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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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ARCHITECTS



Joseph Rankin

ARCHITECT
57 Post Street



25 Years Designing Schools

HENRY C. SMITH

ARCHITECT

Telephone KEarny 1745

HUMBOLDT BANK BUILDING

783 Market Street San Francisco



J. Harry Blohme



Clarence R. Ward



WARD Si BLOHME

Architects

310 Sansome Street San Francisco, Calif.



ARCHITECTS — ENGINEERS



O'Brien Bros.
W. D. Peugh, A. I. A.

ARCHITECTS < ENGINEERS



CAFE



Palm Garden Grill

Frieda Schmidt.Brauns, Proprietor
F. W. Kracht, Manager

Good Foods Best Cooking

LIGHTNING SERVICE

Tel. KEarny 4633 931 Market Street



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT



BULLOCK, KELLOGG
ac MITCHELL

1018 RUSS BUILDING
Kearny 0465



Hicklin and Redmond

Certified Public Accountants
AUDITING ■ TAX SERVICE . ACCOUNTING

941 Russ Building
SUTTER 2085



Hood & Strong

423 Standard Oil Building

SUTTER 0793



ROBINSON, NOWELL & CO.

Certified Public Accountants

DOUGLAS 1868

Crocker Bldg. San Francisco



COACHING — CIVIL SERVICE



CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATIONS
Special Coaching Courses

In the past eight years 95 % of my applicants
were successful. Thorough drills in sU subjects.

MABEL BOX, Teacher

Graduate San Jose State Teachers* College
312 Van Ness Avenue, Apt. 202

For iDtormallon, Pbone Bfinlock 7675, 6 to 7 p. m.



CONTRACTOR — ELECTRICAL



Motor Maintenance Hemlock 7380—7381

W. B. BAKER & CO., INC.

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS

Ventilating Engineers and Manufacturers
Motor Fans and Blowers

W. B. BAKER San Francisco, Calif.

270 6TH STREET



ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT



Joseph Guglielmo, President C. Nagel, Secretary

Brass and Bronze Lighting

Fixture Manufacturing Co.

955 MISSION STREET

Telephotle KEamy 8773



MORTUARY SERVICE



JULIUS S. GODEAU, INC.

41 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco

Phone Market 711

OAKLAND , STOCKTON

"Independent of the Trust"

COMPLETE MORTUARY SERVICE

AT A COST WITHIN YOUR MEANS

Our understanding service lightens

your burden of grief



PASTRY COMPANY



QUALITY SERVICE QUANTITY

G. Grazioli, President A. Monaco, Secretary

Victoria Pastry Co., Inc.

Italian and French Pastries and Confections

Phone: SUtter 2013-2016

1362 Stockton at Vallejo San Francisco



PROVISION MERCHANT



TAYLOR'S

"Supreme" Seasoned
ALL PORK SAUSAGE

LINK OR COUNTRY STYLE— 35c LB.

1143 Market Street

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA



SERVICE STATIONS



Gas 6" Oil — Free Crank Case Service

"Where Service Is Paramount'*

BILL NUTTER'S

Visitacion Valley Service Station

Visitacion and San Bruno Avenue
REST ROOM



TYPEWRITERS



The New Varityper

Sec it at the National Business Show
CIVIC AUDITORIUM — SAN FRANCISCO

APRIL 8th to 13ih
593 Market Street SUtter 1521



Buv from firms that advertise with us



32



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



March



NOVAKCLUB MAKES SPECIAL
PRICE TO CITY EMPLOYEES



Through the efforts of The Mu-
nicipal Employee, city employees
will be able to secure Novakclub All-
in-One Golf Clubs at a one-third re-
duction in price.

To take advantage of this gener-
ous offer send or take your request
or phone the Novakclub, Incorpo-
rated, 60 Federal Street, San Fran-
cisco, phone Douglas 6186.

This saving of money comes at an
opportune time to permit a number
cf the city employees to enter the
Municipal Employees' Golf Tourna-
ment, which is to start March 23.

The Novakclub has an adjustable
head, thus permitting all shots to be
made with one club and, from the
results obtained by its users, cer-
tainly does the job completely.

Some of you golfers know how
often you would like to play a few
holes and not be bothered with a
bag full of clubs. Ask Chief Gavin :
he has had the experience.



If you have not sent in your entry
do so now and get in the game.
Don't hold back because you think
you play Civil War Golf — out in
sixty-one and back in sixty-five — it
is all in fun and you will meet a
good bunch of fellows.

Do you know that California has
more than one-half million golfers?
Why not you?

The exercise, air and recreation is
good for you and good for the wife.
A little practice and you will be sur-
prised how well you can do. Just
picture taking one club for an hour
or two before dinner and having a
little sport, as well as working up
an appetite for the old corned beef
and cabbage.

The city provides golf courses.
Why don't you use them?

We are expecting you to take ad-
vantage of the special price we ar-
ranged for you with the Novakclub,
Incorporated, while it lasts. Act
now and thank us later.



MAYOR ROLPH NAMES NEW

CITY PLANNING

COMMISSION



ACTING under a Charter amend-
..ment adopted by the voters at
the November last election Mayor
Rolph has named the new City
Planning Commission of five. In the
appointments are included three
members of the former commission
which was instituted by ordinance.
The members are :

Judge Matt I. Sullivan, former
Chief Justice of the State Supreme
Court, president of the old commis-
sion.

Major Charles H. Kendrick, mem-
ber of the old commission.

Mrs. Parker S. Maddux, member
of the old commission.

W. W. Chapin, newspaper pub-
lisher.

Ray S. Rossitter, member of the
brokerage firm of Leib-Keyston
Company.



Hospital Furniture - Surgical Instruments Rubber Goods

Also For Sale or Rent: Invalid Chairs and Fracture Beds



We Specialize



In Hospital and Sick Room Supplies, also Industrial First Aid
Room Equipment

TRAVERS SURGICAL CO.

Physician and Hospital Supplies
Phone DOuglas 9477

429 Sutter Street San Francisco, California

Oakland Store, 435 19lh St., near Broadway, Phone GLencoun 7921

CALIFORNIA'S LEADING SURGICAL SUPPLY HOUSE



Compliments
of

A FRIEND



SCHOOL TIME

In San Francisco — is Standard

Thirty Public Schools equipped with Time Clocks by

The Standard Electric Time Co.

The Standard for School Time
Phone SUtter 0241 690 Market Street



HANCOCK BROS.

Bonded and Licensed

TICKET PRINTERS

COUPON BOOKS
STREET CAR TICKETS AND TRANSFERS

25 Jessie Street San Francisco



AIRPORT LUNCH ROOM

All Electrical Equipment Electrically Percolated Coffee

Let us serve you at all times ^ Prices reasonable

Mills Field y y i ' i i San Francisco



Hiiv from firms that advertise with us







€vx^i&^



sEKTicK^EEEiaENcr^co-aBEiaaiaw



Twenty-five Cents



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, APRIL, 1929



Vol. Ill, No. 4




Entrance Tower of the Alamo School. J. R. Miller and T. L. Pflueger. Architects



DRASTIC AUTO DISCOUNTS
STARTLE ENTIRE CITY

Greatest Automobile Sales Event Ever Held!
VERY LATEST 1929

BRAND NEW CHANDLERS

DISCOUNTS FROM $200 TO $800

Light 6s, Big 6s, Royal Light 8 s and Royal de Luxe Big 8s.
Models "65", Big "6", "75", "85"

Sedans, Coupes, Cabriolets, Coaches, Broughams, Sport Phaetons

IN ALL THE LATEST COLOR EFFECTS

Our Prices From ^895 to ^1,945, Delivered Here

Every car is absolutely the latest creation of the Chandler factory and carries a factory guarantee, with a

full and complete line of parts available at all times

^ Down. Balance, 18 Months i Your Old Car Accepted in Trade i See These Today

KELLEY KAR COMPANY



Open All Day Sunday



1595 Van Ness Ave.
Ordway 0780



Open Every Evening



PUBLIC MARKET

8th Street, Mission and Market Streets, San Francisce
FREE PARKING

J L J L J L

TRADE HERE AND

MEET THE
''GOOD FOOD TRIO"

Pure ! Economical ! Wholesome ! The three
guardsmen of this great Market. They guar-
antee you the choicest of Foodstu£F at prices
lower than your neighborhood store.

BVY HERE AND LOWER YOUR GROCERY BILL






Superior Funeral Service

When you call WHITE'S SERVICE you
may be assured that nothing will be neglected.
Everything will be done to make the memorial
service a beautiful tribute.

The members of our organization are skilled
in the performance of their professional duties
and have a sympathetic understanding of the
requirements of the bereaved.

S. A. WHITE

Leading Funeral Director
TRANS-BAY AND PENINSULAR SERVICE WITHOUT E)CTRA CHARGE

2200 Sutter Street T San Francisco

in

J870,



L






^r-



^



;<^



Mention This Magazine When You Patronize Adrertisers




SEE^CS-EEHCEENCr-CaOPEEATION



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE PUBLISHING COMPANY

1093 Market Street Phone Market 8438



Philip P. Levy
Business Manager



Herbert B. Gee, Editor

M. B. Bothwell
Advertising Manager
George H. Allen, General Manager



John D. Gibson
Assistant Business Manager



i
I



Volume III



APRIL. 192^5



No. 4



I



CO^a•RIBUTING EDITORS



Assessor's Office Louise M. O'Hara

Auditor's Office J. Everett Sharp

Board of Education „

„ D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman

Board of Health Edward M. Coffey

Board of Public Works Sid Hester

Bureau of Engineering N. A. Eckart

Bureau of Supplies Ivy Perkins Cerkel

City Attorney's Office Edmond P. Bergerot

Civil Service Commission James J. Maher

Civil Service Association Edward M. Coffey

Coroner's Office Jane Walsh

County Clerk ..Howard Gudelj

Dept. of Electricity Joseph P. Murphy

District Attorney Henry Goldman

Engineers' Union J. L. Slater, Jr.

Exposition Auditorium James L. Foley

Fire Department Lieut. Fred Jones

Justice Courts Robert W. Dennis



Maj'or's Office Edward Rainey

Municipal Railway Eugene W. Clisbee

Municipal Carmen's Union Edward D. Vandeleur

Office Employees' Assn William T. Bonsor

Parks and Museums W. M. Strother

Per Diem Men's Assn F. J. Ferguson

Playground Commission Veda B. Young

Principals' Association Susie A. Ward

Public Library Anne M. Farrell

Public Administrator Henry Boyen

Recorder's Office Daniel McGloin

Registrar's Office George L. Sharp

Retirement Board John W. Rogers

San Francisco Hospital Mrs. Mae H. Noonan

Sealer of Weights and Measures Mrs. M. Dolan

Sheriff's Office W. J. Martenson

Superior Courts Henry J. McGrath

Tax Collector's Office Homer Warren

Treasurer's Office I. A. Richardson



In This Issue



P.AGE

Editorial 5

E. Jack Spaulding 7

Mills Field — Air Transport Terminal 8

By Chas. T. M. Echols
Sculpture Exhibition Opens April 27 10

By W. M. Strother
When Playgrounds Were Sand Dunes 12

By Knave, in Oakland Tribune
A Duel in the Dark 13

By Jack Laulor
Golden Gate Park 14

By jr. M. Strother
Creative Work Among Children 15

By Veda Beresford Young
Noted Engineer Named Bridge Manager 16



P.-\GE

Department of Electricity 16

By Joseph Murphy

Junipero Serra, a Picturesque Drive 17

Flyers Seek Stephens' Promotion 18

Fore! And Game Was On 19

By Harry J. Borba
The Great Street Car Tragedy, or Ray Taylor

Settles a Claim 20

By Ashley Turner
Some New Novels 21

By Anne M. Farrell

San Francisco School Department 22

Board of Health 24

City Service Employees 28

By IVilliam T. Bonsor



\









WWr



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



April



Tel. DAvenport 2500

JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS

Iron Founders • Machinists' Engineers



Office : 200 Pine Street



CALIFORNIA



Pacific Tank & Pipe Go.
National Mill & Lumber Go.

Mtnufacturers
WOOD TANKS, WOOD PIPE, MILL WORK, CROSS
ARMS, PARK BENCHES, FACTORY CUT HOUSES

Telephone Kearny 3620
320 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO



NATIONAL METER
COMPANY

NEW YORK CITY
Manufacturers of

WATER METERS

Since 1870
A METER FOR EVERY KIND OF SERVICE



-*♦-



PACIFIC COAST BRANCHES

SAN FRANCISCO
1048 Folsotn Street

LOS ANGELES
645 Santa Fe Avenue



United Commercial Company

INCORPORATED
234 Steuart Street y San Francisco

Representing

HYMAN-MICHAELS COMPANY, CHICAGO

Agents for
Western Wheeled Scraper Co. y Davenport Locomotive

Works f Ohio Locomotive Crane

Largest itock used Contractors* and Mining Equipment on the Omm

CARS and LOCOMOTIVES— all sizes, all gauges

RAIt^— New and used, all sizes carried in stock

STEAM SHOVELS - CONCRETE MIXERS

AIR COMPRESSORS ■ AIR DRILLS . PILE DRIVER HAMMERS

CLAM SHELL and ORANGE PEEL BUCKETS • PIPE, all aiu*

PUMPS of all description - ELECTRIC MOTORS

GAS AND STEAM HOISTS - BOILERS - TANKS

SHEET PILING
We will be glad to have our representative call on you

PHONE DAVENPORT 2355



C. F. Bulotti Machinery Co.

MACHINE TOOLS — SHOP SUPPLIES

CRANES AND FOUNDRY EQUIPMENT

RAILROAD SUPPLIES

829-831 Folsom Street

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF.

SUtter 1006



FESS SYSTEM Sa'ves JmU

As the FESS SYSTEM COMPANY has
grown, its high standard of quality in ma-
terial and workmanship has been strictly
adhered to and its constant aim has been to
build the product up to the point of highest
efficiency rather than down to the lowest
price.

Trk^p/y/y/jrOr/f 0F7H£:I/}RG£5TF£f)LTY
F/ffM5 0/v7N£/^c/F/cCofl5r7^f/N/< OrOu/=?

_ ^^^._,^^j3^\yj^f ^, _ . ^

"Wa do not hesitate to aay that our ozparlanoe
with the Fasa Botar; Bumar la the most aatisfactor;^
In every way. We have had quite a nimher of thaia
Burners In operation and have been satisfactory, tX-
though the repairs have been mora, due poaalbly to
the fact that thay have had several different repra-
Bentatlvaa here in our city and the sarvloe behind
them has not been aa good as that behind the Fasa
Burner, whloh have had the same agenoy for a period
of ten or twelve years and has been eminently eatla-
,^faotory. if

5PLC/FY»no /nS/3T
UPOfi

FE55 5YSTEM

FESS SYSTEM COMPANY

218-220 Natoma Street
San Francuco California, U. S. A.



Buy from firms that advertise with us



April



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



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EDITORIAL PAGE



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Why Jump on Mills Field?

EVERY big American city is afflicted with an
anvil chorus that has nothing to offer but
complaints at every opportunity to decry the
efforts of constructive groups that seek honestly
to effect, in harmony and concord, improve-
ment in public service and healthy growth in
public enterprises.

San Francisco's municipal airport at Mills
Field is a case in point. Intermittently a cry
goes up that there is "something wrong" at Mills
Field; that the airport is stagnant or slipping
backwards; that the service and equipment there
is lax; that the management of the flying field
is woefully ineflicient.

Of course there is room for expansion at Mills
Field — just as there is at any municipally con-
trolled air field in the United States. Let us be
fair, however, about the basic underlying cause —
a lack of sufficient funds to finance proportionate
expansion of the acreage and equipment. While
other cities have spent a great deal more money
on their airports than San Francisco, thereby
being able to offer greater inducements to the
aircraft industry, the progress made by Mills
Field under the circumstances is phenomenal.

THE city's airport committee, composed of
Supervisors Milo F. Kent, Andrew J. Gal-
lagher and Frank J. McGovern, consistently has
endeavored to get more money for expansion
through a larger budget allowance, and failing
in this, the committee sponsored an amendment
on the November 7, last, ballot providing for a
$1,700,000 bond issue to finance developments
laid out by the City Engineer's office. The
amendment failed to receive the necessary two-
thirds vote, getting 75,993 "yes" votes, with 59,-
354 "no" votes. A great majority of the voters
registered their confidence in Mills Field and its
future, but, largely because of the fact that there
were more than sixty measures to be voted on,
the amendment went down to defeat with many
other bond issues.

It seems to us that it is unfair to compare Mills
Field with the Oakland airport. The City of
Oakland has spent more than $1,500,000 on its
airport to date, starting in June, 1927, while San
Francisco, which opened Mills Field in May,
1927, has spent only $287,326.75 to date on its
airport equipment.



FURTHER to relieve the situation at Mills Field
and as Supervisor Kent so aptly remarked,
"to relieve people's minds in regard to the air-
port," Mayor Rolph and the Board of Super-
visors have indorsed a plan for appointment of
an advisory committee to aid the Airport Com-
mittee, and to make a study and report with
recommendations upon the needs of the airport.
For the step, which means that San Francisco is
to become preeminent in the field of commercial
aviation, with an airport equalled nowhere in
the United States, The Municipal Employee
congratulates Mayor Rolph and the Board.

Supervisor Kent, in speaking for the Airport
Committee, and explaining the committee's re-
quest for appointment of an advisory committee,
said that if the advisory committee, which un-
doubtedly will include Army aircraft officials,
recommends a new form of management and
different authority at Mills Field, it w^ill be
up to the Board of Supervisors to authorize
the change,

SUPERVISOR Gallagher, in speaking of the
advisory committee, declared that the pur-
pose is to get expert advice and have a thorough
study made of the problem. He declared that
if the advisory committee finally advises that
authority over the airport be transferred to some
other body, then it also will advise the Airport
Committee how to achieve that result.

In voicing his company's satisfaction with
conditions at Mills Field, Charles T. M. Echols
of the West Coast Air Transport Company, in
an article in this number of The MUNICIPAL
Employee, states:

"A year of regular use of this airport has
proven the reasoning in our selection of Mills
Field, Our tri-motored planes have never at any
time had trouble in landing or taking off at this
field under any weather conditions. The airport
equipment has been thoroughly adequate. The
airport management has been courteous and
helpful. And true, to expectations, 85 per cent
of our passenger business has originated in Saoi
Francisco. Less than five per cent of our pjts-
sengers have requested to be picked up or set
down at other Bay region airports. Our selec-
tion has been justified, Mills Field is an Air
Transport Terminal."



Our Best Regards



to the



SHERIFF'S OFFICE



from



ARTHUR YOUNG

AND ASSOCIATES



the



NEW MANDARIN CABARET

San Francisco's Most Beautiful Cafe
Grant Avenue at Bush Douglas 2842



L EMPLOYEE April


Since


1858


SUTRO & Co.


SAN FRANCISCO


NEW YORK OAKLAND


Members


NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE


SAN FRANCISCO STOCK EXCHANGE


LOS ANGELES STOCK EXCHANGE



John H. Wong Peter H. Wong Chas. P. Low

WONG AND LOW

Chinese and Filipino Employment Agency

Cooks i Valets i Chauffeurs i Gardeners
Houseboys t Maids r Waiters, etc.

750 Sacramento Street San Francisco, Calif.

Telephones: China 1601, Kearny 4563



World's Largest Makers and Retailers

of
MEN'S SUITS & TOPCOATS

AT THE FOUR FAMOUS PRICES

^20 ^25 ^30 ^35

TRADE UPSTAIRS AND SAVE ^10

FOREMAN and CLARK

Stockton and Ellis at Market



i



Buv from firms that advertise with us



April



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE




^m



UNDERSHERIFF E. JACK SPAULDING



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



April






FRANK J. McGOVERN
Member Airport Committee



Photo by Boye
MILO F. KENT
Chairman Airport Committee



Photo by Boye
ANDREW J. GALLAGHER
Member Airport Committee



Mills Field — ^ir Transport Terminal

By Chas. T. M. Echols

Assistant Traffic Manager, M^est Coast Air Transport Company



THE progress of the West Coast
Air Transport Company in the
operation of its coastwise passenger
air line is very closely allied with the
development of Mills Field, San
Francisco municipal airport. In
1927, when the organizers of the
West Coast Air Transport Company
began to lay plans, survey routes,
and obtain flying equipment, the
question of adequate landing facili-
ties along the contemplated route
was of major importance.



This company was the first pas-
senger air line to operate regular
scheduled service on the Pacific
Coast. The San Francisco-Portland-
Seattle route was selected, because
it ofifered the greatest distances be-
tween centers of population, making
air transportation an asset to these
communities. The next demand was
for suitable airports, including a
terminal in the San Francisco bay
area.

It is interesting to note that at




J



U'esl Coast .lir Transport plane leaving Mills Field for Los Angeles



that particular time the best landing
field on this entire route was located
at Corning, California, where air-
minded private interests had pro-
vided a field suitable for large
planes. Seattle and Portland, like
San Francisco, had not completed
the first construction work on their
new municipal airports.

Airport Considerations

In the selection of an airport for
terminal use several items must be
considered, not only as to present,
but also future conditions. These
items are size, equipment and acces-
sibility.

In the bay region, both Oak-
land and San Francisco had airport
projects under way, and Alameda
expected to have something to offer
in the then near future. This con-
dition offered new problems to our
company. This new problem was
that of selecting the airport which
would be nearest the majority of the
passengers who would patronize the
service.

The bay region airports were
practically the same as to size and
runways, and as to area available
for future expansion and enlarge-
ment. Their hangars and general
equipment were about equal and all
had satisfactory plans for more and
better equipment to be installed, as
funds for the purpose became avail-



April



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE




IVest Coast plane coming to a landing at Mills Field



able. The managements apparently
would render equal service to the
users of their fields.

The Deciding Factor

To our company this made the
deciding factor in the selection of a
bay region terminal, that of acces-
sibility to our passengers. The
years of transportation experience of
our management made this means
of selection a comparatively simple
matter. The city of San Francisco
having a large transient population,
in addition to being the business
center of the Pacific Coast, offers the
best market for the sale of transpor-
tation. To certain groups of busi-
ness men time is an all important
element, and air transportation, be-
cause of its speed, makes a real sav-
ing in this tangible asset of time.

These facts pointed to the selec-
tion of the airport that would be
most accessible, under all condi-
tions, from the business district of



San Francisco. To reach the air-
ports at Oakland and Alameda
would always require the crossing of
the bay, usually during the busiest
transbay traffic, with the added
chance of delay at inopportune time
due to fog or the wait for ferries due
to traffic conditions.

Mills Field, fifteen miles south on
the peninsula, with road conditions,
as they were at that time, meant a
forty-five-minute drive, but money
had been appropriated and construc-
tion started on an arterial highway
leading directly past the airport.
Already the driving time from down-
town to Mills Field has been short-
ened to thirty-five minutes, and by
late summer the trip will easily be
made in twenty minutes.

No Trouble in Landing

A year of regular use of this air-
port has proved the reasoning in
our selection of Mills Field. Our
tri-motored planes have never at any




Tagged! Let's Go




Loading West Coast plane at Mills Field <u:ill: air cxprrss for Los .L nyrtes



Pilot Johnny Gugliemetti and Hov;ard

Bentley, SYz years old. Little Hoviard,

unaccompanied, recently flev: from Mills

Field to Los Angeles

time had trouble in landing or tak-
ing off at this field under any
weather conditions. The airport
equipment has been thoroughly ade-
quate. The airport management has
been courteous and helpful. And
true to expectations, 85 per cent of
our passenger business has origi-
nated in San Francisco. Less than
5 per cent of our passengers have
requested to be picked up or set
down at other bay region airports.

The schedules over this 715-air-
mile route have been increased from
tri-weekly to daily (except Sunday).
Hundreds of regular trips to and
from Mills Field have been made
carrying several thousand passen-
gers. Our selection has been justi-
fied — Mills Field is an air transport



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 14 of 84)