Copyright
Samuel Hubbard Scudder.

The North American Ceuthophili online

. (page 6 of 11)
Online LibrarySamuel Hubbard ScudderThe North American Ceuthophili → online text (page 6 of 11)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


the length of the hind femora, the inner carina with two spines, the
outer of which is hardly subapical but pretty stout. Middle femora
with three pretty stout spines on the front carina, and on the hind
carina from 1-4 small spines besides a long genicular spine. Hind
femora of the length of the body, about two and a half times as
long as the fore femora, very stout, the apical fourth subequal, about
three and a quarter times as long as broad ; the upper half very
faintly but closely scabrous in the darker portions, the outer carina
elevated, with 5-6 unequal and inequidistant large or very large
spines, the largest just beyond the middle, coarse, especially at base,
and much longer than the tibial spurs, besides one or two spinules
in the constricted portion of the femora, the inner carina rather dis-
tantly and rather regularly spiuulate throughout, the intervening sulcus
very broad. Hind tibia? gently arcuate on basal third, much longer
than the femora, not very slender, armed beneath apically with two or
three spines besides the apical pair ; spurs subalternate, the basal at
end of proximal third of the tibia, slightly longer than the tibial depth,
set at an angle of 45 with the tibia and divaricating about 100, the
apical half incurved ; (calcaria and hind tarsi lost in the only specimen
known). Cerci slender, gently tapering, about two thirds as long as
the femoral breadth.



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 67

Length of body, 20 mm. ; antennae, 25 X mm. ; pronotum, 6.5 mm. ;
fore femora, 8.25 mm. ; hind femora, 20.5 mm. ; hind tibiae, 22.3 mm.
1 (J. Chihuahua, Mexico.

29. CEUTHOPHILUS NEGLECTUS, sp. nov.

Ceuthophilus maculatus (pars), Scudd.!, Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii.
434 (1862).

Glabrous, castaneous, more or less, often deeply, infuscated especially
above, the infuscation often but not always terminating below the
middle of the sides, which are there sordid luteous ; a broad more or
less and often very obscure mediodorsal rufo-luteous stripe on the
pronotum, sometimes extended farther back but then generally broken ;
the sides of the pronotum and to a lesser extent the meso- and meta-
notum are more or less blotched or vermiculate with luteous, and the
abdomen is more or less but generally feebly maculate with luteous ;
the markings and the coloring vary greatly, so that it is difficult to for-
mulate any general statement; the female is apt to be darker than the
male, and specimens from New England are often almost uniformly
dark, even almost black, while the contrasts between the dorsum and
the lower portion of the sides are strongest in specimens from the
Middle Atlantic States, where they grow to a large size ; the legs are
generally luteo-castaneous, the tips of all the femora dark, sometimes
almost black, the hind femora with scalariform fuscous markings.
The antennas are not often infuscated and then generally more or less
or feebly annulate with luteous, slender and generally 23 times as
long as the body, the legs rather slender and moderately short.
Fore femora scarcely stouter than the middle femora, considerably less
than half as long as the hind femora and but very little longer than the
pronotum, the inner carina with a subapical spine, rarely accompa-
nied by another. Middle femora with 1-3 spines (largely depending
upon age) on the front carina, and on the hind carina 0-3 spines
besides a longer but short genicular spine. Hind femora two and a
quarter times longer than the fore femora, about as long as the body,
stout and tumid, the upper and lower margins almost equally arcuate,
scarcely more than the genicular portion subequal, almost three times
as long as broad, the inner surface with a very few raised points next
or at the upper margin beyond the middle, scarcely perceptible or
absent from the female, the outer carina minutely, closely, and pretty
uniformly serrulate through all but the basal third, sometimes almost
imperceptible in the female, the inner carina a feebler repetition of the
outer, the intervening sulcus moderate in width. Hind tibiae slender,



68 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

straight in both sexes, barely or no longer than the femora, armed
beneath with 1-2 subapical spines besides the apical pair ; spurs sub-
opposite, the basal at the end of the proximal third of the tibia,
scarcely shorter than the tibial depth, set at an angle of about 45
with the tibia and divaricating about 100-110, their tips incurved;
inner middle calcaria considerably longer than the outer, about twice
as long as the others or as the spurs, but shorter than the first tarsal
joint. Hind tarsi almost two fifths as long as the tibiae, the first joint
not so long as the rest together, the second considerably more than
twice as long as the third and with it fully as long as the fourth.
Cerci moderately stout, tapering rather uniformly, about two thirds
as long as the femoral breadth. Ovipositor half as long as the hind
tibiae, straight, tapering in basal half, equal and moderately slender,
the tip slightly upcurved and acutely pointed (about 35), the inner
valves with aculeate, scarcely arcuate teeth.

Length of body, $ 9 12.5mm.; pronotum, $ 4.4 mm., 9 4.6 mm.;
fore femora, $ 9 5 mm. ; hind femora, $ 12 mm., 9 H-7 mm. ; hind
tibiae, <J 9 12 mm. ; ovipositor, G mm.

31 $, 29 9- Ithaca, N. Y., Comstock (Cornell Univ., Morse) ; Jay,
Vt (A. P. Morse) ; Sudbury, Vt. (S. H. Scudder) ; side of Mt. Wash-
ington, N. H. (S. H. Scudder) ; Forest Hills, Mass. (S. Henshaw) ;
Cambridge, Mass. (Mus. Comp. Zool.) ; Princeton, Mass. (S. H.
Scudder) ; Pennsylvania (Mus. Comp. Zool.) ; Maryland (P. R.
Uhler) ; Baltimore, Md. (Mus. Comp. Zool.) ; Washington, D. C.
Cornell Univ., L. Bruner) ; Virginia (L. Bruner) ; West Virginia
(Museum Comp. Zool.). In the U. S. National Museum, from C. V.
Riley's collection, are 3<J, 2 9, from Maryland, District of Columbia,
and Virginia.

30. CEUTHOPHILUS MACULATCS.

Rhaphidophora maculata [Say, MS.], Harr., Treat. Ins. Inj. Veg., ed.
1841-42, 126 ; Fitch, Amer. Journ. Agric. Sc., vi. 146 (1847) ; Pack.,
Rep. Nat. Hist. Me., 1861, 375 ; Thorn., Trans. 111. St. Agric. Soc.,
v. 444 (1865).

Phalangopsis maculata Harr., Treat. Ins. Inj. Veg., ed. 1852, 137 ;
ed. 1862, fig. 73; Walk., Cat. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 116 (1869).

Ceuthophilus maculatus Scudd. ! (pars), Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist.,
vii. 434 (1862); Pack., Rep. Nat. Hist. Me., 1862, 196; Smith,
Proc. Portl. Soc. Nat. Hist., i. 145 (1868) ; Pack., Guide Ins., 565
(1869) ; Walk., Cat. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 201 (1869) ; Id., Ibid.,
Suppl., v. 23 (1871) ; Smith, Rep. Conn. Bd. Agric., 1872, 359, 380;



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEDTHOPHILI. 69

Glov., Til. N. A. Ent., Orth., pi. 3, fig. 5 (1872); Scudd., Hitchc.,
Kep. Geol. N. H., i. 366 (1874); Prov., Nat. Canad., viii. 75, fig. 5
(1876) ; Putn., Proc. Dav. Acad. Sc., ii. 11 (1876) ; Bol., Ann. Soc.
Ent. France (5), x. 72 (1880) ; Ril., Stand. Nat. Hist., ii. 184, fig. 259
(1884) ; Bran.?, Bull. Washb. Coll. i. 126 (1885); Caulf., Can. Ent.,
xviii. 212 (1886); Id., Rep. Ent. Soc. Ont., xviii. 63, 69 (1888);
Brunn., Monogr. Stenop., 63 (1888) ; Pack., Mem. Nat. Acad. Sc.,
iv. 72, 116 (1888); Fern., Orth. New Engl., 19 (1888); Pack.,
Psyche, v. 198 (1889) ; Davis, Ent. Amer., v. 80 (1889) ; Smith,
Cat. Ins. N. Jers., 409 (1890); Charlt. ?, Ent. News, i. 64 (1890);
Cock.?, Can. Ent., xxii. 76 (1890); McNeill, Psyche, vi. 27 (1891);
Osb., Proc. Iowa Acad. Sc., i. ii. 119 (1892) ; Towns. ?, Ins. Life, vi.
58 (1893); Blatchl., Proc. Ind. Acad. Sc., 1892, 142-143 (1894);
Cock. ?, Trans. Amer. Ent. Soc., xx. 336 (1894).

Phalangopsis lapidicola Uhl, Harr. Treat. Ins. Inj. Veg., 155 (1862).

Geuthophilus lapidicolus Brun. !, Publ. Nebr. Acad. Sc., iii. 32
(1893).

Color and markings almost precisely the same as in G. terrestris, so
that imperfect and immature specimens are exceedingly difficult to
separate ; but the darker markings in this species are as a rule darker
and cover the surface to a greater extent, and when the mediodorsal
stripe is present it is often broader and extends upon the meso- and
metanotum ; on the other hand, the maculation of the abdomen with
luteous is usually more striking in the present species (partly from
the darkness of the ground) and forms sometimes a tolerably regular
pattern, consisting on each joint of an anterior mediodorsal triangular
spot, a central subdorsal oblique dash, and posterior spots farther from
the middle line. The antennae are from two to three times as long as
the body, and slender except at extreme base, and the legs are
moderately long. Fore femora no stouter than the middle femora, a
little more than a fourth longer than the pronotum and much less than
half as long as the hind femora, the inner carina with a long subapical
spine and occasionally an additional one. Middle femora with 0-2
spines besides a rather long subapical spine on the front carina, and
on the hind carina an occasional small spine besides a long genicular
spine. Hind femora of about the length of the body, three and a half
times as long as broad, about two and a third times as long as the fore
femora, moderately stout at base, the distal fifth subequal, with no
raised points on the upper or inner surface, the outer carina with
about thirteen unequal coarse spines, the longest hardly half as long as
the tibial spurs ()or with minute distant inconspicuous spinules (9),



70 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

the inner carina with similar but uniform spinulation, none so large
as on the outer carina (<J) or with a few minute spinules on the
apical half (9), the intervening sulcus not very broad. Hind tibiae
feebly undulate in the basal half in the male, slender in both sexes, dis-
tinctly but not greatly longer than the femora, armed beneath with a
single preapical spine or occasionally with two minute unaligned
spines besides the apical pair ; spurs rudely opposite, the basal at the
end of the proximal third of the tibia, more than half as long again as
the tibial depth, set at an angle of about 40 with the tibia and divari-
cating 90-100, their tips incurved ; inner and outer middle calcaria
subequal, more than twice as long as the others or as the spurs, and as
long as the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi about two fifths as long as
the tibiae, the first joint shorter than the rest together, the second twice
as long as the third and with it longer than the fourth. Cerci stout
in the proximal half, tapering beyond, about two thirds as long as the
femoral breadth. Ovipositor nearly two thirds as long as the hind
femora, shaped and armed as in C. terreslris.

Length of body, $ 14 mm., 9 16? mm.; pronotum, $ 5 mm.,
9 5.1 mm. ; fore femora, g 6.6 mm., 9 6.7 mm. ; hind femora,
$ 15.25 mm., 9 16 mm.; hind tibiae, $ 16.25 mm., 9 17 mm.;
ovipositor, 10 mm.

18 <J, 9 9. Montreal, Canada, Caulfield ; valleys of the White
Mts., N. H. ; Chateaugay Lake, Adirondacks, N. Y., 2,000', F. C.
Bowditch ; Ithaca, N. Y., Pearce, Pettit (Corn. Univ.) ; Michigan,
J. G. Jack ; Cape Elizabeth, Me., E. S. Morse ; Blue Hills, Milton,
Mass., S. Henshaw ; Mass., F. G. Sanborn ; Conn., E. Norton ;
New York ; S. Orange, N. J. ; Moline, 111., McNeill ; Vigo Co., Ind.,
W. S. Blatchley; Iowa City, Iowa, Shimek (Bruner). I have also
seen specimens in the Museum of Comparative Zoology from Norway
(Smith), Gorham, Cape Elizabeth (Morse), Maine, Vermont, Maiden
(Higgins), House Island (Cooke), Feltonville (Jilson) and Nahant,
Mass. In addition to the districts mentioned above it has been
reported (but may often have been erroneously taken for another
species) from Howe's Cave, N. Y. (Packard), Missouri (Brunner),
McPhersou Co., Kansas and Nebraska (Bruner), and Colorado
(Charlton, Cockerell, Townsend).

31. CEUTHOPHILUS TENEBRARUM, sp. nov.

Ceuthophilus latens McNeill!, Psyche, vi. 27 (1891).
Body glabrous, brownish or blackish fuscous, heavily marked with
luteo-castaneous, often more or less pallid, sometimes with a rufous



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 71

tiuge ; the markings consist of a mediodorsal stripe of varying width
but usually rather broad on the prouotum, especially a little before
either border, generally reduced to a line on the abdomen, a large
lateral patch on either side of the pronotum, sometimes confined to the
inferior margin, sometimes extending half way to the mediodorsal line,
and a conspicuous and liberal sprinkling of roundish 'spots, generally
more or less elongated longitudinally, especially on the abdomen ; the
antennae are pale fuscous and the legs sordid luteous more or less
infuscated, the hind femora with heavy fuscous scalariform markings,
leaving roundish dull luteous spots in the openings of the upper half.
The antennae are slender and apparently only about twice the length
of the body or a little more, and the legs short though slender. Fore
femora of the same slenderness as the middle femora, much less than
half as long as the hind femora and a little more (<J) or a little
less (9) than a fourth longer than the pronotum, the inner carina with
1-2 small spines. Middle femora with 13 spines on the front carina,
the subapical the longest but not long, the hind carina with rarely
more than the moderately short genicular spine. Hind femora some-
what shorter than the body, about two and a half times longer than
the fore femora, moderately slender, being about three and a third
times as long as broad, fully the apical fourth subequal, the surface
with no raised spines, the outer carina with a few distant serrations
or recumbent spines on apical half (<) or unarmed (9), the inner
carina similar to the outer, the intervening sulcus narrow. Hind
tibiae straight in both sexes, not a great deal longer than the femora,
armed beneath with a single subapical spine besides the apical pair ;
spurs subalternate, the Sasal at the end of the proximal third of the
tibia, scarcely if any longer than the tibial depth, set at an angle of 45
with the tibia and divaricating about 110, their tips incurved ; inner
middle calcaria much longer than the outer, more than twice as long
as the others or as the spurs, and nearly as long as the first joint of
the tarsus. Hind tarsi fully two fifths as long as the tibiae, the first
joint almost as long as the rest together, the second twice as long as
the third and with it fully as long as the fourth. Cerci slender, taper-
ing regularly, three fourths as long as the femoral breadth. Ovipositor
as long as the fore femora, straight, the apical three fifths equal and
moderately slender, the apex a little upturned and subacute but not
very much produced, the teeth of the inner valves consisting of blunt
pointed crenations.

Length of body, ^ 13.5 mm., 9 12.5 mm.; pronotum, $ 3.75
mm., 9 3.8 mm. , fore femora, $ 4.8 mm., 9 4.25 mm. ; hind femora,



72 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

g 11.75 mm., 9 10.25 mm. ; hind tibiae, $ 12.5 mm., 9 10.6 mm.;
ovipositor, 4.25 mm.

7 <J, 4 9 . Port Byon, 111., July 7 (McNeill) ; S. Illinois (Kenui-
cott) ; Lexington, Ky., May, June, August (S. Garmaii) ; Bee Spring,
Ky., June, Sanboru (Mus. Comp. Zool.); Beaufort, N. C., Shute
(Mus. Comp. Zool.). 2 <J, 2 9 , from Ohio are in the collection of
Riley (U. S. Nat. Mus.).

32. CEUTHOPHILUS BICOLOR, sp. nov.

Body glabrous, luteo-testaceous, with a broad subdorsal blackish
fuscous band on either side, leaving between them a broad bright stripe
the whole length of the body, next the stripe sharply delimited, later-
ally more or less broken, ragged and fading away, narrow on the pro-
notum where it is infringed upon by a large central luteous spot on
the sides, broader and profusely spotted with luteous posteriorly, the
lower portions of the sides almost wholly pallid luteous with cloudy
infuscations, the extreme margin testaceous ; legs luteo-testaceous, the
hind femora feebly marked with fuscous in a scalariform pattern and
tipped with fuscous. The antennas are slender and at least three times
as long as the body, and the legs slender and rather short. Fore
femora no stouter than the middle pair, much less than half as long
as the hind femora, a fifth as long again as the pronotum, the inner
cariua with two or three spines, the preapical much longer than
the others. Middle femora with the front carina similarly armed
and the hind carina with one or two spines mesially situated besides
a long genicular spine. Hind femora as long as the body, two and
a half times longer than the fore femora, stout, tapering with great
regularity to the slightly enlarged genicular lobes, scarcely more than
three times as long as broad, the inner surface above beyond the
middle with a small cluster of raised points, the outer carina armed
on the stouter part of the femora with an open series of serrula-
tions, developing distally into spines, the last two much larger than
the others and half as long as the tibial spurs, followed by 3-4 slight
spines just before and on the genicular lobes, the inner carina
equally but inequidistantly and rather sparsely spinulate, the inter-
vening sulcus broad. Hind tibiae straight, slender, more than a tenth
longer than the femora, armed beneath with a single subapical spine
besides the apical pair; spurs subalternate, the basal before the end of
the proximal third of the tibia, nearly or quite twice as long as the
tibial depth, set at an angle of about 50 with the tibia and divaricat-
ing about 110, their tips incurved ; inner middle calcaria greatly



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 73

longer than the outer, more than twice as long as the others or as the
spurs, and fully as long as the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi barely
two fifths as long as the tibiae, the first joint as long as the rest together,
the second three times as long as the third and with it as long as the
fourth. Cerci not very slender, blunt tipped, about two thirds as
long as the femoral breadth.

Length of body, 11.5 mm.; antennae, (est.) 32+ mm.; pronotum,
3.75 mm.; fore femora, 4.5 mm.; hind femora, 11.5 mm.; hind tibiae,
13 mm.

1 $. Bee Spring, Ky., June 14, F. G. Sanborn (Mas. Comp.
Zool.).

33. CEUTHOPHILUS NODULOSDS.

Ceuthophilus nodulosus Brunn., Monogr. Stenop., 64, fig. 33a (1888).

Luteo-castaneous, heavily marked with blackish fuscous especially
along the posterior borders of all the segments and the anterior border
of the pronotum, and the latter also flecked with it in an obscure
fashion upon the whole disk ; legs luteous, the hind femora almost
lacking the usual scalariform markings. The antennae are slender,
but are apparently less than twice the length of the body, the legs
short. Fore femora very slightly stouter than the middle femora,
slightly ( J ) or no ( 9 ) longer than the pronotum and distinctly less
than half as long as the hind femora, the inner carina with a feeble
subapical spine, at least in the male. Middle femora generally with
3-4 small spines on the front carina, and on the hind carina 0-1 ( 9 )
or 3-8 (() short spines besides a short genicular spine. Hind femora
pretty stout, a very brief apical portion equal, a little less than three
times as long as broad, considerably more than twice as long as the
fore femora, all the scalariform dark portions of the surface, especially
in the male, scabrous with raised points, which are also clustered about
the upper portion of the inner side just beyond the middle, the outer
carina elevated, with three or four inequal and irregularly distant
large and rather coarse more or less arcuate spines, the longest nearly
or quite as long as the tibial depth, placed in the middle half, besides
a few minor spines beyond them (<) or with 45 small distant spines,
most of them in the constricted part of the femora (9), the inner
cariua with a series of closer but in no way crowded smaller and uni-
form spinules, subobsolete in the female, the intervening sulcus moderate
in breadth. Hind tibiae strongly bent or bowed near the middle and
subsinuate, on the middle of the proximal half compressed to form a
triangular denticle on the under surface, from which a regular curve



74 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

sweeps to an inferior slight spiniferous swelling just before the middle
of the distal half ( $), shorter than the femora in both sexes, armed
beneath on the distal half with a series of about three recumbent
spines (in the $ arising from slight elevations) besides the apical pair ;
spurs subopposite, the basal well beyond the end of the distal third of
the tibia, hardly more than half as long as the tibial depth, set at an
angle of about 45 with the tibia and divaricating about as much ;
inner middle calcaria somewhat longer than the outer, twice as long
as the others or as the spurs but much shorter than the first tarsal
joint. Hind tarsi less than two fifths the length of the tibiae, the first
joint nearly as long as the rest together, the second fully twice as long
as the third and with it as long as the fourth. Cerci very short, not
very slender, rapidly tapering, hardly more than half as long as the
femoral breadth (9) or developed basally as a single stout sub-
clavate apically upturned blunt joint, surmounted by a brief conical
multiarticulate appendage, the only portion which surpasses the supra-
anal plate (<J). Ovipositor brief and slight, no longer than the fore
femora, tapering in proximal, equal in distal half, the apex and arma-
ture as in C. inquinatus.

Length of body, $ 13.5 mm., 9 12 mm. ; pronotum, <J 4 mm.,
9 3.8 mm.; fore femora, 4.5 mm., 9 3.6 mm.; hind femora,
<J 10.5 mm., 9 8.5 mm. ; hind tibiae, $ 9.6 mm., 9 8 mm.; oviposi-
tor, 3.5 mm.

2 <?, 2 9. West Point, Nebr. ; McPherson Co., Ivans., Rundstrom,
all from L. Bruner. Subsequently to the description of the above
I received from the U. S. National Museum 3 <J, 1 9, from Dallas,
Texas, of considerably larger size, like that described by Brunner,
also from Texas.

34. CEUTHOPHILUS VALGUS, sp. nov.

Dark luteo-testaceous, more or less infuscated especially along the
hind borders of all the segments and the front border of the pronotum ;
occasionally a few indistinct luteous dots occur in a transverse series
on the abdominal segments, but most of the varied markings are con-
fined to the pronotum, where they are not pronounced and consist of
a dull luteous mediodorsal stripe and vague and irregular streaks or
clouds of luteous upon either side, more or less extensive ; the legs
are generally lighter than the body, but are more or less infuscated
beyond the base of the femora, the hind pair of which scarcely show
any scalariform markings. The antennae are not very slender, two to
three times as long as the body, and the legs are moderately long and



SCDDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 75

slender. Fore femora no stouter than the middle femora, less than a
quarter longer than the pronotum and somewhat less than half as long
as the hind femora, the inner carina with a single minute spine, at least
in the , besides a distinct preapical spine. Middle femora with a
single spine (9) or 2-4 spines (c) on the front carina, and on the
hind carina about four spines (generally fewer in the ?) besides a
short genicular spine. Hind femora nearly as long as the body,
distinctly more than twice as long as the fore femora, not very stout,
being about three and a quarter times longer than broad, glabrous, the
surface with no raised points, the outer carina elevated, armed with
about ten unequal and inequally separated spines, the largest stouter
than and about as long as the tibial spurs ($) or scarcely elevated and
unarmed (9), the inner carina with distant raised thick points, occa-
sionally becoming minute spines (<) or unarmed (9), the interven-
ing sulcus narrow. Hind tibiae as long as the femora, straight in the
9 , strongly bowed on proximal half in the $ (unless immature),
armed beneath with a single preapical spine besides the apical pair ;
spurs subopposite, the basal at about the end of the proximal third of
the tibia, scarcely if at all longer than the tibial depth, set at an angle
of about 50 with the tibia and divaricating about 100, their tips in-
curved ; inner middle calcaria about a third longer than the outer,
twice as long as the others or as the spurs, but hardly more than half
as long as the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi less than half as long as
the tibiae, the first joint nearly as long as the rest together, the second
more than twice as long as the third and with it fully as long as the
fourth. Cerci stout, tapering, pointed, hardly more than half as long
as the femoral breadth. Ovipositor almost as long as the hind tibiae,


1 2 3 4 6 8 9 10 11

Online LibrarySamuel Hubbard ScudderThe North American Ceuthophili → online text (page 6 of 11)