Sadler Phillips.

Fulham palace, formerly called Fulham house, and Fulham manor : a short account of the old manor house of Fulham, written at the wish of the bishop on the occasion of His Lordship's visit to America and Canada, 1907 online

. (page 4 of 4)
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of England among them as if they themselves were an
established church : so their controversial writers
assume very positive airs, and treat the constitution of
our national Church, and the professors of it in this
country especially, with such rudeness and indecency
as tries the patience of the most mortified Christian.

Mr. Hobart, of Freshfield, a few years ago preached
and printed a sermon which began a controversy
which is yet subsisting : after an attack upon the
episcopacy of the Church as inconsistent with that
equality which by CHRIST'S institution ought to sub-
sist among His ministers, he charges schism with great
boldness upon the professors of the Church of England,
and urges the awful guilt of it to deter his hearers from
such dangerous communion.

This has produced vindications, addresses, &c.

It has been argued on our side that the colonies
are part of the English realm which is the Church of
England, and therefore we are in duty bound to
submit to the government thereof in things religious
as well as civil, and not to separate from its com-
munion : That the establishment of the Church of
England extending to all its parts reaches hither, which
is specially evident by the Act of Union and his

75



FULHAM PALACE

Majesty's patent granted to the late Bishop of London
to exercise spiritual jurisdiction in the Plantations.

Against this has been urged the authority of a
passage in a letter of the Lords Justices in the year
1725 to Leu't-Governour Dummer 'that there is no
regular establishment of any national or provincial
church in these plantations.' And of a passage in a
letter from the late Bishop of London to Dr. Coleman,
a Presbyterian minister in Boston, May 24, 1735:
' My opinion has always been that the religious state
of New England is founded on an equal liberty to all
Protestants, none of which can claim the name of a
national establishment or any kind of superiority over
the rest.'

These passages were both wrote without having in
view the present subject of the controversy, but to
answer a quite different purpose, being wrote to and
for the information of one domineering sort which
claims the privilege of an establishment, and would
treat all others, even the professors of the Church of
England, as dissenters and separatists.

That all the various sectaries should enjoy entirely
the benefit of toleration is what nobody gainsays, what
nobody I hope envies them. But when the legislature
of Boston was applied to for convening a Provincial
Synod, the Lords Justices wrote to the Lie't-
Governour directing him to put a stop to such a
proceeding as being an invasion of the king's prero-
gative ; in which letter was the above paragraph, at
least the sense of it, which to me seems only to deny
any establishment that could be made to dissenters.

76



And with respect to the Church of England to
insinuate no more than that we are but too sensible
of, viz., that what the Act of Union provided with
respect to an establishment of religion in the Planta-
tions has had no other effect than to declare us
members of our mother church, the Church of
England, and permit us to adhere to her communion
and revive the sacred influence of her episcopacy with-
out being liable to insults and criminations on that
account, and to expect what we shall be so happy as
to see a bishop appointed for us. This establishment
is indeed wanting. What may be done for us in
consequence of the Act of Union is yet undone. This
seems to be what is implied in the preamble of the
.late Bishop's patent ' cum coloniae, plantationes caete-
raque domina nostra in America nondum divisa vel
formata,' &c.

The dispute is whether the Act of Union, anno
quinto Annas regina, sect. 8, providing for the 'pre-
servation of the English establishment within the king-
doms of England and Ireland, the dominion of Wales,
and the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and the terri-
tories thereunto belonging,' under the word l territories'
does not comprehend the English Colonies.

Your lordship's opinion, if in our favour, and we
had leave to divulge it, would be at this time a con-
solation to many who not only esteem the constitution
of the Church of England preferable in itself to any
other, but think they discharge a good conscience by
professing themselves of that communion, in the face



FULHAM PALACE

of insults and many inconveniences. Because they
think they thus follow peace But their adversaries tell
them that they contract the awful guilt of schism, and
that neither GOD nor the King will approve their zeal
for conformity.

A short paragraph from your lordship would be of
equal authority with those alledged against us, and
carry the same reverence and respect. And for my
own part shall most humbly submit to correction from
your lordship's hand if I have gone into mistakes.

Begging your lordship's prayers and benediction,
and craving pardon for the presumption,
I most dutifully subscribe,

My Lord, your lordship's most dutiful and obedient

son and very humble servant,
To the Right Reverend JAMES WETMORE.

Thomas Lord Bishop of London.

LUNENBERG PARISH IN RICHMOND COUNTY.

May 10, 1707.

To the gentlemen of the vestry and others of the
southernmost Parish of Amelia County. Whereas it is
the desire of our minister, the Reverend William Kay,
to remove from us to settle with you. We, the sub-
scribers, freeholders, and inhabitants, hereby certify that
the said William Kay has been diligent in attending his
churches, and that his doctrine is orthodox and con-
formable to the Church of England as by law established
to the best of our judgment. And whereas there have
been many crimes laid to his charge .... none of which
faults do we know him to be guilty of; and we believe

78



FULHAM PALACE

if he were guilty of any of them, he would certainly
have been prosecuted for the same.

It is reported that if he did get a character, it would
only be to get quit of him ; we do likewise certify that
in that case the majority of the vestry thought fit to
continue him, we and several others should be well
satisfied with it.

Witness our hands, 26 day of December, 1742,

MARMADUKE BECKWITH.

WILLIAM SKANTLEBURY.

E. FANTLEROY.

ROBERT TOMLIN.

JOHN FORD.

CHARLES DYE.

JOHN BELFIELD.

BENJAMIN RUST.
William Lowry and family were sick.

1727.

To the Most Serene and Most Mighty Prince
GEORGE, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland,
and Lord of British America, the humble request of
Charles Augustus NINAGREL, Sachem of the Naragan-
sett Indians. Most Serene Prince, Though I have the
honour to derive my descent from princes absolute and
independent, yet, when the English settled in this Wes-
tern World, my ancestors not only submitted to be
governed by their laws, but at all times assisted the
English against those tribes who at any time, either
by themselves, or in conjunction with the French of
Canada, have committed hostilities upon them, and have
ever since confessed an entire submission to your Em-

79



FULHAM PALACE

pire, as I and all I have with the most profound sub-
mission now do.

And I have observed in the lives of the English a
more regular practice than can ever (as I am now in-
duced to believe) arise from the principles of mere
morality, attribute it to the influence of the religion
your happy subjects do profess.

Being, therefore, of this opinion, and hoping to be
refined by that excellent religion proclaimed to the
world by the disciples of JESUS, and to bring my people
to be governed by its holy rules, I am very desirous to
be instructed and that my people may be informed in
the principles of that religion your Most Serene Majesty
and happy people profess.

In order to obtain this end I propose to make a
settlement of a certain quantity of land for a perpetual
glebe in my territory of Misquammacuik upon a
minister well affected to your Majesty's person and
government, who will take pains to understand our
language so as to instruct us in the Christian religion,
and would therefore humbly entreat your most sacred
Majesty that some pious and discreet clergyman,
ordained according to the manner of the Church of
England, might by your Majesty be ordered to come
and reside as a missionary among us.

And forasmuch as I can only give a tract of wild
and uncultivated land for the encouragement of such a
person to settle among us, I therefore most humbly
beseech your Majesty to allow him a salary sufficient
to support the character of such a missionary from
your Majesty.

80



FULHAM PALACE

And perhaps there will not be a more shining
instance of compassion and well-bestowed charity in
your glorious reign than in being the instrument of
saving (as Europeans call) a savage nation from (what
they say it) eternal ruin.

This is humbly requested of your most serene and
most potent Majesty's entirely devoted and most
obedient and humble servant.

The mark of Charles Augustus Ninagrell, p,
Misquammacuick, alias Westerly, in your U
Majesty's colony of Rhodeesland and province of
Virginia of America, July 13, 1727.
Signed in the presence of

JAMES M. SPARROW, Clerk,
WILLIAM GIBBS,
JOHN HALL, Minister.

An interesting return is made by the Clergy
to the Bishop of Quebec, which gives a glimpse
of the progress of the Church at the time.

This is copied from the Bishop's analysis of
the returns ; the original is a Fulham Palace
MS.

(Circular.} QUEBEC, 15 Nov., 1827.

I. What is the whole number of Protestant In-
habitants within the range of the labours of the Clergy
of the Church of England ?

U.C., 64,829.

L.C., 35,595 (Quebec included).

8l G



FULHAM PALACE

2. What is the total number of persons who attend
upon your preaching in all the different places where
you at any time officiate ?

U.C., 12,574 (4 reports No. not stated).
L.C., 11,266, with the addition of Quebec, viz.,
1650. (No returns from 2 ministers.)

3. What is the number of Churches or of Preaching-
stations, regular or occasional, where you perform
duty ? And at what intervals do you perform it at
each ?

U.C., 42 or 43 churches, 54 preaching-stations.

L.C , 31 churches, 2 chapels, i building, 2 tem-
porary chapels, 54 other preaching-stations.

Greatest number of preaching-stations served by
one clergyman, n, viz., by Mr. Ansley of Hull, who
has 7 in U. and 4 in L.C.

4. What are the distances of each from the head-
quarters of your charge, and what is the present state
of the communication between the one and the other?

U.C., from 3 to 40 miles.

(i) New wood roads, in seasons on foot only; or
by water, canoe over floating masses of ice.

The Bishop and Archdeacons are, in their circuits,
subject to encounter the same difficulties.

L.C., from ij to 90 miles.

5. Can any circumstances be stated which fairly
warrant a belief that more of the persons thus occa-
sionally visited would regularly attach themselves to
the Church of England, if more frequent opportunity
of attendance upon her ordinances could be provided ?

82




THE RK;HT REV. ARTHUR F. \YINNINI;TON-INC,RAM, D.D
BISHOI 1 OK LONDON.



FULHAM PALACE

U.C., 26 favourable answers, i unfavourable, I no
answer.

L.C., 14 favourable, 3 unfavourable answers.

6. What instances are there within your knowledge
of the erection of Churches, or of other preparatory
steps taken for introducing the worship of the Church
of England where no Clergyman of that Church has
hitherto been placed ?

U.C., 37 instances, I returns no answer.
L.C., 17 instances.

7. What places are there in your neighbourhood,
within or without the limits of your charge, where
there is encouragement for the establishment of the
Church of England ; and what do you know of the
number of persons who would be disposed to avail
themselves of her worship and ordinances, if placed
within their reach ?

U.C., 40 instances.
L.C., 27 instances.

8. When did you take possession of your Parish or
Mission ? what has been the increase of your Con-
gregation or Congregations since that time ? and what
proportion has it kept with the general increase of
Population ?

U.C., 22 instances of increase.
L.C., 15 instances of increase.

9. What is the number of Professed Adherents to
the Church of England ? and what is the number of
communicants ?

84



FULHAM PALACE

U.C., professed adherents, 13,415 souls, and 70
families (5 returns no answers); communicants, 1488.

L.C., adherents 11,850, and 25 families; Com-
municants, 1587, with Cjuebeck added, 2087.

10. What is the number of persons within the
sphere of your knowledge who have joined the worship
of the Church of England, not having previously
belonged to that Church ? and, among such persons,
what is the number who have contributed in any way
to the erection of the Church, and the number who
have become communicants ?

U.C., 1609 souls; become Communicants, 244 ;
and at York and Richmond the No. uncertain.
L.C,, 3028 ; Communicants, 242.

1 1. What is the number of persons belonging to
the families of such as are described in the foregoing
question, who were confirmed at the last confirmation?
and what was the whole number confirmed ?

U.C., 109 ; whole number, 813.
L.C., 225 ; total confirmed, 840.

12. What is the total number of persons within
the limits of your charge who are not fixed members
of any religious communion r or who may be con-
sidered as exempt from any decided religious preference?

U.C., 6000 and upwards.
L.C., 5739.

14. What is the number of other Protestant places
of Worship, and of Preachers ?

U.C., 52 places of worship ; 56 preachers.
L.C. 20 places of worship; 23 preachers.

85 H



PRESI
Of the Established Chui



Dis-
tricts.


Clergymen.


Townships an


astern District.


Rev. S. J. Mountain,

Rev. J. G. Weagant,
Rev. F. Myers,


f Mill Roches,
Cornwall,
v Coteau du Lac,
i Onsaburgh,
Williamsburgh,
^ Back Concessions,
Matilda,



I Rev. D. Robertson, Assis't. Concessions,



Rev. Mr. Blakey,
Rev. J. Wenham,

Rev. Mr. Elms,



Rev. Mr. Harris,






Rev. Amos Ainslie,



1 Rev. Mr. Byrne,



Maitland,

Prescott,

Oxford,

Marlborough,

Brockville,

Three Stations besides,

Beverly,

Lansdown,

Wiltsee,

Lake Lorida,

f Drummond, 3d Concessions,

Drummond, 8th Concession,

Perth,

Eight miles from Perth,

Seven from do. another dire<

Bathurst, Hth Concession,

Eleven miles from Perth.

Lanark, 12th Concession,

Seventeen miles from Perth,

Beck with,

Packingham,

Ramsay,

March,

Napean,

Tarbolton,

Fitzroy,

Goulbourne,

Huntley,
k Gloucester,

Richmond,



86



STATE

Upper Canada, February, 1828.



Churches.


Regular
Service.


Occasional
Services.


REMARKS.






Occasional




Church


Regular










Occasional




Church


Regular






Church


Regular










Occasional




Church


Regular










Occasional




Church


Regular






Church


Regular






Church




Occasional








Occasional





Church


Regular










3 Occasional




Church


Regular








Regular








Regular








Regular








Regular








Regular




Church


Regular
Regular
Regular




The Church at Wiltsee lately
burnt by accident.




Regular








Regular








Regular








Regular








Regular










Occasional









Occasional




Church




Occasional Mr. Ainslie resides at Hull, in






Occasional Lower Canada, but serves at






Occasional all these places within this






Occasional Province.






Occasional






Occasional






Occasional




Church


Regular







PRESI
Of the Established Chur



Dis-
tricts.



Clergymen.



Townships and Stations.



i Archdeacon Stuart,

Rev. R. Tunney, Chaplain
to the Forces.

Rev. T. Payne, Navy Chap-
lain



Rev. J. Stoughton,

i Rev. Job Deacon,
Rev. W. Macaulay,

Rev. Thomas Campbell,



c



Rev. M. Grier,



Rev. A. Bethune,



Rev. S. Armour,



Rev. J. Thompson,



The Archdeacon of York,
Rev. Dr. Phillips, Master of
| the Royal Gram. School,
Rev. A. Macaulay, Assis't,
Rev. J. Hudson, Chaplain
to the Forces,



Kingston,



Navy Point,

Batli,

Amherst Island,

Frederickburgh ,

Marysburgh,

Adolphustown,

Hollowell,

Belleville,

Sidney,

Mohawk Village,

Thurlow,

Hillier,

Carrying Place,

Ameliasburgh,

Murray,

Cobourg,

Gaol & Court House, Hamill

Haldimand,

Clarke,

Port Hope,

Peterborough,

Monaghan,

Smith,

Otonabee,

Five miles from Otonabee,

Cavan,

Six miles South East,

Nine Miles South East,

Monaghan,

Emily,

York,

Yonge-Street,
Etobicoke or Mimico,



88



STATE

Upper Canada, February, 1828.



Churches.



Service.



Church Regular



Regular Occasional



Service.



REMARKS.



Church
Church

Church
Church
Church

Church
Church
Church

Church



Church
Church



Regular
Regular

Regular

Regular
Regular
Regular



Regular
Regular
Regular

Regular
Regular



Regular
Regular



Church Regular



Regular

Regular
Regular



Occasional Mr. Stoughton and Mr. Deacon
supply Fredericksburg alter-
Occasional nately.



Occasional
Occasional
Occasional



Occasional



Occasional
Occasional



Occasional
Occasional
Occasional
Occasional

Occasional
Occasional
Occasional

Occasional



PRESE

Of tie Established Chun



tricts. Clergymen.


Townships and Stations.


1 -S { Rev. James Magrath, { J opon J .
o^ [ \ I oronto, back Concessions,





t Barton,


i ( Rev. Ralph Leeming,


Hamilton,


- 1


Glanford,


^ \ Rev. R. Lugger,


Mohawk Village,
^ Brantford,


o I Rev. W. Hough,

V


Oneida Village,


f Rev. G. Grout, | *. Catharines,
-M i (jrimsby,


g Rev. Robert Addison,


Niagara,


g Rev. Thomas Green,


f Queenston,
L St. Davids,


eg -i Rev. J. Handcock, Chap-




as lain to the Forces


Stamford,


;- Rev. William Leeming,
^H


Chippawa,
[ Thorold,


' Rev. Mr. Leeds,

.;


Fort Erie,
[ Nine miles from Fort Erie,


1 1


r Long Point or Woodhouse,


to


St. Thomas,


Q J Rev. A. M'Intosh,


Yarmouth Plains,
Dunwich,





London,


e


I London, six miles further,


> Rev. Thomas Morley,


Chatham,


e /
S ^ Rev. E. J. Boswell,


Sandwich,


j-. a3 -




^Q 1 Rev. R. Rolph,


Colchester,


Total 39 Clergymen


102 Stations



CHART, as given to the Honorable R. W. Horton, May, IS
Clergymen 30

Stations 38

Churches built 35

NOTE 1. Regular, means fixed times for service, if not longer than i
night asunder, except at the residence of the Missionary where thi
service once or twice every Sunday. Many of the Missionaries aj
evenings on week days for performing service and preaching.

90



STATE

Upper Canada, February, 1828.



Churches.



Regular

Service.



Occasional
Service.



Church



Church



Church
Church
Church
Church



Church
Church
Church
Church

Church
Church



Church Regular

Church Occasional



Regular
Regular

Regular
Regular
Regular

Regular
Regular
Regular
Regular



Regular
Regular
Regular
Regular



Regular
Regular



Occasional



Occasional



Church Regular



Church Regular
Church Regular
Church Occasional



REMARKS.



Mr. Grout and Mr. W. Leeming
supply St. Catherines alter-
nately.



Occasional
Occasional*



Occasional
Occasional
Occasional



No Clergyman being yet set-
tled, the service is performed
almost too seldom to be de-
nominated occasional.



43 Churches 59 Regular 43 Occasional



Chart for 1838.

39

102

43



Increase.

9 Clergymen.
44 New Stations.
8 New Churches.



XOTK 2. - There are many Churches building which are not marked, to
avoid confusion, as there were some Churches marked as building in the last
Chart, which are not yet finished in this Chart such only as are built
arc put down.

91





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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARY

Los Angeles
This book is DUE on the last date stamped below.



Form L9-100m-9,'52(A3105)444



an



DA



657



Phillips -
Fulham Palace







DA

68?

F95P51





1 2 4

Online LibrarySadler PhillipsFulham palace, formerly called Fulham house, and Fulham manor : a short account of the old manor house of Fulham, written at the wish of the bishop on the occasion of His Lordship's visit to America and Canada, 1907 → online text (page 4 of 4)