Copyright
S Spitz.

S. Spitz, the jeweler of Santa Fe, New Mexico. A full line of watches, clocks, jewelry, silverware, at wholesale and retail online

. (page 1 of 1)
Online LibraryS SpitzS. Spitz, the jeweler of Santa Fe, New Mexico. A full line of watches, clocks, jewelry, silverware, at wholesale and retail → online text (page 1 of 1)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


S. SIPITZ,



MANUFACTURER OF




lean f Filigree,



C^old and Si



ver.



SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO.






J



. S. SIFITZ,



THE JEWELER OF



SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO.



A FULL LINE OF



WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE,



At Wholesale and Retail.



SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO.



DENVER, COLO.:
TKIBUNE PUBLISHING Co.



T Manufacture the following styles
of Goods at approximate prices,
as per Schedule:

OOLD-20 KARATS FINE.



LADIES' SETS, PIN AND DROPS.

Lily of Valley, - - - $15 oo to $18 oo

Pansy, - 14 oo " 16 oo

Buckle, - - 14 oo " 1 6 oo

Bow and Fringe, - - - 15 oo " 18 oo

Coquetta, - - 13 oo " 15 oo

Fern Leaf, - 15 oo " 18 oo

Fern Leaf and Rosette, - - 15 oo " 20 oo

Wheat Sheaf, - - 15 oo " 20 oo

Round Rosette, - - - 14 oo " 16 oo

Bar Rosette, - - . 10 oo " 15 oo

Fuchsia, 16 oo " 20 oo

Moss Rose and Bud, - - - 15 oo " 18 oo

Moss Rose and Spiral Bud, - 15 oo " 18 oo

Scotch Thistle, 14 oo " 16 oo

Oak Leaf Skeleton and Rosette, 15 oo " 18 oo

Slipper, 10 oo " 14 oo

Guitar, - - - - - 10 oo " 14 oo

Butterfly, 15 oo " 18 oo

Grapes and Stem, 16 oo " 18 oo
Pins alone, % price ; Drops, l / 3 price.

BRACELETS.

Braided, per pair, $38 oo to $100 oo

Woven Wire, per pair, - - - 25 oo " 75 oo

Solid Work, per pair, - 30 oo " 75 oo

Open Filigree, per pair, - 55 oo " 125 oo



3
20-KARAT GOLD GOODS.

(CONTINUED.)





NECK CHAINS.




Braided, each
Woven Wire,
Rope, each,
International,


> - - - $15 oo
each, ... 6 oo
- 25 oo
each, - 50 oo


" $100 oo
75 o

" IOO OO

" 150 oo




GUARD CHAINS.




Braided, -
Rope, -
\Voven \Virc


50 oo
45

ici r^ri


"" IOO OO

" 75 oo


International,


IOO OO


75 oo
" 300 oo




HAIR ORNAMENTS.


tt 2O OO


Head Wheat,
Pansy,


each, - - - 15 oo
- 15 oo


" 20 00

18 oo




CROSSES.




Various Styles


, each, - 3 oo


" 25 oo



RINGS.

Band, plain and fancy, - - 8 oo " 15 oo

Puzzle, plain and fancy, - 7 50 " 15 oo

Scale Grape, - - . - 8 oo " 12 oo

Turquoise, - ... 10 oo " 35 oo

Navahoe Garnet, - - - - 8 50 " 20 oo

Native Opal, - - " . - 12 oo '' 25 oo

Sleeve Buttons, per pair, - - 10 oo '< 30 oo

Studs to match, per set, - - 10 oo " 18 oo

Scarf Pins, each, 5 oo " 8 oo

Native Stones cut and set up to order
in any designs.



STERLING SILVER WORK.



SETS OF PINS AND DROPS, same
style as in Gold, except in much

greater variety Daisy included, S 2 oo to 3 5 oo

Bracelets, various designs, per pair, 5 oo " 20 oo

Bangles, " " ' ; 5 oo " 20 oo

Neck Chains, various designs, each, 5 oo " 15 oo

Neck Chains, Daisy patterns, " 6 oo " 12 oo

I lair Ornaments, "Wheat, each, - 6 oo " 8 oo
Hair Ornaments Pansy, Daisy,

Lily, Fuchsia, etc , - - - 3 oo ' 6 oo
Hair Ornaments Butterfly, Sword,

Ball, - - - - - 3 oo " 6 oo
Lockets, all sizes and styles, - i oo e 5 oo
Crosses, " " 50 " 5 oo
Combs, all sizes and styles, Orna-
mented Silver, 75" 30 oo
Combs, all sizes and styles, Mar-
guerite, - - 7 50 " 15 oo
Card Cases, all sizes and styles, in

Morocco boxes, - - - 8 oo " 45 oo

Cigarette Cases, each, - 15 oo " 25 oo

Match Cases, each, - - - 5 oo " 8 oo

Boquet Holders, each, - 10 oo " 20 oo

Napkin Rings, - - 5 oo " 15 oo

Puzzle Rings, finger, each, - 2 50 " 4 oo

Scarf Pins, each, - - - i oo " 3 oo

Sleeve Buttons, per pair, - 2 50 " 4 oo
Studs to match, per pair sets of

two, - - 3 oo " 5 oo



Native work in any designs desired at reasonable
prices, and satisfaction guaranteed.

Goods sent C. O. D. to any pan of the United
States, with privilege of examination. Send in your
orders.

Respectfully,

S. SIFITZ.



TO OUR PATRONS AND FRIENDS.



Owing to the riiany inquiries daily received regarding the
process of manufacturing Filigree from tourists visiting our
Ancient City, we take pleasure in furnishing the following
description from the pen of Ernest Ingersoll, published in
Harper's Bazar, September, 1879.



KIMGREE JEWELRY.

An Interesting Mexican Manufacture

rnilE manufacture of Filigree Gold and Silver Jew-
elry probably originated among the Italians, was
by them taught the Spaniards, and at the time of the
conquest was brought over by the latter, and intro-
duced to the Mexicans; Santa Fe, Chihuahua and
the city of Mexico, probably being the principal points
where it is manufactured. Until the time that Amer-
ican ingenuity and taste began to be apparent in this
branch of art, the manufacture was very rude, the pat-
terns simple and few some say there were only three
of these and Filigree Jewelry was only odd and fan-
tastic, there being little real beauty about the work.
This has now all been changed, and while the jewelry
is still fantastic in appearance, American skill has in-
vented patterns which display much beauty, and when
worked into form in gold or silver are attractive, taste-
ful and handsome ornaments. The articles manufac-
tured are principally for the wear of females ; breast-
pins, scarf-pins, shawl-pins, combs, ear-rings, bracelets,
finger-rings, and various pretty ornaments for the hair.



Although of late the manufacture has included a great
variety of other articles, such as card-cases, cigarette
cases, match-boxes, etc. In fact, the Mexican work-
men, who have now the entire manufacture in their
hands, claim that they can reproduce any pattern
given them in gold or silver Filigree.

In Santa Fe the manufacture of this jewelry is be-
coming more important, and Filigree work is becoming
in greater demand. Tourists invest in Mexican jew-
elry because in itself it is quaint and pretty, and is
rarely seen in the East, and as Souvenirs of the An-
cient City, they desire naturally to take away some-
thing which has an unmistakably native appearance.
The gold used in manufacturing the jewelry is either
from the Old Placers or the New Placers, twenty or
thirty miles distant, and is generally bought from
Mexicans who earn their living by panning out the
dust from the washings on these properties. The sil-
ver comes generally from Silver City, the " 76 " mine
of Bremen, near there, supplying the ore, and the
smelting being done in that town. It is brought from
there in a crude state, and refined in the shops where
the jewelry is made.

THE WORK SHOP.

It may not be uninteresting to those vtho have seen
Filigree Jewelry in its complete form, to examine for
a moment the process by which the pretty designs are
wrought out.

First, the gold and silver must be almost absolutely
without alloy, as any combination of the baser metals
tends to destroy the necessary ductility of the metal
which is to be operated upon. The metal as it is re-
quired is melted in the shop, refined and then cast into
flat bars. These bars or plates are then put through



r

rollers until they are reduced to the thickness of about
one- eighth of an inch, and a foot or so long. Then,
with shears, strips are cut off which are drawn through
holes in an iron plate successively smaller until the
strip becomes a wire of the necessary thickness. The
smallest of these wires are of the thinness of fine sew-
ing silk, but are perfect in roundness. The next step
is the twisting of the wires together, which is now
done by a lathe, this having been found easier and
quicker, and more accurate than the old way of rolling
the two wires under the hand on a board. The
twisted wires are then passed through rollers, which
turns them out into a very thin tape of metal, the edges
being finely and regularly notched, the effect of the
twisting.

The workman has now done with his metal wire
for a minute, and lays it aside. A frame-work of
thicker wire is made to receive the design he is about
to manufacture, and this is placed flat upon the table.
Into this frame he places divisions or compartments,
and again takes up his wire. Near his hand is a block
of wood, in which is embedded a row of small pins,
or rather brass teeth, set very closely together. One
end of the wire is then attached to the central peg,
and the workman proceeds to wind his wire to the
pegs, moving with each turn of the wire, one pin away
from the centre in each direction. When he has con-
tinued this movement until he considers this coil of
wire is sufficient for his purpose, he cuts the tape and
slips it from the pins, having then a flat, ovrJ coil of
very fine metal wire, irregular on the surface with the
notches of the edges. This coil the workman can
manage as he pleases. He can lengthen it, broaden
it, make it narrow, insert another piece of another de-






sign, and manipulate it to almost any extent, so flexi-
ble is the wire, without marring the appearance pro-
duced by the indentations of the edges. He then fits
this coil into the frame-work, solders it there after fit-
ting it with fine pinchers and nippers, and adds coil
after coil, if more than one is needed, until the figure
is completed.

The patterns worked into jewelry in Santa Fe are
without number, numerous imitations of feather and
scroll work and flowers being manufactured from the
crude gold and silver. According to the taste of the
customer, and his desire to incur expense, jewels are
added to increase the brilliancy of the article. Not
only is the whole work done without the aid of any
machine, but on almost every piece of jewelry accur-
ate messurement is required to proportion the work
exactly, and this is all done by the eye merely, without
the aid of rule, mould or die. The ornamentation is
produced simply by bending or pressing the wire, no
engraving, chiseling or inlaying appearing on any
piece. The work, of course, requires time, and hence,
Mexican jewelry is rather costly, though the prices
asked in Santa Fe are smaller than one who has
watched the tedious and careful process would expect.



'-





1

Online LibraryS SpitzS. Spitz, the jeweler of Santa Fe, New Mexico. A full line of watches, clocks, jewelry, silverware, at wholesale and retail → online text (page 1 of 1)