Samuel M. (Samuel Melancthon) Worcester.

A discourse, delivered on the first centennial anniversary of the Tabernacle church, Salem, Mass., April 26, 1835 online

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Online LibrarySamuel M. (Samuel Melancthon) WorcesterA discourse, delivered on the first centennial anniversary of the Tabernacle church, Salem, Mass., April 26, 1835 → online text (page 6 of 6)
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heed what you receive as truth ; examine it, consider it, compare it with the other
Scriptures of truth, before you do receive it." — See Magnalia, p. 60.

The excellent Robinson did not expect, that God had less " truth yet to break
forth out of his holy Word," than Luther and Calvin had " seen." He had al-



64

ready taken a conspicuous part in the Arminian controversy. " Of such an emi-
nent character was he, that when Arminianism so much prevailed, as it did in the
Low Countries, those famous divines, Polyander, and Festus Hommius, employed
this our learned Robinson to dispute publicly in the University of Leyden against
Episcopius, and the other champions of that grand choak-weed of true Christianity."
— See Magnalia, p. 46.

For remarks upon Robinson's Views of Church Government, see Upham's Ratio
Disciplines, §20.

Z. Page 45.

" The settlement of New England was a result of the Reformation ; not of the
contest between the new opinions and of the authority of Rome, but of implacable
differences between protestant dissenters and the established Anglican church.

" Who will venture to measure the consequences of actions by the humility or
the remoteness of their origin ? * * * A young French refugee, skilled alike
in theology and civil law, in the duties of magistrates and the dialectics of religious
controversy, entering the republic of Geneva, and conforming its ecclesiastical
discipline to the principles of republican simplicity, established a party, of which
Englishmen became members, and New England the asylum. The enfranchise-
ment of the mind from religious despotism, led directly to inquiries into the nature
of civil government 3 and the doctrines of popular liberty, which sheltered their
infancy in the wildernesses of the newly discovered continent, within the short
space of two centuries have infused themselves into the life-blood of every rising
state from Labrador to Chili, established out-posts at the mouth of the Oregon and
in Liberia, and, making a proselyte of enlightened France, have disturbed all the
ancient governments of Europe, and awakened the public mind to resistless action
from the shores of Portugal to the palaces of the Czars." — Bancroft's History
U. S. chap. 8.



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Online LibrarySamuel M. (Samuel Melancthon) WorcesterA discourse, delivered on the first centennial anniversary of the Tabernacle church, Salem, Mass., April 26, 1835 → online text (page 6 of 6)