Copyright
San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

. (page 17 of 84)
Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 17 of 84)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


tween Europe and America. She
will be gone six months.



SONGS OF ALL NATIONS TO
BE SUNG AT CITY EVENT



The truly representative folk-
songs of many nations will be pre-
sented to the people of San
Francisco for the first time on the
night of April 23, when 300 singers
from the Municipal Chorus will pre-
sent a novel program under direc-
tion of Dr. Hans Leschke, city
choral chief. The international
song-fest will be given under direc-
tion of the Auditorium Committee,
and will be purely a San Francisco
affair.

Dr. Leschke has just reported to
Chairman James B. McSheehy and
Supervisors Warren Shannon and
Franck R. Havenner of the Audi-
torium Committee that rehearsals
for the folk-song concert are pro-
gressing to such an extent that the
singers will be letter perfect. In
addition to the group singing there
will be several solos on the huge
Exposition organ by Uda Waldrop.
and by Easton Kent, the popular
local tenor. Kent is well known on
the local concert stage as well as to
many radio fans.



TRACTORS

WEST COAST TRACTOR COMPANY



RUSSELL GRADERS
Phone: MArket 8020



McMillan equipment

1175 Howard Street



KILLEFER IMPLEMENTS
San Francisco, California



Buy from firms that advertise with us



22



THE MUNICIPAL E M P L O Y E E



April



^an Francisco School Department



SAN FRANCISCO BAY AND
PHYSICAL EDUCATION



By John S. Gutleben

ACCORDING to the viewpoint of
.groups or individuals, San Fran-
cisco Bay has a varied meaning. To
the average citizen, who receives an
occasional glimpse, the bay is a
refreshing scene. To many a com-
muter it is a useless barrier, inter-
fering with rapid arrival at the place
of occupation, and on days when
perturbed or when veiled in fog, to
the same group the bay becomes a
vexation of spirits. As viewed by
commercial and shipping interests.
San Francisco Bay looms as one of
the greatest harbors on earth ; as the
source of great riches and of the
rapid spreading over its shores and
surrounding hills of industrial plants
and of habitation upon habitation.

To that group charged with the
training of the future men and
women of this city, San Francisco
Bay is acquiring new meaning.
"What communion hath light with
darkness?" How can we link phys-
ical education with San Francisco
Bay? To the average parent there
is enough anxiety in permitting their
offspring unattended to cross mod-
ern city streets, but the bay, gruff
and ominously wrinkled by its cold
westerly winds, is an open-mouthed
monster ready to devour all ventur-
ing on its surface unless protected
by the secure hull of a ship or ferry.
How then can this fearsome object
serve the benevolent purpose of the
physical welfare of our unthinking
boys and girls?



It is the gradual overcoming of
this attitude on the one hand and the
widening sphere of our educational
program, '"like the wideness of the
sea'' that accounts for the activities
which we propose to describe in sub-
sequent copies of this publication.
It will be of interest first to learn of
the history of the movement; then
the means to the end — type of equip-
ment and facilities, organization —
how handled, and finally, the varied
nature of activities— the unrealized
possibilities of the bay, not as a
source of material wealth, but that
far higher value in the making of
our future men and women.



SCHOOL NOTES



Students of Mission High School,
with a mixed chorus of 125, an or-
chestra of sixty, and other organiza-
tions participating, gave their first
annual music festival the night of
April 12 in the high school audito-
rium. The event, pronounced a
wonderful success, was the first of
its kind in the cit}'.

The program, which was arranged
by George D. Ingram, director, in-
cluded selections by the boys" glee
club, girls' glee club, boys' quartet,
mixed quartet, string quartet, and
the Mission High School band.
Among the soloists were Margaret
Sullivan, contralto, and Annette
Sutt. violinist. Cecil Davis was one
of the girl saxophonists in the
orchestra.

* * *

The Board of Education has de-
cided that when the new senior high
school is constructed on the site



bounded by Geary and Balboa
streets. Thirtieth and Thirty-second
avenues, it will be officially known
as the George Washington High
School.

* * *

The following transfers in the
janitorial staff have been ordered:
Catherine Kelly, from the Emerson
to the George Peabody School;
Patrick O'Mara, from the Raphael
Weill to the Emerson School; Ru-
dolph Patrick, from the Depart-
ment's store room to the Raphael
Weill School.

* * *

A teachers' competitive examina-
tion for qualifying an eligible list
for appointment to the elementary
schools will be held in the High
School of Commerce Saturday, June
8, from 9 a. m. to 4 p. m.

* * *

The following leaves of absence
have been granted by the board:
Miss Stella Keating, Horace Mann
Junior High School; L. M. Scott,
Galileo High School; Edna Harring-
ton, Detention Home; Mary E.
Reene, helping teacher to Deputy
Superintendent Miss Roberts ; Lucy
M. Pray, Part-Time High School;
Myrna Garibaldi, Sherman School.
* * *

During the month of April the
members of the Junior Traffic Re-
serve are to be excused on each
Thursday to attend the demonstra-
tion to be given for them by the
members of the Thirtieth United
States Infantry, stationed at the
Presidio.




ArchitccVs dra^i„, ''J>{'/^f 0,000 Roosevelt School io he erected at Arguello Boulevard and Geary Street. IVhen completed, it ^-ill be
one of the finest school buildings m the United States. J. R. Miller and T. L. Pftueffer, Architects



i^pril



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



23



KITCHNER and GRAKOO

Dining Service

Operating Dining Rooms

GOLDEN GATE FERRY CO.
VALLEJO-RODEO FERRY CO.
BENICIA-MARTINEZ FERRY CO.

Lunches Put Up for Tourists



Telephones: Hemlock 4570-4571

DECKER & HORSTMANN

Distributors

U. S. ROYAL CORDS
U. S. SOLID TRUCK TIRES

141 Grove Street San Francisco



SCHOOL TIME

In San Francisco — is Standard

Thirty Public Schools equipped with Time Clocks by

The Standard Electric Time Co.

The Standard for School Time
Phone SUtter 0241 690 Market Street



Manufacturers of
Electric, Hydro-Electric and Hydraulic
Elevators for Every Conceivable
Purpose

Elevator Repair Work
Elevator Inspections

Inquiries Invited

Spencer Elevator Company

166-180 Seventh Street, San Francisco, Calif.
Telephone MArket 2500



PHONE GRAYSTONE 1905 RES. PHONE PROSPECT 6830

JOSEPH HAGAN 8c SONS

Funeral Directors



1710 to 1716
In Care of Women and Children SACRAMENTO STREET

Mrs. HELEN HOFFMAN Near Polk



Lady Attendant at All Hours



Telephones :
Mission 0098 and 0099



H. F. SUHR CO., INC.

Funeral Directors



H. FRED SUHR, Pres.
HERBERT F. SUHR, Mgr.



2919 Mission Street

Between 25th and 26th
San Francisco



E. N. HAWKINS



J. R. McKAY



EDWARD GLASS



Appraisal and Tax Valuation
Company

Appraisal Engineers y Depreciation Analysts

57 Post Street DOuglas 0212

SAN FRANCISCO



PATRICK 8C CO.

STATIONERY

Printing - Rubber Stamps

560 MARKET STREET



BRADFORD,
KIMBALL & CO.

Government, Municipal and
Corporation Bonds

111 Sutter Street, San Francisco
Sutter 5200



Buv from firms that advertise with us



24



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Apri




Bnaid of Health



DR. HENRY L. CURTIS, with
a record of more than twenty-
seven years with the Board of
Health, retired from that service on
April 6. He is one of San Fran-
cisco's noted physicians.

In honor of Dr. Curtis' long serv-
ice, a group of doctors, city officials
and friends tendered him a banquet
on Saturday evening, April 6, mark-
ing the physician's retirement from
city service.

Dr. William C. Hassler, City
Health Officer, was toastmaster,
and Frank J. Klimm, president of
the Board of Health, presented Dr.
Curtis with a silver vase from his
associates.

Among those present at the ban-
quet were : Frank J. Klimm, Dr. A.
S. Keenan, health commissioner;
Dr. Hassler, Dr. Herbert F. True,
assistant health officer A. B. Crow-
ley, Dr. Joseph F. Poheim, Dr.
Thomas D. Maher, Dr. R. P. Clark,
Dr. R. W. Burlingame, Dr. Robert
Grosso, Dr. T. d'Arcy Quinn, Dr.
A. A. O'Neill, Dr. A. D. Prentice,
Dr. George Becker, Dr. Kuykendall,
G. Pouchan, Percy R. Hennessy,
T. P. Lydon, W. D. Hobro, Fred S.
Ream, W. Wade, Charles Roberts,
W. H. Henning, Walter J. Ragan,
Meade Hoover, W. Cahill, Louis P.
Monaco, I. L. David, Edward M.
Coffey, T. J. Kane, Dr. L. M. Wil-
bor, A. H. Nelson, B. F. Lewis,
William T. Montgomery, Dr. S. E.
Coffey, W. Halderman and Hal
Curtis.

Dr. George H. Becker, associated
with the Board of Health for the
last five years as assistant medical
inspector of schools, was advanced
to the position vacated by Dr. Cur-
tis. Dr. John McGuire has been
appointed to school health inspec-
tion work, vice Dr. Becker pro-
moted.

♦ * *

The Health Officer has been di-
rected by the Board to cooperate
with the San Francisco Federation
of Women's Clubs to make a suc-
cess of the movement of Better
Homes Week, to be observed in San
Francisco April 21-27, and that he
lend all possible assistance in that
regard.




Photo Courtesy The Call

DR. HENRY L. CURTIS
DR. NORMAN ON LEAVE



Dr. Alfred J. Norman, assistant
superintendent of the San Francisco
Hospital, recently was granted a
three months' leave of absence to
recuperate his health. Dr. Norman
at present is at his fruit ranch in
Sonoma county. The question of a
temporary successor to Dr. Norman
is now being considered by the
Board of Health.



ARCHITECTS APPOINTED



Contemplating the sale in the near
future of $3,500,000 in bonds for in-
creased facilities at the San Fran-
cisco Hospital, the Board of Health
recently appointed four architects
to perfect plans and specifications
for the various projects outlined in
the bond issue. The architects and
the work for which they were ap-
pointed are: Alfred I. Coffey, addi-
tions to the San Francisco Hospital,
including new cancer and psycho-
pathic wards; Samuel Heiman, new
health building to be erected in the
Civic Center; Appleton & Hyman,



additions to the Laguna Honda
Home.

The Board of Health's proposec
building program and the approxi-
mated cost of each item follows :

1. Construct two addi-
tional units of forty
beds to the Tubercu-
losis Preventorium at
the San Francisco
Health Farm, and

equip the same f 70,000

Complete necessary
road work at the
Health Farm, build
gates and fences 58,100 $138,100

2. Construct psycho-
pathic building, capac-
ity 150 beds (a por-
tion of this structure
to care for drug ad-
dicts). Estimated cost 400,000
Equipment ISO beds

at 1175 per bed 26,250 426,250

3. Construct a Cancer
Institute, capacity 150
beds, with laboratory
and necessary X-ray
and radium treatment
apparatus.

Estimated cost 400,000

Equipment, 150

beds at |2S0 37,500 437,500

4. Construct three units
as additions to the
Laguna Honda Home,
giving 450 additional
beds to that institu-
tion.

Estimated cost 750,000

Equipment, 450

beds at $150 67,500 817,500

5. Acquire additional
lands for the extension
of the health program
of San Francisco, al-
lowing for the en-
largement and exten-
sion of the hospital
and district health
centers; and purchase
of other suitable
lands

6. Enlarge Central
Emergency Hospital,
including a health
center building on city
owned or acquired
lands, in the Civic
Center.

Estimated cost 550,000

Equipment 50,000 600,000

7. Additional stories to
be added to existing
Ward buildings and to
the present Tubercu-
losis Hospital on the
San Francisco Hos-
pital site.

Estimated cost



725,650



365,000



TOTAL BOND
ISSUE



$3,500,000



A



^pril



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



25



Friends of the San Francisco Hospital



San Francisco: Hemlock 7444



Oakland: Piedmont 5273



SUR-VALL BOX LUNCH INC.

A. J. LEY, Manager

SAN FRANCISCO * LOS ANGELES
OAKLAND Y LONG BEACH



1160 Howard Street



San Francisco, Calif.



H & W DAIRY LUNCH

NELLIE M. HOUSE, Proprietor
220 Embarcadero



TELEPHONE: WEST 3261



A. L. CLOKE, PROP.



GLOBE BAKERY

All kinds of Breads Pies and Cakes, Scotch Short Bread
and Oat Cakes a specialty. Wedding Cakes to Order.

2051 FILLMORE STREET

Between Pine and California San Francisco, Calif.



PHONE MONTROSE 5249

GOLDEN BROWN BAKERY

WM. F. WUCHERER, Prop.

Cakes and French Pastry / Birthday Cakes a Specialty

2034 IRVING STREET SAN FRANCISCO

Near 22Qd Ave.



PHONE KEARNY 7188 Successor to L. Chassagne Co.

CHAS. SEGALAS CO.

MANUFACTURER

MISSION DOLORES TONIC

461 Bryant Street San Francisco, Calif.

Grenadine, Tamarindo, Raspberry, Etc. Non Alcoholic Amer.

Chassagne French and Italian Vermouth Type, Etc.




Just Good Wholesome
Milk and Cream-



Telephone Market 5776

A-1 Butter, Eggs 8C Cotuge
Cheese

Del Monte Creamery

U. DETTLING. Prop.

Pure Pasteurized and Certified
Milk

Family Trade a Specialty



375 POTRERO AVE.
Near 17th St.



San Francisco
California



A. LEVY 8C J. ZENTNER CO.

Distributors

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

Home Office: San Francisco, Calif.

PHONE DAVENPORT 8530

BRANCHES: Sacramento, Oakland, Alturas, Santa Rosa,

Eureka, Chico, Fresno, San Jose, Stockton, Estudillo

— Reno and Elko, Nevada



CLEANLINESS — QUALITY — SERVICE
GOOD PLACES TO EAT

30 Embarcadero — Panama Canal

105 Embarcadero^New Post Office Lunch

116 Embarcadero — Texas Chili Parlor

106 Eddy St. — Texas Chili Coffee Shop

ESTABLISHED 1906



SINGER'S

Market at Seventh

BEST FOOD
FOR LESS MONEY



TELEPHONE MISSION 7020

NEW HOME BAKERY

FRANK DOWNEY. Prop.

BAKERS and CONFECTIONERS

All Kinds of Cakes Made to Order

4734 THIRD STREET



MILK

With the Natural Flavor from

MARVELOUS MARIN

Produced and Distributed by

RUSSELL MILK SERVICE CO.

1656 California Street San Francisco



VAN FLEET-FREEAR CO.

Agent for

ARMSTRONG CORK COMPANY

INSULATING MATERIALS

557 Howard Street San Francisco



SAINT FRANCIS HOSPITAL

AND

SCHOOL OF NURSING

Accommodations for 325 Patients

BUSH AND HYDE STREET
PRospect 7600



COFFIN-REDINGTON CO.

Wholesale Druggists

Importers end Jobbers of

Drugs, Chemicals and Druggists' Sundries

DEPOT FOR PARKE, DAVIS & COMPANY

401-433 Mission Street San Francisco



Buy from firms that advertise with us



26



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Apri



A!




San Francisco plaiit and headquarters of Mutual Stores, Inc., al 255 Tiuetfth Street

THE MUTUAL STORES in San Francisco, the Mutual Stores,
Inc., have probably the greatest in-
vestment in San Francisco of any
food retailing concern.

Yet this great investment has



With a plant and warehouse
building valued at $800,000, and
more than 100 neisfhborhood stores



been built up in just two years, foi
it was in April, 1927, that the firsl
Mutual stores opened in this city.

These stores make a great spe-
cialty of creamery and bakery prod
ucts. In the headquarters building
at 255 Twelfth Street there is one o
the finest bakeries in the state an(
a complete modern creamery. Her<
all of the bread and pastry sold ir
the stores is baked, and all the mill
and cream pasteurized and bottled

In this building, too, there is a
large coiTee roasting department,
where Mutual coflfee is blended,
roasted, ground and packed. Other
departments in the plant are the
grocery and produce warehouses,
the truck repair shops and the offices.

The building also has a large audi-
torium and recreation hall for Mu-
tual employees, with a kitchen
where refreshments may be pre-
pared. Frequent dances and enter-
tainments are enjoyed here by em-
plo)'ees and their friends.

This building is well worth a visit
and arrangements to go through it
may be made at any time by phon-
ing Underbill 2722.



SALADS FOR HEALTH AND
BEAUTY



By Martha Adams
The Best Foods Home Economics
Service

BRILLAT SAVARIN, prince of
epicures, has maintained that a
diet of dainty succulent and delicate
dishes served with artistry and
eaten with an air of devotion, has
power to induce extraordinary
beauty through supplying pliancy
and firmness to the muscles and af-
fording brilliancy and freshness to
eyes and skin.

Whether it is the lure of beauty
or unconscious revolt of appetites
surfeited with heavy winter foods,
by the time warm weather really
comes, we are ready to eschew the
solid meals of cold weather for
something more in keeping with
the new aspect shown by the world,
under more benign sunlight and
bluer skies. Dr. McCollum's edict
of two salads a day now falls on
fertile soil. The ever watchful mis-
tress of the kitchen consulted her
recipe file for new salad combina-
tions long before the appearance of
the first crocus, realizing that salads
are no longer a summertime dainty,
but necessary all through the year.
Now she looks for new spring com-
binations with which she can create
table poems in dishes.

A cupful of cold flaked fish, one-
fourth cup of chopped Fanning's
Bread and Butter Pickles and two-



thirds of a cup of finely cut celery,
are all the ingredients required for
a salad of fish. Toss the salad lightly
with a fork and spoon, mixing with
plenty of Best Foods Mayonnaise
when ready to serve.

Arrange lettuce on dainty salad
plates and pile the salad mixture
on them, garnishing with whole
slices of the Bread and Butter
Pickles.

The tender luscious yellow green
of the lettuce, its delicacy and crisp-
ness of texture if not inducive to
greater beauty, should at least in-
spire you to daily salad making.
With these esthetic qualities, link
the health value you know lurks in
the good green leaves and be en-
couraged to further good works
with salads.



medium priced eight on a 118-inch
wheel base chassis, while the Royal
85-eight series is the most luxurious
of the new line. The Westinghouse
vacuum brake and the one-shot chas-
sis lubrication system are standard
except on the 65. Standard equip-
ment on all models includes an auto-
matic windshield wiper, twin-beam
headlights, gasoline gauge and ther-
mometer on the instrument board,
electrolock. dome light, robe rail
and built-in footrest.

All of these models are now on
displa)' at 1595 Van Ness.



MR. WOLLENBERG HONORED



ALL CHANDLER MODELS
NOW ON DISPLAY



The new Chandler line, of which
the Kelley Kar Company, 1595 Van
Ness avenue, have exclusive terri-
torial rights, is proclaimed b}' thou-
sands as one of the most beautiful
and serviceable on the automobile
market today.

This new line embodies two six
and two eight-cylinder chassis and
includes 26 body models in new col-
ors, many of the models having wire
wheels and side mountings. The 65
series is the lowest priced, with the
Big 6 series running slightly higher
in price. The new Royal 75 is a



Charles M. Wollenberg, superin-
tendent of the Laguna Honda Relief
Home, signally was honored April _
6, when he laid the corner stone o^
the new Masonic Club Building or
the campus of the University oij
California, Southern branch, at Loa
Angeles. Mr. Wollenberg repre-j
sented the Masonic fraternity at the
corner stone ceremonies.
* * *

Edward M. Coffey, genial chiei
clerk and statistician of the Boaro
of Health, is packing up his baggagd
preparatory to setting sail foJ
Alaska, where, for a few weeks, he
will forget the looks, colors and de-j
scriptions of germs and kindreo
micro-organisms. He has promised
the office force a cargo of Alaskar
salmon and a team of live reindeer!
on his return.



'ipril



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



27





Phone: DAVENPORT 1756




TADICH GRILL




The Original Cold Day Restaurant




(ESTABLISHED 1849)


545


CLAY STREET SAN FRANCISCO




Corner Leidesdorff



R. Prigioni A. Vivorio

BAY CITY GRILL

The Landmark of S. F,

Oysters, Steaks, Chops, Fish and Poultry

Private Dining Room for Ladies

Telephones — PROSPECT 10049 -• FRANKLIN 3431

45 Turk Street San Francisco



Purity Restaurant

34 East Street Phone: DAvenport 1181

— OPEN ALL NGHT —

Meal Ticket 0.50 for 0.00 Cash

CHAS. PASSUCHES & CO.



GOLDEN GATE
DAIRY LUNCH

FOOD OF QUALITY



1 73 Eddy Street
SAN FRANCISCO



BAY VIEW BAKERY

B. JANSSEN, Prop.

4532— 3rd Street

PHONE VALENCIA 7513



The Old Fashioned Bakery

A. PINCUS, Prop.

CAKES AND PIES

BIRTHDAY AND WEDDING CAKES
Phone ATwater 1162 901 Noe St.



A. Hubner



West 2705




Fine Cakes



Fancy Tarts



Phone: West 0981 — West 0982

G. ROMANDER

DAIRY PRODUCE
Monthly Accounts Solicited
FOXHALL CREAMERY

2312 FiUmore St. SAN FRANCISCO



PHONE MONTROSE 6014



H. SCHMIDT, Prop.



NEW PORTAL BAKERY

We Bake Our Own Goods

41 West Portal Avenue

San Francisco, Calif.

WEDDING and BIRTHDAY CAKES Made to Order



Buy from firms that advertise with us



28



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



April



NAT T. MESSER

Mills Building
Telephone GARFIELD 0030



Telephone



HEmlock 6148



1184 MARKET ST.



FRED L. ESOLA

United States Marshal



CALIFORNIA ARMS CO.

995 Market Street

SAN FRANCISCO

Telephone Garfield 1359

Manufacturers and Distributors

OF

ARMS AND EQUIPMENTS

FOR USB OF

CIVIL AND MILITARY GOVERNMENTS




City Service Employees



FIREARMS < AMMUNITION / MACHINE GUNS

BULLET PROOF VESTS / BULLET PROOF GLASS

ARMORED AUTOMOBILES



TEAR GAS » CHEMICAL PROTECTIVE DEVICES
TEAR GAS POLICE CLUBS



HAND CUFFS r THUMB CUFFS
TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES



SPORTING GOODS

RIFLES , SHOTGUNS , AMMUNITION , FLASHLIGHTS




WILLIAM T. BONSOR



Buy from firms



By William T. Bonsor

THE youngest and largest organization of City
Employees came into existence a few months ago.
After electing Stephen Sullivan, president; Robert
Drady, secretary, and James Foley, treasurer, they
named themselves the "City Service Employees."
They started oflF with 1100 members and have los^
none to date. They
started oflf with a
bang and about ev-
eryone in our fair
city knows they are
a well organized
body of men and
women. Some of the
boys feel that if they
had been in that
East-West game the
West might have
had another victory.
However, this is an-
other year and they
may know us better
by next Christmas.

The City Service
Employees is com-
posed of the em-
ployees of the
Parks, Playgrounds,
Libraries, Hospitals
and various workers
in other City De-
partments. They are banded together to secure the
benefits of Civil Service in the same manner it was
attained by hundreds and hundreds of other city
employees in the past. Employees of the Parks, Play-
grounds and Libraries, as departments, have never
been placed under Civil Service. With these depart-
ments about 250 nurses and other employees in most
of the remaining City Departments banded together
and went before the voters under Charter Amend-
ment No. 28.

Question Not Beaten on Merits

We opened headquarters and conducted an up-to-
date campaign, and on November 6, 1928, were re-
warded by more than 70,000 "YES" votes for our
efforts. We failed of victory by only about 3000 votes.
The question was not beaten on its merits, as is
attested by the vote. The Presidential campaign, the-
longest ballot in the history of the city, the controver
sial measures coupled with the abnormal "NO" voti
made it impossible to win at that time.

The Charter Amendment was sponsored by Super
visor Jesse C. Colman, chairman of the Civil Servic(
Committee of the Board of Supervisors and approve(
by his colleagues. Supervisors Franck R. Havennei
and Sylvester Andriano. It was also approved by th(
Judiciary committee of the Board of Supervisors, con
sisting of Chairman Milton Marks and Supervisor
J. Emmet Hayden and Charles F. Todd. The proposa
was approved by the eighteen members of the Boari
of Supervisors and Mayor Rolph.

Having been placed upon the ballot, we proceedei
to place our cause in the hands of all the leading citi
zens and organizations of the city. It received thi
indorsement of the men and women of San Francis
those who gave their names as a citizens' coranuttei
headed by Chairman Jesse C. Colman. We then prO'

that advertise with us



April



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



29



ceeded to the various civic organizations and received
the indorsement of all of them. This included im-
provement clubs, women's organizations, labor unions,
the Chamber of Commerce and all business organiza-
tions. This multiplicity of indorsements would have
been impossible except that our cause was just and so



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 17 of 84)