Samuel Rogers.

The poems of Samuel Rogers, with a memoir online

. (page 2 of 16)
Online LibrarySamuel RogersThe poems of Samuel Rogers, with a memoir → online text (page 2 of 16)
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And ail his bells were raiilBed. Then my

Guide,
Lowering his voice, address' d me : " Through

this Chasm
On and say nothing — for a word, a breath,
Stirring the air, may loosen and bring down
A winter's snow — enough to overwhelm
The horse and foot that, night and day, defiled
Along this path to conquer at Marengo.
Well I remember how I met them here,
As the light died away, and how Napoleon,
Wrapt in his cloak — I could not be deceived
Rein'd in his horse, and ask'd me, as I pass'd,
How far 't was to St. Remi. Where the rock
Juts forward, and the road, crumbling away,
Narrows almost to nothing at its base,
'T was there; and down along the brink ho

led
To Victory ! — Dessaix, v/ho turn'd the scale, (4)
Leaving his life-blood in that famous field
(When the clouds break, we may discern the

spot
In the blue haze), sleeps, as you saw at

dawn.
Just as you enter' d, in the Hospital- church."
So saying, for awhile he held his peace.
Awe-struck beneath that dreadful Canopy ;
But soon, the danger pass'd, launch'd f>rth

again.



a ITALT.

IV.

JORASSE.

JoRASSE was in his three-and-twentieth year ;
Graceful and active as a stag just roused ;
Gentle withal, and pleasant in his speech,
Yet seldom seen to smile. He had grown up
Among the Hunters of the Higher Alps ;
Had caught their starts end fits of thoughtfulness,
Their haggard looks, and strange soliloquies,
Said, to arise by those who dwell below,
From frequent deaUngs with the Mountain-
Spirits.
But other ways had taught him better things ;
And now he numbered, marching by my side.
The Savans, Princes, who with him had cross'd
The frozen tract, with him familiarly
Through the rough day and rougher night con-
versed
In many a chalet round the peak of terror,*
Round Tacul, Tour, Well-horn and Rosenlau,
And Her, whose throne is inaccessible, t
Who sits, withdrawn, in virgin-majesty,
Nor oft unveils. Anon an Avalanche
Roll'd its long thunder ; and a sudden crash,
Sharp and metallic, to the startled ear
Told that far-down a continent cf Ice
Had burst in twain. But he had now begun,
And with what transport he recall' d the hour
When to deserve, t


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Online LibrarySamuel RogersThe poems of Samuel Rogers, with a memoir → online text (page 2 of 16)