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Samuel Deane.

The Newengland farmer : or, Georgical dictionary ; containing a compendious account of the ways and methods in which the important art of husbandry, in all its various branches, is, or may be practised, to the greatest advantage, in this country online

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Online LibrarySamuel DeaneThe Newengland farmer : or, Georgical dictionary ; containing a compendious account of the ways and methods in which the important art of husbandry, in all its various branches, is, or may be practised, to the greatest advantage, in this country → online text (page 1 of 54)
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52829



THE

NEWENGLAND FARMER ■

OR

GEORGICAL . DICTIONARYo

CONTAINING

A COMPENDJOUS ACCOUNT

OF TBB

PFATS AND METHODS

IN WBICB THB

IMPORTANT ART of HUSBANimY,

IN ALL ITS VARIOUS BRANCHES,

IS, o& MAY BE,

•RACTISED, TO THE GREATEST ADVANTAGE,
IN THIS COUNTRY.



BY SAMUEL DEANE, B. D.

ViCEPRKSIDENT o? BOWDOIN COLLEGE, and FELLOW of thi
AMERICAN ACADEMY of ARTS and SCIENCES.



THE SECOND EDITION,

SORRECTED, IMPROVED, and ENLARGED, by the AUTHOR.



*• FRIGORIBUS PARTO AGRICOL^ PLERUMQl'E FRUUlTrUS,

MLTUAQT'E INTER SE LJETI COXVIVIA CURA>rT :

INVITAT GENIALIS HYEMS, CURASQLB RESOL\ IT." riRGIL.



PRINTED AT WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS,

AT THE PRESS OF

ISAIAH THOMAS,

By LsoNARD WoRCESTSR, for Isaiah Tuoma(|



\



' i797t



TO THE



FARMERS



or

NEWENGLAND ;
THIS EDITION

UF THE

GEORGICAL DlCTlONART,

REVISED, CORRECTED, an a ENLARGED,
IS INSCRIBED,

WITH MUCH RESPECT,
BY THEIR MOST OBEDIENT,
AND

VERY HUMBLE SERVANT,

THE EDITOR.

WORCESTER, MARCH, I797.



CONTENTS.






Cabbage
Calf
Canker

Canker Worm
Carriage



A. ract

Agriculture 9

Air 10

Anticor ii

Ants 13

Apples 13

Apple Tree 14

Arable Land 15
Arncho]iLe,Cynara 15
Artichoke,//<r/ean/. 15

AOi 15

Aftes 16

Afparagus 17

Afpen 17

Autumn 17

Axe 17

Barley

Barn

Barn Yard

Bean

Beer

Bees

Beet

Bidens

Bird Grafs

Blight

Blood

Bog

Browfe

Buck Wheat

Bull

Burn Baking

Burnet

Burnt Clay

Burnt Grain

Buflies



rue

Carrot 44

Cart 47

Caterpillar 47

Cattle 48

Change of Crops 50
Change of Seeds 52



x8
21

21

23
25
29

32
33
33
34
34
34
34
35
35

36

37

37
38



39
41

42

42

44



Charcoal

CharlocJc

Cheele

Chick Weed

Churn

Churning

Cider

Ciderkin

Cives

Clay

Clay Soil

Clearing Land

Climate

Clog

Clover

Cole Seed

Compoft

Copfe

Corn

Coulter

Cow

Cow Hoiife

Cradle

Cream

Crop

Cucumbers

Cultivator

Currant

Cuftom

Cuttings

Cyon

D.

Dairy

Dairy Room

Darnel

Denlhiring

Dibble

Ditch

Ditching



54
55
65
56
56
67

1^

62
62

64
66
66
66
69

7=>
71



72

72

72
74
74
74
75
7b

76
77

77



77
78

79

79

79

79
60



Divifions


80


Door Dung


81


Drain


82


Dray


85


Drefling


85


Drill


86


Drought


V


Dung


89


Dunghills


94


Dung Mecrs


95


Dutch Hoe


95


Dyke


95


E.




Earth


96


Eddifli


97


Effluvium


97


Elder


97


Elf Shot


97


Elm


08


Employment


98


EncJofure


58


Ewes


<)8


Excrement


99


Experience


99


Experiments


99


F.




Faggot


101


Fall


101


Fallowing


101


Falfe Quarter


103


Fan


103


Farcy


103


Farm


104


Farmer


105


Fen


los


Fence


105


FcrmetUation


110


Fern


111


Fefcue


111


Field


111


Fifh


111


Flail


112


Flanders Grafs


112


Flax


112


Flax Brake



52829



VI



CONTENTS.



Flnx Brake


115


Hidebound


153


Flooding


115


Hoe


1.54


Flour


116


Hoeing


>54


Flower


116


Hoglly


V57


Flv


117


Hop


158


Foal


117


Horn Diftemper


160


Fodder


117


Horfe


i6o


Foddering


liq


Horfe Hoe


162


Fog


121


Hurdle


162


Folding


121


Hurls in the 1
Withers J


163


Food of Plants


122


Forci'l


125


Hufbandry


163


Foandcring


125


I.




Freezing


127




F^ uit Trees


129


Improvement


163
166


Furrow


^31


Inarching


Furrowing


'31


Inclofure


169


G.




Increafe


169




Indian Corn


170


Garden


131


Inoculating


176


Gardening


132


Infect


^77


Garget


132


Intcrral


/4


Gigs
Glanders


»^3


K.




Goats


»33


Kale


185


Goofe


m


Kalendar


185


Grafting


^34


Kali


i-^e


Grain


'34


Kalmia


186


Granary


*3''


Kid


186


Grafs


136


Killing


186


Gravel


J 37


Kiln


187


Greafe


^3^


Kine


187


Green DrefTing


139


Kitchen Garden


4


Greens


'39


L.




Green Scouring


^39




Gripes


139


I^ambs


188


Ground '


140


Lampas


1H9


Grove


140


Land


189


Grub


i4i


Larch


189


H




Layers


189


J. X .




Lay Land


190


Harrow


14 »


Leaves


190


Harrowing


H3


Lees


190


J-iarveft


»45


Lice


191


Halchel


146


Lime


191


Hay


.147


Limeftone


192


Hayhoolc


147


Loam


193


Haymaking


H7


Locuft Tree


193


Hemp


15^


Luccfn


194


Heniin^ Furrows i"."^


Lupines


*94


Herds Grafs


153


Lye


195



M. ft,,

Malanders 195

Malt 19^

Malt Duft 195

Manure 196

Maple 203

Mare 2?o
Marking of Cattle2oo

Marie 201

Marlh • 203

Mattock 2C4

Meadow 204

Meafles 2C5

Melon 205

Meflin 205

Metheglin 206

Mice 2c6

Mildew 207

Milk 210

Millet 210

Mofs 211

Mould 212

Mouldboard 213

Mow 213

Mowing 213
Mowing GrouDd2i4

Muck 217

Mud 217

Mulberry 219

Mulch 219

N.

Nave 219

Navel Gall 219

Nectarine 220
New Hufbandry 220

Nurfery 225

Nut Tree 226

Nympha 227



Oak

Gats

Olive

Onions

Orchard

Ore Weed

Ofier



22 S
231
232

233
23;
237
239



Overflowing 1
ofiheGallj ""^

Olli HQUfi?3



C O I^ T E N T S.



Out Houfcs


240


Ox


240


Oyfter


340


P.




Pale


241


Pan


241


Panax


242


Panic


243


Parfnep


243


Pafture


245



Pafture of Plants 247

Peach Trees 249

Pear Trees 249

Peafe 250

Peat , 253

Pen 255

Perkin or Purre 259

Perry 255
Perfpiration "•

ot Plants / ^^5

Plant 25^

Plafter of Paris 257

Plat 258

Plough 2 -,8

Ploughing 260

Plum Trees 265

Poll Evil fi66

Pond 266

Poplar 267

Potato 268

Poultry 274

Prong Hoe 275

Provender 275

Pulfe 275

Q.

uakingMeadow275
275
275

276
juincunx Order 276
►uitch Grafs 276



>uick
Juicks
[iiickfilver
Kiince Tree



R.



Rabbit

Rack

Radicle

Radilh

Kags



276

277
277
277



Rails 278

Rain 278

Rats 279

Red Worm 279

Reed 279

Ridgling 279

Ripling Cart 280

Rod 2 80

Roller 28o

Rolling 28o

Rood 281

Roots 281

Rot 283
Rotation of Crops283

Rowel 2^4

Runnet 285

Rufh 286

Ruft 2B6

Rye 286

Rye Grafs 287

S.

Salt 287

Salting 288

Sand 289

Sandy Soil 291

Sap 291

Scratches 292

Sea Water 292

Seeds 293

Seeding 294

Seedling 294

Semination 294

Shade 295

Shed 295

Sheep 29J

Shells 297

Shrub 298
Siliquofe Plants 298

Sithe 298

Sled 298

Slips 29?i

Slough 299

Sluice 299

Smut 300
Snead, or Snathe 3'->5

Snow 335

Soil of:Qi

Soiling 307

Soot 307

Sow 308

Sowing 308



Spade

Spavin

Spaying

Spelt

Spiky Roller

Spring

Springs

Spring Grain

Springe

Spur in Rye

Squalh

Stable

Stack

Staggers

Stale

Stallion

Stercorary^

Stock

Stones

Stone Wall

Stooking

Stover

Strain

Stfangles

Straw

Strawberries

String Halt

Stubble

Stump

Sty

Sucker

Summer

Sunllovver

Surfeit

Swamp

Sward

Swarm

Swarth

Swath Rake

Swine

Sycamore

T.



Tail Sicknefs

Team

Teafcl

Tetl'.er

Thatch

Thill Horfe

Thidle

Thrafhin^

Tike °



VII

I'ag«
312
312

3»3
313
3^3
3H
314
315
3^5
3»5
316
316

3V

317
3id

318
318

320
321
323
323
323
323
324
325
32/?
326
326
326
327

32 >
328
328
328

33a
33-^
331
33^
331

33 i
337



33«

3-1'^
340
340
340
341
341
Till,-o



VHI



CONTENTS;



Tillage 342

Tiller 342

Tilth 342

Timber 342

Timothy Grafs 343

Tobacco 343

Top Dreffing 34 s

Tranlplantiilg 346

Tree 347

Trefoil 34>J

Trench 348

Trench Plough. 34*$

Trowel 348

Tumour 348

Turf 350

Turkey 350

Turnip 351

Turnip Cabbage 354

V.

Valley 355

Van, or Fan 355

Udder 356

Veering 356

Vegetable 356

VegetatioH 356

Ventilator 357

Verjuice 357

Verminc 338

Vetch 358

Vmc- 358



363
364
364
304
365
366



Vinegar

Vineyard

\'ives

Ulcer

Urine

Uftifago

W.

'^Vaggon 366

Wall 367

AVane 367

Warbles 367

AA'ater 367

WaterFurro^'ing 369



Watering

Weather

A\'^edge

^^[eedlng

A^'eeds

'V\'^eevil

Wheat

W^heel

Wheezing

Whelp

Whey

White Scour

White Weed

Willow

Wind Gall

Wine

Winnowing



369
369
371
371
372
376

377
3«i

3«3
3^3
3«3
383
383
384

386
391



Winter

Winter Grain

Withe

Woad

Wolf

Wood

W^ood Land

Woody

W^ool

Worms

Wound

Y.



39 »
391
391
392
392
392
392
392
393
394
394



Yard a Aafure 395
Yard an enclofure 395



Year

Yellow Weed

Yellows

Yeoman

Yeft

Yew Tree

Yoak



Z.



Zapctino

Zea

Zebra

Zephyr

Zeft



395
395
395
396
396
396
397



397
397
397
397
397



INTRO DUCTJOI^,



INTRODUCTION.



It is much to be regretted, that the moft
complicated of all the arts, in which the brighteft genius
may find fufficient room to exert and difplay itfelf, fhould
be flighted and neglecled, by a people not generally
wanting in ambition. And it is equally ftrange and unac-
countable, that the moft ufeful and neceffary of all em-
ployments (hould have been confidered, even by the en-
lightened people of Newengland, as below the atten-
tion of any perfons, excepting thofe who are in the low-
eft walks of life ; or, that perfons of a libeml cr polite
education fliould think it intolerably degrading to them,
to attend to praftical agriculture for their fupport.

Perhaps, one occafion of the low efteem in which huf-
bandry has been held, in this country, may have been
the poor fuccefs which has moft commonly attended the
labours of thofe who have embraced the profeflion. Not
only hare moft of them failed of rapidly increafing their
eftates by it, bu too many have had the mortification of
making but an indiEFerent figure in life, even when they
have ufed the ftrideft economy, and worn out their con-
llilutions by hard and incellant labour. The misfortune
has been, that a great proportion of their toil ha^ been
loft by its mifapplication. To prevent this evil in fu-
ture is a leading defign of the prefent publication. And
fmce manv among us begin to be c6nvinced of the ur-
gent neceffity of having the attention of the publick turn-
ed to agriculture, it is hoped that the following attempt to
promote the knowledge of its myfteiies, and a. fpinted at-

£^ tentiQQ



a I N T R O D U C T 1 ON.

tcntipn to the operations of it, will meet with the grciitT'
approbation and fuccefs. And as a very refpe61able So-
ciety in the Commonwealth of Maffachufetts have under-
taken to propagate the knowledge of hufbandry, the day
may be at hand, when the employment of the farmer fhall
no more be treated with contempt ; when the rich, the po-
lite, and the ambitious, fhall glory in paying a clofe at-
tention to their farms ; when refpedlable perfons Ihall
confefs it is one of the noblefh employments to aflift na-
ture in her bountiful prodiiftions * when it fhall be our
ambition to follow the example of the firft man in the
nation, who does not think an attention to hufbandry
degrading ; and wlien. inftead of being afhamed of their
employment, our laborious farmers fhall, as a great writ-
er fays, " tofo about their dung with an air of majefly."

Amidfl the laudable efforts that are now making to
promote fo excellent a defign as the revival of agricul-
ture, the writer of the following fheets is humbly attempt-
ing to throw in his mite. He has been more prompted
to engage in fo arduous an undertaking, by an opinion
he has long entertained of the need of a work of this kind,
adapted to the Hate and circumftances of this country,
than by any idea of his being thoroughly qualified to
undertake it.

European books on agriculture are- fufhciently plenty
in the world, fome of which are extremely well written ;
and this country is not wholly unfurniflied with them.
But they are not perfedly adapted to a region fo differ-
ently circumllanced. Though the produdions of En-
glifh writers may be perufcd by the judicious to great ad-
\'antage, it would be unadvifable, and perhaps ruinous,
for our farmers to adopt the methods of culture in grofs,
which they recomnvend to their countrymen. Local cir-
cumilances fo widely differ in the two countries, that, in
many cafes, the right management in the one mufl needs
be wrong in the other. Britain, being generally liable to
too much wetnefs, the EngliQi methods of culture mull
in may refpeQs be different from thofe of a region that is
moflly annoyed, as ours is, with the oppofite extremity
of drought. Difference of heat and cold muft require a
coriefpondent variation in thefuitable crops and manage-
ments



INTRODUCTION. g

•Tnent- DifFercnce of fcafons and climates vary the fit
times for fowing the fame kinds of feed ; and the ma-
nures that prove to be mofl profitable in one country,
cannot always be rationally cxpt61cd to prove fo in an-
other, although they were equally obtainable. And
though Americans fpeak the Engli(h language, yet the
di6lion peculiar to different farmers on the eafi and wcfl;
of the Atlantick, and the manner of their communicat-
. ving their ideas on hufbandry are fo little alike, as to ren-
der it highly expedient that we fhould be indructcd in it
by our own countrymen, rather than by flrangers, if any
among us can be found capable of doing it in a tolerable
degree.

The writer confeffes he has never had fuflicient leifure
to attend very clofely to the ftudy of agriculture. But,
having always had a high relifh for natural philofophy,
and particularly for this mofl profitable and important
branch of it, he. has paid all pofTible attention to it for a
number of years, employed many of his vacant hours in
perufing what has been publifhed by tjiebcft writers, and
in making ufeful experiments in hulbandry. He flatters
himfelf, therefore, that he Ihall not have the unhappi-
nefs of grofsly mitlL-ading any of the moil ignorant of his
readers. Many things are written from his own exoeri-
.ence, and from that of others in this country, on
whofe veracity in their communications he can rely.
Things which are not certainly known are mentioned on-
ly as opinion or conjc6lure. Extra6ls are made from
fome of the beft authors, and marked as '';'ch. He has
not wilfully allerted any thing which he does not know
tobefa^.t. And though he has adopted the ideas of others,
he has not paflTed any thing on the pubhck as his own,
which has beeu publifhed by others, unlefs it be throu<yh
inattention or miftake. Whether the rcafonings be juft,
every intelligent reader muft judge and determine ; and
to the candour of fuch the whole isfubmitted.

Long and particular accounts of experiments, fuch as
abound in many European publications, are generally
omitted, left they fhould tnke up too much room, in a
book that is me.mt to be comprehenfive, and clieap to the
purchafer, at the fiinie time that it is dcligncd to contain



4 INTRODUCTION.

a ^\'ho!e fyftem of hufbandn'. N^either would the inten-
tion of comprehending much in a little room permit the
pages to be filled with lengthy bills of the coft of culture,
and computations of profit, which many writers have too
much run into : and in which any writer in this countrv,
where the price of labour is variable, would be in dan-
ger of deceiving both himfelf and his readers. Our farm-
ers have a fufficient knowledge of ariihmetick to do thefe
things for themfelves ; and it would not be amifs for
them to amufe themfelves in this way. in fome of their
moments of leifure.

That the writer has been excited to treat on the pref-
€nt fubjecl by a tender concern for the welfare of his
countri-, more than by any felfifh and finifter view, thofe
Tvhoarebeft acquainted with him arefufficiently convinc-
ed. At the fame time, he will not pretend to deny his
feeling of an ambition to be one of the firfl of his nation,
who has thus endeavoured to lighten the labours, and pro-
mote the happinafs of his countrymen. Yet he moft fin-
cerely wifhes, that other writers on the fubjecl mav foon
carry the fyfcem nearer to perfedion, as they undoubtedly
•will. But the difadvantages he is under by being To ear-
ly, and having an unbeaten way to explore, will doubt-
lefs apologize for him with all who are candid andconfider-
ate, and partly atone for his errors and imperfections, from
which it would be ftran^e if he were wholly free.

Though agriculture, {hidlv confidered. has nothing to
do with the breeding and management of tame animals,
yet it is fo clofelv connected with thofe employments, in
praftice, that the farmer cannot be complete wihout a
confiderable knowledge thereof. It is by the affiftance
of labouring beads, fuch as horfes and oxen, that he
mufl carry on his tillage, and fend the produce of his
lands to market. By the help of milch Vine his grafs,
hay, and other fodder, are to be converted into butter and
cheefe. Bullocks, poultr)' and fwine muft be fed and
fattened with the produce of his farm, that he and his
family may be fed with their flefb. and the markets fup-
plied with meat. And the fheep mufl afCft him in
the tranfmutation of the fruits of his ground into mate-
rials for clothing and food. Therefore the rearing, tend-
ing



INTRODUCTION". 5

jDg, and whole manngcmciit, of all thefe forts of animals,
are attended to in the ftillowinj; work ; including the
methods of preventing and curing the moH common dif-
tempers to which, in this climate, they arc liable.

Noxious animals, fuch as beafts of prey, ravenous birds,
and devouring infedls, have too much connexion with agri-
culture, as the farmer knows by his forrowful experience.
He ought therefore to be inflru6led in the mofl effectual
methods of defending his property againfl them. This
arduous tafk, to which no one perhaps can pretend
to be fully equal, the reader will find attempted, and it is
hoped, in fome good degree performed, in the toilowing
pages.

As fruit trees are of effential importance to the farmer,
the rearing of them from feeds and otherwile, as alio the
grafting, tranfplanting and pruning them, are attended
to in this work.

And as agriculture cannot be carried on to the beft ad-
vantage, without a variety of luitabJe tools and machines ;
the mofl important and ufeful of farming implements
are treated of. Much of the eafe and comfort of the la-
bourer, as well as the profit of the farmer, depends upon
their being well conflnittcd. Their conftruttion, there-
fore, is minutely attended to, although the art of the me-
chanick is the branch to which it mod properly belongs.

The author attempted to arrange the parts of his fub-
jc6l analytically. But the variety of the materials he
had colle£led was fo great, and their heterogeneoulnels fo
obvious, that he found it not eafy to doit to his own fat-
isfadlion ; which is one of the reafons why the book
makes its appearance in the lexicographical form. And
when he confiders that what he is doing is not principal-
ly for the inflruQion of critical Icholars, but for the di-
reclion of the conat'non people, it appears that the want
of a fyftematical arrangement iiamatrer of no greatconlc-
cjucnce. On the prelrMit plan, he has faved himfclf the
trouble of writintr a long index, which mnfl have added
leveral pages to the volume, andincreafcd its price to the
purchafers, which ht* wifiics mav be as low as poffibje,
for their encouragement. Perhaps it need not be added,
t'lat the fafhionablenefs of an alphabetical method is a

further



6 INTRODUCTION.

further apology for the form in which this book appears •
nor the advantage the mofl illiterate reader will have of
readily rurning to any particular part cf the general fubjeft.

It IS hoped that an acquaintance with this volume, if
it fliould be perufed by the generality of our farmers, will
enable them to communicate their ideas to each other, and
to learners in hufbandry, with the greater perfpicuity and
propriety, and lead them to ufe nearly the fame language
in doing it, in the various parts of the country. For the
writer has endeavoured that his diclion fhould not only
be concife. but plain and intelligible to ordinary readers ;
fuch as is moft fuitable to the fubjed, and not adapted to
lead any into the ufe of abfurd and ungrammatical lan-
guage. How far thefe deCgns are accomplifhed the learn-
ed and judicious reader will be able to determine.

As a mumber of vulgar errors and prejudices are de-
tected, and new methods of management propofed, it is ex-
pected that ivhat is written will be cenfured by many, who
have confirmed themfelves in wrong practices by invete-
rate habits. But if perfons will only be fofair as to allow,
that there is a poflibili ty of fome want of perfeftion in
their prefent eflablilhed praftice ; which is at lead high-
ly probable, as this is a country where hufbandry as an
art has not been taught, nor much attended to ; they will
then fee it is reafonable to give a candid hearing to any
new fcheme of improvement fuggefled, and to plaufible
arguments offered in fupport of its utility ; and allow
themfelves to be influenced by them. If thofe who are
in low circum fiances fhould fear they may fuffer lofs, by
trying any new praftice in hufbandry, it is hoped the
richer fort will be inclined to do it by love of their coun-
try. For others will undoubtedly inquire concerning
their fuccefs ; and when they are convinced by experi-
ments made by their neighbours of the advantage of any
new pradice, one would think they can need no other
motive to induce them to adopt it.

On the other hand, let not the book be reprobated for
containing fo many things as it does, which are already
well known to farmers. The farmer may find reafons for
his good pradice which he has not before thought of, and
be induced to perfevere in it, And befides, all ufeful

knowledge



INTRODUCTION. 7

knowledge ought to be recorded, that it mav be retained,
and be in no danger of being loft, as a great deal has beeii
in the world. It fiiould alio be remembered that things
which are well known by fome may be quite new to oth-
ers ; cfpecially to young perlons, and to all thofe who-
have newly turned their attention to hufbandiy.

The writer has had more zeal and courage in attempt-
ing to promote improvements in agriculture, lince the
happy termination of the late ftruggle for independence
than before. Our holding the rank of a free and inde-
pendent nation allows us to confider the country as in-
difputably our own, and ourfelves as monarchs over our
farms. Nor does it appear probable, that we fliall fooii
meet with any thing that will give us a material inter-
ruption, in purfuing the arts, or enjoying the bleflings of
peace. If great improvements were now to be inade, we
might have reafon to hope we fliould enjoy the benefits of
them through life, and that pofterity would not be de-
privt"i of them.

But the moft: forcible reafon for our cultivating this art,
is the indifpcnfable necefTity of it, to enable us to live as
becomes an independent people. The alarming cffcd of
the prefent low ftate of hufbandry is, that we are neceffi-
tated to import much of our food, and clothing, while we
are incapable of making proportionable remittances in the
produce of the foil, or in any thing clfe. As a good fyfteni
of national government is now eftablilhed, I fee no reafon
to doubt but that a fpirited attention to hufbandry and
manufadures, accompanied with a more general pradlice of
fmgality and economy, wouldput usona rcfpeftable foot-
ing; fo that fuch a foundation would be laid for our increaf-
ing wealth, that we fhould be able, in a fliort time, to can-
cel our publick debts ; and might reafonably hope ere
long to become an. opulent, refpedable and 'very pow-
erful nation.

As to the prefent edition, its appearing fo foon after the
firft IS dccafioned by the rapid fale of the book, aiifing
from the general acceptance it has obtained ; and the in-
cre.ifmg demand could not otherwife be fupplied.

The author has taken the opportunity to corrcda grcit
number of fmall errors. .Some few things are fupprefl-



8 INTRODUCTIONS

c'd in this publication. The diftion in many parts is much
improved. Many articles are more largely, and more accu-
rately treated of than they were before ; and a number of



Online LibrarySamuel DeaneThe Newengland farmer : or, Georgical dictionary ; containing a compendious account of the ways and methods in which the important art of husbandry, in all its various branches, is, or may be practised, to the greatest advantage, in this country → online text (page 1 of 54)