Samuel T. (Samuel Thomas) Worcester.

A pronouncing spelling-book of the English language : mainly on the principles of comparison and contrast online

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AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY



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Given By



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PRONOUNCING



SPELLUnTG-BOOK



OF THE EJ^QLTSH LAKQUAQE



MAINLY ON THE PRINCIPLES OF



COMPARISON AND CONTRAST



NEW YORK • . • CINCINNATI • . • CHICAGO

AMERICAN BOOK COMPANY



hioo






Copyright
By L. J. CAMPBEI^Iv AND S. T. WORCESTER.

1878.

Copyright 1906,
By IvUCY C. WORCESTER and VIVIAN CAMPBEl^Iy CARR.

E-P 4



Uxi-



PKEFAOE,



The following features, among others, will, it is "believed,
commend this speUing-book to the favor of teachers : —

1. The selection of the words. Only such as are met with
in ordinary reading have been taken.

2. The classification and arrangement.

3. The dictation exercises.

4. The variety in the kind of lessons.

5. The treatment of the few really useful rules for English
spelling.

The pronunciation is shown by the headings of the lessons,
by marked letters, and by re-spelling whenever thought necessary.

L. J. C.



KEY TO THE MAEKED LETTEES.
a, ape ;



a, an;





Yovrels.






e, eve;


i, Ice;


©, old;


u, use.


e, eU;


i, m;


0, on;


u,iip.



a, arm ; ^, fast ;

a (= aw), f^ll ;

a (= e in there), fare ;

e (= ii in fur and i in fir),
her;

i (= e or ee), machine ;

(=z ^ or aw), or ;



6 (=00 in ooze or u in
rude), move;

6 (=u) son;

do, ooze.

do, good.

u (= 00 in good), full ;

u (= 6 or oo), rude.



Congouants.

g, g^et ; 5 (= gz), example ; s (italic) = z, muse ;

th (Ualii), tlvis> ; ch (unmarked), usually as in chin.



L WOBCE STEM'S NEW

VOWEL SOUNDS.
Long Vowels. Short Vowels.

1. e as in eve, 8. i as in ill,

9. e " end.



2.


a


a


ape.


3.


a


u


arm.


4.


A

a


ii


all.


6.


o


u


Old.


6.


Ob


tl


ooze.


7.


Ii*


ii


urn.



10.


a "


and.


11.


6 "


on.


12.


o^o "


good.


13.


u "


up.



C^ompound Vowels.

U. 1 as in ice like a e.



15.


oi


ii


oil


ii


A V

ai.


16.


ou


11


out


a


a 6b.


17.


u


ic


use


a


yoo or ioo.t



18. a '^ ask, past, class, dance.

This sound is not so thin as a in fat, nor so broad as a in far.

19. a as in fare, air, there.

Either short e prolonged before r (in England), or short a
gliding into the sound of slight u before r (in the United States).



* This sound is a little longer and closer than its corresponding short
sound, u, as in m>.



PEONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK.



CONSONANT SOUNDS.



Vocal and IJiquid.


P


as in


pipe.


r as in roar.


b


a


babe.


1 " luU.


t


a


tent.


Vocal and Nasal.


d


u


did.


m as in maim.


k


66


kick.


n " noon,
ng " hang.


g
ch


66
66


gag.
church.


Aspirates and Vocals.




J


66


judge.


S as in sun.








z " zeal.


Vowel Consonants


sh « shall.


y


as in


yard.


z'^=zh) azure.


w


66


war.


f « fife.




Pure Aspirate.


V " valve.


h


as in


hut.


th « thin.












th « this.


wh hw.



6



WORCESTER'S NEW



EOMAN AM SOKIPT ALPHABETS.







/<^



^^^



€2-












7



Spelling Lessons





FIEST


SECTION.






a


1.

in mat.




back


^^^


shall


<mci^


sack


4ac^


scalp


dCO/Ml


lack


€ac^


scan


4ca/n


black


macn^


scant


4ca/?t^


slack


dM^C^


cramp


c^o/mA


smack


4^?nacn'


thank


^^a'?2/£


track


^acd


prank


/i^a/?2y^


quack


anac^


chap


cnaA


act


ac^


scrap


4c^aJi


fact


/ac^


crash


c^ad^


tact


^acl


sash


4a4^


tract


ii'acl^


flax


/fo/x



8


WORGESTEB^S NEW






2.








e in met




neck


dwell


kept


stress


peck


quell


crept


jest


check


belch


depth


chest


speck


bench


cress


quest


sect


clench


less


snell


keg


drench


bless


vex


smell


trench


dress


next


spell


quench


press


text


d/iec^


a

X


c/e^i^


cdedi




^ i in pin.




rich


quick


pill


chip


thick


strict


spill


stint


kick


width


thrill


zinc


lick


skiff


till


chink


brick


cUff


quill


squint


trick


stiff


swill


fix


sick


chill


milk


script


stick


skiU


quUt


minx


i^C^


u^cc/m


^^^"^


'yTicTiay





FRONOUNGING SPELLING-BOOK. 9


O in not.


4. u in


tub.


dock


sock


scrub


gruff


lock


stock


much


stuff


block


scoff


such


dull


clock


strong


duck


chunk


flock


throng


struck


junk


mock


chop


scud


skulk


crock


cloth


cuff


scum


frock


broth


snuff


trunk


d^cma


c/o^d


41^0^'


(micn/^



5.

a in far and a in all

Sound the r clearly. Say jar, not jah; charm, not chahm.
Do not pronounce aw as if ending in r. Say jaw, not ja"wr



jar


[aw]


crawl


scald


scar


caw


drawl


squall


scarf


jaw


scrawl


sward


chart


claw


sprawl


swarm


charm


squaw


yawn


quart


arch


shawl


[a]


dwarf


march


yawl


tall


warm


are


brawl


staU


warp


7na/tc^


rn'Oic^


o^ate^





10


wougestebis new








6.






Ch ill


L church.




chub


chin


which


such


chum


inch


lunch


much


chiU


finch


bunch


larch


chink


pinch


punch


starch


filch


clinch


munch


torch


milch


flinch


church


scorch


umcc'^


cm//icn^


7.


^coi^C'^




tch sounded like ch.




catch


snatch


pitch


botch


hatch


scratch


ditch


notch


latch


fetch


hitch


blotch


batch


stretch


stitch


watch


patch


sketch


twitch


clutch


match


witch


switch


crutch


calc^n^


Tn^a^c^


40^0^0^


dicAcic^



(P/r d^clc^n^ {/n ^{/me dav^ed Tit^n^e,



PRONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK. 11

8.

a in ape.
face glade Q^ c^M'4 Ace.

lace made o-///

/re ca/n ^ui/zi a ^ace,

pace spade

space grade ^^^ ^^^^ ^ ^^^^

race chafe ^^^^ ^ ^eeTi,

grace make ©^ a/ac/e o^ ofien

trace snake ^^^^ ^ a i/j^aac/.

fade quake ^j<7^ / /?

shade scale ^ /

blade lame ^ ^ ^^^^

9.

shame mate q^^^^ ^^^ ^^
blame prate ^^. , v^ y^

shape skate /? />/

crape gaze ^^ o/d ^ec/ /o<z>,

scrape blaze Scm^4 a^a4<:>e o^ eai

case glaze ^^ a^ee^ Madd,

chase graze ^^y , ^ /

haste change ^^^.^^ ^

paste strange ^^ ^^ /^^^ ^^ ^^^

taste bai^Ae /^"^ ^aa^/ic/ macm.



12



WOMGESTEB'S NEW



chore

strode

coke

choke

joke

poke

spoke

stroke

scold

stole

tore
wore
force
forge



10.

o in note.



roll

scroll

droll

stroll

colt

slope

cope

core

score

more



^a^e ^ou OTi^ cn^o^e4






e




e




11.



porch


don't


shorn


[oe]


gross


foe


worn


hoe


those


toe


rose


woe



both /^ . ^ ^

clothe

doze ^^ ^^ ^de /i^'U^n

(2/4 ^^ m^uMeTi tTi A^o-4e

(2/ u^i






PRONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK. IS

12.

i in pine.

ice squire ^^;,^ /^^/^.

slice wise ^^^ . /^

spice size >^^^ ^ ^^ /i^uce a/

price prize ^ ^<^y y^ /aoe .<?

thrice bli/Ae ^r^ .

twice rmd

chime [ie] &^^e ^^Mie cAi/c/ w-ad

diYe die ^M^e a//ia aa^,

scribe tie <^^S ^^^25«^ ^^?^ ^AeAuze.

13.

m in mute.

cube use (^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^t^^?^/.

tube mule ^,^$;7^ / . J^ .

huge mute ^^^ ^ ^^

plume [ewl ^^^ "^"^^ a^a^/i^^i^e

June few ^^^ ^<^ ^;^^^.

tune new ^^ ^.^ ^^ one/

■P ^^ €^Ai9ic/ mem.

flute blew /^r^ /?

cure new ^

pure stew dcm. me c/etc^.



14


WOECESTEB'S NEW






14.






''


a in ask







This sound is


1 not so broad and open as


the full sound of a


in arm.


dance


sha'n't


glass


shaft


chance


grant


pass


craft


lance


ask


grass


graft


glance


cask


cast


staff


blanch


clasp


fast


chaff


branch


grasp


last


quaff


chant


lass


past


lath



15.

J\ OU in out, or CW in CO'W.

Do not sound the diphthong ou or ow as if ^6o, but as ado. Do
not say tS.oon, p^oond.



bound


south


snout


brown


ground


pouch


count


gown


hound


couch


scour


town


pound


crouch


shroud


drown


round


slouch


lounge


scow


ounce


oust


gouge


scowl


mouth


sprout


spouse


browse



(3/^ee^i m'O^iAde o^^^ d^i/Ua4 ci9ic/ miad



PMONOUNCING SFELLING-BOOK,



15







16.






g and dg


sounded like j.




charge


strange


hedge


dodge


eringe


badge


fledge


lodge


hinge


edge


wedge


budge


forge


ledge


dredge


judge


purge


pledge


ridge


drudge


scourge


sledge


bridge


grudge


^^


4cati^ae o^ u^^^^i^ 46^e'te^^,






17.






wh sounded as if hw.




In the following words "wh i


is an aspirated "w.


Be careful to say


h^w^en for "w^hen, not wen; hwitch for -which,


not witch.


whale


wheel


which


while


what


wheeze


whisk


whilst


wharf


where


whist


white


when


whiz


whir


whine


whence


whip


whirl


whelm


whelp


whiff


why-


wharves


whis'^per


whip^lash


whet^stone


whis ker


whirl wind


white wash



i/t^ed' ii/^ei^e d^t^id u/?z€(?ac/



16


WORCESTER'S NEW








18.








00


in moon




root


do




rule


brew


roost


to




rude


chew


soon


who




prude


crew


tooth


whose




crude


drew


smooth


whom




brute


grew


noose


lose




truce


threw


chooie


move




spruce


screw


groove


prove




truth


shrewd


^^uae


7^ea7i4 taw-^


^ouad^ (yl i


wnu/ie^






19.








e in her or


U in fur.




her


scurf




stir


word


fern


curse




third


work


stern


nurse




shirt


world


perch


purse




mirth


worm


were


squirm




first


worse


nerve


chirp




thirst


worst


verse


dirt




whirl


worth


(^e^yn.4


' Maw- i//i


'm.Mdi aot/i.




Qyne7/.


\/


/lui'ii^ ana


r/ii'lid.



(^oe daa a 4au^, die^^m^ /oon^.





FMONOUNGING SI


'SLLING-BOOK. 17






20,


t








Several kinds of vowel sounds.


hence


axe




voice




add


thence


false




noise




egg


pence


gone




house




ebb


fence


have




spare




oflf


since


tense




share




odds


these


dense




scare




was


mere


sense




else






glimpse


^Jje^de /o-a cito-4e


Ao-m.


m^e


4eci.



21.

fie careful to pronounce the following words correctly.



jar


forge


since


crouch


charm


porch


fast


spouse


catch


June


egg


when


rind


tube


how


what


squire


chant


town


sha'n't


quoth


chance


gown


rule


hlithe


are (r)


ground


chew


lithe


were


snout


truths



,J:£il^e 9nea/?t4 7ii/??iy^'ie c?^ ea4{^^ 'den^.



18



WOBGBSTEB'S NEW



22.

why

shall

quill

zinc

such

much

catch

stretch

which

couch

sketch

are

quart

shawl

these

scrawl

glimpse

starch

scale

blaze

space

else



BEVIEW LESSONS.

23.



whirl

lodge

gouge

clew

clothe

choke

stole

scroll

use

doze

botch ^^ moTi,

watch <^de c4tk/i o/ /tkc/d.



W^o-de a^r^e id ^i^^^p
(Woe id a dn^emdj ca//i-



axe Q^
whose

shrewd ^
worm



aouae



&6 uAic/e a/?tci /(}7i.



nurse



V

worse ^^ /ac/ae cti a/n. o/c/

mirth I j. ^

first ^nr- y

worst / ^

scourge



'^/e



c€ea9ide.



PRONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK.



X9



SEOOlSrD SEOTIOK.







24.






Farts of the body.




head


ear


hair


eye


breast


tooth


waist


thumb


skull


mouth


heart


knee


cheek


tongue


nail


fin'ger


toes


throat


wrist


elbow


foot


beard


joint


eye brow



Dictation Exercise 1. — 1. The skull is part of the head.
2. The beard grows on the chin and the cheeks. 3. The girl
has a slim waist. 4. We can bend the joints of the knee,
the "wrist, and the elbow. 5. Your tongue is in your moutb.
6. Your thumb has a thick naiL







25.






Words concerning clothes.




frock


shirt


flounce


jack'et


coat


hood


pock'et


rib bon


cloak


hooks


apron (a'pum)


but ton


boot


gown


trou sers


gai ters


shoe


sleeves


bon net


a prons


scarf


gloves


stock ing


slip pers



Dictation Exercise 2. — l. Gloves are for the hands. 2. Shoes
are for the feet. 3. The little boy's trousers and jacket. 4. The
girls' scarfs and ribbons. 5. Tie on your apron. 6. She put a
bonnet on her head. 7. A flounce on a dress.



20



WOBCESTEB'^ ^EW







26.








Words concerning Food.




tea


cheese




pie


knife


wheat


beef




bread


knives


meal


loaf




broth


fork


cream


loaves




plate


stew


meat


toast




steak


but'ter


veal


roast




soup


din ner


peas


chop




sauce


sup per


beans


spoon




fruit


'cut let



Dictation Exercise 3. — l. Will you have some crsam toast ?
2. No, I will have some roast beef. 3. Please to give me a piece
of pie and a bit of cheese. 4. I will have a beefsteak and some
fruit. 5. I will take a veal cutlet.







27,


>






What


we


can do.




see


eat




chat


yawn


peep


hear




talk


groan


sleep


speak




walk


touch


weep


dream




jump


work


sneeze


gaze




shout


frown


feel


look




laugh


shriek


kneel


call




sigh


scratch


brea^Z-^e


bawl




snore


climb



Dictation Ei2ercise 4. — l. Can you hear me talk? 2. We
should breathe pure air. ^ 3. You must not laugh so loud.
4. She sighs because she is sad. 5. Groans were heard, and
then loud shrieks. 6. We will climb the hill.



PBONOUNCIKG SPELLING-BOOK.



21







28.






In the House.




floor


rooms


basTiet


ta^ble


doors


pan'try


buck et


ladle


chairs


clos et


gob let


cradle


stairs


par lor


car pet


nee die


stove


kitch en


blank et


thim ble


chum


cham ber


tea cup


nap kin


bowls


bed room


sau cer


turn bier



Dictation Exercise 5. — l. Please to take the chairs into
the parlor. 2. The churn is in the kitchen. 3. Shut the door
of the chamber. 4. Please to give me a goblet of milk. 5. The
teacup sits in the saucer. 6. Your frock hangs in the closetc







29.




In the House.


soap


lounge


at'tic


coal


sieve {siv)


gar ret


wood


so'fa


plat ter


pail


hearth


dip per


sheets


towel


ket ties


tongs


man tel


bot ties


comb


entry


snuffers



grid'dle
pil lows
mir ror
skim mer
po ker
win dow
bed quilt

look'ing-glass sauce'pan rock'ing-chair

Dictation Exercise 6. — l. We sift the meal with a fine sieve.
2. There is some dirt on the stove hearth. 3. A comb for the
hair. 4. A toTwel to wipe the face. 5. The clock is on the
mantel. 6. We can play in the attic, or garret.



22



WORCESTER'S NEW



30.

In the Country.

fields

stream

brook

woods

trees

calf

calves

Dictation Exercise 7. — l- The calves are in the cornfield.
2. Flowers bloom in the meadow. 3. Apples grow in the
orchard. 4. A fresh breeze. 5. A cottage stands on thf
river's bank. 6. We can load, hay with a pitchfork.



riv'er


swale


cat'tle


for est


swamp


liar row


flow ers


breeze


reap er


or chard


clouds


mow er


mead ow


roads


hay stack


gar den


plains


pitch fork


corn field


lambs


cot tage



31.

In the Country.



gate


shrubs


birds


ox'en


rake


hedge


fowls


wagon


spade


ledge


geese


hil locks


grain


ridge


sheep


chick ens


plough


bridge


knolls


plough share


weeds


ditch


bush'es


plough man


pigsty


chasm.


leaves


past ure


farm'house


dooryard


barnyard



Dictation Exercise 8. — l. The horses draw the plough. 2. The
cattle are in the pasture 3. The sheep are on the grassy
knolls. 4. Shall we feed the chickens ? 5. Birds sing in the
hedge. 6. Beyond the ridge was a deep chasm {kazm).



world

waiter

much

there

sea

flows

beasts

worms

earth

soil

mould

ores

iron

16ad

some

ver'y

eye

clear

boats

sail

high

they



PBONOUNGING SPELLING-BOOK. 23

32.

THE EARTH AND THE SEA.

The world we live in is round like a
ball. It is part land and part water. There
is not so much land as there is sea. The
sea flows round the land.

Men and beasts and worms live on the
earth. Trees and plants grow in the soil.
The soil of the earth has stones, and sand,
and clay, and mould, with ores of gold and
iron (I'urn), lead and tin.

Some parts of the earth are cold and
some are not. In the cold parts of the
earth are snow and ice. In the hot parts
of the earth trees and plants grow very
large.

The sea is very large. It is salt to the
taste, and looks blue to the eye when the
sky is clear. Fish of all kinds live in it.
Ships and hoats sail on it from place to
place.

The sea has a tide which ebbs and flows.
Twice a day the waters are high and twice
a day they are low. The sea is from two
to three miles deep in some parts.



24



WOBCESTEB'S NEW



,


33.






Fruits good to eat.




peach


cit'ron


straw'berry


ap'ple


ches^ nut


black ber ry


melon


cur rant


blue ber ry


lemon


rai sin


cran ber ry


or ange


cher ry


musk mel on


pear


berry


wa ter mel on



Dictation Exercise 9. — l. Melons are good to eat when they
are ripe. 2. Juicy pears. 3. Sour currants. 4. Raisins are
dried grapes. 5. The strawberry is red. 6. Cranberries grow
in the swamp. 7. Walnuts have a hard shell. 8. Oranges come
^rom the South.







34.








REVIEW LESSON


.




eye


toes


rye




knolls


ver'y


shoe


tongue




walk


sieve


sauce


thumb




rai'sin


thigh


shriek


knife




iron


heart


chest nut pitch fork


wag on


Be careful to pronounce


the following words correctly.


calf


trou'sers


talk


waiter


beard


b5n net


apron


har row


stew


kitch en


tongs


sofa




laugh


cham ber


hearth


chick en


chasm


sau cer


cSllves


plough share



FBONOUNCING SPELLIJSG-BOOK.



26



35.



Fishes.




Birds.




cod


perch


lark


finch


shad


pike


duck


thrush


smelt


shrimp


quail


wren


skate


eel


goose


crane


bass


trout


snipe


stork


roach


dace


swan {sw6n)


gull


sole


chub


grouse
36.


loon




Trades or


Employments.




a'gent


turn'er


black'smith


tan^ner


farm er


mm er


gold smith


tin ner


gro cer


bar ber


post man


hat ter


port er


fire man


fish er man


mason


printer


mer chant


mill er
37.


sail or




Well-known Trees.




ash


elm


yew


poplar


pine


birch


spruce


wil low


oak


larch


lo'cust


wal nut


beech


pate


maple


hem lock


Dictation Exercise 10. —


1. The palm-tree has broad leaves


like the palm


of one's hand


. 2. The oak, the ]


pine, and the


hemlock are


of great use to :


man. 3. The codfish


L swims in the


sea. 4. The trout lives in cool streams. 5. The grouse and the



quail are very good to eat. 6. The ■wren is a small bird.
7. Sailors sail on the sea. 8. The merchant sells goods.



26 WOBGESTEB'S NEW







38.






Tools to work with.


.


axe


gouge


trow^el


hatch'et


adze


au'ger


gim let


ham mer


wrench


chi5 el


pin cers


crow bar


hoe


an vil


razor


pick axe


wedge


hand saw


mal let


jack-knife


scy^/^e


brad awl


fun nel


broad axe



Dictation Exercise IL — 1. An axe is used to cut and split
wood. 2. The carpenter uses an adze to chip off the surface of
timber. 3. Blows of a mallet on the head of a chisel. 4. A
■wrench is used for forcibly turning bolts and nuts. 5. We can
mow grass with a scythe. 6. The carpenter bores small holes
with a gimlet. 7. Pincers are used for griping anything to be
held fast.

39.
Relatives.

parents daugh'ter cous in (luz'n)

chil dren broth er hue'band

fath er sis ter wife

moth er un cle (ung'u) grand fath er

pa pa' aunt (ant) grand moth er

mam ma neph ew (neiy-) grand son

son niece (nees) grand daugh ter

Dictation Exercise 12. — l. My father and my mother are
my parents. 2. My cousin is the daughter or the son of
my aunt or of my uncle. 3. Uncle George calls me his
nephe^w {-Mv'yoo) and my sister Mary his niece. 4. Grand-
mother calls my sister Mary her granddaughter.



FMONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK. 27





40.






At SchooL




les^sons


ci'pher


sketch


stud J


add


rtirer


learn


sub tract'


teach er


re cite'


murti ply


schol ar


readying


di vide'


ink stand


writ ing


slate


black board


spell ing


pen'cil


school mate


writ'ing-books blot'ting-pa'per




41.






We should be —




manly


civ'il truthTul


re spect'ful


gen tie


po lite' pa tient


gen'er ous


hon est


stead'y gen teel'


well-be haved'


cl6an ly


prompt sin cere


kind-he'art'ed




We should not be-





cring'ing


sau'cy rude


cow'ard ly


/ crii el


stin gy tat'tling


un washed'


dis hon'est


la zy heed less


un combed


di/ty


vul gar sul len


ill-be haved'



Dictation Exercise 13, — l. I will hear you recite your
lesson. 2. We use our pencils to cipher with. 3, I am your
sincere friend. 4. We must be patient with a dull scholar.
5. No one likes a rude or saucy boy. 6. It is cruel to kill
a song-bird. 7. His hair was uncombed and his face was
unwashed. 8. Be ready and prompt.



28



WOBCESTEHS NEW







42.








Numbers.


s


One


e lev'en


twen ty-one'


for'ty


two


twelve


twen ty-two


fifty


three


thir teen'


twen ty-three


sixty


four


four teen


twen ty-four


sev en ty


five


fif teen


twen ty-five


eigh ty


six


six teen


twen ty-six


nine ty


sev'en


sev en teen


twen ty-sev en


hun dred


eight


eight een


twen ty-eight


thou sand


nine


nine teen


twen ty-nine


mill ion


ten


twen'ty


thirty


bill ion



43.

]^aines of the Days and the Months.

Sun'day
Mon day
Tues day
Wednes day ^
Thurs day
Fri day
Sat ur day

Thirty days hath September, April, June, and November ;
February has twenty-eight alone; and all the rest have thirty-on<
But leap-year, coming once in four, gives to February one day mop«

* wenz'dd. "f feV roo-a-rt



JSn'u a ]


T


July'


Feb ru a


^ryt


Au'gust


March




Sep tem'ber


A'pril




Oc to ber


May




No vem ber


June




De cem ber



s



PRONOUNCING SPMLLINa-BOOK. 29



THIED SECTIOIir.







44.






a


in mat.




cab'in


plan'et


crack'er


bap'tist


album


band box


chap ter


tariff


hab it


can did


satch el


ca nal'


rabid


ban tarn


fam ish


ja pan


rap id


cavil


ban ish


a dapt


ban ter


mad am


van ish


mis hap



Dictation Exercise 14. — l. A mad or rabid dog. 2. He
seemed to be frank and candid. 3. He began to cavil at my
remarks, and to find fault. 4. She held a satchel in her hand.
6. The list of duties on goods is called a tariS





45.


'






e in met




cred'it


fresh'et


abetf


ex eel'


den tist


ten dril


adept


re pel


pes ter


her aid


mo lest


impel


shel ter


fren zy


amend


pro pel


resin


sense less


be held


dis pel


pres ent


ho tel'


ca ress


com pel



Dictation Exercise 15. — 1. I do not credit such reports.
2. To pester or annoy. 3. The tendrils of a plant are its
tender clinging shoots. 4. Who is the herald of this news?
6. An adept is one fully skilled in anything. 6. The rising
.9an will dispel the clouds.



30



WOBGESTEB'S NEW







46.






i


in pin.




visit .


riVet


lim'pid


in stir


quiv er


fidget


win try


dis til


timid


civil


lincli pin


until


vivid


wit ness


nick el


equip


spir it


liver


for give'


it self


mimic


thrift less


for bid


e clips(


sub mit'


mis tress


enrich


a miss



Dictation Exercise 16. — l. A vivid flash of lightning
2. He gave me a very civil answer. 3. A clear, limpid stream,
4. A cold, -wintry day. 5. Stay until morning. 6. To equip
troops for war. 7. An eclipse of the sun.

47.



o in not.



rob'in

prog ress
florid
vom it
proj ect
pros pect
con vict



clos'et
mod est
nos tril
on set
prop er
pon der
non sense



goblet


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