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tion, the intervening sulcus narrow. Hind tibiae considerably longer



SCUDDEB. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 85

than the femora, slender ; if armed beneath, so slightly as not to be
seen with an ordinary hand-glass ; spurs subopposite, the basal at
about the end of the proximal third of the tibia, rather longer than
the tibial depth, set at an angle of about 35 with the tibia and divari-
cating about 70, their tips scarcely incurved ; inner middle calcaria
considerably longer than the outer, twice as long as the others or as
the spurs, but shorter than the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi almost
half as long as the tibiae, the first joint not so long as the others com-
bined, the second about twice as long as the third and with it shorter
than the fourth. Cerci slender, tapering, finely pointed, slightly
longer than the femoral breadth. Ovipositor straight, considerably
more than two thirds as long as the hind femora, gently tapering in
proximal, slender in distal half, the tip upturned to an excessively fine
point, the teeth produced, triangular, subaculeate.

Length of body, 9 7 mm. ; pronotum, 3 mm. ; fore femora, 3.1 mm. ;
hind femora, 6.1 mm. ; hind tibiae, 7 mm. ; ovipositor, 4.4 mm.

2 9 . Topeka, Kans., F. W. Cragin, through L. Bruner.

43. CEUTHOPHILUS CRASSUS, sp. nov.

Specimens preserved after immersion in alcohol are dark fuscous
and very dull castaneous, the former prevailing, the latter seen on the
anterior borders of the abdominal segments in a median thoracic line,
irregular transverse bands on the middle of the meso- and metanotum,
and irregular blotches on the pronotum, mostly sublinear and very
angular ; the legs are prevailingly dusky except at base. Antennae
imperfect in all specimens but probably twice as long as the body.
Legs rather short. Fore femora distinctly broader than the middle
femora, but little longer than the pronotum and much less than twice
as long as the hind femora, the inner carina with two small semi-
recumbent spines, one of them subapical. Middle femora with 3-4
small spines on the inner carina, one subapical, and on the hind carina
3-4 similar spines besides a small genicular spine. Hind femora con-
siderably more than twice as long as the fore femora, much shorter
than the body, stout, tapering to the tip with no pregenicular constric-
tion, scarcely more than two and a half times longer than broad, with
a very few scattered raised points on the upper surface apically, the
outer carina finely and sparsely serrulate throughout, more densely in
the $ than in the 9 } the inner carina similar, the intervening sulcus
narrow. Hind tibiae straight in both sexes, scarcely or no longer
than the femora, moderately stout, armed beneath with a single sub-
apical spine besides the apical pair ; spurs subopposite, the basal pair



86 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

at the end of the proximal fourth of the tibia, not much longer than
the tibial depth, set at an angle of 30-40 with the tibia and divari-
cating about 60, faintly incurved ; inner middle calcaria somewhat
longer than the outer, nearly twice as long as the others, twice as long
as the spurs, and as long as the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi much
less than half as long as the tibias the first joint hardly equalling the
rest taken together, the second twice as long as the third and with
it a little shorter than the fourth. Cerci rather short and slender.
Ovipositor two thirds the length of the hind femora, rapidly tapering
at base, the distal half slender, the armature of the inner valves acicu-
lar, arcuate.

Length of body, $ 13 mm., 9 17.5 mm.; pronotum, $ 4.5 mm., 9
5.6 mm. ; fore femora, $ 5 mm., 9 6 mm. ; hind femora, $ 11.25 mm.,
9 13.5mm.; hind tibiae, $ 11.5mm., 9 13.5mm.; ovipositor, 9 mm.

1 (, 3 9- Locality unknown; probably from one of the South-
western States. It is a very robust species.

44. CEUTHOPHILCS PINGDIS, sp. nov.

Of mingled fuscous and luteo-castaneous, sometimes one, sometimes
the other prevailing ; when it is the latter, the fuscous shows itself on
either side of the mediodorsal line in a series of subtriangular sub-
dorsal patches seated upon the posterior margin of the segments, much
larger on the thoracic than on the abdominal and partially or wholly
absent from some of the latter ; besides there is a series of lateral
blotches, just failing to reach the lower margins of the nota and more
extended on each segment anteriorly than posteriorly ; on the pro-
notum these two sets blend irregularly, so that here the darker colors
prevail ; the hind femora are more or less infuscated with the mark-
ings common to the genus, more or less distinct, the geniculations
laterally blackish. Antennae moderately stout. Legs not very elongate.
Fore femora basally somewhat stouter than the middle femora, con-
siderably less than half as long as the hind femora, about a fourth
longer than the pronotum, the inner carina with 2-3 spines, the sub-
apical and sometimes one or both the others pretty large. Middle
femora with the front carina as in the fore femora, the hind carina
with 12 spines near the middle besides a very long genicular spine.
Hind femora a little shorter than the body, considerably more than
twice as long as the fore femora, very stout and broad, being con-
siderably less than three times as long as broad, with a preapical
broad constriction, so that the distal fourth is subequal, the apical half
covered very sparsely except beneath with raised spiuous points



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTKOPHILI. 87

of a reddish color, the outer carina armed with 3-4 very small subequal
irregularly distant spines, the inner with a dozen spinules irregularly
placed, the intervening sulcus not very broad. Hind tibiae straight,
about a tenth longer than the femora, armed beneath with a single
preapical spine besides the apical pair ; spurs subopposite, the basal
at end of basal fourth of the tibia, fully twice as long as the tibial
depth, set at an angle of about 30 with the tibia and divaricating
scarcely more than 90 , their tips incurved distinctly ; inner middle
calcaria twice or more than twice as long as the others or as the
spurs and as long as or longer than the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi
fully two fifths the length of the tibiae, the first joint almost or quite
as long as the rest together, the second more than twice as long as the
third and with it as long as the fourth. Cerci pretty stout at base,
tapering delicately, probably as long as the femoral breadth (broken in
all specimens seen).

Length of body, 16 mm. ; antennae, 28+ mm. ; pronotum, 5.1 mm. ;
fore femora, 6.5 mm.; hind femora, 14.6 mm.; hind tibiie, 16 mm.
One imperfect specimen is nearly half as large again.

4 <J, Eagle Pass, Texas, C. 0. Schott.

45. CEUTHOPHILUS INQUINATUS, sp. nov.

Ceuthophilus divergens Brun. ! (pars), Publ. Nebr. Acad. Sc., iii.
32 (1893).

Deep blackish fuscous, almost black, marked slenderly with luteous
which dorsally is tinged with reddish ; there is a mediodorsal line, ex-
panding near the posterior margin of the pronotum, on the middle of
the meso- and metanotum, and on the anterior margin of the abdominal
segments into small subtriangular or sublozenge-shaped patches, and
crossed near the anterior margin of the pronotum by a short transverse
bar sometimes forming a rhomb ; the sides of the segments and particu-
larly of the pronotum are marked in the middle by irregular luteous
blotches and the lateral margins of the thoracic segments are bordered
with the same more or less conspicuously ; the hind femora are dark
luteous with heavy scalariform markings of black and with longi-
tudinal streaks of blackish fuscous on either side of the submedian
clear stripe apically ; other femora luteous like the rest of the legs,
but more or less infuscated, especially apically. Antennae moderately
slender and probably long ; legs moderately long. Fore femora not
stouter than middle femora, less than a fourth longer than the pro-
notum and distinctly less than half as long as the hind femora, the
inner cariua with a very long subapical spine, sometimes accompanied by



88 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

one or two others. Middle femora with the front carina armed as in the
fore femora, the hind carina the same but the apical spine genicular and
very long. Hind femora broad but not heavy, scarcely more than three
times as long as broad, tapering rather rapidly so that the distal fourth is
subequal, considerably more than twice as long as the fore femora, with
half a dozen raised points on the upper surface beyond the middle, the
outer carina with four or five serrations next the narrowest portion of
the femora and before it half a dozen widely separated inequidistant
spines, of which two or three just beyond the middle of the femora
are larger than the others and rather coarse, the longest no longer
than the tibial spurs ( <J ) or wholly unarmed except for two or three
inconspicuous pregenicular spinules (9), the inner carina with a series
of rather distant slight spinules, slighter and less frequent in the 9 than
in the $, the intervening sulcus moderate. Hind tibiae straight in
both sexes or with the faintest possible arcuation in the $, distinctly
though not greatly longer than the femora, armed beneath with a
single preapical spine, besides the apical pair; spurs subalternate,
the basal placed before the end of the proximal fourth of the tibia,
nearly or quite twice as long as the tibial depth, set at an angle
of about 50 with the tibia and divaricating about 110, their tips
feebly incurved ; inner middle calcaria but little longer than the
outer, considerably more than twice as long as the others, nearly
twice as long as the spurs, and slightly longer than the first tarsal
joint. Hind tarsi two fifths the length of the tibiae, the first joint
about as long as the rest together, the second twice as long as the
third and with it about the length of the fourth. Cerci rather stout
at base, tapering beyond, not so long as the femoral breadth. Ovi-
positor more than three fifths the length of the hind femora, straight,
tapering on proximal half or less, beyond moderately slender, the tip
upturned and produced to an extremely acute point, the teeth of the
inner valves aculeate and more or less arcuate.

Length of body, $ 13.5 mm., 9 13 mm.; pronotum, $ 4.3 mm.,
9 5 mm.; fore femora, g 9 5.5 mm.; hind femora, $ 12.25 mm.,
9 12.5 mm. ; hind tibiae, $ 14 mm., 9 13 mm. ; ovipositor, 8 mm.

2 <J, 1 9- Fairbury, Nebr., Dr. Eaton; Lincoln, Nebr. ; both
through Mr. L. Bruner.

46. CEUTHOPHILUS DISCOLOR, sp. nov.

Body blackish fuscous, almost black with luteous markings, as fol-
lows : a mediodorsal series of moderately large roundish spots, two
on the pronotum and one on each of the succeeding segments more or



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 89

less distinctly connected by a luteous thread ; on the middle of each
side of each segment a transverse dash, on the abdominal segments
more elongated than on the thoracic, and generally partly merged in
the mediodorsal spot, on the pronotum larger than elsewhere and ac-
companied by some outlying dots ; also as an inferior margining of the
thoracic segments ; but all these markings may become so enlarged as to
make the surface prevailingly luteous ; the femora are fuscous, becom-
ing lutescent toward the base, on the hind pair as heavy scalariform
markings, on the anterior pairs as slender stripes. The antennae are
brownish luteous, rather slender and apparently about three times
the length of the body, the legs rather short and slender. Fore
femora no stouter than the middle femora, less than a fourth longer
than the pronotum, much less than half as long as the hind femora,
the inner carina with a long subapical spine, sometimes accompanied
by another minute spine. Middle femora with a very long subapical
spine accompanied by a smaller one on the front carina, and the hind
carina with a long genicular spine only. Hind femora much shorter
than the body, but about two and a quarter times longer than the fore
femora, rather slender, being nearly three and a quarter times longer
than broad, the apical fourth subequal, the surface with a few raised
points scattered here and there beyond the middle of the upper
half of the femora both inside and outside, the outer carina with seven
or eight small unequal and inequidistant recumbent denticulations on
the apical half (<J) or apparently unarmed (9), the inner carina with
some very distant and very slight serrulations, the intervening sulcus
slender. Hind tibiae straight in both sexes, distinctly longer than the
femora, slender, armed beneath with a single preapical spine besides
the apical pair ; spurs subopposite, fully twice as long as the tibial
depth, set at an angle of about 35-45 with the tibia, and divaricating
about 90-100, their tips considerably incurved ; inner middle calcaria
scarcely longer than the outer, more than twice as long as the others,
nearly twice as long as the spurs and about as long as the first tarsal
joint. Hind tarsi two fifths the length of the tibiae, the first joint fully
as long as the rest together, the second more than twice as long as the
third and with it nearly or quite as long as the fourth. Cerci rather
slender, tapering regularly, about as long as the femoral breadth.
Ovipositor more than two thirds as long as the hind femora, straight,
beyond the proximal third very slender, the tip upturned abruptly
and produced to an aculeate point, the teeth of the inner valves acu-
leate, pretty long and arcuate.

Length of body, $ 10.5 mm., 9 12.5 mm. ; pronotum, $ 3.5 mm.,



90 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

9 3.75 mm.; fore femora, $ 4.25 mm., 9 4.1 mm.; hind femora,
$ 9 9.5 mm. ; hind tibias, $ 9 10.5 mm. ; ovipositor, 6.75 mm.

1 $, 1 9 . West Point, Nebr., L. Bruner ; Ellis, Kansas, Watson
(Mus. Comp. Zool.).

47. CEUTHOPHILUS PALLIDUS.

Ceuthophilus pallidus Thorn.!, Ann. Rep. U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv.
Terr., v. 434 (1872); Id., Proc. Dav. Acad. Nat. Sc., i. 264 (1876);
Glov., 111. N. A. Ent., Orth., pi. 18, fig. 18 (1874) ; Towns., Can. Ent.,
xxiv. 197-198 (1892) ; [Ril.], Ins. Life, i. 282-283 (1893); Towns.,
Ins. Life, vi. 58 (1893).

Body bright luteous, heavily marked with blackish fuscous ; on the
pronotum the markings are very irregular, but consist in the main of
the following : on either side of the front margin a large transverse
fuscous spot, which reaches neither the mediodorsal line nor the lateral
margin and is interrupted below by a roundish spot and above by the
incursion from the anterior margin of a short narrowing dash; in
the middle of the dorsum a quadrate spot divided by a mediodorsal
luteous line into a pair of longitudinal bars, each connected anteriorly
with the before mentioned anterior spot, and leaving a luteous sub-
marginal anterior mediodorsal spot ; an infero-posterior black spot not
touching! the margin ; and a laterodorsal subtriangular spot on the
posterior margin ; on the succeeding thoracic segments, and on the
abdominal there is a series of large irregularly triangular laterodorsal
spots on the posterior margins, and another lateral series of roundish
or transverse spots generally not reaching any margin ; the legs are
luteous, the fore and middle femora more or less infuscated in longi-
tudinal streaks, the hind femora dull luteous with scalariform fuscous
markings. Antennae moderately slender, about twice the length of
the body, the legs moderately long. Fore femora scarcely stouter
than the middle femora, less than a fifth longer than the pronotum,
much less than half as long as the hind femora, the inner carina with
a tolerably long subapical spine sometimes accompanied by another
minute one. Middle femora with a long subapical spine on the front
carina, accompanied at least in the male by a couple of others smaller,
and on the hind carina one or two short spines at least in the male,
accompanied by a long genicular spine. Hind femora moderately
slender, fully three times as long as broad, two and a third times
longer than the fore femora, the surface with a few scattered raised
points on the distal half and especially along the upper edge of the
inner surface, the outer carina with 6-8 very unequal and inequidistant



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 91

spines, the longest about as long as the tibial spurs (<?) or wholly
unarmed or with a few raised points apically (9), the inner carina
very distantly and subequidistautly serrulate, finer in the 9 than in
the cf , the intervening sulcus moderate. Hind tibia? straight in both
sexes, slightly longer than the femora, armed beneath with a single
subapical spine, besides the apical pair ; spurs subalternate, the basal
near the end of the proximal fourth of the tibia, about half as long
again as the tibial depth, set at a varying angle with the tibia, the
outer series at least in the being directed outward, the inner series
both inward and posteriorly, divaricating about 120, the tips incurved ;
inner middle calcaria considerably longer than the outer, more than
twice as long as the others or as the spurs, and nearly as long as the
first joint of the tarsi. Hind tarsi fully two fifths as long as the tibia?,
the first joint fully as long as the remaining joints together, the second
three times as long as the third and with it as long as the fourth.
Cerci very slender and tapering in their distal half, stouter and sub-
equal in their proximal half, scarcely so long as the femoral breadth.
Ovipositor about half as long as the hind femora, straight, slender and
equal beyond the basal third, the tip produced, acuminate and up-
turned, the teeth long, aculeate, arcuate.

Length of body, 15 mm., 9 12 mm. ; pronotum, $ 9 4.5 mm. ;
fore femora, $ 5.25 mm., 9 5.1 mm. ; hind femora, $ 12.2 mm.,
9 11.5 mm.; hind tibia?, $ 13.1 mm., 9 12 mm.; ovipositor, 5.5 mm.

1 $, 3 9- Hot Springs, Dak'. ; Denver, Col., Beales ; Las Cruces,
N. Mex., C. H. T. Townsend ; Silver City, N. Mex., C. H. Marsh ;
all through L. Bruner. In the U. S. National Museum, mostly from
the'Riley collection, are 2 , 5 9, from Laramie and Red Buttes,Wyo.,
Custer, Colorado (Cockerell), Colorado, and New Mexico. Thomas
reported it from S. E. Colorado, Empire, Col, and Red Buttes, Wyo. ;
Townsend from Colorado and New Mexico.

48. CEUTHOPIIILUS VINCULATUS, sp. nov.

Pale testaceous, nearly uniform, the posterior margins of all the seg-
ments infuscated, the apices of the hind femoral geniculations touched
with fuscous, and the pronotum more or less blotched with pale fus-
cous, particularly with a pair of short submedian stripes on the anterior
half. Antennae slender and nearly three times as long as the body,
the legs short but not stout. Fore femora distinctly stouter than
the middle femora, but very little longer than the pronotum, less than
half as long as the hind femora, the inner carina with a preapical
spine. Middle femora with 1-4 spines on the inner carina, and on the



92 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

hind carina 1-2 spines besides the genicular spine. Hind femora
moderately stout, tapering regularly to the very tip with no pre-
genicular contraction, considerably more than twice as long as the fore
femora, less than three times as long as broad, glabrous, with no raised
points on any part, the outer carina pretty uniformly and finely serrate,
especially in apical half, the inner carina similarly but more sparsely
serrate, the intervening sulcus narrow except distally. Hind tibiae
straight in both sexes, slender, no wider in the middle than at base,
equal to or scarcely so long as the hind femora, armed beneath with
one or two preapical spines besides the apical pair ; spurs subopposite,
not so long as the tibial depth, set at an angle of about 45 with the
tibia and divaricating at even a less angle the extreme tips incurved ;
inner middle calcaria scarcely longer than the outer, nearly twice as
long as the others or as the spurs, and much shorter than the first joint
of the tarsi. Cerci rather stout, tapering, about two thirds as long as
the femoral breadth. Ovipositor rather stout and uniformly tapering
on the basal half, uniform and slender on the distal half, somewhat
longer than the fore femora, the extreme tip prolonged to a spine, the
teeth of the inner valves aciculate, arcuate.

Length of body, $ 12mm., 9 13mm.; antennae, $ (est.) 30mm.;
pronotum, <J 3.75 mm., 9 3.6 mm.; fore femora, <J 4.2 mm., 9 4
mm. ; hind femora, 9 mm., 9 7.65 mm. ; hind tibiae, $ 8.5 mm.,
9 7.65 mm.; ovipositor, 5 mm.

4 <?, 1 9. Nevada, H. Edwards; North Pacific R. R. Survey
below Lake Jessie at Fort Benton, Dr. Suckley. Since description I
have received 2 <J, 5 9, from West Point, Lincoln, and Holt Co.,
Nebraska, from L. Bruner ; and have seen in the Museum of Compara-
tive Zoology at Cambridge a $ and 9 from Santa Barbara, Cal.
(Osten Sacken), which apparently belong here, although there are no
indications of any transverse banding. There are also 2 in the
U. S. National Museum from California and Washington, both from
the Riley collection.

This species is closely allied to C. californianus, but has slenderer
hind tibiae and a longer ovipositor ; its general appearance is very
similar,

49. CEUTHOPHILUS TESTACEUS, sp. nov.

Light fusco-testaceous, with a faint mediodorsal luteous stripe and
obscurely dotted with luteous (sometimes obsolete), the lower sides of
the body growing gradually pallid luteous, and the pronotum more or less
mottled or clouded with fuscous; legs testaceous, sometimes slightly



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 93

infuscated, the hind femora with feeblest possible fuscous scalariform
markings. Antennae very slender, two or three times as long as the
body, the legs short. Fore femora slightly broader than the middle
femora, a very little longer than the pronotum (relatively longer in the
9 than in the $), a little more than half as long as the hind femora,
the inner carina with a rather long subapical spine and sometimes an
additional one. Middle femora with 24, usually three, subequal
spines on the front carina, and on the hind carina generally four spines
besides a moderately long genicular spine. Hind femora moderately
slender, tapering with almost exact regularity to the tip, somewhat
more than three times as long as broad, rather less than twice as long
as the fore femora, the surface just beyond the middle with very
scattered raised points on the whole upper half of the femora outside
and inside, both carinae distantly and delicately serrulate in both sexes,
the intervening sulcus narrow. Hind tibiae straight in both sexes, a
very little longer than the femora, at least in the male, slightly
enlarged apically as viewed from the side, armed beneath with a single
subapical spine besides the apical pair ; spurs subalteruate, the basal
set far before the end of the proximal fourth of the tibia, fully twice
as long as the tibial depth, set at an angle of 30-40 with the tibia and
divaricating at not above 90, their extreme tips scarcely incurved ;
inner middle calcaria of about the same length as the outer, nearly
twice as long as the others and half as long again as the spurs, but
shorter than the first joint of the tarsi. Hind tarsi almost half as long
as the tibise, the first joint as long as the rest together, the second more
than twice as long as the third and with it equal to the fourth. Cerci
moderately slender, at least as long as the pronotum. Ovipositor
slender, straight, tapering at the base, equal from before the middle,
longer than the fore femora, the tip produced to an aculeate spine
projecting a little upward, the teeth of the inner valves pretty long,
aculeate, arcuate.

Length of body, $ 10 mm., 9 9 mm.; pronotum, $ 4 mm., ? 3.6
mm. ; fore femora, g 4.25 mm., 9 4.2 mm. ; hind femora, 8 mm.,
9 7.7 mm. ; hind tibiae, $ 8.5 mm., 9 7.8 mm. ; ovipositor, 4.5 mm.

2 <?, 2 9. West Point, Nebr. ; Sheridan, Wyo., C. Y. Smith, all
from L. Bruner ; St. Louis, Engelmann.

50. CEUTHOPHILUS CALIFORNIANUS.

Ceuthophilus californianus Scudd.!, Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii. 438
(1862) ; Walk., Cat. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mas., i. 202 (1869).

Ceuthophilus castaneus Thorn.!, Rep. U. S. Geol. Geogr. Surv. Terr.,



94 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

v. 435 (1872) ; Glov., 111. N. A. Ent., Orth., pi. 18, fig. 17 (1874> ;
Fletch., Rep. Exp. Farms Can., 1888, 63 (1889).

Cetithophilus denticulatus Scudd.!, Ann. Rep. Geogr. Surv. West
100th Men, 1876, 279 (1877).

Varying from light to dark castaneous with very feeble markings,


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