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ILWO^U:



SAN FRANCISCO, THURSDAY. JULY 3. 1924.



No



NICIPAL RECORD

iday by the Municipal Reference Library at

erve in condensed form all that pertains to
with the government of the city and county:
DfBcials and employees as to the transactions
Its; to furnish information to taxpayers and
e study of municipal affairs; to promote the
irinciples to municipal government.



<»-



Press



28 Montgomery Street



le copies, back or missing numbers must be
cent postage stamp for each copy requested.
For publication should be received not later

3S matter, August 10, 1916, at the postofBce at
.. under the Act of March 3, 1879.

"O MAKE COMPLAINTS

lemselves and at the same time expedite the
iness by observing the following general rules
Dn of complaints:

THE SUPER^^SORS.
legislation or changes in the ordinances, for
jermits as the Board can grant, in relation to
.'ice corporations, for the installation of street
1 beyond the power of any other department

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS.
) streets, including grading, opening, improv-
r thereof, to sewers, to the construction of
onstruction work under its charge, to house
enance of public buildings and all matters of

SE BOARD OF HEALTH
to sanitation and the enforcement or non-
regulations, the abatement of nuisances, etc.

PARTMEXT OF ELECTRICITY.

electrical installation either in buildings or

iTER .\ND LIGHT INSPECTOR.

tnproper ser%'ice or charge for gas. electricity

IE FIRE DEPARTMENT.
it'onal flre protect'on. including fire alarm
: such things as increase the fire hazard, and
rotectlon ordinances.

E POLICE DEPARTMENT.

-enforcement of ordinances and requests for

e Commissioners may grant.

ing to education, parks, playgrounds, civil

mitted directly to the commissioners having

rt weighting you, call up the Weights and

nt or officer fails to acknowledge the receipt

fails to give attention to the matter stated

iction should be brought to the attention of



LEPHONE NUMBERS.



I LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT



At the meeting of the Board of Supervisors last M
al'ternoon July 21 was fixed as the time for hearing obje
to the construction of the Mission-Sunset tunnel.

A resolution was presented instructing the City En
to present a new report on the extension of Van Ness a
with a new assessment district described, and rescindii
former resolution of intention to make the extension. I
made a special order for next week.

Hearing of objections to the closing of a portion of
street was postponed two weeks.

Bids were received for dry goods and clothing for thi
year and were referred to the Supplies Committee.

The City Attorney submitted an opinion in respect
number of votes required to pass the salary ordinance, h
that in certain departments where the ordinance dealt
creative positions, fourteen votes were required, wh:
departments where the purpose was only to fix salaries on
votes were required. The Clerk was directed to segrega
pending ordinance In accordance with the opinion.

An ordinance was finally passed changing the zone c
cation of the northeast comer of Hayes ond Fulton street:
the second residential to the commercial district, the chai
be effective for a period of ninety days.

The ordinance authorizing the Board of Public Woi
grant permits to do street work under private contrac
finally passed.

The following street work was ordered:

Carr street, between Paul and Salinas avenues, by g
and the construction of an asphaltic concrete pavement.

Levant street, between Lower Terrace and States stre
grading and the construction of curbs and a concrete
asphaltic concrete pavement.

Ulloa street, between Seventeenth and Nineteenth av
by the construction of catchbasins and an asphaltic co
pavement.

Spur track privileges were finally passed in favor o
Lurie Company in Harrison street and the Real Estate D(
ment Company across Missouri street.

Resolutions accepting offers to convey land were ad
For land required for the opening and widening of Ro<
way: for right of way easements for Hetch Hetchy transn
line in Alameda and San Mateo counties.

An ordinance was passed to print amending the ord
regulating the construction of garages in respect to th
scribed distance they must be located from schools and chi

A resolution was adopted of intention to establish s
lines along Mallorca way. Ritiro way and Rico way: Ji
set for hearing objections.



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SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY



Accession



*f352 M919^ 320316



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY



Form No. 37-5M— 9-84-C.P.






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Digitized by the Internet Archive

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Vol. XVII.



SAN FRANCISCO. THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1924.



No. 1.



THE MUNICIPAL RECORD

Is published every Thursday by the Board of Supervisors at the City
BaU.

Its purpose Is to preserve in condensed form all that pertains tc
current history connected with the provernmont of tl;e city and county;
to inform the municipal offlciala and employees as to the transactions
of the several departments: to furni.sh information to taxpa.\"ers and
to those Interested in the study of municipal affaivs; to promote tlie
application of scientific principles to municipal gove:'nment.



«•-



The Recorder Press



6S9 Stevenson Street.



SUBSCRIPTION: FIFTY CENTS A TEAR.

In Advance.

All requests for sample copies, back or missing numbers must be
»coompanied with a one-cent postage stamp for each coiiy requested.

.All matter intended for publication should be received not later
than Tuesda-y noon.

Entered .is second-class matter, .\uRust in. 1916. at the poatofflce at
San Francisco, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879.



WHERE TO MAKE COMPLAINTS

citizens can benefit themselves and at the same time expedite the
transaction of public business by observing the following general rules
regarding the transmission of complaints:

TO THE SUPERVISORS.
All requests for new legislation or changes in the ordinances, for
appropriations, for such permits as the Board can grant, in relation
to the conduct of public service corporations, for the installation of
street lights, or for any service beyond the power of any other depart-
ment to grant.

TO THE BOARD OF PUBLIC WORK.'!.
All matters relating to streets, including grading, opening, improv-
ment, repair or cleaning thereof, to sewers, to the construction of
buildings or any othei construction work under its charge, to house
numbering, to the maintenance of public buildings, and all matters ol
an engineering nature, and violations of building laws.

TO THE BOARD OF HE.\LTH.
.Ml matters relating to sanitation and the enforcement or non-
enforcement of sanitar.v regulations, the abatement or nuisances, etc

TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICITY.
All mat'ers relating to electrical installation either in buildings o'
streets.

TO THE FIRE DEPARTMENT

All requests for additional fire protection. Including fire alarm
hoxes. complaints against such things as increase the fire hazard, and
the enforcement of fire protection ordinances.

TO THE POLICE DEPARTMENT.

.Ml complaints of non-enforcement of ordinances and requests for
such permits as the Police Commissioners may grant.



Communications relating to education, parks, playgrounds, civil
service, should be transmitted directly to the commissioners having
control of the Riib.iecr.

If your dealer is short weighting you, call up the Weights and
Measure.^ Department.

In case any department or ofTlcer falls to acknowledtr the receipt
of the communication or fails to give attention to the matter stated
therein, then surh dereliction should be brought to the attention of
the flavor



TELEPHONE NUMBERS.

City Hall, Park 8.S00 Exchange connecting all departments.

Mayor's Office. Market 164,
Fire Department. Park snoo.
Police Department, Douglas 20.
Board of Health, Market 1491.
Park Commission. Pacific 1167.
Public Library, Park 8500.



LEGISLATIVE DEPARTMENT

<j> *

At the meeting of the Board of Supervisors last Monday
afternoon there was a very brief calendar, which was speedily
disposed of, followed by mutual expressions of good wishes for
the coming New Year,

Bids were received for furnishing paper for the School
Department and referred to the Bureau of Supplies.

A resolution of intention was adopted to establish set-back
lines along. Forty-third avenue between Cabrillo and Fulton
streets, Thirty-ftltli avenue between Anza and Balboa streets,
Miramar avenue between Holloway and Grafton avenues, Twen-
ty-second avenue between Ulloa and Vicente streets, Thirty-
seventh avenue between Anza and Balboa streets. Twenty-second
avenue between Cabrillo and Fulton streets, Brodeiick street
between Fulton and McAllister streets, Balboa street between
Forty-seventh and Forty-eighth avenues, and Thirty first avenue
between Taraval and Ulloa streets. Monday, February 4. was
set as the time of hearing objections to the foregoing.

A resolution was adopted dec'aring that public interest and
convenience requires the construction of a tunnel (Mission-
Sunset tunnel) under elevation known as Mt. Olympus: that
it is the intention to order construction of said tunnel, and
that it is the intention to acquire, by condemnation and pur-
chase, the lands required; also, outlining the districts, as
amended, to be assessed for the cost of such work.

James R. McEIroy was granted permission to explode blasts
in connection with the grading of the Lincoln boulevard.

A contract was awarded for installing electric motors at
tlie Mission and Galileo high schools.

The Purchaser of Supplies was authorized to receive pro-
posals for the disposal of swill at the city hospital.

A resolution was introduced soliciting the Pacific Gas and
Electric Company to submit a price to be charged for distrib-
uting electrical energy from the Hetch Hetchy system over its
distributing system. The Board adjourned to meet Monday
at 10 o'c'cck to clear up its unfinished business and at 2 o'clock
for the purpose of receiving the new members elected at the
last municipal election.

.•\ction on Permits.

The following applications for permits were referred to
committee:

Central Auto Laundry, for oil storage tank, 1500 gallons
capacity, at 1740 Market street.

Axel A. Johnson, for oil storage tank. 1500 gallons capacity,
east side of Bay street, 100 feet north of Franklin street.

Permits Recommended and Passed to Print.

Oil fHorafjc Tank (1500 gallons capacity) — J. Epp. at north-
east corner of Fourth avenue and California street: H. U. Bran-
denstein, at 2030 Gough street: Roman Catholic Archbishop,
Inc.. at southwest corner of Cortland avenue and Ellsworth
street: Louis J. Cohen, at southeast comer of De Haro and



^^^^



MUNICIPAL RECORD



Division street; William Helbing, on east side of Octavia street,
120 feet south of California street; William Helbing, on west
side of Hyde street, 87M> feel north of Ellis street; Ames,
Harris & Neville, at 37 Front street.

Boiler — Louis J. Cohen, at southeast corner of De Haro and
Division streets, 50 horse power.



COMMITTEE CHAIRMAXSHIl'S AKRAXGED.

The membership of the several committees of the Board of
Supervisors for next year has not been officially announced,
but it has been stated that the chairmanships have been
tentatively agreed upon as follows:

Auditorium — Hayden.

Civil Service — Katz.

City Planning — McGregor.

Commercial Development — Welch.

Education, Parks and Playgrounds — Morgan.

Finance — McLeran.

Fire — Deasy.

Judiciary and Traffic — Bath.

Lands and Buildings — Wetniore.

Lighting — Schmitz.

Municipal Concerts — Roncovieri.

Public Health— McSheehy.

Public Utilities — Shannon.

Public Welfare — Colman.

Streets and Sewers — Harrelsou.

Supplies — Rossi.

Tunnels and Assessments — Badaracco.



FOUR COUXTIES WILL COMPLETE HIGHWAY.

Fresno, Monterey, Kings and Tulare counties will unite to
complete the 29-mile San Lucas-Coalinga gap in the Sierra to-
the-Sea highway as a means of connecting Mount Whitney with
the Monterey jieninsula, under plans completed at a meeting
of more than 400 representatives of the four counties. Mem-
bers of the boards of supervisors of the four counties attended
the meeting. It is estimated that the cost of grading and
graveling tlie 29-mile gap will be $800,000. The counties are to
share the e.\pense. As twenty-two miles of the road will be
in Monterey County and seven in Fresno County, these two
counties expect to bear the largest share of the burden. State
aid will be sought also.



RECX)RI)ER'S MONTHLY STATEMENT.

Cash receipts for Recorder's fees, December, 1923. $9,322.80;
receipts for same month, 1922, $8,732.65; net increase, $590.15.

Salaries for December, 1923, $7,783.01; surplus for month,
$1,539.79.

Papers filed for record during the luonlh of December, 1923,
5,220; same month, 1922, 4,930; net increase, 290.

Durjflg the month a total of 577 marriage certificates were
recorded, as follows: Whites, 561; colored. 3; Chinese, 7;
Japanese, 5; Oriental, 1. The religious subdivision, where indi-
cated, was as follows: Protestant, 171; Catholic, 124; Hebrew,
15; Oriental, 1; civil, 266.



STREET-CLEAN I X<; DEPARTMENT SHOWS EFFICIENCY.

Ankle deep with confetti, serpentine, horns, squawkers.
flowers, paper, ribbons, bottles and everything else that New
Year's eve merrymakers had strewn upon it. Market street at
midnight was gay to look upon, but hard to walk upon.

At 7 o'clock Tuesday morning everything was clean as a
whistle. Not only was every speck of confetti cleared away,
but the streets had had their faces washed as well.

How did they do it? It seems miraculous to tlie average
reader, but when Superintendent Peter J. Owen, of the Street



Cleaning Department, sent out his force of 120 men at 2 o'clock
in the morning they knew their job and they did it quickly.

First a detail of men equipped with extra wide brushes
swept everything out from doorways, across the pavement and
into the gutter. When they had finished the sidewalks were
clean.

Then came the big feature of the operation — the use of the
automobile flushers. Working right down the middle of the
streets, these released water under pressure and swept all of
the debris over to the sides and into the gutters. There it
was mixed with the sweepings from the sidewalks and the whole
mass made wet, so that it could be handled easily.

Tlie cost of this operation for the entire city, covering every
district where celebrations were held, will total approximately
$1,000. It took a fleet of thirty-nine teams and one auto truck
to cart away the refuse, and they handled about 150 loads.



ROAD CONVICTS FIND WORK IS PROFITABLE.

Convicts employed in California State Highway |)rison camps
are making a net profit of about 60 cents a day under the new
law enacted by the last legislature, which permits them to re-
ceive compensation for their work not to exceed $2.50 per day,
according to the first reports submitted to R. M. Morton, Stata
Highway Engineer, since the law was placed in actual operation.

Morton stated that the State is allowing the convicts $2.10
per day, instead of the maximum of $2.50, and that all of the
men have realized a profit from their work after paying for their
food, clothing, cost of maintaining the camp and guards.

Commenting on the .success of the new plan, which is intended
to assist the p'-isoners in caring for their dependents and at
the same time help them to accumulate enough money to give
them a new start after their release, Morton said :

"I'nder the law each convict is permitted to earn not to ex-
ceed seventy-five cents per day net and he also gets one day
off his sentence for every two days put in on the roads.

"If the convict iias dependents receiving State aid, two-thirds
of the amount earned must be paid these dependents. If he has
dependents not receiving State aid, the convict may designate
what dependents are to receive not more than two-thirds of his
earnings. Ui)on release or parole, the balance is paid him in
monthly installments of not to exceed $50; if f'eed, the whole
amount is paid."



EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM



San Francisco's $2,000,000 Convention
Building

COVERS CIVIC CENTER BLOCK BOUNDED

BY LARKIN, GROVE, POLK AND

HAYES STREETS

Contains Halls of various sizes, which
can be engaged for Shows, Balls,
Lectures, Concerts, etc.

For terms and dates, apply to

Auditorium Committee, Board of Supervisors,

City Hall



MUNICIPAL RECORD



I RECREATION DEPARTMENT

*

POPULAR CONCERT JAXIARV 15.

Tlie third popular concert, second series, of the San Fran-
cisco Symphony Orchestra, Alfred Hertz, conductor, bids fair
to crowd the Exposition Auditorium to the doors again on
Tuesday evening, January 15, at 8:20 o'clock. Chairman J.
Emmet Hayden of the Auditorium Committee of the Board of
Supervisors, under whose direction these remarkable musical
affairs are given, reports that the demand for seats, with prices
ranging from 25 cents to a dollar, without war tax, is very
large at Sherman, Clay and Company's, and that prospects are
bright for an early sell-out.

Particular interest centers in the guest artist of the even-
ing, Ethel Leginska, a tiny slip of a pianist whose artistic
stature is something tremendous and who stands at the very
front rank of her profession. There is a burning intensity in
her style and a fiery sweep, according to a prominent critic,
who also states that her playing is impetuous and hot blooded,
lull of high lights and deep shadows, yet which can be
exquisitely restrained and is not lacking in artistic reticences.
Her tone is full of great beauty, whether it is in passages of
delicacy or of power, or in finest differentiated gradations
between these extremes. Willi the orchestra she will play
Liszt's Hungarian Fantasie. in addition to a group of piano
solos.

Conductor Hertz will open his program with Tschaikowski's
Symphony "Pathetique," Xo. 6. and later in the evening he
will play the same composer's Andante Cantablle, op. 2, for
strings, as well as Percy Grainger'.'^ "Molly on the Shore" and
Elgar's sonorous "Pomp and Circumstance" March.



MORE HIGHWAY KUXDS NEEDED.

Although bonds worth ?73.000,000 have already been voted
for the construction of highways in California, tliis is probably
only one-quarter of what will be required to complete the entire
State highway system. This was told to members of Fresno
Chapter, American Association of Engineers, at their noon
luncheon at the Hughes Hotel, November 30, by J. B. Wood-
son, division engineer at Fresno for the California Highway
Commission. How the use of highways has grown tremen-
dously was shown by figures quoted by Woodson. When the
first highway bond issue of $18,000,000 was voted in 1910 there
were 42.000 automobiles in California, he said. Now there are
more than a million. "In 1913 we took a census of traffic south
of Fresno and noted slightly more than 1500 vehicles in a
twelve-hour day," said Woodson. "In 1922 the census showed
more than 7000 vehicles in a twelve-hour day. If such condi-
tions represent the general increases throughout the State, the
traffic department has an immense problem in liandling this
tremendously growing situation."

Woodson reviewed the history of highway construction and
financing in California since the first bond issue of 1910. The
principal work now under construction, he said, is the com-
pletion of the seventeen-mile section of the Yosemite lateral
between Briceburg and El Portal. It will cost $1,000,000.



STATE PAYS I>.\RGE SUM VOK PENSION'S.

Will C. Wood, state superintendent of public instruction, Wed-
nesday announced payment of $103,192 for the public school
teachers' retirement sala'-y fund, to 922 retired instructors, who
have either served thirty years in the State educational system
or have been pensioned because of disability. The salary fund,
from which retired teache-'s are granted a yearly allowance of
$500 each, now shows a balance of $1,708,561.



FIRE PREVENTION FOR KCHOOL UUILUINUS.

To protect San Francisco's school buildings from the pos-
sible attack of the tirebug who has aroused the East Bay com-
munities, a system of patrolling was put into action this week,
ioUowing a conlerence at the City Hall at which Chief Engineer
Thomas R. Murphy presided and Captain William J. Quinn
represented Chief of Police O'Brien.

Details of firemen from the seven fire districts of the city
inaugurated the system of patroling, the routes being covered
by automobile. These frequent trips were supplemented by
visits to the school buildings by the battalion chiefs.

Captain Quinn announced that police captains would be
instructed to detail officers to guard the school property through-
out the city, to afford additional protection.

Chief Murphy asserted that the action was being taken solely
as a precautionary measure and should not cause any alarm.
"We have reason to believe that the Alameda County fires were
of incendiary origin," he said, "and we don't wish for anything
like that to happen in San Francisco. Being forewarned we
shall be forearmed. The lives of school children are too impor-
tant and school buildings are too valuable to allow any guess-
work in the matter. We shall be prepared for anything to
happen."



MUNICIPAL R.\ILWA\' EARNINGS INCREASE.

Receipts of the Municipal Railways system for 1923 reached
the .$3,000,000 mark, according to figures compiled by Supenn-
tendent Fred Boeken and City Auditor Thomas F. Boyle. The
year was the best in the history of the city lines.

During the twelve months a total of $3,108,833.40 was piled
up. as against -?2,951,6S4.&5 for 1922, or an increase of five per
cent. Decembe"- receipts were .$278,683.45. During the life of the
road $1,406,900 in bonds issued for construction have been re-
deemed and extensions valued at $2,000,000 have been made.



BUILDING PERMITS SHOW GAIN.

Building activities in San Francisco for 1923 increased more
ihan a million dollars over those of the preceding twelve months,
according to a repo'-t made by Chief Building Inspector John P.
Horgan. During the year a total of 9856 permits was reached,
with a valuation of $46,676,076. In 1922 the operations totaled
$45,327,206.

The past year's building operations were segregated as fol-
lows ;

Class A. 15. $4,422,500; class B, 25, $3,998,078: class C, 367.
$10,874,485; frames, 3807, $21,396,756: alterations, 5629, $4,958,-
999: public. 8. $694,637, and harbor. 5. $330,624.

Fi.aures-for 192:1, by months, were as follows:

January, $3,205,811; February, $3,178,676; March, $3,229,572;
April, $5,173,801: May, $4,928,986; .lune. $3,227,115; August,
$3,915,300: Septembe*-, $2,907,389; October, $3,793,374; November.
$3,859,265: December, $4,952,444.

Figures for the last four years were:

For 1920. $26,729,992: 1921. $22,214,672: 1922, $45,327,206 and
1923, $46,676,079.



MAYOH TO DELIVER BIENNIAL MESS.\GE.

Mayor Rolph will begin his fourth term as Mayor of San
Francisco next Monday and will deliver a message setting out
the accomplishments of past years and forecast some of the
things hoped to be brought to pass in the years to come.

The traffic problem, street railway and wate''. bridging the
Golden Gate, the settlement of how municipal distribution of
municipally generated Hetch Hetchy power is to be accomplished,
the completion of the boulevard system and school building pro-
grams are among the big projects that the Mayor sees in front
of him and which he says will tax the ability of the adminis-
tration to handle satisfactorily.



MUNICIPAL RECORD



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I



HEALTH DEPARTMENT



Morbidity Stiitistics.
The following cases ol communicable diseases were reported
in San Francisco for the week ended December 29, 1923:

Influenza 2 Tuberculosis 27

Diphtheria 87 Cerebrospinal meningitis . . 1

Diphtheria "carriers" ... 28 Scabies 1

Scarlatina 36 Erysipelas 5

Chickenpox 5 Gonococcus infection .... 15

Measles 98 Syphilis 16

Pneumonia (lobar) 16

United States Military Reservation, Presidio.
(Week ending December 29, 1923.)

Chickenpox 1 Gonococcus infection .... 9

Pneumonia (lobar) 2 Syphilis 2

Tuberculosis 4

Vital Statistics.

Births registered in San Francisco lor the week ended
December 29, 1923 136



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsMunicipal record (Volume 1924 17) → online text (page 1 of 131)