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excepting usually a greater or less degree of infuscatiou along the
posterior margins of all the segments and the anterior margin of the
pronotum ; the pronotum is also sometimes feebly enlivened with ver-
iniculate fuliginous markings and not infrequently a faint luteous line
may be traced along the middle of the dorsum, often conspicuous on
the pronotum and always slender ; the legs are concolorous with the
body. The antennae are rather coarse, tapering throughout uniformly,
the eyes small, distinctly smaller than the anteunal scrobes, the legs
short and stouter than usual. Fore femora distinctly stouter than the
middle femora, arched superiorly, about a fifth longer than the prono-
tum and slightly more than half as long as the hind femora, the inner
carina with a single subapical spine besides being minutely serrulate
throughout. Middle femora having a variable number of spines but
usually 3-4 on the front carina, and on the hind carina a variable but
generally considerable number of minute spines or serrations besides
a short genicular spine. Hiud femora about two thirds as long as the
body (<) or a little less than that (9), almost twice as long as the
fore femora, moderately stout, regularly tapering to the very apex with
no pregenicular constriction, about three times as long as broad,
glabrous, with a few feeble distant raised points above just before the
geniculation, the outer carina uniformly and rather delicately serrulate
except at base, more feebly in the female than in the male, the inner
carina similarly but more delicately serrulate, the intervening sulcus
tolerably broad apically but not at base. Hind tibiae of male straight,
unusually stout, on the upper surface twice as broad in the middle as at
base, of the same length as the femora, armed beneath with a single
preapical spine besides the apical pair ; spurs subopposite, about equal
to or a little longer than the tibial depth, set at an angle of about 45 to
the tibia and diverging at an angle of 60 or less with each other, their
tips incurved ; inner middle calcaria slightly longer than the outer,
half as long again as the other calcaria, twice as long as the spurs and
nearly as long as the first joint of the tarsus. Hind tarsi nearly half
as long as the tibiae, the first joint nearly as long as the others com-
bined, the second twice as long as the third and with it not so long as
the fourth. Cerci rather stout, tapering throughout, not much longer
than half the femoral breadth. Ovipositor as long as the pronotum,



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 95

tapering in the basal half, beyond equal, not very slender and straight,
the tip strongly upcurved, the armature of the inner valves formed of
long, bluntly pointed, arcuate teeth.

Length of body, $ 19 mm., 9 16.25 mm.; antennae, $ (est.) 40
mm.; pronotum, $ 5.25 mm., 9 4.75 mm.; fore femora, $ 6.75 mm.,
9 5.3 mm.; hind femora and tibiae, each, $ 13 mm., 9 10.25 mm.;
ovipositor 4.75 mm.

19 <J, 4 9. California (Edwards, Behrens, Crotch, Osten Sacken,
Palmer, Bruner), and in particular San Francisco, Pescadero, Gilroy,
Sonoma and Marin Counties, Santa Barbara, June, and San Ber-
nardino, Feb.; Beaver Dam, south of St. George, Utah, in the most
desert region, April 20-28, E. Palmer ; Ehrenberg, Colorado River,
Arizona, E. Palmer. It has also been reported from Vancouver Isl.
by Walker and Fletcher. In the U. S. National Museum, from the
Kiley Collection, are 4 g from California, Martinez, Cal. (Turner),
Los Angeles Co., Cal., and no locality (A. E. Brush) ; also a single $
with extraordinarily broad hind tibiae from Alarneda Co., Cal.

51. CEUTHOPHILUS LATIPES, sp. nov.

Nearly uniform dull luteo-testaceous, with the usual fuscous slender
scalariform markings on the hind femora and short longitudinal fuscous
dashes on the posterior portions of the abdominal segments, repeated
vaguely as cloudy markings on the meso- and metanotum; pronotum
slightly infuscated anteriorly and posteriorly. Antennae moderately
slender, the legs exceptionally short. Fore femora distinctly though
only slightly stouter than the middle femora, scarcely longer than the
pronotum and much less than half as long as the hind femora, the
inner carina unarmed. Middle femora with a single preapical spine
on the front carina, and on the hind carina a single small spine or none
besides a tolerably long genicular spine. Hind femora somewhat
shorter than the body, exceptionally broad, about two and a half times
longer than broad, almost two and a half times longer than the fore
femora, strongly arcuate beneath, strongly and sharply constricted be-
fore the geniculation, with a very few raised points on the middle of the
inner side above, the outer carina closely serrulate, the inner carina dis-
tantly and finely denticulate, the intervening sulcus moderately broad
and uniform. Hind tibiae with the extreme base briefly arcuate, beyond
straight, of the same length as the femora, slender, armed beneath
with a single delicate subapical spine (sometimes two) besides the
apical pair ; spurs opposite, the basal at the end of the proximal
third of the tibia, scarcely longer than the tibial breadth, set at an



96 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

angle of about 60 with the tibia and divaricating about 80, their tips
incurved ; inner middle calcaria considerably longer than the outer,
fully half as long again as the others or as the spurs, but much
shorter than the first joint of the tarsi. Hind tarsi considerably less
than half as long as the tibiae, the first joint hardly so long as the rest
together, the second fully twice as long as the third and with it as long
as the fourth. Cerci rather stout, tapering rapidly, somewhat shorter
than the breadth of the femora.

Length of body, 11 mm. ; antennae, 13-f- mm. ; pronotum, 3.25 mm. ;
fore femora, 3.65 mm. ; hind femora, 9 mm. ; hind tibiae, 9 mm.

1 <J, Sierra de la Miguelito Mexico, E. Palmer.

52. CEUTHOPHILUS PACIFICUS.

Ceuthophilus pacificus Thorn., Ann. Rep. U. S. Geol. Surv. Terr., v.
436 (1872) ; Glov., 111. N. A. Ent, Orth., pi. 14, fig. 8 (1872).

Ceuthophilus unispinosus Brunn., Monogr. Stenop., 64 (1888).

Luteous, heavily irrorate with more or less confluent fuscous dots,
giving it, as Thomas well expresses it, a mossy appearance ; the
amount of confluence and accordingly of infuscation varies somewhat
in different individuals, and is usually deepest on the pronotum, which
also often shows on either side a larger or smaller rufo-luteous patch
free from dots ; the hind femora retain the usual scalariform markings,
which are narrower than common. Antennae moderately stout at
base, very slender beyond, three or four times as long as the body.
Legs rather short. Fore femora scarcely stouter than the middle
femora, about a fourth longer than the pronotum and much less than
half as long as the hind femora, the inner carina with a long subapical
spine. Middle femora with a long subapical spine on the front carina
sometimes accompanied by 12 shorter ones, the hind carina with a
single subapical spine besides the genicular spine. Hind femora
almost as long as the body, considerably more than twice as long as
the fore femora, very stout, apically tapering rapidly especially in the
g , the distal fifth subequal, about two and a half times longer than
broad ( $ ), the darker portions heavily scabrous with raised points,
besides a sparse sprinkling of the same on the apical half of the inner
surface, the outer carina minutely and bluntly bi- or tri-serrulate,
sometimes with a large preapical triangular dentiform spine serrulate
on its proximal edge (<?) or unarmed (9), the inner carina similar
but in the distal half more coarsely uniserrulate, the serration stopping
abruptly before the apex with a distinct denticle, sometimes produced
to a stout triangular spine, serrulate on the proximal edge (<?) or with



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 97

a few feeble raised points or spinules on the apical half ( 9 ), the inter-
vening sulcus broad and V-shaped. Hind tibiae strongly and sharply
bowed just before the middle, and on the proximal portion prominently
and roundly laminate beneath, by reason of the bow no longer than
the femora ( $ ) or straight and simple, slightly longer than the fem-
ora ( 9 ) , armed beneath with a single preapical spine and an apical pair ;
spurs subopposite, the basal pair but little before the middle of the
tibia, about as long as the tibial depth, set at an angle of about 45
with the tibia and divaricating but little more than that, the tips feebly
incurved ; inner middle calcaria slightly longer than the outer, more
than twice as long as the others or as the spurs, and as long as the first
tarsal joint. Hind tarsi about two fifths the length of the tibiae, the
first joint fully as long as the rest together, the second nearly three
times as long as the third and almost equal to the fourth. Cerci stout
in the basal half, beyond tapering, not more than half as long as the
femoral breadth, except in the female. Ovipositor gently tapering in
the basal half, slender beyond and finely pointed, scarcely upturned at
tip, about two thirds as long as the hind femora, the inner valves
feebly and bluntly serrulate apically with no apical hook.

Length of body, <$ 11.5 mm., 9 12.5 mm. ; pronotum, $ 3.75 mm.,
9 4.1 mm. ; fore femora, $ 4.4 mm., 9 5 mm. ; hind femora, $ 10
mm., 9 11.7 mm.; hind tibiae, $ 10 mm., 9 12.25 mm.; ovipositor,
7.5 mm.

9 <J, 13 9. California, P. R. Uhler, J. Akhurst, H. Edwards,
Behrens ; Nevada, H. Edwards ; Mountains about Lake Tahoe, Cal.,
Oct., H. W. Henshaw in Capt. Wheeler's Expl., 1876. The U. S.
National Museum also contains 5 ,39, from Martinez, Cal., H. W.
Turner, and Los Angeles Co., Coquillet and others, mostly through
the collection of C. V. Riley.

The dorsal surface of the abdomen of the male of this species
somewhat resembles its next neighbor, C. henshawi, in its sculpture,
the several segments being somewhat uniformly and rather closely
covered with blister-like elevations, largest and closest next the dorsal
line. Neither Thomas nor Brunner has noticed this peculiarity.

53. CEUTHOPHILTJS HENSHAWI, sp. nov.

Mostly brownish fuscous above, but very minutely and abundantly
irrorate with luteous, increasingly so in passing down the sides, so that
the luteous prevails on the flanks ; the pronotum is also usually
marked with a broad prevailingly luteous mesial band, and the meso-
notum and metanotum often but not always with a similar broad trans-
VOL. xxx. (N. s. xxn.) 7



98 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

verse patch above ; occasionally in young individuals these thoracic
markings are reduced to a narrow mesial luteous stripe ; the hind fem-
ora are similarly speckled in place of the usual markings, though these
sometimes prevail. Antennae very slender, probably about twice the
length of the body. Legs rather short and not stout. Fore femora
no stouter than the middle femora, about a fourth longer than the pro-
uotum in the $ , less than that in the 9 , and in both considerably less
than half the length of the hind femora, the inner carina with an ex-
ceedingly minute preapical spine. Middle femora with 2-3 minute
spines (sometimes obsolete in the 9 ) on the front carina, and the hind
carina similarly armed besides a small genicular spine. Hind femora
stout and broad, the lower margin straight by the posterior elevation
of the outer carina almost to the geniculation, when it terminates
abruptly and subacutely, as long as the body and about three times as
long as broad (<) or stout and broad, normal, about three fourths as
long as the body, with a few raised points clustered above the depressed
middle line of the femora ( 9 ), the outer carina closely serrulate through-
out (^) or simple and ur.armed (9)- Hind tibiae abruptly and con-
siderably bent just beyond the base, but still nearly a tenth longer
than the femora, beyond the bend nearly straight ( $ ), or straight
throughout and similarly longer than the femora (9), beneath with a
series of raised points and 12 recumbent subapical spines besides a
preapical and apical pair (<J) or with a single subapical spine and an
apical pair ( 9 ) ; spurs subopposite, the basal pair situated not far
before the middle of the tibia, no longer than the tibial depth, set at
an angle of 45 with the tibia and divaricating about 90, their tips
incurved ; inner middle calcaria considerably longer than the outer,
more than twice as long as the others or as the spurs, but shorter than
the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi about one half the length of the
hind tibiae, very slender, the first joint not so long as the rest together,
the second fully twice as long as the third, and with it longer than the
fourth. Cerci greatly swollen in the basal half, beyond slight, the
whole about half as long as the femoral breadth. Ovipositor consider-
ably less than two thirds as long as the hind femora, tapering through-
out, the tip pointed but hardly upturned, the inner blades obsoletely
serrulate with 7-8 elevations.

Length of body, $ 9 12 mm.; antennae, $ 9 15+ mm.; pro-
notum, $ 4 mm., 9 3.5 mm. ; fore femora, $ 5.2 mm., 9 4 mm. ; hind
femora, $ 11.5mm., 9 8.9mm.; hind tibiae, $ 12.25mm., 9 9.4mm.;
ovipositor, 5.25 mm.

6 c?, 2 9- Sanzalito, Cal., California, Vancouver Isl., Washington,



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 99

H. K. Morrison, coll. S. Henshaw ; 1 ,49, Oregon, and Placer,
Kern, and Los Angeles Counties, Cal., mostly from the Riley collec-
tion (U. S. Nat. Mus.).

The male of this species is remarkable for the surface sculpture of
the dorsum of the abdomen, the first seven segments of which, but
particularly the second to the sixth inclusive, are densely covered with
minute strongly .elevated tubercles, besides which on the anterior por-
tion of the first to the fifth segments and almost crossing the segment
is a mesial series of large slightly transverse tumid elevations, rounded
anteriorly, truncate posteriorly. I have seen nothing resembling it in
any other species, excepting to a less degree in its next neighbor,
C. pacificus ; this and the peculiar characteristics of the outer hind
femoral carina make this a very striking species, which I take pleasure
in dedicating to my colleague, Mr. Samuel Henshaw.

54. CEUTHOPHILUS DEVIUS, sp. nov.

Nearly uniform brownish testaceous, subglabrous, with very feeble
infuscated obscure blotches especially upon the pronotum, and a fine
mediodorsal luteous thread running the length of the body ; surface,
especially in $ and particularly on the thorax, very finely sub-
corrugate. The antennae are coarse at base (beyond broken), the
joints more or less thickened apically. The legs are rather short.
Fore femora much less than half the length of the body, hardly a fifth
longer than the pronotum, a little stouter than the middle femora and
a little less than half as long as the hind femora, the inner carina with
a preapical spine and a few (9) or many (<J) spinous points; the fore
tibiae with a single median spine on the inner side above, and beneath
with 3 (9) or 4 ( ) pairs of stout spines. Middle femora with 56
(9) or 8-9 ((J) spines on the fropt carina, the preapical small, at least
in the , the hind carina similarly armed and with a small genicular
spine. Hind femora considerably shorter than the body, distinctly
more than twice the length of the fore femora, nearly straight above
in the $ where they are of nearly equal breadth on the proximal two
thirds and are then somewhat abruptly emarginate beneath, less than
three and a half times as long as broad in both sexes, the surface
glabrous with no raised points excepting sparsely scattered ones on
the upper surface in the middle half, the outer carina of both sexes
with equal slight denticulations on the constricted portion of the
femora, the inner carina with larger denticulations throughout (except
at base) much larger and more unequal in the <J, where the largest
are as long as the tibial spurs, the inferior sulcus narrow. Hind tibiae



100 PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

straight, of the same length as the femora, stout, basally constricted,
beneath with a row of distant spines besides the apical pair ; spurs sub-
opposite, the basal pair at the end of the proximal third of the tibia,
scarcely longer than the tibial depth, set at an angle of 45 with the
tibia and divaricating 70-80 ; inner middle calcaria but little longer
than the outer, about half as long again as the others or as the spurs,
shorter than the first joint of the tarsus. Hind tarsi about one third
as long as the tibiae, the first joint scarcely longer than the fourth and
less than twice as long as the second and third together, the sec-
ond but little longer than the third. Cerci rather slender, tapering
throughout, pointed, much shorter than the femoral breadth. Ovi-
positor nearly straight, scarcely longer than the fore femora, the basal
half tapering, the apical slender and equal, the tip pretty strongly
upcurved to a fine point, the teeth and especially the apical tooth very
long, slender, and arcuate.

Length of body, <J 17 mm., 9 17 mm.; pronotum, $ 6.25 mm.,
9 5.5 mm. ; fore femora, $ 7.65 mm., 9 6.5 mm. ; hind femora and
hind tibiae, each, $ 16.25 mm., 9 13 mm. ; ovipositor, 7 mm.

1 <J, 1 9. Explorations of the Upper Missouri and Yellowstone
under Lt. Warren, F. V. Hayden. I also find in the U. S. National
Museum from the Riley collection 1 (J, 2 9, from Nebraska, the
Platte River, Nebr. (McCarthy), and Ft. Riley, Kans.

By the brevity of the first and second hind tarsal joints and the
slight enlargement of the fore tibiae in the male, this species approaches
the genus Phrixocnemis, but the normal development of the armature
of the hind tibiae forbids placing it there.

55. CEUTHOPHILUS NEOMEXICANUS, sp. nov.

Dark testaceous or castaneous, glabrous, broadly but gradually
infuscated, especially above, on the posterior margins of all the seg-
ments, and on the anterior portion of the pronotum, which is otherwise
more or less slightly mottled, beneath and on the lower portions of the
sides invariably lighter and generally more nearly unicolorous. Legs
testaceous, the hind femora externally with a feeble median longi-
tudinal infuscation sometimes visible only on the distal half, where it
is often diffused and accompanied by feeble slender herring-bone
iufuscations on either side, the hind tibial spines feebly infuscated at
apex. The antennae are not very slender and the legs short. Fore
femora distinctly stouter than the middle femora, but little longer than
the pronotum and less than half as long as the hind femora, the inner
carina with a subapical spine, sometimes accompanied at variable



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 101

distances by a smaller one. Middle femora with 14 spines on the front
carina, most numerous in the 9 and the subapical the largest, the
hind carina similarly armed, but one spine genicular and the others as
numerous in the <J as in the . Hind femora much shorter than the
body, considerably more than twice as long as the fore femora, stout,
being in the $ less than three times as long as broad, with hardly any
subapical constriction, that is, tapering almost regularly to the apex,
the surface with no raised points, the outer carina pretty regularly and
rather minutely denticulate in the distal half or less, exclusive of the
geniculation (<J), or minutely denticulate throughout (9), the inner
carina similar to the outer, but in the $ more extensively denticulate
than the outer, the intervening sulcus narrow. Hind tibiae straight in
both sexes, distinctly shorter than the femora, the upper surface
rather broad in the <J and basally constricted, beneath with a longer
( $ ) or shorter ( 9 ) series of median spines, besides the apical pair ;
spurs subopposite, the basal pair at the end of the proximal third of
the tibia (),* about as long as the tibial depth ($), or two to three
times as long as the tibial depth (9), set at an angle of about 50
(cJ) or 30 (9) with the tibia and divaricating as much, their tips
scarcely incurved ; inner middle calcaria not greatly longer than the
outer, less than half as long again as the others or as the (<) spurs,
nearly as long as the first tarsal joint. Hind tarsi much less than
two fifths as long as the tibia, the first joint not so long as the rest
together, the second but little longer than the third and with it a little
shorter than the fourth. Cerci rather slender and regularly tapering,
pointed, considerably shorter (<) or considerably longer (9) than
the hind femoral breadth. Ovipositor about two thirds as long as the
hind femora, its upper margin feebly arcuate, the apical two thirds
subequal, the apex slightly upturned and very acuminate, the teeth of
the inner valves long, aciculate, the distal arcuate.

Length of body, $ 12 mm., 9 11.5 mm. ; pronotum, $ 3.5 mm.,
9 3.25 mm.; fore femora, 4 mm., 9 3.6 mm. ; hind femora, 8.75
mm., 9 F.6 mm.; hind tibiae, $ 8.3 mm., 9 7.25 mm.; ovipositor,
5.2 mm.

4 $, 1 9. Ft. Wingate, N. Mex. (Shufeldt), U. S. Nat. Mus.

The species is most nearly allied to G. devius, from which it differs
principally in its smaller size and the armature of the femora.

The single 9 I have seen has four pairs of spurs on one tibia, the basal
pair at the end of the proximal fourth of the tibia, while the other tibia has but
a single non-opposite pair in the middle of the tibia. It is further anomalous in
the excessive length of the spurs, in contrast to the $ .



102 PROCEEDINGS OP THE AMERICAN ACADEMY.

The following species have not been seen by me.

56. CEUTHOPHILUS SCABRIPES.

Phalangopsis scabripes Hald., Proc. Acad. Nat. Sc., Philad., vi.
364 (1853) ; Walk., Cat. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 116 (1869).

Rhaphidophora scabripes Scudd., Proc. Bost. Soc. Nat. Hist., viii. 7
(1861).

Ceuthophilus scabripes Scudd., Bost. Journ. Nat. Hist., vii. 436
(1862) ; Walk., Cat. Derm. Salt. Brit. Mus., i. 201 (1869).

I cannot find any species which corresponds sufficiently with Halde-
man's description to apply this name to it. When we are better
acquainted with the forms occurring in the South, west of the
Alleghanies, we may be able accurately to fix it. It was described
from Selma, Alabama.

57. CEUTHOPHILUS UTAHENSIS.

Ceuthophilus utahensis Thorn., Proc. Dav. Acad. Nat. Sc., i. 264,
pi. 36, fig. 8 (1876).

None of the species I have seen can be referred to this. It seems to
resemble G. valgus. It comes from Mt. Nebo, Utah. (See Appendix.)

NOTE. Ceuthophilus cubaensis Walk. (Locusta Rhaphidophora cubensis De
Haan), of Cuba, is a Pherterus, according to Bolivar and Brunner, belonging
to the Anostostomata.

PHRIXOCNEMIS (<ptos, /cn^t?;), Gen. nov.

Closely allied to Ceuthophilus, and having its general aspect, though
the legs are stouter than is commonly the case in that genus. Head
rather large, the vertex well rounded and deflexed, barely interrupted
from continuation into the frontal costa by the confluence of the
antennal scrobes. Eyes small, subpyriform, as large as the antennal
scrobes. Antennae as in Ceuthophilus. Palpi very small, the ante-
penultimate joint but little shorter than those on either side of it.
Pronotum sub-semicylindrical, the inferior margin of the descending
lateral lobes arcuate, the anterior and posterior angles equally or
almost equally rounded ; those of the meso- and metanotum similarly
rounded without the posterior oblique truncation common in Ceutho-
philus, or present in the slightest degree. Anterior coxas compressed
and elevated to form a median denticle. Legs short and rather stout.
Fore femora stout, or at least broad by compression. Middle femora
unarmed apically, or, when armed, only by an inferior and brief spine



SCUDDER. NORTH AMERICAN CEUTHOPHILI. 103

on the posterior side, the geuicular lobes very small. Hind femora
very broad and incrassate, even the extremity stout, both inferior
carinae feebly denticulate, rarely with any conspicuous spines. Fore
tibiae unarmed above, enlarged in the male ; middle tibiae armed above
with several pairs of spines besides those beneath ; hind tibiae stout, no
longer than hind femora, armed beneath with a single apical spine
besides the apical pair and above with lateral spines of two classes :
a larger series of generally long stout spines, longer than the calcaria,
and, especially in the 9> becoming longer and more crowded apically,
the 46 spines of one row not greatly divergent from those of the
other ; and minute denticulations occupying the interspaces, at least on


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