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AN HISTORICAL INQUIRY INTO THE
PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION
OF THE PRECIOUS METALS, from the
Earliest Ages, and into the Influence of
their Increase or Diminution on the prices
of Commodities. BY WILLIAM JACOB,
Esq. F. R. S. In 8vo.
" Mr. Jacob's Historical Inquiry into the
Production and Consumption of the Precious
Metals is one of the most curious and import-
ant works which has lately issued from the
press. The influence of the precious metals
an the industry of mankind is acknowledged
to be great ; though, perhaps, the notions re-
specting the precise mode of its operation
were obscure, and undoubtedly the history of
its effects had never been traced with accu-
racy and ingenuity. Mr. Huskisson, who had
maintained a friendship with Mr. Jacob for
more than five-and-twenty years, first put the
author on the investigation ; it is one of the
minor obligations which the country owes to
that enlightened statesman." Spectator.

" It was written at the suggestion of the
late Mr. Huskisson, and displays the fruits of
much industry and research, guided by a sound
judgment, and embodying more learning than
is usually brought to bear on statistical or eco-
nomical subjects. We recommend the book to
general attention." Times, Sept. 2, 1831.
NARRATIVE OF A VOYAGE TO THE
PACIFIC AND BEHRING'S STRAIT, to
co-operate with the Polar Expeditions : per-
formed in His Majesty's ship Blossom, un-
der the command of Capt. F. W. Beechey,
R, N. in the years 1825, 26, 27, 28. In 8vo.
" The most interesting of the whole series
of expeditions to the North Pole." Quarter-
ly Review.

" This expedition will be forever memora-
ble as one which has added immensely to our
knowledge of this earth that we inhabit."
Blackivood's Mag.

" Captain Beechey's work is a lasting mon-
ument of his own abilities, and an honor to
his country." Lit. Gaz.
A GENERAL VIEW OF THE PROGRESS
OF ETHICAL PHILOSOPHY, chiefly
during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth
centuries. By SIR JAMES MACKINTOSH,
M. P. In 8vo.

" This, in our humble opinion, is the best off-
spring of the pen of an author who in philoso-
phical spirit, knowledge and reflection, rich-
ness of moral sentiment, and elegance of style,
has altogether no superior perhaps no equal
among his contemporaries. Some time ago
we made copious extracts from the beautiful
work. We could not recommend the whole
too earnestly." National Gazette.
HISTORY OF ENGLAND, by SIR JAMES
MACKINTOSH. Octavo edition. In the press.
%* The first volume of this edition will contain the
same matter as the first 3 volumes of the 18me edition.



LARDXEK-3 CABINET CYCLOPAEDIA.



HISTORY OP THE RISE, PROGRESS,
AND PRESENT STATE OF THE SILK
MANUFACTURE; with numerous en-
gravings.

" It contains abundant information in every
department of this interesting branch of hu-
man industry in the history, culture, and
manufacture of silk." Monthly Magazine.

" There is a great deal of curious informa-
tion in this little volume." Lit. Gazette.

HISTORY OF THE ITALIAN REPUBLICS,
by J. C. L. SISMONDI.

HISTORY OF MARITIME AND INLAND
DISCOVERY. InSvols. (In the press.)
" This book abounds with curious informa-
tion." Gentleman's Magazine.

" The whole work is so filled with variety
and excellence, that any ten of its pages which
we might quote, would prove to readers that
they ought not to be satisfied with less than
all." Lit. Gazette.

HISTORY OF THE RISE, PROGRESS, AND
PRESENT STATE OF THE MANUFAC-
TURES OF PORCELAIN AND GLASS.

With numerous wood cuts. (In the press.)

HISTORY OF THE RISE, PROGRESS,
AND PRESENT STATE OF THE IRON
AND STEEL MANUFACTURE. (In press.)

" This volume appears to contain all useful
information on the subject of which it treats."
Lit. Gazette.
BIOGRAPHY OF BRITISH STATESMEN;

containing the Lives of Sir Thomas More,

by SIR JAMES MACKINTOSH ; Cardinal Wol-

sey, Archbishop Cranmer, and Lord Burleigh.

" A very delightful volume, and on a subject
likely to increase in interest as it proceeds.
* * * We cordially commend the work both
for its design and execution." London Li'L
Gazette.

" The life of More, being from the pen f
Sir James Mackintosh, engaged and fully rev
warded our attention. It is a rich theme, and
has been treated with the lofty philosophical
spirit and literary skill which distinguish the
writings of Sir James." Nat. Gazette.

" We are certain, that no one can rise from
the perusal of the work, without having his
understanding enlarged, and the best affectiojajs
of his heart improved." Album.

" A most interesting and valuable volume."
Gent. Magazine.
ELEMENTS OF OPTICS. By DAVID BREW-

STER. 18mo. (In the press.)

" The author has given proof of his well-
known industry, and extensive acquaintance
with the results of science in every part of
Europe." Monthly Mag.

" The subject is, as might be expected, ably
treated, and clearly illustrated." U. S. Jow.



FAMILY CABINET ATLAS.

In preparation.
THE FAMILY CABINET ATLAS, CON

STRUCTED UPON AN ORIGINAL PLAN: Being

a Companion to the Encyclopaedia Ameri-
cana, Cabinet Cyclopaedia, Family Library,
Cabinet Library, &c.

This Atlas comprises, in a volume of the Family Library
size, nearly 100 Maps and Tables, which present equal
to Fifty Thousand Names of Places ; a body of informa-
tion three times as extensive as that supplied by the
generality of Quarto Atlases.

Opinions of the Public Journals.

"This beautiful and most useful little volume," says
the Literary Gazette, " is a perfect picture of elegance,
containing a vast sum of geographical information. A
more instructive little present, or a gift better calculated
to be long preserved and often referred to, could not be
offered to favored youth of either sex. Its cheapness, we
must add, is another recommendation ; for, although this
elegant publication contains 100 beautiful engravings
it is issued at a price that can be no obstacle to its being
procured by every parent and friend to youth."

" This Atlas far surpasses any thing of the kind which
we have seen, and is made to suit the popular libraries
which Dr. Lardner and Mr. Murray are now sending into
every family in the empire " Monthly Review.

" Its very ingenious method of arrangement secures to
the geographical student the information for which hith-
erto he has been obliged to resort to works of the largest
dimensions." Athenaeum.

This miniature and beautiful Atlas is likely to super-
sede, for general purposes, maps of a more expensive and
elaborate character. It appears to us to answer the
double purpose of exercising the attention while it im-
prints all that is important in Geography on the memo-
ry." Atlas.

" The workmanship is among the beet of the kind we
have ever witnessed." Examiner.

" It contains all the information to be derived from the
nost expensive and unwieldy Atlas." York Courant.

" By a moment's reference, the exact situation of any
place may be found." Birmingham Journal.

" An excellent little work, engraved with a clearness
and correctness which is quite surprising: when com-
plete, travellers will have a system of Geography and a
complete Atlas, which they may carry in their pocket."
Spectator.

" This is the most perfect gem of an Atlas which has
ever been published." Bristol Journal.

" It corresponds in size with those popular publications
to which it will form so useful an addition namely,
' The Family Library,' ' The Classical Library,' and
Cabinet Cyclopajdia." Court Journal.

' Nothing could be devised better calculated to impress
upon the mind a knowledge of the general principles of
geography, than the plan of this publication." The
Warder.

" It will be a crying shame in this age of intellect, if
this able and beautiful work be not extensively patron-
ized ; but we cannot doubt the success which we feel
assured its intrinsic merits must secure to it." Intelli-
gencer.

It is scarcely in the nature of things, that a work of
so much public service should fail in meeting with that
extensive patronage which can alone remunerate the
projectors." Leak Intelligencer,

"The plates are beautifully executed; and the geo-
graphical student may obtain in this little vyork, such is
the excellence of its arrangement, as much information
as he could gain by wading through several books of far
greater bulk." Weekly Dispatch.

" We have seldom seen a work so perfect in its arrange-
ment, and so elegant in its execution." York Courant.

"For the accuracy of its delineation, and the extent
of the information which it conveys, it stands without
a rival in English topography." Freeman's Journal.

"The plan of this usefil and elegant work may, in-
deed, be called original. The style and execution of the
Maps are of the first character." Woolmcr's Exeter and
Plymouth Gazette.

"This work is one of the most usef.il publications
which has yet issued from the press ; it will be an unique
and brilliant accession to th library, and a very useful
work to the student in geography," Reading Mercury
and Oxford Gazette.

" Its qualifications will render it one of the most popu-
lar, highly interesting, and usefvl publications of the
day." Liverpool Courier.



MISCELLANEOUS.



MEMOIRS OF THE LIFE OF SIR WALTER
RALEGH, with some account of the Period
in which he lived. By Mrs. A. T. THOMSON,
With a portrait

"Such is the outline of a life, which, in Mrs. Thom-
son's hands, is a mine of interest ; from the first page
to the last the attention is roused and sustained, and
while we approve the manner, we still more applaud
the spirit in which it is executed." Literary Gazelle.

"In all respects a most appropriate volume for the
Cabinet Library. We shall take an opportunity in
another notice, to give some of the many interesting
passages in the volume that offer themselves for
quotation." N. Y. American.

" Mrs. Thomson has written a very interesting book.
It takes what we are inclined to think, a just, and at
the same time, favorable view of Ralegh, and is oc-
cupied beside with many entertaining and illustrative
anecdotes." Craftsman.

" Presents in a concise but succinct style the variety
of incidents connected with the life of the distinguish-
ed subject of the memoir." National Journal.

" The book is unquestionably the best Life of Ra-
legh that has ever been written." Album.

" This is a piece of biography which combines the
fascinations of romance with the deeper interest that
attaches to historical narrative." Southern Patriot.



ELEGANT LIBRARY EDITIONS

OF THE FOLLOWING WORKS.



WORKS OF JOANNA BAILLIE.

COMPLETE IX ONE VOLUME, 8VO.

In the press.



WORKS OF HENRY FIELDING.

IN TWO VOLUMES 8vO., WITH A PORTRAIT.



WORKS OF TOBIAS SMOLLETT.

W TWO VOLUMES 8vO., WITH A PORTRAIT.

In the press.

SELECT SPEECHES

OF THE

RIGHT HONORABLE GEORGE CANNING.

EDITED BY ROBERT WALSH, ESQ.
WITH A BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL INTRODUCTION,

BY THE EDITOR.
|N ONE VOLUME 8rO.

In the press.

SELECT SPEECHES

OF THE

RIGHT HONORABLE WILLIAM HUSXISSON,

AND OF THE

RIGHT HONORABLE WILLIAM WINDHAM.

EDITED BY ROBERT WALSH, ESQ.
WITH A BIOGRAPHICAL AND CRITICAL INTRODUCTION,

BT THE EDITOR.
lit ONK VOLUME 8vO.

In the press.



MEDICINE, SURGERY, &c.



SURGICAL MEMOIRS OF THE CAM-
PAIGNS OF RUSSIA, GERMANY, AND
FRANCE. Translated from the French
of BARON LARREY. In 8vo. with plates.

A MANUAL OF MEDICAL JURISPRU-
DENCE, compiled from the best Medical
and Legal Works; comprising an account
of I. The Ethics of the Medical Profes-
sion ; II. Charters and Laws relative to the
Faculty; and III. All Medico-legal Ques-
tions, with the latest Decisions: being an
Analysis of a course of Lectures on Foren-
sic Medicine. By MICHAEL RYAN, M. D.
Member of the Royal College of Physi-
cians in London, &c. First American edi-
tion, with additions, by R. EGLERFIELD
GRIFFITH, M. D. In 8vo.
"There is not a fact of importance or value con

nected with the Science of which it treats, that is not

to be found in its pages. The style is unambitious but

clear and strong, and such as becomes a philosophic

theme." MonVdy Review.

'It is invaluable to Medical Practitioners, and may

be consulted safely by the Legal Profession." Weekly

Dispatch.

DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING ANATOM-
ICAL PREPARATIONS, formed on the
basis of Pole, Marjolin, and Breschet, and
including the new method of Mr. Swan : by
USHER PARSONS, M. D. Professor of Anat-
omy and Surgery. In 1 vol. 8vo. with plates,
"It is compiled and prepared with judgment, and is
the best and most economical companion the studenl
can possess to aid him in the pursuit of this delightfa
department of his labors." Bost.Med.& Surg.Journ
Sept. 27, 1831.

"This is unquestionably one of the most useful
works on the preparation of Anatomical Specimens
ever published. It should be in the hands of every
lover of Anatomy ; and as attention now is more di
reeled to the formation of museums, it will be found a
very valuable book. Nothing is omitted that is inv
pprtant, and many new formulae are introduced, de
rived from the author's experience, and from rare
books, which he has had the industry to collect."
N. Y. Medical Journal, August, 1831.

A PRACTICAL GUIDE TO OPERATIONS
ON THE TEETH, by JAMES SNELL, Dentist
In 8vo. with plates.

PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGICAL MED
ICINE, including Physiology, Pathology
and Therapeutics, in the form of Proposi
tions, and commentaries on those relating
to Pathology, by F. J. V. BROUSSAIS, &c
translated by ISAAC HAYS, M. D. and R. E
GRIFFITH, M. D. In 8vo.

ELEMENTS OF PHYSIOLOGY, by ROBLEY
DUNGLISON. In 2 vols. 8vo. with numerous
illustrations. (In the press.)

PRINCIPLES OF SURGERY, by JOHN SYME
Professor of Surgery in the University o
Edinburgh. In 8vo.

PRACTICAL REMARKS ON THE NATURE
AND TREATMENT OP FRACTURES OF
THE TRUNK AND EXTREMITIES; b)
JOSEPH AMESBURY, Surgeon. In 8vo. with
plates and wood-cuts. (In the press.)



MISCELLANEOUS.



GREEK AND ENGLISH LEXICON. By D.

DONNEGAN. Abridged for the use of schools.

In 1 vol. royal 18mo. containing nearly 600

pages.

This work is printing on a handsome distinct type,
and will contain as much matter as many of the larger
exicons; but owing to the form in which it is printed,
will be sold at such price as to be within the reach
of all students. It will offer more advantages to the
young student than any other lexicon now in use. The
vocabulary is more extensive and complete compris-
ng not only words found in the classics, but also such
as are found in the writings of Hippocrates and the
ek Physicians. The meanings attached to words
by the several writers are also given.

Words are given in alphabetical order in every
poetical and dialectic variety.

The conjugation of verbs and flection of nouns are
more complete than in other lexicons; the meanings
of words fuller and more correct there being first
a primary and then a secondary meaning, each dis-
tinguished from the metaphorcial and idiomatical.
Phrases are also given when they note any peculiarity
in signification. The etymology of words is only
omitted where it is confused or disputed. There is
nothing left out which the young student would find
necessary in studying the Classics, and which would
enable him to understand the true meaning of a word.
In short, in this work the essential advantages of a
good Dictionary are combined with those of a good
Grammar advantages not found in any Greek and
English lexicon now used.

ELEMENTS OF MECHANICS. By JAMES
REN WICK, Esq. Professor of Natural and
Experimental Philosophy, Columbia College,
N. Y. In 8vo with numerous engravings.

"We think this decidedly the best treatise on Me-
chanics, which has issued from the American press,
that we have seen; one, too, that is alike creditable
to the writer, and to the state of science in this coun-
try." American Quarterly Review.

TREATISE ON CLOCK AND WATCH-MA-
KING, Theoretical and Practical, by
THOMAS REID, Edinburgh Honorary Mem-
ber of the Worshipful Company of Clock-
Makers, London. Royal 8vo. Illustrated by
numerous plates.

MILLWRIGHT AND MILLER'S GUIDE.
By OLIVER EVANS. New Edition, with ad-
ditions and corrections, by the Professor of
Mechanics in the Franklin Institute of Penn-
sylvania, and a description of an improved
Merchant Flour-Mill, with engravings, by
C. & O. EVANS.



THE PEOPLE'S LIBRARY.

The editors and publishers should receive the thanks of the present generation, and the gratitude of
posterity, for being the first to prepare in this language what deserves to be entitled not the ENCYCLO-
PAEDIA AMERICANA, but the PEOPLE'S LIBRARY."^. F. Courier and Enquirer.

Just Published, by Carey <$ Lea,

And sold in Philadelphia by E. L. Carey & A. Hart; in New- York by G.fyC.fy H. Carvitt; in Boston

by Carter fy Hendee ; in Baltimore by E. J. Coale, $ W. <jr J. Neal ; in Washington by Thompson $ Hermans ;

in Richmond by J. H. Nash; in Savannah by W. T. Williams; in Charleston by W. H. Berrett; in New-Orleans

by W. M'Kean; in Mobile by Odiorne fy Smith ; and by the principal booksellers throughout the Union.

VOLUME 9,-CONTAINING ABOUT 1,50O ARTICLES,

(To be continued at intervals of three months,)

OF THE

ENCYCLOPAEDIA AMERICANA:

A

POPULAR DICTIONARY

or
ARTS, SCIENCES, LITERATURE, HISTORY, AND POLITICS,

BROCOHT POWM TO THE PRESENT TIME, AND INCLUDING A COPIOUS COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL ARTICLES IN

AMERICAN BIOGRAPHY:

On the basis of the Seventh Edition of the German

CONVERSATIONS-LEXICON.



EDITED BY FRANCIS LJEBER,

ASSISTED BY

EDWARD WIGGLES WORTH AND T. G. BRADFORD, ESQRS.

IN TWELVE LARGE VOLUMES, OCTAVO, PRICE TO SUBSCRIBERS, BOUND IN CLOTH,

TWO DOLLARS AND A HALF EACH.
EACH VOLUME CONTAINS BETWEEN 600 AND 700 PAGES.



THE WORLD-RENOWNED CONVERSATIONS-
LEXICON." Edinburg h Review.

" To supersede cumbrous Encyclopaedias, and put within
the reach of the poorest man, a complete library, equal to
about forty or fifty good-sized octavos, embracing every
possible subject of interest to the number of 20,1 00 in all-
provided he can spare either from his earnings or his ex-
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contrived, as to be equally suited to the learned and
the unlearned, the mechanic the merchant, and the pro-
" ssional man." JV*. Y. Courier and Inquirer.

* The reputation of this valuable work has augmented
with each volume; and if the unanimous opinion of the
press, uttered from all quarters, be true, which in this
instance happens to be the case, it is indeed one of the
best of publications. It should be in the possession of
every intelligent man, as it is a library in itself, compris-
ing an immense mass of lore upon almost every possible
subject, and in the cheapest possible form." JV. Y. Mirror.

' Witnesses from every part of the country concurred
in declaring that the Encyclopaedia Americana was in a
fair way to degrade the dignity of learning, and especially
the learning of Encyclopaedias, by making it too cheap
that the multitudes of all classes were infatuated with it
in saying in so many words from the highest to the low-
est, ' the more we see of the work the better we like it.' "
JV Y. Courier and Inquirer.

" The articles in the present volume appear to us to
evince the same ability and research which gained so
favorable a reception for the work at its commencement.
The Appendix to the volume now before us, containing an
account of the Indian Languages of America, must prove
highly interesting to the reader in this country; and it is
at once remarkable as a specimen of history and philology.
The work altogether, we may again be permitted to ob-
serve, reflects distinguished credit upon the literary and
scientific character, as well as the scholarship of our
eountry." Charleston Courier.

"The copious information which this work affords on
American subjects, fully justifies its title of an American
Dictionary; while at the same time the extent, variety,
and felicitous disposition of its topics, make it the most
convenient and satisfactory Encyclopaedia that we have
ever seen." National Journal.

"If the succeeding volumes shall equal in merit the
one before us, we may confidently anticipate for the work
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the most flattering encouragement and patronage." fed-
eral Gazette.

" A compendious library, and invaluable book of refer-
ence.''^. Y. American.



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our countrymen will sustain the publishers, and well re-
ward them" for this contribution to American Literature.''
Baltimore Patriot.

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respects, to be the best as well as the most compendious
dictionary of the arts, sciences, history, politics, biogra-
phy, &c. which has yet been compiled. The style of the
portion we have read is terse and perspicuous; and it is
really curious how so much scientific and other informa-
tion could have been so satisfactorily communicated in
such brief limits." JV. Y. Evening Post.

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Journal of Education.

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pond with the testimony in favor of their enterprise, and
the beautiful arid faithful style of its execution, the hazard
of the undertaking, bold as it was, will be well compen-
sated ; and our libraries will be enriched by the most gene-
rally useful encyclopedic dictionary that has been offered
to the readers of the English language. Full enough for
the general scholar, and plain enough for every capacity,
it is far more convenient, in every view and form, than
its more expensive and ponderous predecessors." Ameri-
can Farmer.

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own merits will do the rest." SHUt/ian's Journ.

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ment upon all that has gone before it ; a thing for our
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and familiar learni ng on every possi ble su bject, so arra nged
as to be speedily and safely referred to on emergency, as
well as on deliberate inquiry; and better still, adapted to
tha understanding, and put within the reach of the mul-
titude. * * * The Encyclopaedia Americana is a work
without which no library worthy of the name can here-
after be iiinde up." Yankee.



ENCYCLOPAEDIA AMERICANA.



[ The work will be a valuable possession to every family | MORE than half of the volumes of this work are



or individual that can afford to purchase it ; and we take
pleasure, therefore, in extending the knowledge of its
merits." National Intelligencer.

'This work appears to improve as it issues from the
[)ress. The number of able writers, who contribute ori-
jinal matter in all the departments of literature and sci-
;nce is amply sufficient to give it celebrity and high char-
acter. To men engaged in the active pursuits of life - , - .
whose time is precious this popular dictionary is a most scnption is large, and increasing; and in those quar-
valuable and ready mode of reference. It embraces brief ters where its circulation is greatest, and where it is
views and sketches of all the late discoveries in science '



now before the public, and the reception they have
met with is the best evidence that the publishers have
fulfilled the promises made at its outset. They have
now only to promise, for the editors and themselves,
that no exertion shall be spared to render the remain-
ing volume equal to those already published, and
thus sustain the reputation it has acquired. The sub



and the present condition of literature, politics, <fcc. &c.
Every merchant's counting-room every lawyer's library
very mechanic every fanner ought to possess a copy
of this useful and valuable work." Courier.


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Online LibrarySamuel ButlerGeographia classica, or, The application of antient geography to the classics → online text (page 18 of 23)