Samuel T. (Samuel Thomas) Worcester.

A pronouncing spelling-book of the English language : mainly on the principles of comparison and contrast online

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of fence


nug get



Dictation Exercise 79. — l. A sour look and a crabbed'
answer. 2. No account has ever been given of what occurred
on that day. 3. A surly, stubborn child. 4. We will try to
succeed. 5. There were figures in stucco on the walls. 6. To
adduce or bring forward an example from history. 7. A sud-
den alarm. 8. The old trapper's speech amused us by its oddity.

9. To get rid of a disagreeable visitor is a good riddance,

10. An impression which will not soon be effaced.



88 WORCESTER'S NEW



162.


163.


[U]


ballast


pallid


com'mercft


al low^


gal lant


pol len


common


allot


col lect'


chal lenge


mam mon


alloy


college


gul let


mam ma'


col lide


bal loon'


mol li fy


com mand


col late


al lay


nul li fy


com mend


en roll


village


pel let


im mure


col lapse


pil lage


wal let (w6V-)


sum'mit


el lipse


cal lous


[mm]


sum mon


al lude


gal lows


im mense'


rum mage


al lure


pul let


im merse


gam mon


pol lute


bal lad


com mode


com mit'


ballot


mel low


com mence


im mense


bul let


yel low


dum'my


mum'my


gal Ion


al lege'


emmet


tram mel


gal lop


shallop


com mune'


com ment


sul len


bul lock


com mute


comma


mol lusk


til lage


ham'mock


mam moth



Dictation Exercise 80. — i. To coUate two writings is to
compare tJiem critically. 2. Railway engines collide when they
dash against each other. 3. I neither told them the story nor
alluded to it. 4. Snails, oysters, etc., are molluaks. 5. His
unfeeling conduct showed us that his heart was callous. 6. It
ig alleged that he stole the money and ran away. 7. A face
pallid from fear. 8. The pollen or dust in the anthers of
flowers. 9. The hare challenged the tortoise to run a race.
10. To nullify or make of no force or effect. 11. Immured in
ft dungeon. 12. He was trammelled bv unnecessary rules.



PRONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK,



89



164


••


165.


[nn]


cun'ning


ap prove'


an iioy'


pen nant


ap prov'al


an nounce


an nals


copper


con nive


ren net


flip pant


ken'nel


pin nate


sup pie


tun nel


[pp]


ap pair


chan nel


ap ply


ap par el


lin net


sup ply


op press


son net


ap peal


pip'pin


an nex'


sup press


ap prise'


flannel


sup plant


sup pose


con nect'


ap pend


[rr]


win'now


ap point


terrace


can non


op pose


er rand


an nu al


sup port


ar range


ton nage


ap plaud


ter'ror


bon net


ap plause


sur round'


tan nin


pup'pet


cor rode



narrate
t5r rent
tor rid
tiir ret
par rot
cor rect'
cor rupt
der'rick
ar rive'
ar riv al
bar'rel
ar rest'
har'row
ar ray'
hur rah
quar'rel
war rani
bur row

Dictation Exercise 81. — l. The arrival of the great mai>
was announced in the morning papers. 2. You should not
connive at wrong-doing. 3. A sonnet is a kind of short poem>
4. The farmer winno^ws the grain from the chaflp. 5. Our
annual vacation. 6. Tannin is a peculiar principle in oak -
bark. 7. Who wrote the annals of this town? 8. The pen-
nant flew from the mast-head. 9. A pinnate leaf has smaller
leaves attached to each side of a central rib. 10. Does his con-
duct meet your approval? 11. A careless, flippant remark,
12. Iron will corrode or rust.



yo



WORCESTER'S NEW



166.

current
ar rear'
bar'rack
sor rel
sorry

[ss]
gos'sip
fos sil
cos set
gus set
tas sel
clas sic
ves sel
tis sue
bios som
pres sure
as sault'
as sume



as sert^
mes'sage
pas sage
de5 5ert'
mis'siie
mis sive
as sets
mas sive
pas sive
fis sure
as sail
as suage
dis suade
as sist
es'sence
po5 5ess'
as sure
as sort



167.

dis sect'
dis sent
pass'port
en gross'

IttJ
mut'ton
bot tom
at tend'
at tract
Scot'tisli
pat tern
pret ty {jprU'-)
lat tice
at tain'
at taint
at test
at tire
at tach



ax xac-K
at tune
kit'ten
otter
mat tress
pet ty
mot to
put ty
twit ter
utter
tat tier
bot tling
grot to
set tier
but tress

[zz]
giz zard
buz zard



Dictation Exercise 82. — l. He is in arrears for Ms house-
rent. 2. Sorrel grows in tlie pasture. 3. Does she like to''
gossip about her neighbors ? 4. Everybody likes his writings ;
they have become classic. 5. The delica?fee tissue (fe/^'i/ob) of
the cloth. 6. I closed the door by a gentle pressure (preshfdbr).
7. A missile like a dart, or a stone from a sling. 8. His assets
were barely enough to pay his debts. 9. A fissure (fish'oor) or
cleft in the rock. 10. Time will assuage her grief. 11. This
plan engrossed my thoughts for several days. 12. A kind of
cave or grotto. 13. "We slept on a mattress.



PBONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK.



91



WOKDS SOUNDED ALIKE BUT SPELLED DIFPEEENTLY.

169.



10



168.

adds, does add.
adze, a cooper's axe.

air, what we breathe.

ere, before.

e'er, ever.

heir, an inheritor.

alter, to change.

altar, a place for sacrifices.

ark, a vessel.

arc, a part of a circle.

assent, act of agreeing.
ascent, act of rising.

ate, did eat.
eight, twice four.

aught, anything.
ought, to be obliged.

bard, a poet.

barred, fastened with a bar.

barren, producing nothing.
baron, a nobleman.

beau, a gallant.

bow, for shooting arrows.



11



12



13



14



15



16



17



18



bin, a box for grain.
been, from to be.

beer, malt liquor.
bier, a frame for carrying
the dead.

bell, a sounding vessel of

metal.
belle, a gay young lady.

berry, a small fruit.
bury, to inter.

berth, a sleeping-place.
birth, a coming into life.

bite, to pierce with the teeth.
bight, a bay ; coil of rope.

bold, brave.

bowled, did bowl or roll.

bolder, more bold.
bowlder, a round stone.



bole, a clayey earth.
19 boll, the pod of a plant.
bowl, a dish ; to roll.



Exercise Q^. — Elliptic aL

{Put the right word in the right place.)

Sharpen the (1). Breathe pure (2). I am the (2) to this
estate. Tell me (2) you go. You can (3) the shape of it.
Noah's (4). They would not (5) to make an (5) in winter. He
(6) (6) apples. The door was (8). A tract of (9) land. A (10)
attends a lady. Have you (11) well? Did you (14) the (14) in
the ground? The sailor sleeps soundly in his (15). We moored
in a (16). Have I said (7) to displease you?



92



WORCESTER'S NEW



10



170.

bored, did bore.
board, a piece of sawed tim-
ber, broad and thin.

borne, carried.

bourn, a bound, a limit.

bough, a branch of a tree.
bow, an act of respect.

bridal, a wedding,
bridle, for a horse.

brute, an irrational animal.
bruit, to noise abroad.

burrow, a hole for rabbits.
borough, a corporate town

call, to summon.
caul, a net for the hair.

candid, frank.
candied, sugared.

cannon, a large gun.
canon, a rule or law.

canvas, cloth for sails.
canvass, to sift, to examine.



11



12



13



14



15



16



17



18



19



20



171,

capital, the chief town.
capitol, a public edifice.

carat, a weight of 4 grains.
carrot, a garden root.

cellar, an underground
seller, one who sells, [room.

cord, a thick string.
chord, a right line joining
the two ends of an arc.

collar, for the neck,
choler, rage.

complement, a full number.
compliment, praise.

core, the heart, or inner part,
corps, a body of troops.

council, an assembly for ad-
counsel, advice. [vice,,

councillor, a member of a

council.
counsellor, an adviser.

cozen, to cheat, [an aunt.
cousin, child of an uncle or



Exercise 84. — Elliptical.

{Put the right word in the riqht place.)

He (1) a hole through the (1). He was (2) on a bier to his
last resting-place. The (3) of a tree. Her (4) morn. Senseless
as a (5). How many voters live in the (6) ? Did you hear me
(7) you ? They were (8) and dispassionate men. The booming
of the (9) was heard. (10) the question thoroughly. The (11)
at Washington is an imposing building. The diamond weighed
a (12) and a half. A (13) under the house. Describe a (14) of
ninety degrees. He is rash and sudden in (15). A merited (16).
A. well-drilled (17) of men. Give good (18) if you give any.



FEONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK,



93



EIGHTH SEOTIOK



EASY RULES FOR SPBLL.ING.

I. Words ending with silent e drop the e when a
termination beginning with a vowel is added,

172.

(Spell first the, word in the left-hand column and then the derivative
in the right-hand column, as, come . . coming.)

[-ing.]



come .


. com'ing


em brace'


em brac'ing


fence


fenc ing


a muse


a mus ing


face


fac ing


grieve


griev'ing


owe


owing


res'cue


res cu ing


choose


choos ing


cen tre


cen tring


judge


judging


tease


teas ing


plague


plagu ing


blige'


blig'^ing


guide


guid ing


man'age


man'ag ing




17


3.




[-able or -ible.]


C-al.]


sale . .


sal'a ble


re move'


. re mov'al


blame


blam a ble


pe ruse


pe ru 5al


move


mov a ble


re cite


re cit al


ex cuse'


ex cu'sa ble


[-ish.]


de sire


de sir a ble


blue


blu'ish


force


for'ci ble


thieve


thiev ish


sens^


sen si ble


rogue


rogu ish



94



WOBCESTEB'S NEW



Add -able to the following: —

{Be sure to drop the silent e before adding.)

note rate cen'sure

val'ue a dore' ad vise'



Add -ance to the following: —



con nive



en dure'



guide



ad mire
con sole



grieve



174.

Exceptions to Knle I.

(a) Words ending in ce and ge keep the e before

{Spell down the columns.')



able and ous.



trace

trace'a ble
peace
peace a ble
charge
charge a ble



change

change'a ble

ser vice

ser vice a ble

no tice

no tice a ble

175.



out'rage
out ra'geous
courtage
cour a'geous
ad van tage
ad van ta'geous



(6) Verbs ending in oe, and some in ye and ge, keep
the e before ing. ee final keeps both e's.



dye (to color) singe

dye'ing singeing

tinge toe

tinge ing toe ing

Also:

mile'age a'cre age



shoe see

shoe'ing seeding
hoe a gree'

hoe ing a gree ing

glu'ey mortgage of



TBONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK,



95



176,

II. Words ending in silent e usually keep the e when
a termination beginning with a consonant is added,

en gage'ment
al lure ment



pale .
sliame



pale'ness
sliame ful
peace peace ful
move move ment
change change ling
cause cause less



en gage
al lure
a chieve
whole
sense



a chieve ment
whole'some
sense less



re venge' re venge'ful



Exceptions to Hale U,



awe . . aw'ful
woe wo ful

due duly ^

true tru ly

whole whol ly
acknowredge .



nurse . . nursling
judge judg ment
ar'gue ar'gu ment
a bridge' a bridg'ment
wise wis'dom

ac knowl'edg ment



Dictation Exercise 85.

1. They stood a minute quietly facing each other.

2. You have shown a very obliging disposition.

3. These linen and cotton goods are always salable.

4. Some t Jble events occurred while we lived in that hous*.

5. The deed was done through your guilty connivance.

6. Our interview was not only peaceable but cordial.

7. The bargain proved to be very advantageous to both.

8. The blacksmith was shoeing the farmer's horse.

9. When the boys reached home they were in a ■woful plight.

10. An abridgment of the history was made.

11. The most famous achievements of heroes.



96



WOMCESTER'S NEW



fan'cy .


. fan'ci ful


tidy


ti di ness


glory


glo ri ous


merry


mer ri er


live ly


live li est


greed y


greed i ly


de ny'


de ni'al


enVy


enVi a ble


pity


pit i a ble


jol ly


jol li ty



177.

III. Words ending in y, with a consonant before it.
usually change the y into i in derivatives.

re ply' . . re plies'
sup ply sup plied
sat'is fy saf is fies
grat i fy grat i fied
mer ry mer ri ment

\_In the plural of nouns, y is
changed into ies.]

po'ny po'nies
gal ler y gal ler ies
al ly' al lies'

178.

Spell the plural of the following ; —

{Pronounce ies of the plural like i25.)

a'gen cy rem'e dy rob'ber y lux'u ry

en er gy lar ce ny gro cer y ni ce ty

faculty agony history facility

pira cy fac to ry ob lo quy forger y

Dictation Exercise 86. —r l. He ate up the food greedily.
2. It was a glorious victory. 3. She told a pitiable story.

4. There were two galleries, one on each side of the room.

5. ▲gencies for the sale of these goods were established. 6. He
still retains the brightness of his faculties. 7. Various rem-
edies were tried. 8. Fights and robberies were common in
that part of the city. 9. Eeproaches and obloquies did not
deter him. 10. Luxuries of the table.



PBONOUNGING SPELLING-BOOK. 97

179.

Add -er and -6St to the following: —

(Be sure to change y into i before adding.)

healtVy ti'dy la'zy ea'sy

worthy rosy lofty giddy

greedy stately noisy busy

happy lovely clumsy wealthy

Add -al to the following: —
try deny' mem'ory cer'emony

bur'y rem'edy mercury testimony

Dictation Exercise 87. — l. Bathing in the sea made him
healthier. 2. You are the noisiest children I ever saw. 3. A
trial of a lawsuit. 4. He was of a sprightly, mercurial tem-
perament.

180.

Add -Otis to the following: —

fu'ry vic'tory va'ry in'jury

en vy lux u ry stud y mel o dy

Add -ly to the following : —



mer'ry


read'y


bus'y


wor'thy


speed y


an gry


shab by


luck y


steady


happy


wary


saucy


Add -ness


to the following: —






ngly


holy


wear'y


stead'y


sil ly


ready


lone ly


empty



Dictation Exercise 88. — i- A furious wind. 2. Melodious

strains of music. 3. The bells rang merrily, 4. We were busily
employed. 5. The camel is not remarkable for beauty but for
ugliness. 6. It is weariness of the muscles.



98



WOBGESTEB'S NEW



181.

Exceptions to Rule in*
But when ing, ish, or ist is added, y is kept.



pit'y . .


pit y ing


de fy .


. de fy'ing


carry


car ry ing


fan'cy


fan'cy ing


oc cu py


oc cu py ing


stead y


stead y in| ;


sup pi/


sup plying


weary


wea ry ing


murti'ply


muFti ply ing


copy


cop y ist


worry


wor ry ing


baby


ba by ish




y changed to e.





beau'ty . beau'te ous
gLu ty du te ous



plen'ty . plen'te ous
boun ty boun te ous



Most derivatives of dry, shy, sly, keep y,
dry . . . dry'ness but driver or dry'er, etc
shy shyness ^' shier '' shyer^ *'

sly slyness " slier " slyer, "

dryly shyly slyly

Also in the possessive singular of nouns y is kept.



Our country's flag.
Our party's success.



The lady's bonnet.
My pony's bridle

Also in the plural of most proper nouns ending in y.

Ma'ry Ma'rys I Hen'ry Hen'rys

Dictation Exercise 89. — i- One pitying glance. 2. Yol'

are "worrying yourself for nothing, and -wearying me. 3. The
bounteous Giver of good gifts. 4. He could not help fancy*
ing that he was piirsued. 5. She looked shyly at him.



PRONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK. 99

182. ■

IV. Final y with a vowel before it is not changed,

{Take the words across the page.)

buy . . buys . . buy'er . . buy'ing

de lay de lays' de layed' de laying

con vey con veys con veyed con vey ing

de stroy de stroys de stroy er de stroy ing

em ploy em ploys em ployed em ploy er

an noy an noys an noyed an noy ance

es say es says es sayed es'say ist

o bey o beys o beyed o bey' ing

hon'ey . . hon'eyed mon'ey . . mon'eyed

Exceptions to Rule IV.

laid said paid slain

mis laid' saitli un paid' dai'ly



Be sure to follow the rule in nouns ending in ey, — plural
eys, not ies. ^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^^ columns.)

'mon'ey valley don'key attor'ney

moneys valleys donkeys attorneys

turkey chimney monkey jour'ney

turkeys chimneys monkeys journeys

Dictation Exercise 90. — l- He obeyed his employer. 2.

The mosquitoes were the chief annoyance. 3. Macaulay was
a brilliant essayist. 4. He gains strength daily. 5. It had bet-
ter be left unsaid. 6. The letter has been mislaid. 7. She
spoke in honeyed accents. 8. A moneyed man. 9. Two at-
torneys were employed in the suit.



100 WOnCESTEB'S NEW

183.

Spell first the singular and then the plural ; as, al ly', al lies' \

al'ley, al'leys.

(Apply Kules III. and IV.)



all/


ed'dy


pen'ny


com'e dy


alley


kidney


lack ey


con voy'


army


fancy


poppy


a poro gy


abbey


med ley


ruby


whis'key


beauty


jelly


jock ey


re ply'


berry


gully


coun try


effigy


pulley


pony


par ley


gal ler y


essay


vol ley


a bill ty


whim sey



Dictation Exercise 91. — l. In that war England and France
were allies. 2. There are many alleys in the city. 3. The
pale, unripened beauties of the north. 4. Ropes ran over the
pulleys. 5. EflSgies of King George the Third were burned in
the streets.

184.

Add ing and ed to the following : —

(Apply Rules III. and IV.)



fry


mar'ry


cop'y


de fray'


try


con ve/


de coy'


satis fy


esp/


descry


betray


sur vey'


stray


en joy


hur'ry


gratl fy


de lay'


deny


ar ray'


en joy'


tar'ry


va'ry


apply


fan'cy



Dictation Exercise 92. — l. Meat was frying in the frying-
pan. 2. I tried to see you. 3. The cattle strayed far into
the woods. 4. After delaying the coach awhile he was ready to
go. 5. How were the passengers conveyed to the city ? 6. I am
satisfied with my place. 7. How have you enjoyed the ride?



PBONOUNCING SiPELLING-BOOK.

185.



101



V. In words of one syllable a final consonant after
a single vowel is doubled before a vowel-suffix.



drop


dropping


slop


sloppy


plot


plot ting


slip


slip per y


brag


brag ging


beg


beg gar


stun


stun ning


star


star ry


step


stepped


rid


rid dance


big


big'ger


job


job ber


fat


fat ten


quit


quit tance *



186.

Add -ing and -ed to the following : —

(Apply Rules I. and V.)

whip bar mope robe sham

wipe bare mop rob shame

scare wag pin skate strip

stir wage pine ship stripe

VI. If two vowels precede the consonant, or if
the word ends with two consonants, the final conso-
nant is not doubled.



beam


beam'ing


join


joinW


drain


drain ing


rail


rail ing


roof


roof ing


foot


foot ing


call


call ing


toil


toiled


cheat


cheat ed


room


roomV



* qui — kv(/", hence there is only one vowel sound.



102



WOBGESTEB'S NEW



187.

(Apply Rules V. and VI.)
Add -er to the following : —

win reap tan drum cart

wrap rob slip roam creep

shut plot sleep pot run

lead spin steam cold neat

Add -ery to the following : —

slip gun wag shrub nun

mock pig pot lot fop

Dictation Exercise 93. — l. Sometimes I would rather be
the loser than the winner. 2, He was a leader of men. 3. He
put on his woollen wrapper. 4, You should not walk in
slippery places. 5. Much shrubbery grew in the field.



188.

Add -en to the following : —
fat writ bit

red lead mad

Add -ish to the following : —
clan sot sheep

fop hog snap

Md -age to the following : —
stop cot coin

drain bag ton

Add -y to the following : —
sun star slop

sleep soap wit



tight


sad


rid


sweet


thin


fool


red


rub


lug


wharf


cart


pack


tar


fun


meal


spleen



PRONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK,



103



189.

VII. In words of more than one syllable^ a fined
consonant after a single vowel is doubled before a
vowel-suffix, when the last syllable is accented.

When the last syllable is not accented they do not
double the final consonant.



allot' . .


al lot'ted


be gin' .


be gin'ner


admit


ad mit tance


com pel


com pel ling


re cur


re cur rence


e quip


e quipped


be dim


be dimmed


ac quit


ac quit tal


be stir


be stirred


ful fil


ful fil ling


con cur


con cur ring


mit


mit ted


oc cur


oc cur ring


for get


for get ting


pre fer


pre ferred


sub mit


sub mit ted



190.

(Apply Rules I., VI., and VII.)



Add -ing and


-ed. to the follo\


^^mg : —




car'pet


visit


ben'e fit


trans mit'


ap peal'


ad mit'


re pel'


trans mute


en'ter


•admire


re peal


differ


a buse'


refit


mur'mur


demur'


refer


flat'ter


offer


remain


A.dd -anco or


-ence to the following : —




allow'


re cur'


re mit'


occur'


admit


ap pear


de liv'er


assist


sub sist


differ


ab hor'


after


ac cept


for bear'


attend


con cur'



i04 WORCESTER'S NEW

Exceptions to Rule Til.

191.

Final 1 after a single vowel is commonly doubled
whether the last syllable is accented or not ; as, travel,
travelling, traveller ; wool, ■woollen.



Add -ing and


. -ed to the


following : —






ap par'el


di shev'el


ken'nel


par'cel


shov'el


can'cel


du^el


label


pen cil


shriv el


carol


en am'el


level


peril*


sniv el


cavil


im pan el


libel


pom mel


tram mel


chan nel


e'qual


mar shal


qnar rel


travel


chisel


gam bol


marvel


ravel


tunnel


coun sel


grovel


model


revel


nn ravel


cudg el


jewel


panel


rival


victual



192. '

But parallel does not double the last 1 ; hence, — j

par'al leled par'al lei ing un par'al leled

Add -er to the following : —

jew'el rev'el model sniv'el enam'el

cavil libel shovel travel victual

Other Exceptions.

The final consonant is commonly doubled in the derivatives of —

kid'nap wor'ship bi'as sul'phttret carl3nret

As, — (Spell down the columns.)

kid'nap per wor'ship per bf as sing

kidnapping worshipping biassed

kid napped wor shipped snl phn ret ted

* But perilous has only one 1.



PBONOUNCING SPELLING-BOOK,



105



193,



VIII. Double 1 (11) sometimes loses one I when cam^


pounded.








al'so


bel'fry


thral'dom


ful fir


al ways


bul rush


dul ness


until


al read'y


wel fare


ful ness


dis til


al though


wel come


wil ful


in stil


al to geth'er


chil blain


skilful


wi^^ al


m starment


in thrarment en


rol'ment



194.

IX. If the first letter of the word or root is the same
as the last letter of the prefix, both letters are kept.

Caution. Do not write miss for mis- nor diss for dis-.



spent .


. mis spent'


solve c .


di5 solve'


state


mis state


sev'er


dis sev er


spell


mis spell


hold


with hold


judge


mis judge


sat'is fy


dis sat is fy


take


mis take


mor tal


im mor tal


nobble


631 no'ble


le gal


il le gal



Dictation Exercise 94.

The vial was labeUed,



— 1. How was he appsirelled? 2.
3. Unparalleled audacity. 4. The
jeweller sells rings and watches. 5. Kidnappers seized the
child and rode away. 6. A wilful child. 7. A skilful artist.
8. Piilfil the golden rule. 9. Do you withhold your consent?
10. I left him almost speechless. 11. I thought him a good
counsellor or adviser. 12. The money was paid in fiN^e in-
stalments. 13. A dishonest man may dissemble or misstate a
fact. 14. I felt disappointed and dissatisfied.



106



WOnCESTEB'S NEW



195.

X. When a syllable beginning with a consonant is
added to a word ending with the same consonant both
consonants are kept; as, real, really; lean, leanness.

Add -ness to the following : —

plain eVen * mean wan'ton

drunk'en barren stub'born keen

sud den o pen green sullen



Add -ly to the following : —






law'M skiVful


le'gal


spe'cial


faith ful peace fiQ


use ful


moral



Many words formerly written with the letter k at the
end have lost that letter ; as, public, almanac, but —

XL The k comes back in the present participle and
past tense of verbs in ic.

froric mimic pic'nic traffic

frol ick ing mim ick ing pic nick ing traf fick ing
frol icked mim icked pic nicked traf ficked

196.
Write the following contractions:



can't


for


cannot.


is n't for


is not


could n't


((


could not


sha' n't "


shall not


should n'1


J


should not.


won't "


will not


does n't


(C


does not.


I'm "


I am.


don't


a


do not.


I '11 "


I wiU.


has n't


((


has not


you'll "


you will.


have n't


(I


have not ^


you 're '^


you are.



PBONOUNGING SPELLING-BOOK.



107



Ho'w the possessive is written.

197.

The possessive singular is usually formed by adding
the apostrophe ' and s (thus, 's).

Write :



A sister^s prayers.
My uncle's wagon.
A mother's voice.
The people's choice.
A horse's mane.
The enemy's defeat.



A lady's bandbox.
The baby's mother.
Henry's pocket-book.
Lucy's glove-box.
James's overcoat.
Charles's hatchet.


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Online LibrarySamuel T. (Samuel Thomas) WorcesterA pronouncing spelling-book of the English language : mainly on the principles of comparison and contrast → online text (page 5 of 9)