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Samuel Hubbard Scudder.

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for other species, from Iowa (Bessey, Osborn), Penn., Md., Geo., Ind.
(Walker), Canada (Provancher), New Jersey (Smith), Indiana
(Blatchley), and Nebraska (Brunei 1 ).



48 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.



14. CETJTHOPHILUS CELATUS, sp. nov.

Body blackish fuscous, glabrous, liberally sprinkled with luteo-
testaceous giving it a speckled appearance in best marked specimens ;
some of these spots or dots are clustered in a more or less conspicuous
mediodorsal stripe, while others margin subequidistantly the posterior
border of all the abdominal segments or are submarginal ; on the pro-
notuna and to a less degree on the meso- and metanotum they are liable
to coalesce and form vague and irregular patches and blotches ; the
fore and middle legs are luteous, more or less infuscated especially at
the distal ends of the femora ; hind femora brownish fuscous, often
with an olivaceous tint, the scalariform markings nearly obsolete.
Antennae very slender, about twice the length of the body, the legs
rather short. Fore femora no stouter than the middle femora, about
a third ( (?) or a fourth (9 ) longer than the pronotum, and much less
than half as long as the hind femora, the inner carina with a subapical
spine sometimes accompanied by a few others near it. Middle femora
with a subapical spine sometimes accompanied by one or two others
on the front carina, and on the hind carina a not very long genicular
spine sometimes accompanied by two others. Hind femora rather
slender, tapering almost regularly, about three and a half times as long
as broad, considerably more than twice as long as the fore femora,
with no raised points upon the surface, the outer carina very finely
denticulate ( $ ) or wholly or almost wholly unarmed ( 9 ) > the inner
carina feebly and very finely serratulate, the intervening sulcus narrow.
Hind tibiae straight in both sexes, a little longer than the femora,
slender, armed beneath with a single subapical spine besides the apical
pair ; spurs opposite or subopposite, the basal at the end of the proxi-
mal fourth of the tibia, no longer than the tibial depth, set at an angle
of about 45 with the tibia and divaricating about 60 ; inner middle
calcaria considerably longer than the outer, more than twice as long
as the others or as the spurs, but shorter than the first tarsal joint.
Hind tarsi a little less than half as long as the tibia, the first joint
scarcely as long as the rest together, the second much more than
twice as long as the third and with it longer than the fourth. Cerci
slight, tapering regularly, about three fourths as long as the femoral
breadth. Ovipositor straight, tapering on the proximal, slender and
equal on the distal half, somewhat more than half as long as the hind
femora, the tip very gradually attenuated and very slightly upcurved,
not very finely pointed, the inner valves rather feebly crenulate.

Length of body, $ 9 mm., 9 13 mm. ; pronotum, $ 3 mm., 9 3.5



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 49

mm.; fore femora, $ 4 mm., 9 4.25 mm.; hind femora, $ 9 mm.,
910 mm. ; hind tibiae, $ 9.5 mm., 9 10.75 mm. ; ovipositor, 6 mm.
3(J, 59- Behrens, Shaster County, Cal., San Francisco, Cal.,
Los Angeles, Cal., Coquillett, all from L. Bruner ; and Siskiyou,
Placer, and Los Angeles Counties, Cal., mostly from Riley's collection
(U. S. Nat. Mas.).

15. CEUTHOPHILUS BREVIPES.

Geuthophilus brevipes Scudd. !, Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii. 434
(1862); Walk., Cat. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 201 (1869); Prov.,
Nat. Canad., viii. 75 (1876); Fern., Orth. N. Engl., 19 (1888);
Blatchl.!, Proc. Ind. Acad. Sc., 1892, 148 (1894).

Dull fuliginous brown, but glabrous, marked with very dull and pale
luteous dots, occasionally somewhat confluent ; there is sometimes, but
rarely, a mediodorsal luteous stripe on the pronotum ; the dots are
generally a little elongate and margin the segments posteriorly, often
turned obliquely inward and when accompanied by other dots in
advance these arranged to give an added obliquity to their general
course ; the pronotura is more or less marmorate with dull luteous ;
the legs have the general tone of the body and the hind femora the
usual markings of the genus, the darker colors generally the more
extensive, but the pattern obscured apically so that the distal extremity
of the femora, including more than the geniculation, is more or less
deeply infuscated. The antennas are stout at base but immediately
become slender and are at least twice as long as the body. The legs
are short and rather slender. Fore femora no stouter than the middle
femora, a third longer than the pronotum and about half as long as
the hind femora, the inner carina with a subapical spine. Middle
femora with a subapical spine on the front carina and on the hind
carina 1-2 spines, sometimes wanting in the 9 , besides a fairly long
genicular spine. Hind femora moderately stout and plump, regularly
tapering, about three and a half times longer than broad, the distal
fifth equal, the surface with no raised points, both carinas sparsely and
finely serrate in the , almost unarmed in the 9> the intervening
sulcus of moderate breadth and V- sna P e d- Hind tibia? considerably
longer than the femora, unusually slender, straight in both sexes,
armed beneath with two preapical spines besides the apical pair ;
spurs subopposite, the basal at the end of the proximal fourth of the
tibia, nearly half as long again as the tibial depth, set at an angle of
40-45 with the tibia and divaricating about 135, their tips incurved;
inner middle calcaria considerably longer than the outer, nearly twice

VOL. xxx. (N. s. xxii.) 4



50 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

as long as the others or as the spurs, but much shorter than the first
tarsal joint. Hind tarsi about two fifths the length of the tibia, the
first joint shorter than the others together, the second twice as long
as the third and with it as long as the fourth. Cerci rather slender,
regularly tapering, slightly longer than the femoral breadth. Oviposi-
tor gently tapering on proximal, equal on distal half, rather slender,
very slightly arcuate, two thirds the length of the hind femora, the
tip acute but not produced, the armature of the inner valves a dull
and nearly obsolete serration.

Length of body, $ 14 mm., 9 15.5 mm. ; pronotum, $ 3.9 mm.,
9 4.5 mm.; fore femora, $ 5.5 mm.. 9 6 mm.; hind femora, $ 11
mm., 9 13 mm.; hind tibiae, $ 12 mm., 9 13.5 mm.; ovipositor,
8.4 mm.

3 ,3 9. Grand Menan Id., Me., A. E. Verrill ; Vigo Co., Ind.,
October, Blatchley. Specimens are in the Museum of Comparative
Zoology from St. Johns, N. B.

Provaucher gives it from Canada with a query, and it appears, but
wrongly, in Bruner's list of the Orthoptera of Nebraska (Publ. Nebr.
Acad. Sc., iii. 32, 1893).

16. CEUTHOPHILUS LAPIDICOLA.

Phalangopsis lapidicola Burm., Handb. d. Ent., ii. 723 (1838).

Locusta (Rhaphidophorus) lapidicola De Haan, Bijdr. Kenn. Orth.,
178 (1842).

Body glabrous, blackish above and on upper part of sides, with a very
broad dark rufous mediodorsal stripe, narrowing on the abdomen and
disappearing in the middle of the same, the black portions sprinkled,
especially on the abdomen where it covers all the sides, with rufo-lute-
ous dots or small roundish spots, the lower portion of the sides of the
thorax and especially of the pronotum luteous, flecked and clouded to a
greater or less degree with fuscous ; antennae fuscous, very distantly and
narrowly annulated with luteous ; legs luteous, infuscated more or less
and in this very variable especially at the distal extremity of the
femora, the hind femora almost wholly blackish fuscous externally,
flecked, streaked, or stained, especially below, with sordid luteous.
The antennae are very slender and at least three and a half times as
long as the body, and the legs slender and pretty long. Fore femora
barely stouter in the basal half than the middle femora, somewhat less
than half as long as the hind femora, nearly a half ($} or almost a
third (9) longer than the pronotum, the inner carina with two rather
short spines. Middle femora with 2-3 rather short spines on the front



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 51

carina and on the hind carina two very feeble spines besides a moder-
ately long genicular spine. Hind femora about as long as the body,
somewhat more than twice as long as the fore femora, rather slender,
being fully three and a half times as long as broad, the distal third to
fourth subequal, the inner surface above and beyond the middle with
three or four distant raised points, both cariuae feebly spinulate in the
distal half, the outer more strongly than the inner in the male, the
reverse in the female which as a whole is a little more feebly armed,
the intervening sulcus rather narrow. Hind tibiae straight in both
sexes, of the same length as the femora, armed beneath with 12 sub-
apical spines besides the apical pair ; spurs subopposite, the basal
before the end of the proximal third of the tibia, with sometimes a
supplementary spur still farther toward the base, fully half as long
again as the tibial depth, set at an angle of about 70 with the tibia,
and divaricating about 1 60, the apical third incurved ; inner middle
calcaria considerably longer than the outer, fully twice as long as
the others or as the spurs and scarcely shorter than the first tarsal
joint. Hind tarsi two fifths as long as the tibiae, the first joint some-
what shorter than the rest combined, the second more than twice as
long as the third and with it about as long as the fourth. Cerci
rather slender, scarcely shorter than the femoral breadth. Ovipositor
a little less than two thirds as long as the hind femora, straight,
feebly tapering on the basal third, equal and moderately broad beyond,
the tip a little upturned and acuminate (about 35), the teeth not long,
aculeate.

Length of body, $ 9 21 mm. ; antennae (est.), $ 75+ mm., 9 68+
mm. ; pronotum, $ 6.5 mm., 9 7 mm. ; fore femora, $ 9.5 mm., 9 8-9
mm. ; hind femora and tibiae, 20.25 mm., 9 20.4 mm. ; ovipositor,
12.75 mm.

1 $, 2 9, and 3 immature specimens, N. Carolina, Morrison (Coll.
Henshaw, Bruner). A 9 from Pennsylvania is in the Museum of
Comparative Zoology, and a 9 without locality in the U. S. National
Museum.

Burmeister's Phal. lapidicola came from Virginia and South Caro-
lina. The present species is the only one known to me from the
Southern Atlantic States which completely or approximately agrees
with his description, the species formerly referred by me and others
to this being a Northern form to which the description poorly fits,
and that described by Brunner under this name is a very different
insect.



52 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

17. CEDTHOPHILUS ARIZONENSIS, sp. nov.

Pallid luteous, so heavily infuscated that behind the pronotum there
is only left a single series of luteous spots on each side, which on the
meso- and metanotum are transverse oval and rather large, and on
the abdomen are transverse anterior stripes, sometimes confluent with
those of the opposite side ; the pronotum is mostly fuscous, deepest
around the margin, more or less dotted and vermiculate with luteous
elsewhere, there being commonly a transverse row of dots bordering
the anterior fuscous margin, and the disk on either side more or less
heavily blotched with the same ; the legs are fuscous, varying in depth
in different individuals, the hind femora generally with sufficiently
conspicuous scalariform markings. The antennae are very slender and
fully three times as long as the body, and the legs are slender but not
very long. Fore femora slightly stouter than the middle femora, a
third longer than the pronotum and half as long as the hind femora,
the inner carina with one or two spines. Middle femora with 1-3
spines on the front carina, and the hind carina generally unarmed
except for a slight genicular spine, but sometimes with as many as
three other minute spines. Hind femora nearly as long as the body,
twice the length of the fore femora, moderately slender, being a little
less than three and a half times longer than broad, gradually diminish-
ing in size and yet with the distal fourth subequal, the surface with no
raised points, the outer carina with only a few raised points, mostly on
the distal half, the inner carina with most minute but sharp distant
spinules, the intervening sulcus narrow. Hind tibia? scarcely longer
than the femora, straight in both sexes, very slender, armed beneath
with a single preapical spine besides the apical pair; spurs nearly
opposite, the basal beyond the end of the proximal third of the tibia,
about as long as the tibial depth, set at an angle of from 35-40 with
the tibia and generally divaricating about 70-80 (one example about
100), their tips incurved ; inner middle calcaria a little longer than
the outer, fully twice as long as the others or as the spurs, but much
shorter than the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi less than half as long
as the tibiae, the first joint fully as long as the rest combined, the
second twice as long as the third and with it as long as the fourth.
Cerci stout on the proximal, slender on the distal half, nearly as long
as the femoral breadth. Ovipositor four fifths the length of the hind
femora, slender, nearly straight, tapering slightly, the tip finely pointed
at an angle of about 30 and barely upturned, the armature of the
inner valves aculeate, only the terminal arcuate.



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 53

Length of body, $ 8 mm., 9 11.5 mm.; pronotum, $ 2.7 mm.,
9 3.75 mm. ; fore femora, $ 3.75 mm., 9 5 mm. ; hind femora,
7.5 mm., 9 10 mm. ; hind tibiae, $ 8 mm., 9 10.2 mm. ; ovipositor,
8 mm.

3 <J, 9 9 St. George, Utah, April 1-12, E. Palmer ; Prescott Mt.
district, Central Arizona, E. Palmer. One specimen was collected by
Xantus, locality not mentioned but not improbably Cape St. Lucas,
Lower California. In the U. S. National Museum are 3 <J, 1 9,
from Ft. Wingate, N. Mex. (Shufeldt), in the Riley collection.

18. CEUTHOPHILUS UNIFORMIS, sp. nov.

Ceuthophilus pallidus Scudd. !, Bull. U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr.,
ii. 261 (1876) ; Id. !, Ann. Rep. Geogr. Surv. West 100th Mer., 1876,
279; Brun.?, Bull. Washb. Coll., i. 126 (1885), i. 194-195 (1886);
Id. ?, Publ. Nebr. Acad. Sc., iii. 32 (1893).

Smoky luteo-testaceous with a slight olivaceous tinge, glabrous,
marked more or less deeply with fuscous along the posterior margins of
the segments and generally along the anterior margin of the pronotum ;
in this posterior infuscation are indistinct dots of luteous in a trans-
verse series ; generally there is also a mediodorsal luteous line over
all the segments but deepest and broadest on the pronotum, which is
also laterally irregularly streaked, clouded, or blotched with luteous ;
beyond the lighter more luteous bases of the femora, the legs are of
the body color, but the hind femora are considerably inf'uscated in a
scalariform pattern, apically confluent. The antennae are slender and
nearly or quite three times the length of the body and the legs are
moderately short. Fore femora no stouter than the middle femora,
more than a third ($} or less than a fourth (9) longer than the
pronotum and somewhat less than half as long as the hind femora,
the inner carina armed only with a subapical spine. Middle femora
with two spines on the front carina, and on the hind carina 2-3 (9)
or 3-4 (c) spines besides a not very long genicular spine. Hind
femora nearly as long as ($} or much shorter than (9) the body,
a little more than twice as long as the fore femora especially in the 9 ,
pretty stout, in the $ being but a little more than two and a half times
longer than broad, though in the 9 fully three and a quarter times as
long as broad, with no raised points on the surface, or at most four or
five scattered insignificant ones on the inner surface in the , the
outer carina with a few spinous points on the distal half, the inner
carina similarly armed but in the weaker, the intervening sulcus
narrow. Hind tibiae scarcely or no longer than the femora, straight



54 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

in both sexes, slender, armed beneath with a single subapical spine
besides the apical pair ; spurs almost opposite, the basal rather beyond
the end of the proximal third of the tibia, scarcely longer (<J) or a little
longer (?) than the tibial depth, set at an angle of about 45 with the
tibia and divaricating 70-90, their tips incurved; inner middle
calcaria distinctly longer than the outer, twice as long as the others
or as the spurs, but distinctly shorter than the first tarsal joint.
Hind tarsi nearly half as long as the tibiae, the first joint fully (J 1 ) or
nearly (9) as long as the rest taken together, the second more than
twice as loug as the third and nearly as long as the fourth. Cerci
rather stout tapering from before the middle, shorter than the femoral
breadth. Ovipositor nearly twice as long as the fore femora and not
very much shorter than the hind tibiae, beyond the extreme very
slightly swollen base slender and subequal but gently tapering, slightly
arcuate in the distal half, the extreme tip produced to a very fine
scarcely upturned point, the armature including the apical members
consisting of sharp minute reversed serrations hardly apparent until
mature.

Length of body, $ 10.7 mm., 9 16 mm.; pronotum, 3.25 mm.,
9 4.1 mm. ; fore femora, $ 5 mm., 9 4.9 mm. ; hind femora,
J 10.2mm., 9 11 mm. ; hind tibiae, $ 10.5 mm., 9 11 mm.; oviposi-
tor, 9.4 mm.

5 , 9 9- Plains of Northern New Mexico, eastern slope, October
14 ; Beaver Brook, Col., 6,000', July 11, S. H. Scudder ; Empire City,
Col., E. Palmer. It has also been reported from Southern Colorado,
Manitou and Idaho, Col. (Scudder), Western Nebraska, and Topeka
and Berks Co., Kans. (Bruner).

19. CEDTHOPHILUS HEROS, sp. nov.

Body castaneous, so heavily marked with black or blackish fuscous
as to appear rather as black marked with castaneous ; the latter
appears on the pronotum only in a very broad mediodorsal stripe of
unequal width, an impure blotch in the middle of the sides usually
connected with the former, and an inferior edging sometimes expand-
ing anteriorly ; in younger specimens, however, it extends over nearly
all the surface ; on the meso- and metanotum it margins the segments
anteriorly except below, separated from the black irregularly, and
extends mediodorsally across the segments ; on the abdomen it appears
as small spots dotting the surface and merging along the anterior mar-
gins ; the antennae are pale fuscous obscurely and distantly annulated
with luteous; the legs are castaneous, more or less infuscated, the



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 55

hind femora externally marked heavily with fuscous in a scalariform
pattern, with a broad obscure castaneous annulation well before the
genicular lobes. The antennae are slender and exceedingly long,
about four times as long as the body, and the legs are very long though
only moderately slender. Fore femora no stouter than the middle
femora, a little less than half as long as the hind femora, and rather
more (<) or rather less (9) than three fourths as long again as the
pronotum, the inner carina with 2-3 spines. Middle femora with
similar spines on the front carina and on the hind carina a couple of
similar spines besides a not very long genicular spine. Hind femora
fully as long as the body, a little more than twice as long as the fore
femora, the basal portion stout and swollen but delicately tapering so
that nearly or in the female quite the apical third is subequal, and the
whole is four times as long as broad, the upper edge of the inner sur-
face with 4-5 distant raised points, the outer carina with about ten
sub-equal spines, the longest much shorter than the tibial spurs ((?),
or with about six slight and distant recumbent spines (9)> the inner
carina rather bluntly denticulate, distantly in the outer half ((J) or
like the outer carina but more closely denticulate (9) the intervening
sulcus narrow. Hind tibiae barely arcuate at base (<J) or straight (9),
a very little longer than the femora, armed beneath with 1-2 sub-
apical spines besides the apical pair ; spurs subopposite, the basal at
the end of the proximal third of the tibia, a little longer than the tibial
depth, set at an angle of about 60 with the tibia and divaricating
about 130 (<J) or 150-170 (9), incurved at tip; inner middle cal-
caria a little longer than the outer, twice as long as the others or as
the spurs, and as long as the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi two fifths
as long as the tibia?, the first joint much shorter than the rest together,
the second nearly three times as long as the third and with it fully as
long as the fourth. Cerci slender, nearly half as long again as the
femoral breadth. Ovipositor three fifths as long as the hind femora,
straight, tapering and not very stout in the basal, slender and equal in
the apical half, the apex obliquely truncate, upturned, and acuminate
but not much produced, the teeth of the inner valves rather short
and aculeate.

Length of body, $ 23.5 mm., 9 21 mm. ; antennae, $ 85 mm.,
9 92 mm.; pronotum, $ 6.25mm., 9 7.2 mm.; fore femora, $ 11.5
mm., 9 12 mm.; hind femora, $ 24 mm., 9 25 mm.; hind tibiae,
$ 25.5 mm., 9 26mm.; ovipositor, 15mm.

3 $,2 9. North Carolina, H. K. Morrison; over two hundred
were found in one old hollow tree when it was felled. 2 $ and 2 9 ,



56 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

of what is apparently the same species, but smaller, are in the U. S.
National Museum from Washington, D. C.

20. CEUTHOPHILUS UHLERI.

Ceuthophilus uhleri Scudd.!, Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist, vii. 435 (1862) ;
Walk., Catal. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 201 (1869) ; Glov., 111. N. A.
Ent., Orth.,pl. 8, fig. 8 (1872) ; Riley, Stand. Nat. Hist., ii. 184 (1884) ;
Brunn., Monogr. Stenop., 64-65, fig. 33b (1888) ; Smith, Catal. lus.
N. J., 409 (1890).

Ceuthophilus latisulcus Blachl.!, Proc. Ind. Acad. Sc., 1892, 146
(1894).

Dull luteo- or rufo-testaceous, very heavily flecked with dark fuscous
so as to produce a tolerably uniform mottled appearance, ordinarily a
little more open than elsewhere in a narrow mediodorsal streak on the
pronotum, and in the tolerably clear luteous or pallid luteous of the
inferior margin of the descending thoracic lobes ; the flecking is made
up of small more or less confluent dots, which assume a certain longi-
tudinal regularity on the abdomen only ; legs varying from luteous to
testaceous, more or less infuscated, especially on the apical portions of
the femora and in the distinct and heavy scalariform markings of the
hind femora. The antennae are moderately stout in the basal, but in
the apical half very slender, apparently only a little more than twice the
length of the body, the legs moderately long. Fore femora no stouter
than the hind femora, much less than half as long as the hind femora,
but considerably more than a third longer than the pronotum in the $
though only a fourth longer in the 9 , the inner carina with 2-3 spines,
the subapical not much longer than the others. Middle femora with
the front carina as in the fore femora, the hind carina armed with 13
spines besides a moderately long genicular spine. Hind femora
longer (<J) or shorter (9) than the body, considerably more than twice
as long as the fore femora (at least a third more in the male), stout, the
apical third or fourth subequal, about three and a third times as long
as broad in the male, the darker portions of the surface of the apical
half of the femora and the upper portion of the inner side rather
heavily ($} or very sparsely (9) scabrous with raised points, the
outer carina armed with 7-8 unequal inequidistant coarse irregular ar-
cuate spines, the largest (just beyond the middle) as long as but much
stouter than the tibial spurs (<) or almost entirely unarmed but for
some 34 raised points ( 9 )> the inner carina with about sixteen small
inequidistant coarse spiiiules covering the whole length ( $) or a few
slight ones only on the apical fourth of the femora ( 9 ) the interven-



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 57

ing sulcus exceptionally broad. Hind tibiae faintly and irregularly
sinuous (<) or straight (9), distinctly longer than the femora, slen-
der, armed beneath with 1-2 subapical spines besides the apical pair ;
spurs subopposite, the basal at or a little beyond the end of the proxi-
mal fourth of the tibia, a little longer than the tibial depth, set at an
angle of about 35 with the tibia and divaricating 80-90, the apical


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