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the proximal half of the tibia and the proximal free portion, but, at
least in the 9 , commonly absent from the distal half of the tibia ; the
three pairs of apical calcaria are not widely different in length. Hind
tarsi short, much less than half as long as the tibiaa, the first and fourth
joints, and the second and third joints, respectively subequal, the latter
together much shorter than either of the others. Ovipositor equal in
breadth throughout, when viewed laterally scarcely or not taperiug in
the basal half.

Table of the Species of Phrixocnemis.

Hind tibiae of male strongly bowed ; distal hind tibial spurs of male as
widely separated as the proximal trnculentus.

Hind tibiae of male straight or almost straight; distal hind tibial spurs

of male much more closely approximated than the proximal.
Nearly uniform in coloring; vertex at tip, between upper bases
of antennae, bituberculate ; four pairs of hind tibial spurs in

the male validus.

Distinctly particolored ; vertex at tip, between upper bases of
antennae, not bituberculate ; five pairs of hind tibial spurs in
the male bellicosus.

PHRIXOCNEMIS TRUCULENTUS, sp. nov.

Extreme apex of vertex with a slight depression. Body glabrous,
pale luteous, becoming rufo-luteouson the dorsum, where it is heavily
marked with blackish or blackish fuscous, particularly on the posterior
margins of the segments, the abdominal segments almost wholly
brownish fuscous with only an anterior luteous stripe, the meso- and
metanotum more rufo-luteous than blackish fuscous, and the pronotum
rufo-luteous above, luteous on the sides, with heavy fuscous markings,



104 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

particularly an anterior bordering not reaching the lower margins and
thrusting back subdorsal stripes which are broadly separated by rufo-
luteous, all of which is sometimes very obscure ; legs luteous, the hind
femora externally tinged with rufo-fuliginous, in which fuscous scalari-
form markings more or less feebly appear. The antennae are moder-
ately slender and the legs short. Fore femora considerably stouter
than the middle femora, as long as () or less than a fifth longer than
( 9 ) the pronotum, and considerably less than half as long as the hind
femora, the inner carina with two or three feeble denticulations ; fore
tibiae subullate, considerably stouter than the middle tibiae. Middle
femora with 13 short spines on the front carina, the hind carina with
4-5 very short but not very slight spines ( $ ) or 1-2 feeble denticula-
tions ( 9 ), besides a very short inferior depending geuicular spine, at
least in the 9 . Hind femora much shorter than the body, but con-
siderably more than twice as long as the fore femora, stout and heavy,
being in the <J about two and a half, in the 9 about two and three
quarters time as long as broad, with a rather strong pregenicular con-
striction beneath in the , the upper carinate margin of the inner
surface with a series of distant denticulations, the outer carina almost
angularly elevated in the middle, armed, mostly beyond the middle,
with a strong serration and just before the genicular lobes with a short
arcuate compressed rather blunt triangular spine, serrate on its
proximal edge, as long as the tibial depth, followed by a nearly similar
but smaller tooth upon the genicular lobe ( <J) or with a post-median
spine much shorter than the shortest tibial spurs, another pregenicular
spine of smaller size, and between them 6-8 spinules (9), the inner
carina with a uniform series of raised points (),.or with small den-
ticulations throughout, similar to these of the outer carina but with
no large spines (9), the intervening sulcus moderate. Hind tibiae
strongly and pretty regularly bowed (<J) or faintly arcuate (9), tri-
quetral, deeper than broad, only three fourths (9) or a little more
than three fourths (<J) the length of the hind femora, armed beneath
with a single preapical spine besides the apical pair; spurs sub-
opposite, in the $ four pairs in number, the basal at about the end of
the proximal third of the tibia, markedly increasing in length toward
the tarsi, so that the proximal are only half as long as the distal, the
middle ones slightly longer than the tibial depth, set at an angle of
about 70 with the tibia and divaricating about 45 ; in the 9 six
pairs in number, the basal placed before the end of the proximal fourth
of the tibia and just beyond a slight but distinct constriction of the
tibia, the distal series as long again as the proximal, the inner series a



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 105

little longer than the outer, the shortest not exceeding in length the
tibial depth, the proximal more recumbent than the distal and there-
fore set at an angle with the tibia varying from 40 to 75, divaricat-
ing 20 30, the whole faintly incurved ; inner middle calcaria of $
scarcely longer than the others or than the distal spurs and much
shorter than the first tarsal joint; calcaria of 9 subequal but decreasing
in length from above downward, those of opposite sides subequal, the
longest no longer than the shortest tibial spurs and much shorter than
the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi about two fifths as long as the tibiae,
the first and fourth joints subequal, and either nearly twice as long as
the second and third, which again are subequal, and all but the last
apically produced beneath in the 9 to a spinous point. Cerci slender,
tapering regularly, about three fourths as long as the femoral breadth.
Ovipositor short, hardly as long as the fore femora, straight, broad
even at apex, the extreme upper tip of which is feebly produced ; teeth
of inner valves aculeate, arcuate.

Length of body, $ 15 mm., 916 mm. ; pronotum, $ 5 mm., 9 4.5
mm. ; fore femora, $ 5 mm., 9 5.25 mm. ; hind femora, $ 12.5 mm.,
9 11.25 mm.; hind tibiae, $ 10.5 mm., 9 8.5mm.; ovipositor, 5 mm.

2 <J, 1 9. Peru, Nebr., Professor Townsend; Colorado, July,
Snow, Coll. Univ. Kans., all through L. Bruner.

PHRIXOCNEMIS VALIDUS, sp. nov.

Nearly uniform testaceous, glabrous, with feeble infuscation in
clouds upon the sides of the pronotum, and to a scarcely perceptible
degree upon the whole dorsum, made more evident by a fine medio-
dorsal luteous thread down the whole body, the legs of the body color,
but the apical half of the femora more or less though at most feebly
infuscated and the hind femora tipped narrowly with fuscous ; the
hind femora have also a faint rufous tinge. The antennae are moder-
ately stout and probably at least three times as long as the body, and
the legs short and stout, the vertex rudely bituberculate. Fore femora
distinctly stouter than the middle femora, a sixth longer only than the
pronotum and half as long as the hind femora, the inner carina fur-
nished with a row of minutest denticles but with no subapical spine.
Middle femora with three subequal spines on the front carina, the hind
carina unarmed and apparently with no genicular spine. Hind femora
very much shorter than the body, twice as long as the fore femora,
very stout, being not over two and a half times longer than broad,
with only two or three raised points on the inner edge of the upper
surface beyond the middle, the outer and inner carina? similarly armed



106 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

with miuute denticulations, the intervening sulcus not broad. Hind
tibiae considerably shorter than the femora, straight, stout, armed
beneath with a single small preapical spine, besides the unusually long
apical pair ; the four pairs of spurs are opposite or subopposite, the
basal near the end of the proximal third of the tibia, regularly increas-
ing in length distally, so that the last are as long as the nearest calcaria,
while the proximal are but little more than half that length or than
the tibial depth, set at an angle of 70-80 with the tibia and divaricat-
ing only about 20, the whole feebly incurved, the tips not more so ;
the spurs are also more closely crowded on the distal half of the tibia
than before it, and indeed so crowded as to have no intervening spines,
which even between the others are few in number and irregular, the
two distal spurs with the proximal calcaria being at uniform distances
apart, a distance hardly one half that which separates the preceding
spurs ; all the calcaria are subequal in length, those of opposite sides
similar, but they decrease slightly from above downwards, and the
longest is as long as the first to third tarsal joints combined. Hind
tarsi hardly more than a third as long as the tibiae, the first and fourth
joints subequal and either of them much longer than the subequal
second and third joints combined. Cerci moderately stout, equal and
single jointed in proximal half, tapering pointed and multiarticulate
beyond, the whole about as long as the width of the hind femora.

Length of body, 15 mm. ; antennae, 29+ mm. ; pronotum, 4.3 mm. ;
fore femora, 5 mm. ; hind femora, 10 mm. ; hind tibiae, 9 mm.

1 $. California, H. Edwards.

PHRIXOCNEMIS BELLICOSUS, sp. nov.

Vertex smooth. Rather bright luteo-testaceous, subglabrous, very
broadly marked with blackish fuscous especially in a broad anterior
bordering to the pronotum, and a broader or narrower posterior bor-
dering to all the segments, relatively broader on the abdominal than
on the thoracic segments, but on the latter sometimes reinforced by a
stout mediodorsal stripe deeper in color posteriorly than anteriorly ;
the interior edges of the anterior and posterior borderings of the pro-
notum are very irregular, and particularly show subdorsal posterior
thrusts of the anterior, and laterodorsal anterior thrusts of the posterior
bordering; the lower borders of the thoracic segments are broadly
luteous and immaculate ; the legs are luteous, the femora infuscated
more or less especially beyond the middle, the hind pair with more or
less distinct scalariform markings. The antennae are slender and
about three times as long as the body, and the legs short. Fore



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 107

femora distinctly stouter than the middle femora, very little longer
than the pronotum and much less than half as long as the fore femora,
the inner carina, at least in the male, with a couple of minute sub-
apical spines ; fore tibiae much stouter in the $ than in the 9 .
Middle femora with two (<J) or 0-1 (9) spines on the front carina,
the hiud carina quite unarmed, even wanting a genicular spine. Hind
femora about two and a third times longer than the fore femora but
much shorter than the body, very stout, being about two and three
quarters times longer than broad (narrower in the 9 ), the upper surface
with 3-4 raised points on its inner edge, the outer carina in the male
elevated, arcuate, with about eleven subequal small triangular spines in
the distal half, in the female hardly elevated with similar but very
feeble spinules, the inner carina with a series of smaller denticulatious,
the intervening sulcus narrow, but in the male deep. Hind tibiae very
stout, much shorter than the femora, broadly and faintly arcuate, but
in the female this is scarcely perceptible, armed beneath with a single
subapical spine besides the apical pair; the five (<?) or six (9) pairs
of spurs are subalternate, the basal at about the end of the proximal
fourth of the tibia, increasing in length from the first to the penulti-
mate, the ultimate and the three calcaria then decreasing in reverse
order, the proximal not much more than half as long as the distal and
much shorter than the tibial depth, the distal spurs more closely
crowded than the proximal, and lacking between them the few and
irregular spines of the second order found between the proximal, all
set at an angle of 60-70 with the tibia and divaricating 20-30 only,
the whole feebly incurved, their tips perhaps slightly more ; calcaria
'of opposite sides subequal, the longest (uppermost) shorter than the
first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi much less than half as long as the tibiae,
the first and fourth joints subequal and either of them more than twice
as long as the subequal second and third joints together. Cerci slender
and no longer than the width of the hind femora. Ovipositor slender
and of uniform width excepting a slight apical expansion, about as long
as the hind tibiae, the tip acutangulate, at an angle of about 40,
slightly upturned, the inner valves crenato-denticulate with four
projections which face posteriorly.

Length of body, $ 11.5 mm., 9 9.5 mm.; antennae, $ 31+ mm.,
9 (est.) 18+ mm. ; pronotum, 4 mm., 9 3 mm. ; fore femora,
$ 4.3 mm., 9 3.35 mm.; hind femora, $ 9.9 mm., 9 8 mm.; hind
tibiae, $ 8.5 mm., 9 6 mm. ; ovipositor, 6 mm.

1 <?, 1 9 . Colorado, H. K. Morrison, the $ at an elevation of
7,000', the 9 at one of 5,000' (the therefore probably in the Ute
Pass, the 9 on the plains between Denver and Colorado Springs).



108 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

DAIHINIA HALDEMAN.

Daihinia Hald., Proc. Amer. Assoc. Adv. Sc., ii. 346 (1850);

Girard, Marcy Expl. Red River, 257 (1853) ; Scudd., Bost. Journ.

Nat. Hist., vii. 443 (1862).
Not Daihinia Sauss., Orth. Nova Amer., i. 14-15 (1859).

This genus is remarkable for lacking the third tarsal joint of the
fore and hind legs. Brunner (Monogr. Stenop., 60, foot-note) pre-
sumed this to be an abnormal condition found in a single specimen
seen by me ; but it was seen and specially remarked upon both by
Haldeman and Girard before me, and I have examined fourteen speci-
mens of both sexes, all of which agree in this particular except that
in two or three of them the fore or hind tarsi, or both, are broken,
so that it cannot be affirmed of them. There can be no question that
it is normal as no specimen of the two species has been found in which
the condition was different.

Table of the Species of Daihinia.

Hind femora of male about two and a half times longer than broad,
armed with 3-4 very large spines on the apical half of the outer
carina much larger than the others, the inner carina much more
feebly armed ; hind tibiae armed beneath with a single subapical
spine brevipes.

Hind femora of male fully three times as long as broad, the spines of
the outer carina nearly uniform and much less prominent than
those of the inner carina ; hind tibiae armed beneath with a row
of spines gigantea'.

DAIHINIA BREVIPFS.

Phalangopsis (Daihinid) brevipes Hald. ! , Proc. Amer. Assoc. Adv.
Sc., ii. 346 (1850) ; Walk., Catal. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 116
(1869).

Daihinia brevipes Girard, Marcy Expl. Red River, 257, pi. 15, figs.
9-13 (1853); Id., Ibid., 246, pi. 15, figs. 9-13 (1854); Scudd.!,
Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii. 443, fig. 3ab (1862) ; Walk., Catal.
Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 205 (1869) ; Glover, 111. N. A. Entom.,
Orth., pi. 7, figs. 14, 15 (1872) ; Brunn., Monogr. Stenop., 60 (1888) ;
Brun., Publ. Nebr. Acad. Sc., iii. 31 (1893).

Upper waters of the Red River of Arkansas (Girard) , Platte River
above Ft. Laramie, Wyo. (Haldeman, Scudder) ; Sand Hills, Western
Nebraska, and other points in Nebraska, as Sugar Canon and Thed-



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 109

ford, Thomas Co. (Bruner) ; Ft. Hays, Ellis Co., Kans., J. A. Allen
(Mus. Comp. Zool.) ; Ellis, Kansas, Watson (Mus. Comp. Zool.) ; Kan-
sas (Bruner) ; Black Hills, South Dakota (E. P. Austin) ; a specimen
was also obtained during the Pacific R. R. Surveys under Lt. E. G.
Beckwith, U. S. A., near Lat. 38, presumably in Southern Colorado,
and it was taken by Snow in Colorado (Bruner). The species there-
fore extends along the eastern margin of the Rocky Mts. from Lat.
34 to 44 N.

DAIHINIA GIGANTEA.

Daihinia giganlea Brun.!, Bull. Washb. Coll., i. 127 (1885);
i. 195 (1886).

Udeopsylla gigantea Brun.!, Can. Ent., xxiii. 39 (1891); Id.,
Publ. Nebr. Acad. Sc., iii. 31 (1893).

Labette and Berber Cos., Kans. (Bruner). Bruner also reports it
to be found in Nebraska and the Indian Territory.

NOTE. Daihinia mexicana Sauss. is not a Daihinia, nor one of the Ceutho-
phili, but has been placed by Brunner in the genus Glaphyrosoma among the
Anostostomata

UDEOPSYLLA SCUDDER.

Udeopsylla Scudd., Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii. 442 (1862) ; Brunn.,
Monogr. Stenop., 59 (1888).

Table of the Species of Udeopsylla.

Body piceous, occasionally with faint rufous spots .... nigra.
Body varying in color from dark testaceous to mahogany brown.

robusta.
UDEOPSYLLA NIGRA.

Udeopsylla nigra Scudd.!, Can. Nat., vii. 284-285 (1862) ; Id.!.
Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii. 443, fig. 2 (1862) ; Walk., Catal. Derm.
Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 205 (1869) ; Thorn., Rep. Geol. Geogr. Expl.
Surv. 100th Mer., v. 902 (1875) ; Broadh., Trans. St. Louis Acad.
Sc., iii. 345 (1876) ; Caulf., Rep. Ent. Soc. Ont., xviii. 63, 69
(1886); Brun., Bull. Washb. Coll., i. 195 (1886) ; Brunn., Monogr.
Steiiop., 60 (1888) ; McNeill, Psyche, vi. 27 (1891) ; Osb., Proc. Iowa
Acad. Sc., i. ii. 119 (1892) ; Brun., Publ. Nebr. Acad. Sc., iii. 31
(1893); Blatchl., Proc. Ind. Arad. Sc., 1892, 153 (1894).

CeiUhophilus niger Scudd.!, Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii. 437 (1862) ;
Walk., Catal. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 202 (1869) ; McNeill, Psyche,
vi. 27 (1891) ; Blatchl., Proc. Ind. Acad. Sc., 1892, 153 (1894).



110 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

The specimens described by me as a Ceuthophilus belong to this
species, though separately described at the same time.

Specimens are recorded as having been taken, or have been seen
by me, from Perry Co., 111., Dr. E. R. Boardman (Uhler) ; Illi-
nois (Uhler, Comstock, McNeill) ; Southern Illinois and Rock
Island, 111. (Uhler) ; Red River, Manitoba (Caulfield) ; Carbery,
Manitoba, in the gizzard of a sparrowhawk (Fletcher) ; Northern
Minnesota, leaping about in the grass at midday (Scudder) ; Denison,
Crawford Co., Iowa, July 13, 15, 20 (J. A. Allen) ; Iowa (Osborn) ;
Nebraska City and the Platte Valley, Nebr. (F. V. Hayden) ; Ne-
braska City, West Point, and Pine Ridge, Nebr. (Bruner) ; Northeast
Nebraska (Bruuer) ; Berber Co., Kans., and Topeka, Kans., Cragin
(Bruner); Missouri (Broadhead) ; Sedalia, Mo. (U. S. Nat. Mus.) ;
Dakota (Bruner), and Colorado, 5,000' (Morrison) ; so that its general
range appears to be between the Mississippi River or a little east of
the main stream to the Rocky Mountains between Lat. 37 and 50
North. But I have two specimens in my collection, one from North
Carolina (Shute), the other from El Dorado Co., Calif., 4,000' (Giss-
ler), both of them far beyond the otherwise known limits of the
species. Of the latter locality I entertain no doubt, especially as I
have recently found in the Museum of Comparative Zoology a single
specimen collected by Morrison in Arizona; but as to the former I am
inclined to believe the label became accidentally attached to the wrong
insect, particularly as Shute's collection was made on the seaboard.

UDEOPSYLLA ROBUSTA.

Phalangopsis (Daihinia) robustus Hald. ! , Proc. Amer. Assoc. Adv.
Sc., ii. 346 (1850); Walk., Catal. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 117
(1869).

Daihinia robusla Girard, Marcy Expl. Red River, 1853, 257;
1854, 246.

Udeopsytta robusta Scudd.!, Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii. 442 (1862) ;
Walk., Catal. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 205 (1869) ; Pack., Guide
Ins., 565 (1869); Thorn., Proc. Acad. Nat. Sc. Philad., 1870,77;
Glov., Rep. [U. S.] Dep. Agric., 1871, 79 ; Thorn., Ann. Rep. U. S.
Geol. Surv. Terr., ii. 265 (1871), v. 437 (1872); Scudd.!, Rep.
U. S. Geol. Surv. Nebr., 249 (1872); Glov., 111. N. A. Ent, Orth.,
pi. 8, fig. 9 (1872) ; Scudd.!, Ann. Rep. Geogr. Surv. West 100th
Mer., 1876, 279 ; Thorn., Bull. U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr., iv. 485
(1878) ; Scudd.!, Rep. U. S. Ent. Comm., ii. App. 23 (1881) ; Brun.,
Bull. Washb. Coll. i. 127 (1885); Brunn., Monogr. Stenop., 59-60,



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. Ill

fig. 31 (1888) ; Osb., Proc. Iowa Acad. Sc., i. ii. 119 (1892) ; Brun.,
Publ. Nebr. Acad. Sc., iii. 31 (1893).

Udeopsytta compacta Brun.!, Can. Ent., xxiii. 38-39 (1891); Id.,
Publ. Nebr. Acad. Sc., iii. 31 (1893).

Specimens have been seen by me from Clifford, N. Dak. (Bruner),
explorations in Dakota under Gen. Sully (Rothhammer) ; Sheridan,
Wyo. (Bruner) ; Ft. Fettermaun, Wyo. (U. S. Nat. Mus.) ; above
Ft. Laramie, Wyo.; Denison, Crawford Co., Iowa, July 15 (J. A.
Allen); Holt Co., Pine Hills, Lincoln, and Broken Bow, Nebr.
(Bruner) ; Nebraska City and the banks of the Platte (Hayden) ;
Nebraska (P. R. Uhler and Miss Walker) ; Republican River, Nebr.
or Kans. (W. T. Wood) ; Syracuse, Kans. (U. S. Nat. Mus.) ;
Pacific R. R. Surveys, Lat. 38 (Lt. Beckwith) ; Colorado (U. S. Nat.
Mus.) ; Albuquerque, N. Mex., Wickham (Bruner) ; Texas (Uhler) ;
Pasadena, Cal. (Bruner). From the same States or Territories it
has also been reported as follows : Dakota and Wyoming (Thomas) ;
Holt and Wheeler Cos., Nebr. (Bruner), New Mexico (Bruuer,
Scudder), and Texas (Brunner). It has also been credited to the
following: Montana, Southern Idaho, and Bloomington, 111., the
last probably in error (Thomas) ; Missouri (Bruner) ; Bourbon Co.,
Kans. (Bruuer); Colorado (Scudder); and "open sections of the
Rocky Mt. region " (Thomas) ; besides Utah (Glover, Thomas).

GAMMAROTETTIX BRUNNER.
Gammarotettix Brunn., Monogr. Stenop., 60, 61 (1888).

GAMMAROTETTIX BILOBATUS.

Ceuthophilus bilobatus Thorn. ! , Ann. Rep. U. S. Geol. Surv. Terr.,
v, 437 (1872).

Gammarotettix calif or nicus Brunn., Monogr. Stenop., 61, fig. 32
(1888).

California (Brunner, Behrens) ; Marion and Sonoma Cos., Cal.
(Osten Sacken) ; Lakeport, Lake Co.. Gilroy, Santa Clara Co., Chrys-
tal Springs, San Mateo Co., and San Diego, Cal. (Crotch) ; Santa
Cruz Mts., Santa Clara Co., Los Angeles Co., Cal. (U. S. Nat.
Mus.).



112 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.



APPENDIX.

After this paper was in type, I received from the Davenport Academy
of Natural Sciences, through the kind intervention of Prof. Herbert
Osborn, of Ames, Iowa, the single type of Ceuthophilus utahensis
Thorn, (see p. 102), and append a description of it to render this paper
more complete. It is not so closely related to C. valgus as I had sup-
posed from the description and figure, but belongs rather in the near
vicinity of G. uhleri and C. blatchleyi, though with the inferior sulcus
of the hind femora not so exceptionally broad as in those species, and
also with very different markings, in which respect it recalls rather
C.pallidus. The measurement of the hind tibiae given by Thomas
is too great. The specimen was collected in alcohol, but has since
been pinned.

Brownish fuscous with dull luteous markings ; on the pronotum the
fuscous borders all the margins broadly, the anterior and lateral mar-
gins very broadly, sending backward from in front a broad mediodorsal
stripe nearly meeting the posterior bordering, and through it runs a
faint median luteous thread ; the posterior bordering throws forward
on either side a subdorsal tooth embracing the posterior end of the
mediodorsal stripe and leaving between the two a U-shaped luteous
mark which connects the luteous disks of either side, the latter of
which are more or less mottled with fuscous lines ; the me'so- and
metanotum are heavily spotted anteriorly with partly confluent luteous
spots, and the abdominal segments are more regularly margined an-
teriorly with luteous ; legs warm luteous, the hind femora with the
usual scalariform infuscations. The antennae are moderately slender
and more than twice, probably thrice, as long as the body, and the
legs moderately long. Fore femora no stouter than the middle femora,
a little less than half as long as the hind femora, scarcely more than a
third longer than the pronotum, the inner carina with a moderately
long preapical spine preceded by a shorter one. Middle femora with
a single moderately long spine on the front carina and on the hind
carina 1-2 short spines besides a moderate genicular spine. Hind
femora nearly as long as the body, somewhat more than twice as long
as the fore femora, moderately stout, only the distal sixth subequal,
about three and a quarter times as long as broad, the surface with a
very few raised points along the upper edge of the inner side, the
outer carina considerably and subequally elevated, with about fifteen
coarse but rather small subequal and inequidistant spines, the longest



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 113

not a third as long as the tibial spurs, the inner carina with a series of
rather distant short spinules partially biseriate, the intervening sulcus
broad, equal, and deep. Hind tibiae rather feebly and broadly sinuate
(this point is exaggerated in the original figure), a very little longer


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