Samuel Adams Drake.

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Arife in the shop. Samuel Parkman, afterwards a well-known
Boston merchant, was Thompson's fellow-apprentice. The
famous Tommy Capen succeeded to the shop and enjoyed its
custom.

Thompson, at nineteen, went to Concord, Xew Hampshire,
then known as Eumford, and from which his titular designation
was taken. At this time he was described as of " a fine manly
make and figure, nearly six feet in height, of handsome fea-
tures, bright blue eyes, and dark auburn hair." He soon after
married the widow of Colonel Benjamin Rolfe, a lady ten or a
dozen years his senior. Eumford himself is reported by his
friend Pictet as having said, " I married, or rather I was mar-
ried, at the age of nineteen." One child, a daughter, Avas the
result of this marriage. She was afterwards knoAvn as Sarah,
Countess of Eumford.

If Eumford meant to convey to Pictet the idea that his union
with Mrs. Eolfe was a merely passive act on his part, or that she
was the wooer and he only the consenting party, he put in a
plea for his subsequent neglect which draws but little on our
sjanpathy. His wife, according to his biographers, took him
to Boston, clothed him in scarlet, and Avas the means of intro-
ducing him to the magnates of the Colony.

The idea forces itself into vieAV that at this time Eumford's
ambition Avas beginning to'dcA^elop into the moving principle
of his life. The society and notice of his superiors in Avorldly
station appears to have impressed him greatly, and it is evident
that the agitation which Avide differences Avith the mother



430 HISTORIC FIELDS AND MANSIONS OF MIDDLESEX.

country was then causing in the Colonies did not find in him
that active sympathy which Avas the rule with the young and
ardent spirits of his own age. He grew up in the midst of
troubles which moulded the men of the Revolution, and at a
time when not to be Avith his brethren was to be against them.
We seldom look in a great national crisis for hesitation or de-
liberation at twenty-one.

Certain it is that Eumford fell under the suspicions of his
own friends and neighbors as being inclined to the royahst
side. He met the accusation boldly, and as no specific charges
of importance were made against him, nothing was proven.
The feeling against him, however, was so strong that he fled
from his home to escape personal violence, taking refuge at
first at his mother's home in Woburn, and subsequently at
Charlestown.

Thompson was arrested by the Woburn authorities after the
battle of Lexington, was examined, and released ; but the taint
of suspicion still clung to him. He petitioned the Provincial
Congress to investigate the charges against him, but they re-
fused to consider the application. He remained in the vicinity
of the camps at Cambridge, vainly endeavoring to procure a
commission in the service of- the Colony, until October, 1775,
when he suddenly took liis departure, and is next heard of
within the enemy's lines at Boston.

In the short time intervening between October and March,
— the month in which Howe's forces evacuated Boston, —
Thompson had acquired such a confidential relation with that
general as to be made the bearer of the official news of the end
of the siege to Lord George Germaine. He does not seem to
have embraced the opportunity of remaining neutral under
British protection, as did hundreds of others, but at once
makes himself serviceable, and casts his lot with the British
army.

It has been well said that nothing can justify a man in be-
coming a traitor to his country. Thompson's situation with
the army at Cambridge must have been wellnigh intolerable,
but he had always the alternative of living down the clamors



THE HOME OF EUMFORD. ' 431

against him, or of going into yolnntary exile. His choice
of a course which enabled him to Jo the most harm to the
cause of his countrymen gives good reason to doubt whether
the attachment he had once professed for their quarrel was
grounded on any fixed principles. Be that as it may, from
the time he clandestinely withdrew from the Americans
until the end of the war his talents and knowledge were
directed to their overthrow with all the zeal of which he was
capable.

From this point Eumford's career is a matter of history. At
his death he was a count of the Holy Roman Empire, lieuten-
ant-general in the service of Bavaria, F. E. S., Foreign Fellow
of the French Institute, besides being a knight of the orders of
St. Stanislaus and of the White Eagle.

Eumford had derived some advantage from his attendance at
the lectures of Professor Winthrop, of Harvard University, on
Xatural Philosophy. With his friend, Loammi Baldwin, he
had been accustomed to walk from Woburn to Cambridge to
be present at these lectures. Being at the camp, he had assisted
in packing up the apparatus for removal when the College
buildings were occupied by the soldiery. In his will he re-
membered the University by a legacy of a thousand dollars
annually, besides the reversion of other sums, for the purpose
of founding a professorship in the physical and mathematical
sciences, the improvement of the useful arts, and for the exten-
sion of industry, prosperity, and the well-being of society.
Jacob Bigelow, M. D., was the first incumbent of the chair of
this professorship.

A miniature of Count Eumford, from which the portrait in
Sparks's Biography was engraved, is now in the possession of
George W. Pierce, Esq. The Count is painted in a blue coat,
across which is worn a broad blue ribbon. A decoration ap-
pears on the left breast. The miniature, a work of much
artistic excellence, bears a certain resemblance to the late Presi-
dent Pierce, a distant relative of the Count. It is a copy from
a portrait painted by Kellenhofer of Munich, in 1792, and is
inscribed on the back, probably in Eumford's own hand, "Pre-



432 HISTORIC FIELDS AND MANSIONS OF MIDDLESEX.

sented by Count Rumford to liis much loved and respected
mother 1799."

Colonel Loammi Baldwin, the companion of Thompson in
early youth, and who manfully stood up for his friend in the
midst of persecution, when the name of tory was of itself suffi-
cient to cause the severance of life-long attachments, lived in
the large square house on the west side of the road before you
come to the birthplace of Thompson. The house has three
stories, is ornamented with pillars at each corner, and has a
balustrade around the roof. In front is a row of fine elms, with
space for a carriage-drive between them and the mansion. The
house could not be mistaken for anything else than the country-
seat of one of the town notabilities.

Baldwin's sympathies were wholly on the side of the patri-
ots, and he was at once found in the ranks of their army. He
was at Lexington, at the siege of Boston, and in the surprise at
Trenton, where a battalion of his regiment, the 26th Massachu-
setts, went into action with sixteen officers and one hundred
and ninety men. Wesson, Baldwin's lieutenant-colonel, and
Isaac Sherman, his major, were both in this battle, leading
Mighell's, Badlam's, and Eobinson's companies.

Colonel Baldwin resigned before the close of the war, and
was appointed High Sheriff of Middlesex in 1780. He has
already been named in connection with his great project, the
Middlesex Canal. He discovered and improved the apple
known by his name, and if that excellent gift of Pomona is
king among fruits, the Baldwin is monarch of the orchard. His
son Loammi inherited his fether's mechanical genius. While
a student at Harvard he made with his pocket-knife a wooden
clock, the wonder of his fellow-collegians. The Western Ave-
nue, formerly the Mill Dam, in Boston, and the government
docks at Charlestown and IS'ewport, are monuments of his skill
as an engineer.

Woburn was originally an appanage of ancient Charlestown,
and was settled in 1640 under the name of CharlestoAvn Til-
lage. Among its founders the name of Thomas Graves — the
same whom Cromwell named a rear-admiral — appears. A



THE HOME OF EUMFORD. 433

confusion, not likely to be solved, exists as to whether he was
the same Thomas Graves who laid out Charlestown in 1629,
and is known as the engineer. The admiral, however, is en-
titled to the distinction of having commanded, in 1643, the
" Tryal," the first ship built in Boston.

" Our revels now are ended ; these ovir actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits, and
Are melted into air, into thin air ;
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capped towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself,
Yea, all which it inherit, shall dissolve.
And like this insubstantial pageant faded.
Leave not a rack behind. "



19



INDEX.



Adams, Hannah, 337.

Adams, John, 68,. 337.

Adams, John Quincy, 226.

Adams, Samuel, at Lexington, 365-368.

Alcott, A. Bronson, his residence and

family, 376-378.
Alcott, Louisa May, 378.
Alcott; May, 378.
Aldrich, Thomas Bailey, 318.
Allston, Washington, residence at

Cambridge, 193 ; works of, 193, 194 ;

burial-place, 279.
Amory, Thomas C, 93.
Anchor, the history of, 39.
Andrew, John A., 409.
Appleton, Nathaniel, 215.
Apthorp, East, 197, 273, 274.
Arlington, incidents of battle at, 398 -

405.
Arnold, Benedict, at Bemis's Heights,

133 ; at Cambridge, 257 ; anecdotes

of, 258, 272, 309.
Artillery, American, 152-155.
Auvergne, Philip d', 358.

B.

Baldwin, Loamnii, 81, 431, 432.

Baldwin, Loamnd, Jr., 40.

Baldwin, Captain Jonathan, 187.

Ballard, John, anecdote of, 354.

Barker, Josiah, residence of, 28 ; re-
builds Constitution,- 40; sketch of, 41.

Barren, Joseph, 172, 177, 178.

Batchelder, Samuel, 283; residence of,
285.

Baylor, George, 300.

Bayonet, history of the, 247.



Belcher, Andrew, 214.

Belcher, Governor Jonathan, death and

burial, 279 ; residence of, 285, 286.
Belknap, Dr. Jeremy, 68.
Bennington battle, incidents of, 126, 127;

trophies of, 128, 129; prisoners, 128.
Bernard, Governor Francis, 228.
Bigelow, Dr. Jacob, 330, 338.
Bird, Joseph, 346.
Bissell Trial, 397.
Bond, George P., 201.
Borland, John, 197.
Boston, blockade of, in 1781, 35 ; naval

battle in harbor, 35 ; Grenadiers,

178 ; bombardment of, 181, 182 ;

relics of siege, 265.
Boston Frigate, armament of, 34.
Bourne, Nehemiah, 12.
Boutwell, George S., 418.
Boylston, Nicholas, 225, 226.
Bradstreet, Governor Simon, 351.
Branding, examples of, 171.
Brattle's" Mall, 280, 281.
Brattle Street Church (Boston), ball

in, 182.
Brattle, Thomas, 281.
Brattle, Thomas, son of William, 281,

282.
Brattle, William, 281.
Bray, Major John, 97, 184.
Brimmer, George W., 338.
Brocklebank, Captain, 416, 417.
Brooks, Governor John, residence and

sketch of, 133, 134.
Bunker, George, 80.
Bunker Hill Monument, history of,

73-79.
Bunker (Breed's) Hill, battle of.

British landing-place, 48, 49 ; Brit-



436



INDEX.



ish regiments engaged, 53 ; losses
in, 56, 57 ; anecdotes of, 56-60 ;
Trumbull's picture, 60; question of
command, 60-63 ; anecdotes of, 64,
65; redoubts, etc., 65, 66; disap-
pearance of, 66 ; anomalous author-
ity of American officers, 66-68; ac-
counts of, 70 - 73 ; American hos-
pital, 71 ; i^risoners, 71 ; slaughter
of British officers, 72, 73; Bunker
Hill proper fortified, SO, SI.

Burbeck, Captain Henry, 173.

Burgoyne, General Jolin, in Boston,
59; arrives at Cambridge, 158 ; re-
turns to England, 165; residence in
Cambridge, 197.

Burr, Aaron, anecdotes of, 104, 105.

Buttrick, John, 381.



Cambridge, fortifications, 180-187,
213, 243, 244; settlement of, 195,
196 ; first church, 211, 212; Ferry,
212 ; topography of, 212, 213; Court-
House, 217 ; camps at, 245; Com-
mon, 245 et seq.; old burial-place,
276-280.

Campbell, Colonel Archibald, 89 ;
imprisoned at Concord, 382, 383.

Capen, Hopestill, 428.

Carter, Robert, 323.

Cartwright, Cuff, 358.

Cipher of United States, origin of, 47.

Channing, W. E., 200.

Chardon, Peter, 181.

Charles River, named, 2; bridged, 3-5.

Charles River Bridge, projected, 3 ;
built and opened, 4, 5 ; building
committee, 6.

Charlestovi'n Lane, 357.

Charlestown Ferry established and
granted to Harvard College, 5 ; ex-
change of prisoners at, 8, 9.

Cliarlestown, topography and settle-
ment, 8 ; dispersion of inhabitants,
8 ; site of the "Great House" and
first ordinar}' in, 9; old burial-place,
11 ; distinguished citizens of, 10.

Christ Church (Boston), bells of, 52.

Christ Church (Cambridge), 273-276.



Cliurch, Dr. Benjamin, residence of,

286; his treason, 287, 288.

Chelsea Bridge, built, 7.

ClafJin, William, residence of, 351.

Claghorn, Colonel George, constructs
frigate Constitution, 29.

Clap, Preserved, 154.

Clarke, James Freeman, 352.

Clarice, Samuel, 352.

Clarke, Samuel C, 352.

Clark's House (Lexington), 364 ; occu-
pied by Hancock and Adams, 365.

Clark, Rev. Jonas, 36-3, 367.

Cleaveland, Colonel, 183.

Clinton, General Sir Henry, 80.

Cobble Hill (McLean Asylum), forti-
fied, 172 ; prisoners on, 177; Barrell's
palace, 177; Insane Asylum, 178.

Codman, Captain John, murder of,
169, 170.

Coffin, John, at Bunker Hill, 57.

Colonial Army, early composition of,

246 ; in 1775, 247-254; location of

regiments, 249 ; roster in Cambridge,

250 ; fiag of, 251, 252: punishments,

• 252 ; uniform, 253, 254.

Committee of Safety, rendezvous of,
257.

Concord, 371-394; approach to, 372,
373; topography in 1775, 380-383 ;
Old Court House, 380; grist -mUl
and jail, 381 ; mill-pond, 383 ; Old
Hubbard House, 384 ; hill burial-
ground, 385 ; battle monximent, 387
-389; named, 389; Old Manse, 389
-392; retreat from, 393, 394; Mer-
riam's Corner, 393.

Constitution, frigate, incident of her
building, 29, 30; cruise in the East
Indies, 30; conflict with the Guer-
riere, 32, 33; rebuilt in Charlesto\vn,
40; story of the figure-head, 41-44;
action with the Java, 47 ; has the
first made mast in our navy, 47 ;
memorials of, 50; lines to, 363.

Convent of St. Ursula, 91 - 95.

Convention troops, march to Rutland,
163; barracks at, described, 164 ;
march to Virginia, 165.

Cook, John, residence of, 348.



INDEX.



437



Coolidge, Charles, 378.

Coolidge, Joseph, 378.

Copley, John S., works of, 225.

Copper sheathing, origin of, 47.

Cox, Lemuel, builds Charles River
Bridge, 3, 4 ; sketch of, 6.

Cradock's Fort, 134.

Cradock, Governor Matthevv-, 134, 135,
136; dies, 139.

Craigie, Andrew, 179.

Cresap, Michael, 88.

Curtis, George William, 379, 380.

Cushman, Charlotte, birthplace of, 22 ;
anecdotes of early life, 22 ; first ap-
pearance in public, 22 ; studies for
the stage, 23; debut in London, 23,
24 ; Cushman School, 25.

D.

Dana Hill, 199; mansion, 200.

Dana, Judge Francis, 200.

Dana, Richard H., 200.

Dane, Nathan, 218, 219.

Davis, Isaac, killed, 408.

Davi.s, Judge John, residence of, 59.

Dawes, Major Thomas, 173.

Daye, Stephen, 224.

Dearborn, General Henry, 105 ; at
Monmouth, 106.

Derby, George H., 380.

Derby, Richard, 370.

Dewey, Samuel P., exploit with Con-
stitution's figure-head, 41 - 44.

Dickerson, Mahlon, 43, 44.

Dickinson, Edward, 193.

Dirty Marsh, 27.

Doncaster. England, night surprise at,
12,13.

Dorchester Heights, occupation of, pro-
posed, 260, 261.

Downer, Eliphalet, duel with the regii-
lar, 399.

Downing, Sir George, 238.

Dudley, Thomas, residence of, 112.

Duer, William, 303.

Dunster, Henry, 211.

E.

Edes, Benjamin, printing-office of, 347,
348.



Edes, Thomas, 19.

Ellsworth, Annie G. , dictates first tel-
egraphic message, 21.
Emerson, Rev. William, 389.
Emerson, Ralph W^aldo, 378, 379.
Essex Bridge built, 6.
Eustis, William, burial-place of, 370.
Everett, Edward, 11, SO, 210, 211.



Fayerweather, John, 414.

Fayerweather, Thomas, 316.

Fife, the, introduced into British army,

248.
First church (Cambridge), sites of, 211,

212; Provincial Congress sits in, 215.
Flags of truce, methods of conducting

before Boston, 86, 87.
Flucker, Thomas, 63.
Foot of the Rocks, 359.
Fox, Jabez, residence of, 256.
Eraser, Sirnon, 382.
Fresh Pond, 340; ice-traffic of, 344, .3*45.
Fuller, Abraham, 351.
Fuller, Joseph, 351.
Fuller, John, 351.
Fuller, Sarah, 351.
Fuller, Sarah Margaret, birthplace of,

192.
Funeral customs, 331 - 333.

G.

Gage, General Thomas, 8, 63, 356.

Gardiner, Rev. J. S. J., anecdote of, 18.

Gates, General Horatio, 104, 299.

Gergeroux, Marquis de, banquet to, 36.

Gerry, Elbridge, 317, 320.

Gerrymander, history of the, 320-322.

Gibbeting, instances of, 169, 170.

Gibbet in Middlesex, location of, 170.

Gibbs, Major Caleb, Washington's re-
buke of, 15, 27 ; commands Life
Guard, 308.

Gilbert, John, birthplace of, 22.

Glover, Colonel John, quarters of, 292-
294.

Gookin, Daniel, 200.

Gordon, Rev. William, 347.

Gorham, Nathaniel, sketch of, 14 -16.



438



INDEX.



Graves, Samuel, 358.

Graves, Thomas, ■432.

Greene, Catharine, Eli Whitney a pro-
tege of, 152.

Greene, General Nathaniel, Knox's
opinion of, 149 ; camp on Prospect
Hill, 149 ; trial of Andre, 150 ; money
embarrassments, 150, 151, 272.

Green, Samuel, 224.

Gridley, Colonel Richard, 187.

H.

Haldimand, General, 355.

Hamilton, Alexander, 300.

Hancoclc Frigate, armament of, 34.

Hancock, John, at Lexington, 365-
370.

Hancock, Thomas, 225, 368.

Hand, General Edward, 90.

Harrington, Jonathan, 361.

Hari'ington, Daniel, 361.

Harris, Lord George, at Bunker Hill,
■ 56, 57.

Hartt, Edmund, naval yard of, 27.

Harvard College, C'harlesto^vn Ferry
granted to, 5; tirst observatory, 201 ;
Fellows' Orchard, 201; Gore Hall,
201; College libraries, 201-206;
President's house, 206-212; Dane
Hall, 218; early accounts, 221, 222,
229; enclosures, 222; building and
sites of old Halls, 223; College Press,
223, 224; Massachusetts, 224, 225;
Portrait Gallery, 225, 226; lotteries,
226, 227; buildings used for bar-
racks, 227; Harvard, 227, 228; Hol-
lis, 229; Holden Chapel, 229, 230;
Holworthy, 230; University Hall,
2-30; customs, 232, 233; clubs, 234:
Commencement, 234, 235; dress of
students, 235, 236; Oxford caps,

237, 238; distinguished graduates,

238. 239; historic associations, 240,
241 ; outbreaks of students, 241, 242;
American works, 243, 244 ; seal, 242.

Harvard, John, 10; library and monu-
ment, 11.
Hastings, Jonathan, 256.
Hastings, Rebecca, 261.
Hastings, Walter, 256, 257.



Hawthorne, Nathaniel, residence in
Concord, 373, 391.

Henley, Colonel David, court-martial
of, i60; sketch of, 161, 162.

Hessians, appearance of, 158; uniform
ajid colors, 315, 316.

Hewes, Shubael, 271.

Hollis, Thomas, 226.

Holmes, Abiel, 262.

Holmes, 0. W., 254, 262.

Hopkins, Commander Ezekiel, per-
sonal appearance of, 38.

Hoppin, Rev. Nicholas, 275.

Hosmer, Abner, 408.

Hovey, C. M., 186.

Howard, Caroline, 324.

Howard, Samuel, 324.

Howe, Lyman, 421.

Hudson, Frederick, 380.

Hudson, William, 12.

Hull, Commodore Isaac, described, 31,
32; superintends docking the Con-
stitution, 40.

Hull, General William, tomb of, 349 ;
sketch of, 350-352.

Humphreys, David, 300.

Humphreys, Joshua, reports in favor of
Charlestown as a naval station, 27.

I.

Inman, Ralph, 187-189.

J.

Jackson, Colonel Henry, 27; residence,

348.
Jackson, Colonel Michael, 349.
Jaqnes, Samuel, 99.
Jones, Ephraim, 381, 382.
Jones, Commodore John Paul, hoists

American flag, 38.
Joy, Benjamin, 178.

K.

Kent, Duke of, 310, 311.
Kent, Judge William, 284.
Keyes, George, 389.
Keyes, John S., 392.
Kirkland, John T., 209.



INDEX.



439



Kuight, Sarah, journey to New York
in 1704, 425, 426.

Knox, General Henry, 27, 56 ; book-
store of, 172 ; accident, 173 ; mar
riage, 174 ; at Trenton, 175; birtli
place, 177, 187, 272, 275; residence,

Knox', Lucy (Flucker), 173, 176, 177
Knox, William, 173.

L.

Lafayette, Marquis, 303, 304.
Lardner, Dionysius, prediction of, 35.
Lechmere's Point, 179 ; British land at,
180 ; access to, 180 ; fort on, ISO -
184; executions at, 184.
Leclftnere, Richard, 179.
Lechmere, Thomas, 179.
Lee, General Charles, announces his
arrival to the enemy, 85, 86; quar-
ters of, 129, 141 ; sketch and anec-
dotes of, 142-144; alleged treason,
145 ; incidents of his capture, 146 ;
singular request and death, 147, 148,
272.
Lee, Joseph, 316. 1

Lee, Colonel William R., 107.
Leonard, Rev. Abiel, 191. !

Leverett, Governor John, serves with

Cromwell, 12; portrait of, 14.
Lexington, battle of. Prisoners of, ex-
changed, 8, 9 ; Smith's march^ to,
354-364; topography of the Com-
mon, 360; meeting-house and belfry,
360 361 ; battle monument, 362,
363'; Clark House, 364-369; burial-
ground, 370; Fiske's Hill and the
road to Concord, 371 ; Smith's junc-
•tion with Percy, and the retreat,
395, 396.
Lightning conductors first applied to

vessels, 47.
Linzee. Captain John, 188, 189.
Longfellow, H. W., description of his

residence, 290, 312.
Long, Samuel, innkeeper, 9.
Lowell, Rev. Charles, 317, 322.
Lowell, James Russell, 317 ; home of,

318, 323, 324.
Lurvey, James, 258.



M.

Magoun, Thatcher, 41.

Maiden Bridge, built, 6, 83.

Mallet, Andrew, 110.

Mallet, John, 110.

Mallet, Michael, 110.

Martin, Michael, career and execution

of, 97, 184, 185.
Mason, David, 174, 183.
Mather, Increase, 211.
McLean Asylum, 172.
McLean, John, 172.
Massachusetts Bay divided into shires,

7.
Mass. Horticultural Society, 337, 338.
Merrimac Frigate, launch and history

of, 45, 46.
Middlesex Canal, 81, 82.
Middlesex Comity formed, 7.
Mifflin, Thomas, residence of, 282, 283,

300.
Military roads in 1775, 83, 84.
Miller's River (Willis's Creek), 179, 180.
Molineux, William, Jr., 424.
Moncrieti', Major, officiates at an ex-
I change of prisoners, 8, 9.
Monmouth, battle of, incidents of, 106,
I 163.
Morgan, General Daniel, accotmt of

his corps, 87 - 90.
Morse, Samuel F. B., birthplace of, 19;
first attempts at painting, 20 ; con-
ception of the telegraph, 20 ; first
line and message, 21.
Morse, Jedediah, 16-18; residence, 19.
Moulton's Point (Moreton's or Mor-
ton's), British landing-place at bat-
tle of Bunker Hill, 27 ; fortified, 28.
[Mount Auburn, 326-340; the Tower,
329; the Chapel and statuary, 335-
I 337; origin of, 337, 338.
Mount Pisgah. See Prospect Hill.
Murray, Samuel, 357.



N.
Napoleon I., his opinion of American

sailors, 46.
Navy Yard, Cliarlesto^vn, 26-51; first

Government yards, 27 ; history of



440



INDEX.



Charlestown purchase, 27; siirround-
ings, 28 ; commanders of, 29 - 33 ;
the park of artillery, 33 ; compared
with Woolwich, 34 ; dry dock, 40;
famous vessels built at, 44 - 46 ;
landiug of Sir William Howe, 48, 49 ;
area, cost, and original profirietors,
49, 50 ; Naval Institute and tro-
phies, 50.

Nelson, Horatio, noble conduct of, 37.

Newman, Robert, 354.

Newton, celebrities of, 348 - 353.

Nicholson, Commodore Samuel, com-
mands Charlestown Yard, 29; col-
lision with Claghom, 29, 30 ; death
and burial, 30.

Night watch, customs of, 9, 10.

Nix's Mate, 170.

Noddle's Island (East Boston), 27.

Nonantum Hill, 352, 353.

o.

Old Manse (Concord), 389-392.

Old South Church (Boston), 183 ;

Washington's visit to, 271, 272.
Old Wayside Mill. See Powder House.
Oliver, Thomas, 318, 319.
Otis, James, 336.



Parker, Isaac, 218.

Parker, Theodore, birthplace of, 361.

Parker, John, 361, 409.

Parker, P.ev. Samuel, 274, 275.

Parkman, Samuel, 379, 429.

Pearson, Eliphalet, 262.

Percival, Captain John, 30.

Percy, Hugh, Earl, march to and re-
treat from Lexington, 395 - 405.

Penny Ferry, 83.

Pere la Chaise, Mount Auburn com-
pared with, 329, 334.

Phillips, Rev. George, 346, 347.

Phillips, General William, 165.

Phips, David, mansion, etc., 200.

Phips's Point. See Lechmere's.

Pierce, Josiah, Jr., 428.

Pierce, George W., 431.

Pierce, Joseph, 173.

Pigot, General Robert, 5.



Pitcaim, Major John, at Lexington,
357 - 359, 381, 382.

Plowed Hill (Mt. Benedict), fortifica-
tions described, 84, 85; convent on,
burnt, 92, 93.

Pomeroy, Colonel Seth, at Bunker
Hill, 60, 61.

Pontefract Castle, England, capture
and siege of, 12.

Powder House, history and description
of, 110-112; legend of, 115.

Prentice, Captain Thomas, 348.

Prescott, Colonel William, 60 - 62.

Prospect Hill, occupied by Putnam,
62; fortifications, 148 ; vestiges of,
148, 149, 166, 167 ; garrison of, 149;
descrijition of camps and flag-raising
on, 156, 157 ; Burgoyne's troops en-
camped on, 157 ; description of their
barracks, 159; collision between
prisoners and guards, 160.

Putnam, General Israel, conducts an
exchange of prisoners, 8, 9 ; at Bun-
ker Hill, 60 - 62 ; quai-ters and



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