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Samuel Putnam Avery.

The Avery, Fairchild & Park families of Massachusetts Connecticut & Rhode Island : with a short narration of facts concerning Mr. Richard Warren Mayflower passenger and his family connections with Thomas Little online

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going to Charlestown, a few rods east of the residence of Christo-
pher Rath bun, near where the shore road enters the post-road.
The meeting-house or church is now gone.

IN MEMORY OF THE r

RBT. JOSEPH PARK, WHO DIED MARCH I, I777,
IN THE 72D YEAR OF HIS AGB AND THE 45TH
YEAR OF HIS MINISTRY. HB WAS A FAITHFUL
MINISTER OF THE GOSPEL, A GREAT PATRIOT,
A KIND HUSBAND, A TENDER PARENT, A GREAT
FRIEND TO THE WIDOW AND ORPHAN AND
FATHERLESS, AND WAS AN EXCELLENT NEIGH-
BOR. ^ V

IN MEMORY OF '
ABIGAIL THE WIFE OF THE REV. JOSEPH PARK
WHO DIED OCT. I9TH, 1 772, IN THE 68tH YEAR
OF AGE. A FArTHFUL WIFE, A TENDER MOTHER,
A KIND NEIGHBOR, A COMPASSIONATE AND
STEADFAST FRIEND, AND AN EXCELLENT
CHRISTIAN.

These stones were in a good state of preservation in 1918.

Joseph Park's will is now in the possession of the Westerly,
R. I., Historical Society. It was formerly owned by Hannah
Anne Parke^ bom April 24***, 1804, died June 26**', 1888 (great-
granddaughter), wife of Samuel Putnam Avery*, and was presented
to the Society by one of her sons. ' '



[101]



BENJAMIN PARK»

■pENJAMIN PARK', second son of Joseph Park* and Abigail
-■-' (Greene) Park, was bom in Westerly, R. I., November i'*,
1735. Married, December 4'^ 1757, Hannah Stanton York, of
Westerly, bom June i'*, 1739, daughter of James Stanton York
and Jemima (Shaw) York. He died June 17*'', 1775. She died
December, 1800.

CHILDREN

I Mary*, bom September 8*S 1758, in Westerly. Died at Parkevale,
Pa.

II Jonathan Greene', . bom March s*^ ^Z^o* in Westerly. Died
March 25*^*, 1761.

III Joseph*, bom November ij***, 1763, in Charlestown, R. I.

IV Benjamin*, bora September i6**», ,1765, in Charlestown, R. I.
Married, 1800, Susanna Maria Keens, of New York, bora December 2"**,
1776. He died August s*\ 1807. She died February I7*^ 1807. They
had two children. See forward.

V Thomas*, bora September i**, 1767, in Charlestown. Married,
December 4"*, 1800, Eunice Champlin, of Newport, R. I., bom September
I8*^ 1768. He died November I6*^ 1842. She died November 19*^,
1857. They had eight children.

VI John*, bom August 29*^ 1 769, was lost at sea.

VII Hannah Stanton*, bora July 12*'', 1771, in Charlestown. Died
183 1, Harrisburg, Pa.

yill Henry*, born September 12*^ 1774, in Charlestown. Died 1830.
IX Susan*.

Benjamin Park' was bom in Westerly, R. I., November l'*,
1735, and with his twin brother Joseph, Jr., and Thomas, is given
the credit, by various writers, of having fought at Crown Point,
N. Y., 1756 and at Fort William Henry, Lake George, N. Y., 1758,
also with having participated at the battle of Bunker Hill, June
17***, 1775, "where he was killed" although apparently there are
(aside from the letter written by his wife, Mrs. Hannah Stanton
York Park, dated Charlestown, R. I., April 20*^ 1782, almost

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seven years after the battle) no civil or military records extant
which prove that Benjamin Park* was officially commissioned
and served as Captain at this battle. Undoubtedly he served in
the Colonial and Revolutionary wars and may have been desig-
nated as Captain when connected with volunteers called upon
for special alarms, etc. See the following:

April ii*N 1756. Appointed Wednesday 14*'' as a day of fasting and
prayer, to humble ourselves before God, to implore His gracious presence
with, and blessings to our young brethern Joseph Parle, Jr., Benjamm
Park and Thomas Park and William Garrit, all who offered their desires
in writing to this society, and we Pray that God of His infinite mercy will
hear and answer, and also that God would bless our Army in general, who
. are going forth against our enemies.

The young men here mentioned were in the expedition that went forth
for the reduction of Crown Point, N. Y., in 1756. It will be noticed that
three of them were sons of Rev. Joseph Park, who was always a man of
public spirit.

Whereas the Rev. Joseph Park of Charlestown in the County of
Kings, presented this Assembly with a memorial setting forth that he
hath ever been ready to contribute all the assistance m his power to stop
his Majesty's enemies from their injurious encroachments on his dominion
and just rights in America an^ to defend the Country. That in the year
of 1756 he consented to the voluntary service of three of his sons who
served in the expedirion formed for the reduction of Crown Point; that
when they were discharged from the service upon their return homeward,
they put their clothmg and other furniture to the value of £100 cur-
rency, in their chest which was unfortunately lost in the sea. . . .

That this summer when the enemy attacked Fort William Henry,
[in 1758] they volunteered in the stead of ofl&cers who declined, that they
did this without any consideration purely to serve their country, that he
the memorialist was thereby put to considerable charge, wherefore he
prays for such allowance as should be thought proper.

On considerarion whereof this Assembly do vote and resolve that the
sum of £100 be paid said Joseph Park out of the general Treasury, for
the use of his aforesaid sons, as an allowance for what they lost, as afore-
said, but that nothing be allowed them as officers. JUiodi Island Colonial
Records, Vol. VI, p. 119, 1758. . ^

Denison in his "Westerly and its Witnesses " says "this good,
laborious, tried and faithful man [Rev. Joseph Park<] died at
his home in Westerly in the seventy-second year of his age, and
fourty-fifth year of his ministry." He had nine children, three
of whom distinguished themselves in the Colonial wars, viz.,

[ 103 ]



Joseph, Jr., Benjamin, and Tliomas, notably at Crown Point in
1756, on Lake Champlain and Fort William Henry in 175S, on
Lake George. Benjamin was prominently identified with the
struggle of the colonies in the early days of the Revolution, march-
ing to the relief of the troops on the Lexington Alarm, April ig***,
1775. He participated in the severe engagement at Bunker Hill,
June 17*'', 1775, '* where he was killed"

Hb son, Captain Benjamin Park, joined the patriot army, and was
never heard of after the battle of Bunker Hill. Drake's American Biog-
raphy, p. 687.

Benjamin Park, Captain, seven days in service. Adjt.-Genera? s Record
of Service of Connecticut Men in the JVar of the Revolution.

April the II*'', 1756, Joseph Park, Jr., Lieutenant Benjamin Park and
Thomas Park, Sergeants, went forth for the reduction of Crown Point.

April the ii**», 1756 Appointed Wednesday, ye 14"* of this Instant as
a day of Fasting and Prayer, to Humble ourselves before God, to Implore
his gracious presence with, and blessing to, our young Brethren, Joseph
Park, Jun., Lieutenant; Benjamin Park and Thomas Park, Sergeants;
and William Gavit, Corporal, all who offered their Desires in wriring to
this Society, (of which they all are members); and we pray that God of
his Infinite Mercy will hear and answer . . . as also that God would
bless our army in general, who are going forth against our Enemies.
Denisons Westerly and its JFitnesses, p. 72.

Denison in his work on Westerly, page no, says, "Worthy of
conspicuous and enduring record are the noble sentiments ex-
pressed by the freemen of Westerly in the beginning of 1774 at a
meeting which was the largest ever held in the town."

The records state: "At a town meeting, specially called, and
held at the dwelling-house of Major Edward Bliven, in Westerly,
in the county of Kings, Feb. 2, A.D. 1774, the Hon. Samuel Ward,
Esq., was chosen Moderator.

"The Moderator and several other gentlemen, viz., Joshua
Babcock, Esq., Mr. James Rhodes, Col. W". Pendleton, Mr.
George Sheffield, Oliver Crary, Esq., and Captain Benjamin
Park, were appointed a Committee to take the important sub-
jects before the meeting into their consideration and report as
soon as may be, what measures will be proper for the Town to
take in the present alarming situation of the ColonieslI "

[ 104 ]




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Mrs. Hannah Stanton Park*s PETmbK f"oR Relief *

To the Honorable, the General Assembly of the StaU of Rhode Island and
Providence Plantations, to be holden at Newport, in said StaU, in May, 1782.

The Memorial of Hannah Stanton Park, of Charlestown (widow),
Humbly showeth that Captain Benjamin Park, your Memorialist's late
husband, being highly impressed with the Justness of the American War,
and zealous at the risk of his life, of rendering his country every service
in his power, did, in the beginning of the month of June, 1775, at the ex-
pense of forty pounds lawful money, arm, and otherwise equip himself;
and set himself out to join his brethren in the American Army then lying
against and blockading the British Army in Boston.

That he arrived among our troops some few days before our troops took
possession of, and broke ground on Bunker Hill. That in pursuit of his
laudable intentions he joined himself with that brave handful of men
under the command of the never to be forgotten General Warren, with
full purpose at the risk of his life, to contribute all in his power to defend,
that important hill.

When your Memorialist's husband was in that dreadful action of the
17th of June, where he received two wounds from the enemy in the action
of that day, and was, in the retreat of our army, left to suffer the cruel
rage of a merciless enemy. Since which time he has not been heard of,
nor found among the living, and your Memorialist having thus suffered
in the cause was left a widow with eight small, fatherless children to
support, without any consoladon but of that of his having spilt his blood
for his Country's cause. • ^

That your Memorialist hath ever since, even beyond her ability,
exerted and contributed all in her power to pay taxes to carry on the
war and has of late been obliged to borrow money for that purpose, in-
somuch that the debt she has contracted to discharge her taxes, and
support her family, hath increased to a large debt upon her. Wherefore
your Memorialist would pray the interposiuon of your Honors in her
favor, and that she may have some just part of the public monies ade-
quate to her late husband's losses in arms and necessaries in the public
service. Or that your Honors would otherwise take into consideration
her distressed circumstances, and grant and enact that she may in future
be exempted from all public taxes during the war, or such time as your
Honors in your great wisdom shall think just and reasonable.
And your Memorialist as in duty bound shall ever pray.

Your Honor's Humble Servant
H. S. Park.
Dated at Charlestown
This 20*'' day of April, A.D. 1782.

* Narragansett Historical Register, VoL I, p. 217.
[105]



BENJAMIN PARKE«

"DENJAMIN PARKE* (who added the final e to his name) was
■■-^ the third son of Benjamin Park*, bom September 16**', 1765,
in Charlestown, R. I. Married, 1800, Susanna Maria Keens, of
New York, born December 2""*, 1776, daughter of Joseph and
Mary (Giles) Keens. He died August s***, 1807. She died Feb-
ruary 17*'', 1807.

CHILDREN

I Susannah «

II Hannah Anne^ bom April 24*"*, 1804, in New York. Married,
January !•*, 1821, Samuel Putnam Avery, of New York, bom January
!'*» 1797- She died June 26*S 1888, in Jersey City, N. J. He died July
24*^, 1832, in New^York. They had six children. See forward.

Benjamin Parke' went to New York after his mother's death,
December, 1800, and engaged in the shipping business with his
brother Joseph. He died in New York City, August s***, 1807,
and was buried in Trinity Churchyard on Broadway, New York
City, about eighteen paces north of, and near the west end of the
church. Susanna his wife was born December 2""*, 1776, and died
February 17*^ 1807. She is buried in Trinity Churchyard on
Broadway, in the same grave with her mother Mary Keens, and
next to her husband, Benjamin Parke.



C106]



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TOMBSTONE OF CAPTAIN BENJAMIN PARKE*
AS IT NOW STANDS (1917) IN GOOD CONDITION, IN TRINITY CHURCH-
YARD, NEW YORK, ABOUT EIGHTEEN PACES NORTH OF AND NEAR
THE WEST END OF THE CHURCH. THE TOMBSTONE ON
THE RIGHT IS THAT OF HIS WIFE's MOTHER



HANNAH ANNE PARKE'

TTANNAH ANNE PARKE^ second daughter of Benjamin
**• ■*■ Parke* and' Susanna Maria (Keens) Parke, was bom April
24*S 1804, in New York. Married, January i'*, 1821, Samuel
Putnam Avery*", of New York, bom January !•*, 1797. She died
June 26*'*, 1 888. He died July 24*^ 1832.

CHILDREN

I Avery", Samuel Putnam, bom March 17^, 1822, in New York. Mar-
ried, November 24*'', 1844, Mary Ami Ogden, of New York, bom December
I*S 1825, daughter of Henry Aaron and Katharine (Conklin) Ogden, of
• New York. He died August 11**', 1904, in New York. She died April
29*'', 191 1, in Hartford, Conn.^They had six children. See forward.

n Avery*, Hannah Stanton, bora October 12*^, 1824, in New York.
Married, May 2***, 1854, Charies R. Cornell, of Troy, N. Y., bom June
20*'', 1806. She died June 25"», 1885, in New York. He died September
12**', 1866. They had one daughter.

ni Avery', Susan Jane, bom December ii*^, 1826, in New York.
Married, December 5*^, 1850, Stephen Avery, of Hudson, N. Y. She
died March 18^, 191 2, in Santa Barbara, Cal. He died January i*\
1853, in New York. They had one son.

IV Avery', Benjamin Parke, bom November ii**, 1828, in New York.
Married, November 27''', 1861, Mary Ann Fuller, of San Francisco,
Cal., bom July ij***, 1827. He died November 8**', 1875, in Peking,
China. She died June 9*'', 1913, in San Francisco. They had no children.

V Avery', Mary Rebecca Halsey, bora August lo***, 1830, in New York.
Married, June 7"», 1856, Rev. T. De Witt Talmage, of Bound Brook,
N. J., bom January 7"', 1832. She died June 7*^ 1861, in Philadelphia,
Pa. He died April 12**', 1902, in Brooklyn, N. Y. They had two children.

VI Avery', Charles Russell, bora October, 1832, in New York. Died
August s"», 1833.

Hannah Anne. (Parke) Avery^ second daughter of Benjamin
Parke* and Susanna Maria (Keens) Parke, was bom in New
York City, April 24*'', 1804. Her womanhood was passed in

[107]



kindly deeds, patriotic eiforts, and charity which was as broad as
it was bountiful, knowing no creed or color. In the War of the
Rebellion of the slave-holding states she was active in sending
delicacies to our sick and wounded soldiers, in caring for their
widows and orphans, and was the chief instrument in founding a
home for the children of the dead soldiers. She subsequently
became identified with Mrs. Gen. U. S. Grant in extending this
work, and was at one time vice-president when Mrs. Grant was
president of the National Organization.



[io8]



SAMUEL PUTNAM AVERY*

SAMUEL PUTNAM AVERY', third son of Samuel Putnam
Avery ^ and Hannah Anne (Parked Avery, was born in New
York March I7*^ 1822 (M.A., Columbia University, 1896).
Married, November 24*S 1844, Mary Ann Ogden, of New York,
bom December i**, 1825, daughter of Henry Aaron Ogden and
Katharine (Conklin) Ogden. He died August ii*N 1904, in New
York. She died April 2^*\ 191 1, in Hartford, Conn.

CHILDREN

I Mary Henrietta*, bom October 4*^ 1845, in Brooklyn, N. Y. Died
April 7***, 1900, in New York. ^

II Samuel Putnam', born October 7*^ 1847, in Brooklyn, N. Y. 5//

forward. . »> 1 1 m v

III Fanny Falconer', born November 3"*, 1849, m Brooklyn, IN. X.
Married, February is'\ 1881, Rev. M. P. Welcher, of Newark, N. Y.,
bom October 27*N 1850 (Williams College, 1877), She died July 22»*,
1918, in Hartford, Conn. They had four children. ^

IV Henry Ogden», bora January Ji"', 1852, in Brooklyn, N. Y. Died
April JO***, 1890, in New York.

V Emma Parke', bom August 29»^ 1853, in Brooklyn, N. Y. Died
August 31'*, 1857. in Brooklyn, N. Y. , . „ , , t.. ^ o- ,

VI Ellen Walters', born January i'*, 1861, in Brooklyn, N. Y. Uied
March 25**', 1893, in New York.

Samuel P. Avery«, who is dead at a ripe age, was one of those men,
more plendful in a world much accused of sordidness than the world
knows, who do good without employing a press agent to state the fact.
Beginning life as an engraver, he naturally acquired an interest in art,
and became one of the best known dealers in pictures in the metropolis.
It was to his encouragement that many of the American as well as not a
few of the foreign irtists owed their success. The various socieries or-
ganized for sales and exhibitions, and the various schools established for
the teaching of art in all its branches, had his quiet but effecrive and
monetary support. At the time of his death he was a member of seven

[109]



of these societies, and was a patron of most of the schools. But his use-
fulness and his generosity extended beyond his chosen field. He was a
trustee of three public libraries, a founder of the Metropolitan Museum,
a veteran of the army, a giver to charities, he endowed several free beds
in hospitals, he took a part in educational work in the South, and in
measures designed to protect and enlighten the Indian, he created the
library in the Teachers College, and made and endowed the library of
architecture m Columbia University which gave to him [in 1896] the
degree of Master of Arts. To the Lenox Library he gave his remarkable
collection of prints and examples of lithography, illustrating that art in
its completeness, these gifts numbering over 17,000. Withal he was not
a remarkably rich man, and he never put himself on exhibition when a
service was to be done for the community, although he was one who could
be counted upon to do more than his share of it. His memory is held in
love and reverence by the whole body of painters, sculptors, architects
and medalists, whom he assisted, and by the educators of the country.
He set an example worthy to be kept before those who have either wealth
or talent to devote to the public interest. Brooklyn Eagle, August is***,

1904-

The vagaries and habits of the collector are legion, while his motives
are as varied as his habits. Some men collect books for investment, resell
their libraries, and gloat over the profits; others buy purely with the idea
of reading, while again some have the dual motive of pleasure in reading
rare books and of a shrewd investment. To none of these classes did the
late Mr. Samuel P. Avery belong. He vras a collector primarily for his
own pleasure and delectation, and secondarily for the purpose of doing
good to those to whom he was a benefactor and of helping those from
whom he was a purchaser. He was that rara avis, an altniisric collector.

Mr. Avery began life as an engraver on copper, and early had his at-
tendon drawn to the arristic and mechanical part of book-making. He
was once employed by a bank note company. It was natural, therefore,
that all through his career he should be an ardent admirer as well as col-
lector of specimens of fine book-making, as r^ards type, illustration,
and general format. 1 Mif 1

Mr. Avery also practiced wood engraving, and became very sbllful
at his art. He compiled and illustrated several volumes of humorous
quality, and tlioie who knew him soon discovered that he possessed a
keen sense of humor. It was a matter of course that when The Grolier
Club was founded in 1884 Mr. Avery should take a deep interest in its
object and work, and all through his career he was a constant attendant
at its meetings, working on important committees, besides serving the
club as its president. It is said that his record for attendance at the
monthly members' meetings exceeded that of any other member of this
well-known organizadon. Not only was his mterest manifested by the
giving of his rime, but Mr. Avery early began to present the library of
the club with books, engravings, bindings, etc As a collector Mr. Avery
was most discriminating and careful in his buying, and early formed one

[no]



LE



BIBLIOMANE




TV Mr. Samuel P, Avery

I have illustrated this little book (Le Bibliomane
par Charles Nodier), with particular interest, because of
my connection with Mr. Nodier's family, and the
affection I had for his little son who has just died.
As for the water-color, I have had great pleasure in
using it, as a frontispiece, and in it put the figure of a
nnan of taste and a true book lover, for whom I have
profound esteem and sincere friendship.

Maurice Leloir

Psritfjuly loth, 1896



of the best collections of bookbindings, as a fine art, ever made in this
country.

Every institution in this country with which he was directly associated,
and many which had no possible claim upon him, were enriched by his
gifts. To the Avery Architectural Library he gave his very complete
collection of books on fine bindings, and the Metropolitan Museum of
Art was a frequent recipient of books of interest, particularly those re-
lating to etchings, engravings, and the allied arts. Even remote college
libraries received unsolicited gifts, generally relating to the arts and
crafts. •

It is said by one of Mr. Avery's most intimate friends that his library
at the time of his death was not a large one, because he was such a con-
stant giver of books. It represented only the undistributed remnant.

The writer has been in some of Mr. Avery's haunts in Paris and Lon-
don, and wherever he was a familiar figure the verdict was the same;
namely, that he was a most well-informed, modest, courteous, kindly
gentleman of the old school whose object seemed to rather give than to
get. One phase of his kindliness will long be remembered' by men greatly
his junior. He never seemed to look down upon them, but always treated
them as possessing great possibilities, and many a kind word spoken to a
young engraver or bookbinder was followed by a substantial order. Mr.
Avery did not do like some collectors, wait until the fame of an artisan
or artist was established and his name on every one's lips, and then to
seek his wares, but he early recognized merit and took an especial pride
in being among the first to order the work of new men.

Mr. William Matthews, the first American binder who gained stand-
ing as a master, was a lifelong friend of Mr. Avery's, and the writer well
remembers watching Mr. Avery at the sale of Mr. Matthews's library
some years ago, securing books which had formed the subject of their
united taste, and many hours of discussion.

Of bookplates, he used three, if not more; one engraved by the English
master, C. W. Sherbom, one made for the Avery Architectural Library,
one engraved by French, forming No. lo in Mr. Lemperly's check list.
This was made in memory of his daughter. Miss Ellen Walters Avery,
whose library was presented by her father to the Teachers College, and
is dated March 25***, 1893. It is one of the most successful of Mr. French's
creations. The design represents a lyre, telescope, daisies, etc., worked
into an elaborate border, while an open book of music, an astronomy, a
natural history, a church history, a volume of poems, and the "Imitation
of Christ " are set in an artisric group, evidently representing the tzstes
of his daughter.

Mr. Avery was a delightful letter writer, and something pf a punster,


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Online LibrarySamuel Putnam AveryThe Avery, Fairchild & Park families of Massachusetts Connecticut & Rhode Island : with a short narration of facts concerning Mr. Richard Warren Mayflower passenger and his family connections with Thomas Little → online text (page 9 of 12)