Samuel Manning.

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Great Britain is, and ought to be, totally dissolved ; and that, as Free and
Independent States, they have full power to levy war, conclude peace, contract
alliances, establish commerce, and to do all other acts and things which Inde
pendent States may of right do. And for the support of this Declaration,
with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually
pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honour."

It is said that, after signing the Declaration, John Hancock exclaimed,
" We must now all hang together ;" Franklin replied, " If we do not, we
shall all hang separately."

Fairmount Park, with its three thousand acres of hill and valley, the
Centennial Exhibition, Girard College, and other points of interest in and
around the city must remain unnoticed for want of space.



PHILADELPHIA AND WASHINGTON.



From Philadelphia, where the Independence of the United States
received its formal assertion, we pass on to Washington, the seat of the
government thus established. The railroad conducts us through Maryland,
whose green, rounded, well-wooded hills and fertile valleys call to mind those
of England. Shortly after leaving Baltimore, the dome of the Capitol conies
into view, and in a few minutes more we are in the City of Magnificent
Distances, as the Federal capital is styled. The appropriateness of this
epithet becomes less obvious every year. The avenues and streets having




been laid out on a vast scale, to provide
for the wants of a population which did not
arrive, it was perhaps the most straggling
and sparsely peopled city in the world. A
few large public buildings and caravanserais
were grouped round the Capitol. A few private houses for permanent
residents were scattered here and there. The rest of the city consisted of
roadways stretching out into space, waiting for the builder to complete what
the road-surveyor had commenced. By degrees, however, it is beginning to fill
up, and in 1870 the population had reached the respectable figure af 109,388.
During the Session of Congress the streets are alive with traffic, and Penn
sylvania Avenue is thronged with carriages and equipages. But at other times
it has the air of being too large for its population. "Washington," says
Mr. Sala, "will be, when completed, the most magnificent city on this side



THE CITY OF MAGNIFICENT DISTANCES.



the Atlantic, and some of its edifices, as, for instance, the Post Office, the
Patent Office, and the Treasury Buildings, are really magnificent in propor
tion and design ; but it is not quite begun yet. It contains certainly some
noble public buildings, but they are scattered far and wide, with all kinds of
incongruous environments, producing upon the stranger a perplexed impression
that the British Museum has migrated to the centre of an exhausted brick
field, where rubbish may be shot ; or that St. Paul's Cathedral, washed quite
white and stuck upon stone stilts, has been transformed to the centre of the
Libyan Desert and called a Capitol." Like so many of Sala's droll and
grotesque exaggerations, this description contains truth enough to give it point.




THE CAPITOL.



Few things strike the English visitor to Washington more strangely
than the free and easy style in which the government of the country is
conducted. There is a total absence of ceremony, not merely in the Local
and State Legislatures, but in those of the Federal Union. The dignified
reserve which high governmental officials maintain in Europe is almost ostenta
tiously avoided. Meeting a plain bluff man, wearing a wide-awake hat and
brown overcoat, smoking a cigar and driving himself, unattended, in a buggy,
I learned, with some surprise, that it was the President of the United States.
Calling upon him next morning at the White House, as the presidential
residence is called, I was received with less formality than would have been
observed in the house of a private gentleman in England.

In these hasty sketches of America and its people, I have not ventured



PHILADELPHIA AND WASHINGTON.



to discuss the grave political and social problems which are being worked out
there. It would be worse than impertinent in me to endeavour to forecast
the future of the Great Republic of the West. Its founders were content to
speak of it, in the words of John Adams, the second President of the Republic,
as "an experiment better adapted to the genius, character, situation, and
relations of this country and nation than any which had ever been professed."
Its centennial eulogists boast of it as the perfection of human wisdom, to
which other systems must ultimately conform. Washington, in his Farewell
Address to the People of the United States, clearly pointed out the conditions
on which the stability and prosperity of a nation depend : " Of all the dis
positions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality
are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of
patriotism who should labour to subvert these great pillars of human happi
ness, those foremost props of the duties of men and citizens. The politician,
equally with the pious man, ought to respect and cherish them. A volume
could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it
be simply asked, Where is the security for property, for life, if the sense of
religious obligation desert the oaths which are the instruments of investiga
tion in the courts of justice ? And let us with caution indulge the supposition
that morality can be maintained without religion. Whatever may be con
ceded to the influence of refined education on minds of peculiar structure,
reason and experience both forbid us to expect that natural morality can
prevail in exclusion of religious principles."

These wise and weighty words are applicable alike to England and to
America. Prosperity, morality, and religion are inseparably connected.
' Righteousness exalteth a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people."




THE WHITE HOUSE, WASHINGTON.



224



ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF TRAVEL

Uniform with "AMERICAN PICTURES."




PICTURES FROM BI 4 BLE LANDS,

Drawn with Pen and Pencil.
Edited by the Rev. S. G. Green, D.D. The Illustrations by Edward Whymper and others.

Imperial 8r0., elegantly bound in cloth, gilt edges, Ss.



ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF TRAVEL.




^JK



JHE PHURCH OF THE J^ATIVITY, JBETHLEHEM.

"THOSE HOLY FIELDS."

Palestine Illustrated by Pen and Pencil. By the Rev. Samuel Manning, LL.D.

With Kumcrj'is Engravings. Imperial Bvo., elegantly bound in cloth, gilt edges, Ss.

" Dr. Manning writes in an unobtrusive, solid, and thoroughly interesting style, and his facts help us to understand
Judea and its cities more completely than any amount of mere declamation." Daily Neivs.

" The work is executed with great ability ; but the great charm of the book is the illustrations. Very simple, but
executed with extreme fidelity, and a thoroughly artistic feeling." Graphic.



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ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF TRAVEL.






PALACE OF THE PEAK.

ENGLISH PICTURES,

Drawn with Pen and Pencil. By the Rev. Samuel Manning, L.L.D., and the Rev. S. G. Green, D.Q.
With Coloured Frontispiece and Numerous Wood Engravings.

Imperial 8vo., elegantly bound in cloth, gilt edges, 8>".

" Next to seeing the beautiful places of the earth, comes the delight of reading of them, and many a one who is
doomed to begin and end his days within a ' cribb'd, cabined, and confined ' circle, can roam, guided by such a book, at
the will of fancy through sunny glades, by babbling streams, or over the breezy moorlands." Times.



ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF TRAVEL.




FRENCH PICTURES,

ID I?, jft. -W IT "WITH IPE1T .A. IN" ID FE3STCIL.

^ By the Rev. Samuel G. Green, D.D. With upwards of

150 Fine Engravings.

' Imperial Zvo., elegantly lovnd in cloth, gilt edges, 8s.



"One of the most sumptuous of gift books. The perfection of wood engraving and descriptive letterpress"
Court Joiirtta/.

"A most readable and handsome gift book." Nonconformist.



ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF TRAVEL.




THE ALCAZAR, SEGOVIA.

SPANISH PICTURES,

Drawn with Pen and Pencil. By the Rev. Samuel Manning, LL.D. With Illustrations
by Gustave Dore, and other eminent Artists

Imperial Svo., elegantly bound in cloth, gilt edges, 8s.



' The letterpress is pleasant reading, and many of the sketches are ot the highest excellence." Times.



. ILLUSTRATED BOOKS OF TRAVEL.




JHE ^VELLHORN AND ^VETTERHORN.

SWISS PICTURES,

Drawn with Pen and Pencil. By the Rev. Samuel Manning, LL.D. With Numerous Illustrations

by Whymper and others.

Imperial 8z>0., elegantly bound in cloth, gilt edges, *.





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Online LibrarySamuel ManningAmerican pictures drawn with pen and pencil → online text (page 12 of 12)