how,



706 THIRTEENTH NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT.

drawing upon a good memory, he would fling at us quotations from the
highest EngUsh authors — and, when occasion demanded, a little Latin
or Dutch.

" The refinement of his nature found illustration in his quarters, order
being everywhere visible, and such frequent little artistic touches of taste
as could be wrenched from his surroundings.

" He studied ' Casey,' too, exhaustively. A commission finally came
as a reward for his faithful services ; but while as an officer and soldier
he always maintained the honor of his commission, his heart was with the
hospital department, and his sympatliies were with the sick and suffer-
ing, among whom he had ministered so long and so well. In his studies
and practical experiences while in the Thirteenth, he laid the founda-
tion of his medical profession, which to-day he so nobly adorns.

'' George H. Taggard needs but little said of him, you all know him.
But tliere was a time when he was a stranger among you ; it was then
while on the march from Aquia Creek to Fredericksburg that Lewis Sil-
ver, the teamster, mistook him for an army Chaplain — he saw his mis-
take later. The issuing of rations in the streets of Fredericksburg he
never recalls without a smile, and the persistency with which he urged
the men to put a good supply of tea in their haversacks ; telling them
they had started for Richmond, and it was probably their last chance to
obtain any tea until they got there.

" Yes, we had started for Richmond, but we took a round-about route,
and were many long months in traveling it ; and very many of our good
fellows became weary and worn, and fell out by the way, giving up them-
selves and their lives to make it possible for some few of us to reach that
goal ; and we here to-day record our meed of affection and honor for the
memory of the men in the ranks of the Thirteenth, and in the army, who
dared, and were glad ' to do and to die ' for their country.

" Twice daring his term of service he confesses to having been con-
siderably scared. Once when the 'bread riot' arose in the Thirteenth
while we were in the ' Pines ' camp at Getty's Station in 1863. He had
not had much experience with hungry soldiers, and when the tumult was
at its height, he thought war had begun in earnest, and did not know but
he was to be ' hanged, di-awn and quartered.' As he looks back upon the
affair, he guesses the Colonel was in quite as much danger as himself.

" The next time was during the rebel Coehorn mortar shelling, on the
evening of the day when we captured Fort Harrison. He was Acting
Adjutant of the Thirteenth then. As he moved along the line to the
right tbe shells came thickest there ; going to the left the shells were still
thicker there ; again arriving at the right he found the fire redoubled and
concentrated there — each particular shell with its little tail of fire seem-
ing to be aimed directly at his head. Indifference, however, soon seized
him, as the danger, though made more terrible by our forced inaction,
seemed to be about as great in one place as in another, and he remained
on the riffht and received no harm.



REUNION OF 1887. 707

" As a body the non-commissioned staff of the Thirteenth comprised a
set of men of more than ordinary intelligence, education and character,
comparing very favorably with the staff of any regiment we met with in
the service and one which any Colonel might reasonably be proud to
have under his command."



The expenses of the Reunion, itself, aside from individual traveling
expenses, were a total of above four hundred and fifty dollars. In addi-
tion to this, and on his personal account, as a fitting incident to the Re-
union, though at a later date, Asst. Surgeon Sullivan presented to John
A. Andrew Post, G. A. R., of Boston, the colored cut of the Thirteenth's
battle-flags richly and appropriately framed, the Post acknowledging the
gift in most complimentary terms.

The meeting extended a vote of thanks to the committee — Sullivan,
Woods and Wentworth — who had so ably and acceptably managed the
entire affair ; after which at about 6 p. m. the meeting closed with a song
and cheers. No incident occurred to mar the enjoyments of the Veterans
or their distinguished guests, — and this was unanimously voted the best
Reunion ever held by the Thirteenth Regiment.

These Veterans now part temporarily, with cheerful word, benison and
outlook and with high hope and confident step, to march — and may
weather be fair, roads broad, grades rising, stages easy, reunions many,
rations full, bivouacs merry, pay-day fi'equent and the march be long —
to march through their own good land to that greatest and best of all
countries ; where slavery is not, conspiracy unknown, secession most un-
desirable, rebellion without a place, and war an impossibility though its
heroes assemble, but where union, peace and freedom abide without dis-
cord, interruption or an end.



INDEX.



A. — Company. 63, 126, 127, 129, 139,

240, 281, 284, 496.
Abbott, Henry L., Col. B23, 537.
Abbott, Joseph C, Col. 315.
Alexander, C. S. A. Lt. Col. 72,

86.
Allerson, Albert. 349.
Alexandria, Va. 11, IS, 19, 21, 24.
Ames, Charles A., Qr.-mr. Sergeant. 199,

704.
Ames, J. H. 527.
Ames, Adelbert, Gen. 3-38, 517.
Anderson, R. H., C. S. A. Gen. 483.
Andersonville, Ga. 305, 453.
Andrew, John A.. Gov. of Mass. 206,

595.
Annapolis, Md. 440.
Angell, Jesse F., Major. 285.
Antietam, Va. 6.
Appomattox. 587, 593.
Aquia Creek, Va. 31, 33, 34, 96, 102,

106, 108, 109.
Arlington Heights, Va. 9, 13.
Arms, Thirteenth. 6, 497, 543.
Army of the Potomac. 21, 34, 87, 96,

97, 103, 254, 406, 422, 427, 612.
Army of the James. 2.54, 422, 427, 459,

515.
Armies of Grant and Sherman. 597, 599.
Atkins, John. 585.
Ayletts, Va. 178.
Ayling, Augustus D., Adj't. Gen. N. H.

390, 604, 687 et seq.

B — Company. 31, 32, 38, .39, 41, 66,

67, 70, 79, 81, 96, 190, 199, 207, 214,

240, 242, 245, 264, 265, 292, 297, 309,

440.
Bamberger, William W., Lt. Col. 549,

555 et seq.
Band, Thirteenth. 10, 12, 21, 22, 24,

63, 69, 80, 81, 135, 179, 183, 210, 223,

249, 369, 370, 422, 428, .590, 601, 602,

624. Roster of, 625.
Baltimore, Md. 9, 440.
Bannister, George H. (of H). 503.
Batchellor, Charles W. (of D), Sergeant.

24, 72, 129, 215, 224, 282.
Barksdale, William, C. S. A. Gen. 39,

85, 87.
Barlow, Francis C, Gen. 366.
Barker, Theodore E., Lt. Col. 550.
Baker, Savage. 229, 243.
Barnabee, D. Webster (of K). 191, 237,

687 et seq.



Barnabee, Henry C. (Brother of above —

Actor). 237.
Barney, Val. G., Lt. Col. 549.
Bassett, Washington. 337, 338.
Beatty, , C. S. A. Major, 388, 389.

Beasley, , Mr. 397, 410.

Betton, Matthew T., Captain. 67, 68,

143, 235, 239, 240, 281, 311, 394, 450,

453, 489, 517, 5.34, 536, 541, 549, 575

et seq., 580 et seq., 595, 602, 626, 698

et seq.
Belle Isle — Prison. 601 et seq.
Beauregard, G. T., C. S. A. Gen. 262,

293 et seq., 312, 339, 407.
Birney, David B., Gen. 430, 459 et seq.,

524, 546.
Big Bethel, Va. 181.
Blake, Aaron K. (of A). 364.
Black, John C, Gen. 686.
Bliss, George N., Capt. 501.
Bodge, Daniel W. (of B), Color Sergeant.

70, 363, 390, 394, 463 et seq.
Bodge, George E. (of B). 264.
Boutwell, Nathan B., Adjutant. 7, 123,

175, 222, 246, 249, 280, 324, 343, 380,

384, 394, 408, 417, 423, .538, 602, 687

et seq.
Bowers, George, Lieut. Colonel. 8, 33,

56, 94, 100, 106, 109, 113, 121, 122,

139, 141, 147, 165, 166, 167, 530, 612,

697 et seq.
Bowen, George K., Lt. Col. 550.
Booth, J. Wilkes. .589.
Boodry, Augustus (of G). 444.
Bounty. 5, 18.
Boston, Mass. 590, 609.
Brooks, Joseph C, Major. 578.
Brooks Station. Va. 34.
Brooks, W. H. F., Maj. Gen. 2-52, 291 et

seq., 338 et seq., 345, 383 et seq.
Brabble, E. C, C. S. A. Col. 320.
Brown, Manson S. (of C). 31, 184, 262,

621, 687 et seq.
Brown, James T., Lt. Col. 550.
Brown, John C. (of E). ' Ambulance

Brown.' 178, 395 et seq., 405.
Brown, John, Song of. 235.
Bradley, Charles 0., Captain. 2, 41,

121, 170, 221, 277, 419, 420, 421.
Bratton, John, C S. A. Gen. 482.
Bright, John. 213.
Bruce, George A., Captain. 228, 249,

430, 466, 578 et seq., 609, 614, 687 et seq.
Bruce, G. (of D). 450.
Bush, Charles, 32.



710



INDEX.



Billiard, John A. (of G). 230.

Buzzell, Lewis H.. Captain. 4, 121, 137,

144, 147, 153, 157, 232.
Buikesville, Va. 585.
Bull Bun, Va. 5, 442.
Burnside, Ambrose E., Maj. Gen. 20, 22,

24, 34, 3G, 39, 40, 71, 72, 74, 75, 77,

78, 70, 83, 87, 06, 07, 102, 103, 404,

091 et seq.
Burbank, James M. 613.
Burns, John (of A). 285.
Burns. W. W., Gen. 83.
Burns, George (of C), Sergeant. 284, 704.
Bunting, Edward T. 196.
Butler, Benjamin F., Maj. Gen. 216,

253 et seq., 263 et seq., 312, 333, 407,

440, 447, 465, 494, 517, 519, 524, 599,

615.
Burnham, Hiram, Brig. Gen. 252, 254

et seq., 291 et seq., 326, 342, 3()2 et

seq., 386, 388, 398, 424, 436, 466 et

seq., 479, 486, 614.
Burnham, W. G. (of I), Sergeant. 288,

292.
Butterfield, Daniel W. 621, 704.

G — Company. 2, 38, 41, .53, 70, 79, 80,

146, 176, 212, 240, 281, 284, 448, 458,

487. 512. 517, 527, .5.54, 614.
Caswell. James M. (Band). 687.
Canbv, E. R. S., Gen. 595, 600.
Casey, Silas, Maj. Gen. 9, 11, 13, 14, 18,

19^ 20, 500, 630.
Catlett, , C. S. A., Capt. .501.

Carter. Buel C, Captain. 25, 70, 81, 203,

240, 311, .543, 613, 688 et seq.
Carter, Sanborn B. 613.
Carr, J. B., Gen. 614.
Carr, William D. (of G). 282.
' Carleton ' — C. C. Coffin. 58, 74, 576

et seq.
Capen. Levi (of B). 294.
Centreville. Va. 11, 19, 442.
Chapman, Charles Henry, Lieut. 535.
Chapman, Nathan D., Lieut. 619, 687

et seq.
Chapman, Charles F. (of E), Sergeant.

38, 191,21.5,303,304,327.
Charleston, S. C. 534.
Chuckatuck, Va. 144.
Chichester, N. H. 2.
Churchill, Henry, Lieutenant. 126, 260,

262, 284 et seq., 426, 448, 511, 514,

538, 688 et seq.
Cheney, Person C, Quarter-master. 26,

87, 102, 103, 190, 192, 527, 686 et seq.
Childrey, J. K. 460 et seq.
Christian Commission. 449.
Childs, Mr. and Miss. 28.
City Point, Va. 438.
ClaVk, , Capt. 269, .398, 475.

Clingman. , C. S. A. Gen. 311, 482.

Clav, Cecil. Capt. 550.
Coitt, Charles M., Capt. 386, 498.
Corse, M. D., C. S. A. Gen. 311,
Cold Harbor, Va. 335 et seq.
Copp, Geoi^e N. (of B). 228.



Cobum, Charles R. (of D). 464.
Cochrane, W. H. D., Lt. Col. 687 et seq.
Colquitt, , C. S. A. Gen. 484.

Contrabands — Negroes. 599.
Copperheads. 452.
Cobb, T. R. R., C. S. A. Gen. 71.
Cox, Henry. 460 et seq. 498.
Cooper, Wm. M. 7, 8.
Cooper, Wm. R. S. 7, 8.
Couch, D. N., Maj. Gen. 22, 83.
Concord, N. H. 1, 6, 7, 10, 19, 610.
Coffin, Nathaniel J., Lieutenant. 109, 169.
Corcoran, Michael, Brig. Gen. 118, 127,

129.
Couglilin, John, Lt. Col. 115, 227, 268,

273, 294, 299, 428.
Council, , C. S. A. Lt. Col. 388, .389.

Colors of Thirteenth. 6, 70, 74, 3(51, 393,

394, 4(>2 et seq., 519, 565 et seq., 574.
Critcliley, William, Jr. (Band). 2-i(>, 428,

687 et seq.
Crosby, Hiram B., Major. 80.
Crowley, Timothy B., Capt. 507.
CuUen, Edgar M., Col. 502 et seq., 525,

.545, 568, 698.
Cummings, Capt. 105.

Custer, George A., Gen. 536, 586.
Curtis, Charles H., Captain. 2, 70, 121,

144, 146, 168, 176, 245, 277, 483, 509,

592, 617, 687 et seq.

D — Company. 1, 2, 6, 31, 72, 190, 199,

207, 214, 240, 242, 245, 281, 282, 343,

356, 466, 613.
Dahlgren, LHric, Col. 571.
Dandy, George B., Col. 547, .551.
Dalton, E. B., Surgeon. 233.
Davis. Gilman (of A). 261.
Davisi Van R. (of H). 573.
Dawson, T. W. 55tJ.
Davis, Jefferson, President C. S. A. 1.38,

291, 452, 486, 492, 573 et seq., 581,

592, 599.
Devin, Thomas C, Gen. .536.
Derby, Isaac W., Sergeant. 442.
Derrom, Andrew, Col. 34, 136, 153.
De Peyster, Johnston, Lieut. 576.
Devens, Charles, Maj. Gen. .338 et seq.,

359, 472, 497, 501, .532, 547, 548, 549,

567 et seq., 597, 601, 610, 614, 687 et

seq.
Defenses of Wasliington. 18.
Dickerman, Joseph W. (of C). 38.
Dix, John A., Maj. Gen. 130 et seq., 170,

184.
Dix, Miss Dorothea. 450.
Dodge, Elisha E., Captain. 39, 59, 66,

67, 121, 190, 218,. 220, 222, 242,245,

278, 310, 333, 394, 408, 409, 417.
Donohoe, Michael T., Brig. Gen. 34, 62,

129, 137, 168, 174, 179, 186, 459 et seq.,

479, 549, 607, 608, 610, 687 et seq.
Dominy, Levi T., Lt. Col. 549.
Downes, Amasa (of B). 70.
Drew. Cyrus G. (of B). 136, 511, 605, 698.
Durell, James M., Captain. 18, 70, 100.

170, 185, 207, 222, 228, 245, 284, 327,



INDEX.



711



345, 358, 361, 427, 448, 449, 458, 527,

605, 614, 687 et seq.
Dustin, Jonathan, Lieutenant. 13, 18,

3il, 451, 491, 617.
Duncklee, William R. 70.
Duiham, N. H. 238.
Dutch Gap Canal. 497, 522.
Button, Arthur H., Col. 35, 100, 118,

122, l:}0, 1()(), 179, 329, 614.
Duulop, , Mr. 274.

Dyer, G. W., Major. 108.

E — Company. 1, 2, 3, 4, 32, 39, 41, 53,
66, 88, 89, 137, 139, 140, 141, 176, 185,
193, 240, 264, 265, 279, 300 et seq., 384,
390, 396, 511.

Early, Jubal A., C. S. A. Gen. 511.

Elmira, N. Y. 277, 446.

Elder, , Capt. 477.

Emory, J. C., Asst. Surgeon. 583, 602.

England, 5.

Endieott, William C. 630.

Ewell, R. S., C. S. A. Gen. 507, 548.

Exeter, N.H. 1,2,442,530.

F — Company. 15, 86, 232, 236, 250, 252,

257. 2()4, 448, 602, 617, 703.
Farr, George, Captain. 1, 190, 233, 240,

242, 311, 343, 346, 466, 511, 533, 605,

612, (>87 et seq.
Fairfax Seminary, Va. 9, 18, 20, 25, 34,

96.
Falls Church, Va. 11, 12, 13, 23.
FairchUd, H. S., Col. 34, 504.
Falmouth, Va. 86.

Farragut, David G., Admiral. 493, 530.
Favor, C. C, Lieutenant. 311, 450, 703

et seq.
Ferguson, George W., Lieutenant. 427,

448, 450, 602, 7(34.
Ferguson, Robert. 26.
Field, C. W., C. S. A. Gen. 3-39, 481, 507.
Flanders, Josiah C. (of A). 286.
Forbush, Gustavus A., Captain. 4, 18,

41, 96, 102, 121, 134, 153, 188, 194, 232,

239, 250, 425, 448, 465 et seq., 479,

489.
Fokom, James W. (of E). 307.
Foye, John H. (of E). 146
Foster, John G., Maj. Gen. 186, 216,

546.
Fowler, H. B., Surgeon. 324, 522.
FoUett, F. M., Capt. 398, 465.
Forrester, Richard G. 559 et seq.
France. 4.
Franklin, W. B., Maj. Gen. 21, 83, 101,

103.
French, Wm. H., Gen. 50, 86.
French, Warren S. (of E). 202.
Fredericksburg, Va. 21, 36 et seq., 40,

99, 113. 380, 4.56.
Friend, Charles. 384, 397, 404, 422.
Friend, Rev. Charles." 282 et seq.
Fuller, Arthur B., Chaplain. 691.

G — Company. 1, 2, 3, 6, 41, 93, 100, 126,



127, 131, 212, 264,319, 358, 409,444,

44S, 616, 618.
Gafuey, Charles B., Captain. 50, 123,

292, 297, 368, 394, 408, 417, 426, 428,

456, 613, 697 et seq.
Gaidt, William H. (of H). .558 et seq.
Gary, , C. S. A. Gen. 507, 575.

Garland, George E. (of E). S(k
Gaines' Mill, Va. 3.")0 et seq.
Getty, George W., Maj. Gen. 34, 46 et

seq., 54, ()3, 73, 74, 75, 82, 83, 84, 85,

86, 117, 124, 127 et seq., 162, 170, 229,

422, 614.
Gettysburg, Pa. 522.
Gerrish, Charles F. (of E). 130.
Gilman, Austin (of D). 291.
Gilkey, H. B. (of H). 315.
Gilmore, Lucius. 185.
Gilmore, Q. A., Maj. Gen. 254, 279 et

seq., 33;), 430.
Gilmore, Joseph A., Gov. N. H. 602,

612.
Gibbs, John F. (of E). 104, 121, US, 388,

486.
Gibbon, John, Maj. Gen. 450, 524, 526,

549, 584 et seq., 603, 604, 698.
Glenville, Jamos L. (of D). 269.
Glidden, Edwin H. (of A). 284.
Goss, Enoch W., Captain. 67, 115, 123,

243, 279, 286, 288, 292, 329. 342, 351,

387 et seq., 437, 448, 452, 482 et seq.,

501 et seq., 507.
Goldsmith, George E. (of A). 285.



Online LibraryS. Millet ThompsonThirteenth regiment of New Hampshire volunteer infantry in the war of the rebellion, 1861-1865: a diary covering three years and a day → online text (page 80 of 81)