Samuel Waddington.

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THE SONNETS OF EUROPE.



Fcap. 8vo, 3s. 6d.

SONNETS, AND OTHER VERSE.

By SAMUEL WADDINGTON.



" The workmanship of the sonnets is scholarly and delicate,
and they express the graver and wiser thought of the age. We
recommend to our readers the sonnets named 'The School-
master,' • Faith and Love,' and 'What GosT^teW "—Westmiiister
Review.

"Mr. Waddington's sonnets are no mere metrical exercises.
(Deft craftsmanship was to be expected from a critic of Mr.
Waddington's knowledge and equipment. More than this we
find in the best examples in this little collection, in ' Through
the Night- Watches ' and ' To-day,' for instance. These are very
picturesque in expression, full of thought and suggestive fancy."
—Saturday Review.

"This exquisitely-attired little volume proves that Mr.
Waddington is not merely a tasteful collector of these ' cameos
of verse,' but a cunning and delicate carver, whose carefully
cut gems future collectors will not despise." — Academy.

"That these poems are above, it would not be too much to
say far above, the average of the verse of the day, is evident
enough," — Spectator.



Published by Geo. Bell & Sons, York Street,
Covent Garden, W.C.



THE
SONNETS OF EUROPE

A VOLUME OF TRANSLATIONS
Selected and Arranged^ with Notes ^

BY

SAMUEL WADDINGTON.

'Laborum duke leiiimen.'—UoR.
LONDON:

Walter Scott, 24 Warwick Lane, Paternoster Row,

AND NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE.
1886.



'Ji^i.-r».*«. X



UINIVERSITY OF CALIFORNU



TO

MY FRIEND

AUSTIN DOBSON.



AUTHORS AND TITLES.



An asterisk is prefixed to those Sonnets which have not been
previously published.



ITALIAN SONNETS.



Fra Guittone D'Arezzo-
Love's Bondmau

GUIDO GUINICELLI—

Of His Lady .

GUIDO Catalcanti—

To Dante
Love and Lapo
Whatso is Fair

BOXAGGIUNTA IJRBISANI—

Wounded of Love



PAGE

Henry Francis Gary 1
Henry Francis Cary 2



Percy Bysshe Shelley 3

Warburton Pike 4

Henry Francis Cary 6



Charles Bagot Cayley 6



viii AUTHORS AND TITLES.


Dante Alighieri—


PAGE 1


To Guido Cavalcanti ,


Percy Bysshe Shelley


7


To Brunetto Latini


Henry Francis Gary


8


On the 9th June 1290 .


Henry Francis Cary


9


Love's Messenger


Warburton Pike


10


From the '* Vita Nuova "


Sir Theodore Martin


11


From the " Vita Nuova "


Sir Theodore Martin


12


From the " Vita Nuova "


Sir Theodore Martin


13


From the " Vita Nuova "


Thomas W. Parsons


14


From the " Vita Nuova "


Charles Eliot Norton


15


From the "Vita Nuova "


Charles Eliot Norton


16


From the '■ Vita Nuova "


Henry Francis Cary


17


From the " Vita Nuova "


Henry Francis Cary


18


From the " Vita Nuova "


James Rtissell Lowell


19


CiNO Da Pistoia—






Why Sighest Thou? .


Warburton Pike


20


FOLGORE Da San Gemignano—






On Knighthood (I.) .
(11.) .


John Addington Symonds


21


John Addington Symonds


22


Francesco Petrarca—






Love's Fidelity .


Earl of Surrey


23


Love's Inconsistency .


Sir Thomas Wyatt


24


She Ruled in Beauty .


Thomas W. Higginson


25


Doth any Maiden Seek


Thomas PT. Higginson


26


Those Eyes, 'neath which


Thomas W. Higginson


27


Dreams Bore my Fancy


Thomas W. Higginson


28


Oft by my Faithful Mirror


Thomas W. Higginson


29


Gentle Severity


Thomas W. Higginson


30


The Buried Heart


Barbarina, Lady Daere


31


Love's Pilgrimage


. Barbarina, Lady Dacre


32


Visions of Laura


Thomas Russell


33


A Stolen Glove .


Charles Bagot Cayley


34


Two Roses


Charles Bagot Cayley


35


The Heart on the Hill


Charles Bagot Cayley


36


Signs of Love .


Charles Bagot Cayley


37


Quitting Vaucluse

On the Projected Crusade


Charles Bagot Cayley


38


Charles Bagot Cayley


39


Giovanni Boccaccio—






On Dante


F. C. Gray


40



AUTHORS AND TITLES.


ix


Lorenzo De' Medici—


PAGE 1


Violets ....

Seek he who wiU

In Tears ....


William Roscoe
William Roscoe
William Roscoe


41

42
43


Leonardo Da Vinci—






*0f Will, Power, and Duty


Samuel Waddington


44


Jacopo Sanazzaro—






Mors Et Vita .


James Glassford


45


Michael Angelo—






The Transfiguration of Beauty

Thanks for a Gift

The Garland and the Girdle .

The Doom of Beauty .

Celestial Love .

Love, the Light-Giver .

Love's Entreaty

On the Brink of Death

A Prayer for Purification

Love's Justification

To the Supreme Being


J. Addinuton Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
William Wordsworth
Willia7n Wordsivorth


46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56


LoDOVico Ariosto—






In Will's Despite


James Glassford


57


PlETRO BEMBO—






" Ye Haunts Recluse "
The Dream


James Glassford
James Glassford


53
59


VlTTORIA COLONNA—






The Massacre of the Innocents
" Ye are the Branches "


James Glassford
James Glassford


60
61


Francesco Coppetta—






In Dreamland .


James Glassford


62


Claudio TOLOMEI-






The Evening St&r


Anon


63



AUTHORS AND TITLES,



Bernardo Tasso—
The Fountain .

Giovanni Della Casa—
To Sleep .

Erasmi Di Valvasone—
Mormoranti Famosi

ToRQUATO Tasso—

To Ferrante
Love

Love Unloved .
*To a Mature Beauty
Oft Have we Heard



page

James Glassford 64

J. Addington Symonds 65
James Glassford 66



Jam^ Glassford 67

J. Herman Merivale 68

James Glassford 69

Baroness von Oilsa 70

John Hoole 71



Giov. Battista Marint—

*Lux Umbra Dei
In Memoriam .

Gabriello Chiabrera—
The Italian People

Giordano Bruno—

The Philosophic Flight

TOMMASO Campanella—

The "World's a Stage
The Human Comedy
The People
To Ridolfo Di Bina
The Book of Nature
The Modern Cupid
The True Kings
The Resurrection

Salvator Rosa—



Baroness Von Gilsa 72
James Glassford 73



Sir Aubrey de Vere 74



J. Addington Symonds 75



J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J, Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds
J. Addington Symonds



83



William Michael Rossetti 84



AUTHORS AND


TITLES.


xi


Petrocchi—


page I


I Call on Time


James Glassford


85


GiULio Bussi—






Of Glory


Sir Aubrey de Vere


86


LoDovrco Paterno—






Ye Airs 1 Sweet Airs .


Henry Francis Cary


S7


Francesco Redi—






The Garden of Earthly Love .
The Creation of My Lady
Grief ....
Love, the Musician
The End of Earthly Love


Edmund Gosse
Edmund Gosse
Edmund Gosse
Edmund Gosse
Edmund Gosse


88
89
90
91
92


Vincenzo Da Filicaja—






Of Providence .

Where, Italy, 's Thine Ann .

Buried Cities .

No, not to Thee

To Italy ....


Leigh Hunt

Thomas Le Mesurier

Thomas Le Mesurier

, James Glassford

Anon


93
94
95
98
97


GIOVAM. CUESCIMBENI—






I Ask the Sky . . ;


. James Glassford


98


G. COTTA-






Love's Canticle .


. James Glassford


99


Gaetana Passerini—






Geneva Mia


. James Glassford


100


Zappi—






As toward the Ascrean Mount
The Statue of Moses .


Thomas Le Mesurier
Sir Aubrey De Vere


101
102


PlETRO METASTASIO—






Fair Unsullied Rose


. James Glassford


103


Faustina Maratti—






The Rival


Thomas Russell


104



xii AUTHORS AND TITLES.


G?LEMENTI BONDI—


page


A Husband's Homily .


James Glassford 105


Casti—




The Debt of the GimK Tre .
(1L>


Leigh Hunt 106
Leigh Hunt 107


Pastorini—




To Genoa ....


Leigh Hunt 108


VlTTORELLI—




On a Nun . , . .


Lord Byron 109


Bettinelli—




Venice .... James Montgomery 110 1


Gabriele Rossetti—




*StatusQuo . . William Michael Rossetti 111


FRENCH SONNETS.


Mellin De Saint-Gelais—




*The Sonnet of the Mountain .


Austin Dolson 115


Pierre Ronsard—




Voici LeBois . . . Rol

Page, Suy Moy . . Eol

Two Flowers I Love . . L
*Avant qu' Amour

Roses ....

Of His Lady's Old Age
*Another Rendering

On His Lady's Waking

His Lady's Death

His Lady's Tomb
*The Apparition
*0n His Astrsea's Arising


ert. Earl of Lytton 116

)>'rt, Earl of Lytton 117

[enry Francis Cary 118

. Cosmo MonkJiome 119

Andrew Lang 120

Andrew Lang 121

. C. Kegan Paul 122

Andrew Lang 123

Andrew Lang 124

Andrezv Lang 125

Thomas Ashe 126

Thomas Ashe 127



AUTHORS AND


TITLES.


xiii


Joachim Du Bellay—




page 1


It Was the Time, When Rest
On High Hill's Top I Saw .

*Happy the Man

*Rep-ets ....
To Heavenly Beauty
To His Friend in Elysium


. Edmund Spenser
. Edmund Spenser
Austin Dobson
Atistin Dobson
Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang


128
129
ISO
131
132
133


Jacques Taiiureau—








Shadows of His Lady .
Moonlight


;


Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang


134
135


Louise Labe—








*LongasIStill .


.


Arthur Piatt


136


Estienne Jodelle—








The Ivy, Holly, and Green


Bay


Henry Francis Gary


137


Amadis Jamyn—








A Game at Football .


.


Henry Francis Cary


138


Philippe Desportes—








An Invitation .
*The Fugitive .





Henry Francis Cary
Samuel Waddington


139
140


Theophile De Viau—








Sleep .


.


Edmund Gosse


141


Paul Scarron—








The Black Doublet


.


R. H.


142


Moliere—








*To M. la Mothe le Vayer


.


Atistin Dobson


143


Felix Arvers—








*The Secret
Another Rendering .


: . Thomas Ashe
Uenry Wadsworth Longfelloiv


144
145


Albert Glatigny—








Before the Snow


'


Andrew Lang


146



AUTHORS AND TITLES.



J. Truffier—

The Burial of Molifer*



PAGE

Andrew Lang 147



Baudelaire—

The Day's End

Meditation
*The Rebel



Arthur Reed Ropes 148
Arthur Reed Ropes 149
. Cosmo Monkhouse 150



Sully Prudhomme—

The Shadow
Profanation
The Struggle .
The Appointment



Arthur 0' Shaughnessy 151

Arthur 0' Shaughnessy 152

Arthur 0' Shaughnessy 153

Arthur 0' Shaughnessy 154



GERMAN SONNETS.



G. A. BURGER—

The Heart without a Home



CapelLofft 157



J. WOLFGANG Von Goethe-

The Maiden Speaks .
To a Golden Heart



U. A. Bowring 158
Margaret Fuller Ossoli 159



C. August Hedge—

In Memoriam (Theo. Korner)

Theodore Korner—
Queen Louisa .



Charles T. Brooks 160



Charles T. Brooks 164



L. A. Von Chamisso—
Last Sonnet



Anon 165



J. W. Ludwig Gleim-
Cynthia Bathing



Thomas Russell 166



AUTHORS AND


TITLES.


XV


A. G. Von Platen-Hallermunde—


PAGE 1


Fair as the Day


Anon


167


J. LUDWIG Uhland—






*The Death- Angel
The Two Maidens
The Conversion to the Sonnet


M. Dickson
. Alexander Piatt
. Alexander Piatt


168
169
170


Heinrich Heine—






*Fresco Sonnets to Christian S —
*To My Mother .
Fain Would I Weep .'


- . M. Dickson

. Stratheir

M. Dickson

. Stratheir

E. A, Bo wring


171

172
173
174
175


SPANISH SONNETS.




Had I a Thousand Souls


Sir J. Bowring


179


TOME BURGUILLOS—






To-morrow and To-morrow .


Sir J. Bowring


180


M. Vazquez De Leca—






ToLeander


Sir J. Bounring


181


Francisco De Figueroa—






The Death of G. de la Vega . Ron. William Herbert


182


Santa Teresa De Avila—






'Tis not Thy terrors, Lord


Sir J. Bowring


183


Francisco Quevedo—






Rome ....


, Felicia Herram


184


Juan De Tarsis—






Thou, who hast fled .


. Felicia Hemans


185



xvi AUTHORS AND


TITLES.




MiG. De Cervantes—




PAGE 1


The Author to His Pen




J. Y. Gibson


186


From Don Quixote


,


Charles Jarvis


187


>> >i




Charles Jarvis


188


Last Sonnet




J. Y. Gibson


189


Lopez Maldonado—








The Brook


Henry Wadsioorth Longfellow


190


Lope De Vega—








To-Morrow


Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


191


The Good Shepherd .


Henry Wadsworth Lotigfellow


192


La Vida es Sueno




C. Tomlinson


193


Not Winter Crystal .
Sonnet on the Sonnet .




Lord Holland


194


-


J. Y. Gibson


195


LuPERCio Leonardo—








Truth and Beauty




J. Y. Gibson


196


P. Calderon De la Barca-


_






*These Flowers>hose pomp ,


Arthtir Piatt


197


PORTUGUESE SONNETS.




Luis De Camoens—








An Adieu to Tagus




J. J. Aubertin


201


The Death of King Sebastian


J. J. Aubertin


202


To a Fillet




J. J. Aubertin


203


Sibella .




J. J. Aubertin


204


If Thou Indifference .




J. J. Aubertin


205


Corydon and Tityrus .




J. J. Aubertin


206


The Fisher lonio




J. J. Aubertin


207


The Shepherdess Nise .




J. J. Aubertin


208


Audaces Fortuna Juvat




J. J. Aubertin


209


Catharina De Athaide




J. J. Aubertin


210


On the Death of C. De Athaide


J. J. Aiibertin


211


The Eyes Where Love .




J. J. Aubertin


212


Beholding Her .




Robert Southey


213


His Insufficiency of Praise .


Richard Garnett


214



AUTHORS AND TITLES.


xvii


J. Xavier De Matos—


page 1


Night-fall


. ' . Richard Garnett


215


Rodriguez Lobo—






Past Joys


. Richard Garnett


216


Francisco De Aldana—






The Native Land
The Image of God


Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


217
218


CURVO Semedo—






It is a Fearful Night


. William Cullen Bryant


219


Manoel Du Boccage—






*0n Nelson


J. J. Aubertin


220


SWEDISH SONNETS.




GUSTAV ROOSENHANE—






*Deep in a Vale . , Edmund Gosse
^And There I Sat Me Down , . Edmund Gosse


223
224


Olof Wexionius—






*The Death of a Lady ,


Edmund Gosse


225


Stagnelius—






*Hope Repulsed
*Luna
*Memory .


Edmund Gosse
Edmund Gosse
Edmund Gosse


225

227
228


POLISH SONNETS.




MiCKIEWICZ—






The Rock of Aiudah .
Eastward, the Sun


. Richard Garnett
. Richard Garnett
b


231
232



xviii AUTHORS AND TITLES.


GREEK SONNETS.




Abistomenes Provilegios— page I


Ah, now at last . . E. Mayhew Edmonds


235


Alkx. R. Rhangabe—




*Love V . . . E. Mayheio Edmonds


236


DUTCH SONNETS.




P. CORNELISZOON HOOFT—




*To Hugo Grotius . . . Edmund Qosse
^Friendship .... Edmund Gosse


239


240


Jan Van Broekhutzrn—




Beyond the Rhine . . . Sir J. Bowring


241


LATIN SONNET.




Huao Grotius—




*To Thomas Farnabie . . Samuel Waddington


242


Notes


245



preface.




HE sonnets of Dante and Michael
Angelo, of Petrarch, Camoens,
and Ronsard, could hardly fail
to attract even those who are not
especially interested in this form
of verse — while to those who are,
it were difficult to imagine what would furnish
greater delight than the perusal of the works of
these "old masters" of the "sonnet." But the
large majority of readers may not be able to study
these compositions in the various languages in
which they were originally written, and they must
consequently have recourse to such translations
as may be found scattered through the pages
of our own poets. These, moreover, are contained
in numberless volumes, many of which may not
always be readily accessible, and it is therefore
hoped that a fairly representative selection of these



XX PREFACE.

translations may prove of service, and a source of
pleasure, to those who wish to become acquainted
with the gems, modem or antique, of foreign
poesy.

Many of the sonnets, translations of which are
included in this volume, were composed more than
three hundred years before Milton wrote his
Paradise Lost — some of them more than two
hundred years before the birth of Shakespeare —
yet they are, for the most part, as fresh as flowers
newly gathered, and possessed of a grace and
delicate fragrance that have outlived the passing of
so many centuries. But while a large number of
the original sonnets are of this ancient date, the
greater portion of the translations, as, for in-
stance, those by Mr. Aubertin, Mr. John
Addington Symonds, and Mr. Andrew Lang, have
been written during recent years, and many of
them are here published for the first time. Of
those previously unpublished, mention may be
made of Mr. Gosse's rendering of the Swedish
and Dutch sonnets ; Mr. William Michael Rossetti's
translations of sonnets by Salvator Rosa and his
father, Gabriele Rossetti ; Mr. Thomas Ashe's
translations from the French ; Mr. Arthur Piatt's
from Louise Labe, Calderon, and Lope de
Vega ; Mrs. Edmond's from the modern Greek



PREFACE.



poets ; those by Dr. Richard Gamett from the
Portuguese ; by Mr. Cosmo Monkhouse from
Ronsard and Baudelaire ; by the Baroness von
Gilsa from Tasso and Marini ; and the very able
rendering of Boccage's fine sonnet " On Nelson,"
by Mr. J. J. Aubertin, to which we would call
special attention.

The translation of a sonnet from one language
into another in the legitimate, or Italian, sonnet-
form is attended with some difficulty ; and it is
to this difficulty of translation that we are probably
indebted for what is now known as the English, or
Shakespearian, form of the sonnet. It was first
used by the Earl of Surrey, who translated several
of Petrarch's sonnets, and also composed a few
original poems, in this form, which is much easier
for the purposes of translation than that in which
the Italian poets wrote. The following is an ex-
ample of the latter, and is, moreover, the oldest
sonnet extant in any language, it having been
written by Piero delle Vigne about the year
I220 A.D.

Natura D' Amore.
Per6 ch' Amore non si pu6 vedere,
E non si tratta corporalemente,
Manii ne son di si folle sapei-e
Che credono ch' Amore sia nieute !



PREFACE.



Ma poi ch' Amore si face sentere

Dentro del cor signoreggiar la gents,
Molto maggiore pregio de' avere

Che se '1 vedesse visibilemente.
Per la virtute della calamita

Como lo ferro attrae non si vede,
Ma si lo tira signorevolmente.
E questa cosa a credere m' in vita

Che Amore sia, e dammi grande fede
Che tuttor sia creduto fra la Gente.

It will be seen that the rhymes in the octave of the
above are alternate, and a large number of the
early Italian or Petrarchan sonnets follow this
arrangement of the rhymes. At page 23 of this
selection will be found a translation of one of
Petrarch's sonnets by Surrey in which the rhymes
are alternate, but the translator has apparently
been compelled to adopt fresh rhymes in the
second quatrain in order to be able to more
closely follow the sense of the original poem.
Now this use of additional rhymes in the second
quatrain constitutes the main difference between the
Italian and the Shakespearian form of the sonnet,
for if the rhymes were the same as those used in
the first quatrain, the sonnet would then be a legiti-
mate Italian sonnet. As regards the use of the
final couplet, it should be mentioned that although
rare, it is to be found in the early Italian sonnets,



PREFACE.



and a few of those by Petrarch have this termina-
tion. The majority of modern critics agree that
the final couplet detracts from the beauty of
the composition, but they also agree that the
following (all of which close with a final couplet)
are amongst the best of our English sonnets : —
Blanco White's " Night and Death," Keats's " Last
Sonnet," Michael Drayton's " Last Chance," Sir
Philip Sidney's " With how sad steps, O moon, — "
Wordsworth's "Sonnet on the Sonnet," Mrs. Fanny
Kemble's "Art thou already weary of the way,"
Leigh Hunt's " Nile," Tennyson-Turner's " Time
and Twilight," Hartley Coleridge's "Long time a
child, and still a child, when years, — " Cowper's
"To Mary Unwin," Donne's "To Death," Ros-
setti's " Match with the Moon," Matthew Arnold's
Sonnet on " Shakespeare," etc.

But to return to the subject of this volume, the
domain of translation, it may be observed, extends
from the most bald and literal substitution of word
for word, and line for line, on the one hand, to
mere paraphrase, interpretation, or imitation, on
the other, — and Lord Woodhouselee, in his in-
teresting Essay on the Principles of Translation,
published at the close of the last century, points out
that neither of these extremes can be deemed
satisfactory. It is, however, to D. G. Rossetti that



PREFACE.



we are indebted for the most intelligent and com-
prehensive criticism on this subject. " The life-
blood," he writes, " of rhythmical translation is this
commandment, — that a good poem shall not be
turned into a bad one. The only true motive for
putting poetry into a fresh language must be to
endow a fresh nation, as far as possible, with one
more possession of beauty. Poetry not being an
exact science, literality of rendering is altogether
secondary to this chief law. I say literality, — not
fidelity, which is by no means the same thing.
When literality can be combined with what is thus
the primary condition of success, the translator is
fortunate, and must strive his utmost to unite
them ; when such object can only be attained by
paraphrase, that is the only path."

A good poem shall not be turned into a bad 07ie.
How far the compositions in the present volume
comply with this great commandment of rhythmical
translation must be left to the reader to determine,
but the editor has endeavoured, however unsuc-
cessfully, to adopt it as his Kaviiiv koX fih-pov in
making this selection. Bramston, the worthy and
witty Vicar of Starting, wrote more than a century
ago—

" True taste to me is by this touchstone known,
That's always best that's nearest to my own," —



PREFACE. XXV



yet an editor may indeed esteem himself fortunate
who finds that the consensus of public opinion
confirms his own judgment.

It only remains for me to thank Mr. J. A.
Symonds, Mr. Edmund Gosse, Dr. Garnett, and
others, for much valuable assistance generously
accorded, — as well as those holders of copyright
who have given me permission to include various
sonnets in this volume.

SAMUEL WADDINGTON.

47 CONNAUGHT STREET, HyDE PaRK,

November 1886.



>^



3talian Sonneta.



AUGUST GRAF VON PLATEN-HALLERMUNDE.

TO SCHELLINQ.

With a Volume of Poems.

Is he not also Beauty's sceptre hearing^

WJio holds in Truth's domain the kingly right ?
Thou se'est in the Highest both unite^
Like long-lost melodies together pairing.

Thou wilt not scorn the dainty, motley band,
With clang of foreign music hither faring,
A little gift for thee from Morning-land, —
Thou wilt discern the beauty they are wearing.

Among the flowers, forsooth, of distant valleys,
I hover like the butterfly, that clings
To swmner-szveets and with a trifle dallies : —

But thou dost dip thy holy, honeyed -cuings.

Beyond the margin of the world's floiuer-chalice,
Deep, deep into the mystery of things.

Anon,



ITALIAN SONNETS.



FRA GUITTONE D'AREZZO.

Love's Bondman.

Great joy it were to me to join the throng
That thy celestial throne, O Lord, surround,
Where perfect peace and pardon shall be found,
Peace for good doings, pardon for the wrong ;

Great joy to hear the vault of heaven prolong
That everlasting trumpet's mighty sound,
That shall to each award their final bound.
Wailing to these, to those the blissful song.

All this, dear Lord, were welcome to my soul.
For on his brow then every one shall bear
Inscribed, what late was hidden in the heart ;

And round my forehead wreath'd a lettered scroll
Shall in this tenor my sad fate declare :
" Love's bondman, I from him might never part.'

Henry Francis Cary.



ITALIAN SONNETS.



GUIDO GUINICELLI.
Of His Lady.

I WOULD from truth my lady's praise supply,
Resembling her to lily and to rose ;
Brighter than morning's lucid star she shows,
And fair as that which fairest is on high.

To the blue wave, I liken her, and sky,

All colour that with pink and crimson glows,
Gold, silver, and rich stones : nay, lovelier grows
E'en love itself, when she is standing by.

She passeth on so gracious and so mild,

One's pride is quenched, and one, if sick, is well ;
And they believe, who from the faith did err ;

And none may near her come by harm defiled :
A mightier virtue have I yet to tell j
No man may think of evil seeing her.

He7try Frauds Cary.



ITALIAN SONNETS.



GUIDO CAVALCANTI.
To Dante.

Returning from its daily quest, my Spirit

Changed thoughts and vile in thee doth weep
to find :

It grieves me that thy mild and gentle mind
Those ample virtues which it did inherit,
Has lost. Once thou didst loathe the multitude


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Online LibrarySamuel WaddingtonThe sonnets of Europe; → online text (page 1 of 10)