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Samuel Henry Putnam.

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HrocI lirigaiiirr-Cicncral, U. S. V.



THE STORY



OF



Company A



TWENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT, MASS. VOLS.,



IN THE



WAR OF THE REBELLION.



By SAMUEL H. PUTNAM.




WORCESTER, MASS.:
PUTNAM, DAVIS AND COMPANY, PUBLISHERS.
1886.



C^



X.-






h ^
t^-^'^



%tX CUHfc* uX LAibufc f AI1UI Wmi AlTiM;KAI'H Sli;NATt'KK$.



Con'RHiirr, 1886,

n> R II Puln.ni



woarum rwvATi raaaa or r«»Niiuia r urr



/



TO THE MEMORY

OF

2ri)C I3catr of (i!tom|jani) .^,

I Dedicate
THIS SIMPLE STORY.



Preface.



'npHIS STORY is written from the standpoint of a private soldier,
for soldiers — the surviving members of Company A. It is an
attempt to give, somewhat in detail, the everyday life of soldiers
in active service and under canvas walls, with incidents of camp,
march, and bivouac. The "Story" may possess but little merit,
yet it may please the "Boys" for whom it was written.

No march is described in which the writer did not participate,
no battle in which he did not take a hand, in his humble position ;
and it is claimed that the story is a true one. The language is
sometimes rough, but it should be remembered that it was a rough
life we were leading. If an occasional strong expression is found
in these pages I can only say that "our army swore terribly in
Flanders" ; and I have tried to describe the soldier as I saw him
— as I knew him.

I am indebted to my friend, Franklin P. Rice, for the elegant
typographical appearance of the book. It is issued from his private
press, and is entirely the work of his own hands. Thanks are due



Preface.

W. 1*. I>crl»y. K«(|.. author uf the HiMon- of the rwcnty-scvcntl)
(Mxvv) Kegimcnt, for the use of the maps contained in this vol-
ume. ITic fine iMrtmit of our Ca|>tain is from a photograph by
Bla« I ..r li-.Mon. taken in 1863.

SAMUti. H. Plti-nam.

VVorccUcf, Mak*.

iSth Anntul Reunion uf Cu. A^

June 3.1. 1 886.



Contents.



CHAPTER I. Formation. Pages 7 to 22.

CIIAl'TER II. At Camp Lincoln. Pages 23 to 35.

CHAPTER III. Cami> Hicks. Pages 36 to 45.

CHAPTER IV. The Burnside Expedition. Pages 46 to 61.
CHAPTER V. The Battle of Roanoke. Pages 62 to 96.

CHAPTER VI. The Cafiure of New Berne. Pages 97 to 1 1 1.
CHAPTER VII. New Berne and Camp Oliver. Pages 1 1 2 to 1 29.
CHAPTER VIII. Expeditions. Pages 130 to 158.

CHAPTER IX. Expeditions {continued^. Pages 159 to 195.
CHAPTER X. Camp, March, and Bivouac. Pages 196 to 226.
CHAPTER XI. Re-enlisting. Pages 227 to 256.

CHAPTER XII. The Batile Summer. Pages 257 to 324.



Battles ami Skirmishes

in which C'tunpany A look |iart.



KilAXOKE IsUCMi.


Fcljniar)' S,


1862


N».w Bf.knf..


March


•4.


••


KiMim>N,


1 )eccmlKT


•4.


•'


Wnm^uu,


••


I6.


••


( ^1 >uie>auRt)',


••


I 8.


• •


Near KixsTiiN,


March 6.


1863.


DfKP (Juij.v.


••


•3.




(IiM Swamp.


May


22,


"


h»Ri Waltiui..


"


6.


1S64.


ClU>.TKRHKU) JuXCnoN,


.


7-


••


AKRDwriKUi Church,


••


9.


'•


l*AiJ4ij{'s Crkkk,




'5.




DRrruRv's Bixfk,


' '


1 6.


..


CoHij's Hiu^




- 1.




(*"I It flAKIUtR.


J line


I,


"


( 'har{,'f.


.


3.




PrTKRsiii'Ri;, Ciins captured.


• '


IS,





"16.
• ' I s.



THE STORY OF COMPANY A.



CHAPTER I.

FORMATION.

XHE DARK CLOUDS which had so long low

ered above the American horizon at last burst
over the fiery land of South Carolina ; and with the opening

of the

first gun fired by rebellious hands at Fort Sumter, R,,i,eiiion.
the country was plunged into a whirlwind of civil
war.

If, as Emerson says, the first shot fired at Con-
cord was heard round the world, so the first shot
at Sumter, April 15th, 1861, was not only heard
round the world, but its echoes will resound through
the ag-es ; and the state which has the credit of com-
mencing the fierce and bloody struggle of 1861, —
that dastardly attempt to overthrow the freest and
best government the world has ever seen — cannot
escape being damned to an infamy for which history
has no parallel.



8 ///*■ A'l'/^j OJ f^ out f any . I.

— The cicciion of Abraham Lincoln as President of
'**'• ihc I'nilctI Siaics in i860, was the si^Mial for an
upri^in^ of the whole Slave Power aj^ainst the pre-
vailing free-labor sentiment of the Northern People.
Ilu •' • V ■ inevitable, ami while the South
was -f^.. ^ .t:ul arininj^. the North, depend-
ing upon the ability of the Ciovernment lu protect
it&clf. was in a measure unprepared lor ihc terrible
and blocxiy stnij^j^le that was soon to follow.

\lassachusetts. however, always wait hi ul lor the
cause of Union ami Lil>erty, was ready to meet the
"' enemy when its uplifted haml shoulil strike the
blow. C»overn<»r John A. .Andrew, foreseeinj^ the
appnachin}^ storm, wisely provided for the emer-
gency : and by the promul^^ation of (jeneral Order
' -"- No. 4, in January, 1S61. the number of officers ami
men of the volunteer militia, who wouKl respond in-
stantly to any call which mi^ht l>e made upon ilu-in
by the President of the L'niieil .States, was ascer-
tained with absolute accuracy.

The Worcester companies. City (iuartls ami Li,v;ht
Infantr)', voted almost unanimously "read)-." as ilid
moikt of the companies in the state. .Subsecjuent
events provrd the wisdom of this order, for almost
Ixrfore the sound t»i lh«- first hostile j^'un o-asnl its



2^111 Rcgt. Mass. Vols. 9
reverberations, the militia of the Old Commonwealth

T 9Kf\t

were marching" to the relief of our defenseless Cap-
ital.

The men of Worcester, whose patriotism never
failed, were among the first to answer the call to
arms. The Sixth Regiment, with our Worcester
Light Infantry, encountering armed treason In the
streets of Baltimore, gallantly fought their way yy^^,
through to the city of Washington ; and the ring of Capital
their muskets on the marble floor of the Senate ^"''^ '
Chamber gave assurance that the Capital was safe,
and that the conspirators were foiled.

The Third Battalion Rifles, with the Worcester
City Guards, Emmet Guards, and Holden Rifles, ^y^,.^,^
three full companies, proceeding to Annapolis, Md., ^^lonths'
and from thence to Fort McHenry, re-enforcing the
handful of regulars there, saved that important po-
sition from capture by the secessionists of Baltimore.
The Fourth, Fifth and Eighth regiments did excel-
lent service at Fortress Monroe, the Relay House,
and In Virginia.

The State of Massachusetts had ever been noted ^y^^
for Its excellent militia system, which In point of Mmtia.
numbers and efficiency, was superior to all others.
There were many people, however, who considered



lO I h*: Siory of Company A.

it useless ami iinprofiiablc This sentiment was

* ** changed quilc rapiiUy when the danj^er signal was

I ad its enemies became its most enthu-

M«i.<aK. iricuils when ihey found that these " holiday

' ' * wf re ready at a moment's notice to leave
ii.m.. iiiemls. business. <^rn7///'/^. — J^oinj^ to scenes
of strife and unknown danj^ers, |)erha|)S never to
mum ; but resolved to perform their tliity to the
counif)' as soldiers and citizens, rej^ardless of con-
^ „, , scijuences to themselves. The three months' men.
by iheir courage and devotion to diit\ in ilu: lioiir
of peril, checked the liile of treason, ami proved the
stcHing worth of our volunteer militia. Their record
IS one which will ever redound to the ^lory of Massa-
chusetts, and will Ik! jirizetl amoni,^ her richest his-
toric treasures.

^^^^ \\\f \i\ day of .Ma\. the IVesidtMit issued a
I'f" -n callinj^ for a force of volunteers to serve

three years. He a|>{iealed to all loyal jjeojjle to aid
in maintaining the nation's honor and integrity. On
ihc I5lh of June, the first three years* regiment left
the state, and others followed in rapitl succession ;
the l^'ifleenth left Worcester on the Slh. aiici liie
Twenty-first on the 22nd of .August.



2Sth Regt. Mass. I ^ols. 1 1

The return of the Sixth Reeiment and Third Bat-



tahon, August 2nd, after three months' service, was

an occasion for general rejoicing. They were given r^j^^

a perfect ovation by the throngs of people that im- oidsixih.

peded their progress through the streets, with such

demonstrations of welcome as had never been seen

in Worcester before. The boys were glad enough

to get home, but soon became restless, and nearly

all of them re-entered the service, a larije number

as officers in the three years' regiments.

The public excitement at this time was intense.
The people were thoroughly aroused. Thousands
of loyal, patriotic men, regardless of politics or na-
tionality, were seeking an opportunity to march to
their imperilled country's defense. They had re-
solved to maintain the honor of the flag and the
unity of the states at all hazards. They only desired
leaders of ability and courage in whom they could
place confidence. Officers of experience were in
demand, and among those whose services were ea-
gerly sought for was Lieut. Pickett of the Worcester /?>«''•
City Guards. Previous to the war he had seen con-
siderable service in the militia, joining Company F",
Old Sixth Massachusetts, as early as 1840, and the
Worcester City Guards in 1855. When the first call



l6tn



Tlu Story of Company A.

. \::\ A\ April, 1861, he held a commission as lieii-

icnani in this company. His ready and jjatrioiic

• hile others were hesiiatinj^, had made him

:«»us. and ^ave him a hij^h reputation as a

..... 1 t»r un<piestioned ability and couraj^e. Since
his return from the three months* ser\'ice, he had
1- .1) oflcreil the command of the Webster comjiany
in the I'ifleenth. ami the Harre comjjan\ in th(.*
rweniy-first. hut declined, preferrinj^ to remain with
his old associates of the Thinl Battalion, who were
armnj^injj for the formation of a new rej^iment. The

' ■•» xM»n develoj>ed. and resulteil in an order from
i »«»\ . Andrew, issued Sept. loth. for the orj^anizalion
of a \\\)rcester County rej^imenl to l>e desijrnated
the Twenty-fifth ; and Captain Josiah Pickett was
authorized to recruit Co.MrANV A for this rej^nment.
I lc.ul<|uariers were immediately openeil at Briniey
I lall. then the armor)' of the Guards, and business
became brisk at once. The lx!St youn^^ mgn in the
city were eager to enlist in the new comj)any nndcr
its |)opular commander, and (piitc a number of his
old comrades in Company A. Third Ritles, were;
amon}{ the first to enroll themselves.

In ten days' time the ranks of the Comj'.in\ \\( re
filird with res4»lui«- < oiir.iircous younj^ men, aiui



2Sth Rcgt. Mass. Vols. 13

it was waiting orders. On September 26th, orders



, . 1 , 1861.

were received to go into camp, and at 10 a. m. the

same day, the company assembled for the last time in
Brinley (now Grand Army) Hall, marched to the
Agricultural Grounds, and went into camp, which camp
was known as "Camp Lincoln." These grounds ^^^'^°^^-
had a half-mile race track in the center, and am-
ple sheds for cattle and horses on exhibition days,
with a large building containing halls for the display
of fruit, vegetables, and all farm products. The
whole was enclosed with a high board fence, inside
of which the soldiers were posted on guard duty,
and paced their rounds with all the precision of reg-
ulars. These grounds, which were considered the
largest in Massachusetts, were bounded on the east
by what is now Sever street, on the north by High-
land street, on the west by Agricultural street, and
extended southerly nearly to Cedar street.

The orpfanization of the Company was here com- ^

•=> ^ ■' Lompany

pleted. Francis E. Goodwin, a young business vf\-2cc\ orgajiized.
of high character and patriotic purpose, and an old
member of the City Guards, was appointed first
lieutenant. Merrit B. Bessey, who had served with
much credit in Company A, Third Rifles, in the three
months' service, received the appointment of second



14



J h^ Siory oj Company .1.



lieutenant : and the followinjj is the full roster aiul



•Ml



roll of the Company



tUmk Af

Captain, 38
1st Lieut.. ;i



Jo«iah Pickett.
Trancis K. Gootlwin.

Mcrrit HI 21I ' 22

' A. JiiluiNtMi. I si Sergt., 42

C*ci»r^«- iUirr. Scrj^l.. 26

James M. Her\ey. 23

Jamrs J. Mcl-ine. 24

Wckome W. Spraj^ur. 33

Frank U R. Cocs. Corp.. 23

Jaalam (<ates. 38

Calvin A. Wesson. ' * 29

Kdwin A. Morse. * ' 19

Henr> M. Kle. 30

John A. Thompson. 22

John A. Chener)-. 26

Samuel H. Putnam. 27
JuUal H. Havtn Musiii.m. 54
Jesse 1^ Veaw.

Sylvanus (i. Hullf>ck. W.i^^oncr.
Nathaniel (). Adams, Private,
Samuel ' I \lM»rn.
' li.irtlrtt



- /

■» •»
>9



KnidrMT

Worcester.



(iraflon.
Worcester.



Norihhoro'.
Worcester.

Hoston.
Worcester.



z^tJi RegL, Mass. Vols.



15



George R. Brown,
Moses P. Brown,
Moses L. Bolster, Jr.,
Francis B. Brock,
Henry D. Brock,
Hamlin Butterfield,
Horace E. Brooks,
David B. Bigelow,
George W. Bigelow,
Albert N. Bonn,
Cyrus Briimley,
Hiram H. H. Billings,
George E. Curtis,
Samuel S. Dresser,
Reuben H. DeLuce,
Thomas Earle,
Lewis J. Elwell,
Joseph P. Eaton,
Daniel T. Eaton,
Elbridge B, Fairbanks,
Jerome H, Fuller,
Charles Forbes,
Francis Greenwood,
John L. Goodwin,
3



Private,



23


RosKlencc.

Grafton.


1861.


21


Worcester.


Roll


20
28


Athol.


of the
Company


19


( (.




21


Sterling.




26


Worcester.




29


1 <




18


1 (




24


' ' [Ct.




24


Jewett City,




25


Worcester.




21


' '




20


( (




22


Boston.




Z^


Worcester.




18


( i




2 I


Auburn.




31


t 1




30


Worcester.




18


( 1




42


1 (




00


I (





20



l6



Tkt Story of Company A.



iMi.



llcnr) (*uuld»njj;. 2d. IVi\
Jaincs M. C*rt*cn.
Amlrrw I-, Cx.'orgc,
Charlc!i Ht-nr)-.
C)*!!!* L. Huichins.
Edward S. Mcwiii.
John \V. Hartshorn.
William H. Holman.
C)TU!i W. Holman.
Edwart! P. Hall.
William R. Kccf.
Charles H. Knowhon.
IU*njamin C. Kn<»\vlrv
Au);ijsius Knowlcs.
Lucius F. Kinj;man.
Hrnr>' F. Knox.
Waller I). Knox.
William L. Lyon.
Charles A. Mayers.
Charles U. Monroe.
Lloyd (i. Manninj^.
Gr-MP^e K. Merrill,
p. .! M (i. Merrill.
C 'lalherson,



ate.



30
2 I
2 I

44
30

2 1

'> t

»9
21

19
20

4-
2 1



20



Worcester.
Worcester.



.\ul)iirn.
Worcester.



.\iil)iirn.

Worcester.

.\iil)urn.

Xorthhoro'.

li..Kicn.

Worcester.

.Aiihiirii.
Worcester.



Hoston.



25th Regt., Mass. Vols.



17



Chauncey L. Metcalf, Private,

EH Pike,

George F. Penniman,

Sidney W. Phillips,

Henry H. Pratt,

William W. Putnam,

Orrin Parsons,

Walter H. Richards,

George F. Robinson,

Henry W. Reed,

Amos E. Stearns,

Georcre F. Stearns,

John B, Savage,

George L, Seagrave,

Hiram Staples,

Elijah Simonds,

Charles Smith,

Paris Smith,

Augustus Stone,

Julius M. Tucker,

Nelson Tiffany,

Chester O. Upham,

Alonzo D. Whitcomb,

Frederick A. White,



Age.
36


Resid.nce.

Worcester.


1861.


19


( (


Roll


22
24


( 1


of the
Cofupany


21


Grafton.




21


( t




34


Worcester.




18


< (




21


( «




18


< i




28


t <




22


Clinton.




25


Worcester.




24


Uxbridge.




20


Douglas.




39


Worcester.




39


( I




44


( (




20


t (




20


i i




18


Auburn.




35


Worcester.




26







20



i8



Thf Story of Company ,-i.



iMi.



Km»


ftMlk.


\tr


Kr^'dmrr


Hale \Vcs5ion.


Private,


»9


Grafton.


James Wesson.


• •


iS


• •


' ink Wri^lil.


• '


20


Holdcn.


juiin Wrij^lu.


• •


iS


Worcester.


Kdwin L). W'aicrs.


• •


-5


Millbury.


Timoihy M. Ward.


• •


»9


Worcester.


CyTus K. Webber.


• •


20


Brook field.


Total : offic<Ts


.^^ : men.


98-


lOI.


NAMI > 1


1 klXK


.rns




%»^


i(«.' k


Ak -


Hr.lJ. t..'»


Abel S. An^cll.


Private.


iS


I^oston.


Sitlney J. Atkinson.


t 1


4-"


\\"(«ri'csicr


Charles E. Benson.


• «


20


Blackstone


Walter S. IUij^lx.'e.




30


W'nrcrstCT


Daniel W. Hurt.


4 •


24


• '


John P. Coulter,


t 1


'9


Clinton.


Charles A. Davis.


t I


iS


I'lJlon.


JoM'ph L. Delaney.


« •






.Auhiirn.


Horace W, Dr>tlen.




23


Worcester


Charles Katon.


• t


22


Gartlncr.


Timothy l^'oley.




'9


W Orccsicr


Benjamin C. Green.




25


t 1


Reuben Heywcxxl.




21


1 1


Charles B. Kendall.




21





2stJi Rcgt., Mass. Vols.



19



James Kerwin,
William R. Leseur,
Horace Lincoln,
Ira Lindsey,
John Madden,
Andrew J. McKinstry,
Bernard McSheny,
John Moore,
George H. Nottage,
Charles O'Neil,
George Packard,
Henry A. Pond,
Lyman J. Prentiss,
Charles D. Roby,
Edward J. Sargent,
George E. Sawyer,
Liberty W. Stone,
James D. Thompson,
Joseph H. Thompson,
Charles E. Wheeler,
James White,
George W. Wood,
William H. Wood,



Rank. Ajie.


Rosnicni'c.


•ivate, 44


Worcester. 1861 .


19


Mil ford. Names of


26


Charlestown. ^^^''«^''^-


38


Worcester.


44


( t


44


Southbridge.


36


Mendon.


18


Dudley.


18


Hopkinton.


18


Milford.


24


Fitchburg.


18


Milford.


' ' 21


Northbridge.


19


Worcester.


' ' 21


Oakham.


23


Clinton.


38


Milford.


21


Oxford.


19


Worcester.


39


Uxb ridge.


45


Worcester.


18


Upton.


18





Number of Recruits, ^il -



t'Mrm



The Story of Company A.

The Twcniy-fiflh Rcj^Mmenl was a Worcester

****' County regiment, nearly all of the officers and men
bclonj^in^ to that section. The commanding' officer
was Colonel Kiiwin r|>ton. of Fitchbiir^. forty-five
years of age. firm and dignified in hearing, genial and
courteous to ever)* one. For many years connected
with the Massachusetts Militia, he was a thorough
soldier and a brave officer. Resigning on account
of disability affer more than a year's service, it is but
little to say that he was beloved by every soldier in
the Regiment. He still lives (April. iS86). a wreck
of hi«i former self, having lost his sight l)\ a terrible
liile blasting rocks. Peace be witli liiin.
May his end lie like the going down of tlu- sun in a
cloudless sky^-calm, serene, and beautiful.

The Lieutcrnanl-Colonel was A. !> i\. Sprague,
'it build and gentlemanly ajjpearance. thirty-
lour )»*ars of age, and a resilient of Worcester. H(*.
also, was a militia officer of ytrars of experience.
and vrx'ed during the three nu)nlhs' camj^aign as
Captain of Company A (City (iuartls), in the Third
liattalion Rifles. He was thoroughly familiar with
militar)' tactics, and a strict disciplinarian. lb- re-
signed after about a year's service in ihi- Iw* iu\ -
fifth. an<l ap|KMred again in the field as Colonel of



i86i.



2§th Re of., Mass. Vols. 21

the Fifty-first, a nine months' regiment ; later he was
Colonel of the Second Massachusetts Heavy Ar-
tillery, and was mustered out of the service in 1865
as Brevet Brigadier-General. He is, at present
writing, living in Worcester, and is still on duty as
Sheriff of the County.

Major Matthew J. McCafferty was thirty-two years

l\I(ijor

old, and a resident of Worcester. He was one of McCaf-
the (very) few lawyers of Worcester who, in 1861, f'-'*'^y-
locked their office doors, threw away the keys, and
fought under the starry folds of "Old Glory." He
was also a three months' man, serving as Lieutenant
in the Emmet Guards ; and remained with the
Twenty-fifth until after the battles of Roanoke and
New Berne, when he returned home and effectively
aided the cause by furthering enlistments, and de-
livering many patriotic addresses. At the time of
his death, in May, 1885, he was one of the justices
of the Boston Municipal Court.

Our Adjutant was Elijah A. Harkness, twenty-
three years old, and a man of very delicate build for ^'O^f'^f^^

... -. •ii'-iir 111 Harkness.

a soldier. He resided in Worcester, and had served
in the three months' campaign as Lieutenant in the
City Guards. He resigned to accept the position



The Storv of Company A.



ol Major m ihc iiiiy iir^i Rc^Minciu. Alicr tlu- war

he went Co Chicajjo, wlicre he died.

'llie Surveon was I. Marcus Rice, a well known
tt*.t physician of Worcester, ihiriy-foiir years old. Me
was wounded at Roanoke, was afterwards Medical
Director of the Eijjhteenth Army Corps, and still
later. Medical lnsj>ector of the Army of llu* Janus.
scn'injj through the war. He is still in practice in
Worcester, as genial and full of business as ever.

Our Chajilain was R<-v. Horace James, Pastor of

. . the Old South Church in Worcester. After the

j^w^t. battle of New Berne he had charge of the freedmcn,

and was afterwards CajUain and Assistant Ouarler-

master, L*. S. \'ols. li<.- dictl in 1S75.

'I*he (Quartermaster. William ( ). Brown of l-'itch-
burg, was forty-six years of age. I le was a man —
ever)botly liked him — always pleasant, and ever
ready to do a good turn for the private soldier —
no wonder ever)'body liked him. lie served his
full time of three years, and is now living in I'itch-
burg. holding the office t)f County Commissionirr.
Ever)'lxKly likes him still.

I^*t us now glance at life in Camj) Lincoln.



CHAPTER II.



AT CAMP LINCOLN.

T^HE MEMBERS of the Company, after selecting

tent-mates, quickly adapted themselves to the
routine of camp life. The work of drill and disci- Adapta-
pline now befjan in earnest. The nucleus of old

^ =• Camp

soldiers in the ranks of the Company was of great Life.
advantage ; as instructors to the new men they were
invaluable. This was soon manifested in the excel-
lent appearance of the Company on drill or parade.
Company A was assigned the post of honor on the
right of the regimental line.

It was interesting to witness the change from citi-
zens to soldiers. Camp life was new to the major-
ity of the Company, but after a few days of the regu-
lar company drill, and a few nights of sleeping in
tents, the novelty wore off ; and when the time came
to break camp, it was hard to distinguish the three,
months men from those of less experience.
4



The Sfory of Company A.

Comi>an) A. bcinjj ihc riglu flank company, was

* *' tlrilUil iu ihc bayonet exercise, and also the skir-
mish drill. These evolutions always attracted a crowd
of s|K*cialors from the niiml>ers which thrt)ngL*d ihc
grounds, and were perlormeii with the greatest tn-
ihusiasm by the Company daily. As to amusements
while in Camp Lincoln, it must be confessed that
the crowds of visitors were so great that there was
little time to attend to any : still athletic exercises
were indulgeil in to some extent. Boxing, g)mnas-
lics, and running races arouml the half-mile track
were daily practiced. The weather was delightful
during the stay of the Twenty-fifth at Camp Lincoln ;
and although the nights were often cold and frosty,
the ilays were clear and bright. The recollection of
those cri.sp. sparkling October da\s of iS6i comes
back to us like the memory of a pleasant dream.

The tents used by the Compan) in Camp Lincoln
were A tents, and were intended to hold six men
each, with all their e(juijMnents. This was rather
crowding things, and a gooil ileal like j)acking sar-
dines in a l>ox ; still it was taken as a matter of course,
and the inconvenience submitted to in j)erfect good
nature. These tents were, some time after, ex-
changed for Sibley tents, — much more comfortable



Ttmli



2Sth Regt., Mass. Vols. 25

-later for shelter tents, and at last, while before



Petersburg, for no tents at all.

The streets in Camp Lincoln were named. Our
company street was designated, as the signboard
read, "Pickett Avenue," in honor of our Captain. Camp
The tents bore names accordincr to the whims of the ^^"^"-
occupants. One was known as "Rovers' Lodge,"


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Online LibrarySamuel Henry PutnamThe story of Company A, Twenty-fifth regiment, Mass. vols. in the war of the rebellion → online text (page 1 of 17)