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San Francisco (Calif.). Board of Supervisors.

The municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) online

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to their homes and friends; to bring to the bar of
justice men and, ofttimes, women, who have contrib-
uted to the delinquency of juveniles; patching up do-
mestic discord between husband and wife, parents and
children, and boy and girl sweethearts.

There are in San Francisco, many women, contented
and happy, with homes and children, women who can
thank the women protective officers for rescue work
at a time when the purported delinquents were ad-
vancing toward a ruinous life.

Policewomen are under Civil Service. Their rank
and salary are equivalent to that of the uniformed
policeman one meets on the street. The policewomen
are entitled to pension in case they are obliged to re-
tire on account of injury received in line of duty, or
when they have served the requisite number of years.
(Turn to Page 22)



January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



11



Board of Public IVorks



WITH the close of 1928 the Board of Public
Works issued a resume of major activities car-
ried on during one of the most successful years
in the history of that department.

The statement of the Board's activities follows:
Sunset Tunnel completed February 4, 1928.
The "X" line of the Municipal Railway started
operation on Sunday. October 21, 1928, with daily
average receipts of SHOO.

The Mission Everett Junior High School completed
and opened for the August term.

Many hundreds of street signs were installed.
Additional traffic buttons and markers were in-
stalled.

Expended approximately |750,00O for the recon-
struction of streets.

Expended in the repairs and cleaning of streets,
$1,000,000.

Expended for the repairs of school and public build-
ings approximately SI. 000,000.

Some of the larger contracts awarded during the
year were :

School buildings :

Edward Robeson Taylor School.. ..$

Jefferson School addition

Balboa Elementary School

South Side (Balboa) Junior High

School, second unit

Polytechnic High School addition
Harrison Street School warehouse

Marina Elementary School

Police Stations :

Sunset-Parkside Station

Highways, boulevards, sewers, etc. :

Ocean Beach Esplanade

Bay Shore Boulevard, Section A....
Bay Shore Boulevard, Section B....
Bay Shore Boulevard, Section D....

Alemany Boulevard, Section B

Alemany Boulevard, Section D-1..

Alemany Boulevard. Section E

Storm Drains, Bay Shore and Ale-
man v boulevards



105,000

84,000

115,000

344,000
40,000
69.000

175,000

70,000

330,000
224,000
140,000
213,000
107,000
50,000
66,000



60.000



Great Highway, Lincoln Way to

Sloat Boulevard 131,000

Kezar Stadium roadway , 55,000

Laguna Honda sewer : 49,000

Laguna Honda Boulevard 103,000

Municipal Airport runways 42,000

Glen Park Terraces 33,000

Grand View Avenue 28,000

Fillmore Street main sewer, Tenth

Street section 49,000

Wawona Street sewer 25,000

Quintara Street sewer 21,000

Bemal Cut 505,000

Building permits issued 38,000,000

In addition to the above the Board awarded con-
tracts for the improvement of hundreds of blocks of
street work, particularly in the Sunset and Potrero
districts.

The personnel of the Board of Public Works is :
Timoth)' A. Reardon, President. He has served con-
tinuously for the past sixteen j'cars. Colonel Charles
E. Stanton, a member of the Board since 1921, and the
junior commissioner, Frederick W. Meyer. The sec-
retary is Sidney J. Hester, who succeeded Sheriff
W. J. Fitzgerald.

The Board takes this opportuinty to express its
appreciation to the various chiefs of departments who
are largely responsible for the successful administra-
tion of the Board of Public Works.

M. I\I. O'Shaughness}-, City Engineer, the "Daddy
of them all."

N. A. Eckert, Assistant City Engineer, in charge
of the Hetch Hetch)- project.

C. E. Heal}-, Assistant City Engineer, in charge of
boulevards, streets and sewers.

P. W. King, Superintendent of Street Repair,
charge of reconstruction and repairs to streets.

Joseph C. Linehan, Superintendent of Sewers,
charge of repairs and reconstruction of sewers.

Peter J. Owen, Superintendent of Street Cleaning,
in charge of cleaning and washing streets.
(Turn to Page 24)



in



in




The new Portola Junior High School, a 1928 Board of Works accomplishment



12



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January




— Photo by Chaffee

M. M. O'SHAUGHNESSY

CITY ENGINEER M. M. O'Shaughnessy has
transmitted to the Board of Public Works his
annual report on the activities of the Bureau of En-
gineering for the year ended June 30, 1928. A series
of maps and photographs illustrate the progress of
the work under way. Following is a brief resume of
the report:

Carrying out of the boulevard program authorized
under the recent elections was begun with substantial
construction progress on Bay Shore and Alemany
boulevards and the Ocean Beach Esplanade. Bids on
the construction of the Great Highway had been called
for, and specifications for the other improvements
authorized were prepared simultaneously with the
acquisition of necessary rights of way. Bernal Cut
construction awaited only an exchange of lands with
the Southern Pacific Company.

County Roads Fund provided money for the com-
pletion of Market Street extension from Mono Street
to Ord Street, of Roosevelt Way from Fourteenth and
Alpine streets to Seventeenth and Clayton streets, of
Grand View Avenue, and for the widening of San Jose
Avenue.

The widening of Noriega Street to ninety-four feet
from Twenty-first to Forty-eighth avenues was ac-
complished by the cooperation of the property owners.

Total street and sewer contracts were completed
during the year of an aggregate value of $3,162,404.

The Municipal Airport, Mills Field, was improved
by the construction of hangar No. 2, a comfort sta-



The
Engineering
Department



tion, and a concrete apron, 100 feet in width, over the
entire front of both hangars.

An important extension to the high pressure fire
protection system was made — the construction of a
twelve-inch main from Harrison Street and Twenty-
fifth Street to the densely industrialized section of the
Butchertown district.

The greatest development of concrete sewers dur-
ing the year was in the Sunset district — the westerly
Sunset district main being completed, and sections of
the central Sunset district, the Wawona Street and
Laguna Honda Boulevard sewers being under con-
struction. In addition, a section of the Fillmore Street
sewer outlet on Tenth Street from Harrison to Divi-
sion Street, and an extension of the Guttenberg Street
sewer were under way.

A chapter on street railways gives the steps taken
toward acquisition of the privately owned system and
provision for a unified transportation system. Failure
of the people to pass a bond issue and consequent
lack of funds prevented construction of desired exten-
sions to the municipal system with the exception of
the Sunset line, funds for which were available from
the old Depreciation Fund.

Excellent conditions exist in the city's great Hetch
Hetchy project. Gratifying progress was recorded in
the construction of the Foothill Division tunnel and
the Coast Range shafts of the aqueduct. In the Foot-
hill Division, tunnel driving was carried forward in
ten headings and 32,659 feet of tunnel driven, making
a total to June 30 of 80,606 feet, or 96 per cent of the
total tunnel length in the division. Preparations were
practically complete for placing the concrete lining of
the tunnel. In the Coast Range division, work was
carried on in five shafts, four of which were completed
to tunnel grade so that tunnel driving would com-
mence shortly.

Operation of the Moccasin power plant was prose-
cuted continuously and satisfactorily, the power out-
put of the vear being over 526,000,000 kilowatt hours.
With the 19,000,000 kilowatt hours developed at Early
Intake plant, the power output, due to a contract for
distribution by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company,
netted the city $1,994,766.50. The aggregate net in-
come of the power plants for the entire period since
commencing operation August 21, 1925, was over
$5,500,000.

A definite policy for completion and future opera-
tion of a combined water supply and distributing sys-
tem was made possible by the favorable vote of the
people on the two bond issues, one for $24,000,000 for
completion of the Hetch Hetchy aqueduct, and the
other for $41,000,000 for acquisition of the Spring
Valley Water Company's properties, which will be-
come the property of the city on February 1, 1929.



lanuary



THE MUNI CIPAL EMPLOYEE



13



The Citys Playgrounds

By Veda Beresford Young, Secretary, Playground Commission



THE year nineteen hundred twenty-eight always
will be remembered in the annals of the San
Francisco Playground Department, because of
many achievements. .

The outstanding accomplishment was the mcreas-
ing of all facilities, not only in the admmistrative
office, but the physical properties at the playgrounds,
to provide maximum recreational opportunities tor
the greatest number of San Franciscans. The Music,
Statistical and Community Center Departments were
added and are now flourishing.

The Department of Construction and Maintenance
was exceptionally busy. Every playground was thor-
oughly improved. Field houses over the entire de-
partment were painted throughout. Lawns, shrubbery
and plantings were placed in first-class condition.
Eleven new asphalt courts were constructed and com-
pletely fenced. Especial rehabilitation work was done
at Excelsior, Funston, Hamilton, North Beach, Jack-
son, Richmond, Southside, Spring Valley, Margaret S.
Hayward, Mission and Presidio Heights Playgrounds.
A 333-foot storm sewer, having a three-foot nme-
inch diameter, was laid at Glen Park Playground. Here
also, a 15,000 cubic-foot fill was made, providing a
regulation turf baseball field.



A new and enlarged backstop was erected at James
Rolph, Jr. Playground.

Additional apparatus for children was installed on
many of the grounds. Numerous retaining walls
were erected.

Several new playgrounds and schoolyards were
added. They are all supervised, and are as follows:
Ocean View, West Portal, Douglass, Portola, Alva-
rado, Andrew Jackson, Francis Scott Key, Guada-
lupe, John Muir, Laguna Honda and Longfellow. The
playground at the detention home is also supervised
by a trained recreation director.

The Commission is purchasing additional land for
playgrounds at Potrero Hill, St. Mary's Park, Ocean
View and Balboa Terraces.

A school lot on Eighteenth Avenue, between Clem-
ent and California streets recently has been con-
verted into an indoor baseball field for the boys of the
district. The Michaelangelo School site on Green-
wich Street between Jones and Leavenworth streets,
is now undergoing a complete change. The building
is being thoroughly renovated to provide for com-
munity center work, while the yard will be improved
and devoted to little children's activities.

(Turn to Page 26)




upper. left-Caterpillar grading ground at Ocean Vie^ Playground. ^^^^^ "Yirn/J^/r fi™
afoien L^ ^^''^^round.U^er.left-^^re^a^^^^^ ^ouglass^ f/^- ,,,,„,



aht—lrea filled, graded and turfed for baseball field
' ■ -■ " id. Lou-er, right— H'est Portal

round. — Photos by Chaffee



14



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January



Of Interest to ff^omen



By Anita Day Hubbard




ANITA DAY HUBBARD
— Photo by Fisher



I SUPPOSE that by the time you have read this
your New Year's resolutions will all have been
comfortably broken, your greeting cards either
in the scrap basket, or if you are more orderly, neatly
filed against next year's needs, and the Christmas
tree, shorn of its glory, dumped into the back yard,
with only a stray thread of tinsel to console itself.

Nineteen hundred
and twenty-nine is
under way. What it
will bring besides the
regulation quota of
seasonal excitements,
is only known to the
Fates. Whether the
millennium will arrive
in the next twelve
months is somewhat
in question. How-
ever, it is quite pos-
sible that San Fran-
cisco will continue in
its march toward a

f , place in the sun, and

f f i that all of us, loyal

# f children that we are,

^ I will benefit thereby.

* I That 1928 was a

■ — — ^ ' great year for the

West is not to be
denied. In athletic
prowess, what with the U. C. crew winning the
Olympic races against an international slate, with
the football teams of California colleges walking oflf
with the honors of the national season, and with Stan-
ford sending a President to Washington, D. C, the
West has had quite a year. The crowning glory was
certainly the greatest event in the history of American
music, when "America," Ernest Bloch's Epic Rhap-
sody, was played at the Civic Auditorium, at the same
time that it was performed by almost every important
symphony orchestra in the country, with the composer,
director of our own San Francisco Conservatory of
Music, present here to receive the acclaim of his fel-
low citizens.

If ever there was a more heartening sight to the
ardent San Franciscan than the packed tiers of the
auditorium rising as if by sheer emotional uplift to the
noble anthem "America, America, thy name is in my
heart," this scribe has never seen it.

December 20 will go down in history as one of the
great days in musical history, and as the date of the
re-dedication of San Francisco to her cultural career.
Please pardon the lyric ravings. Really, even an old-
time journalist wasn't proof against the situation.

But after all, that was last year. This year is before
us, with good Maestro Hertz preparing a proper feast
for the music lovers, and the summer symphony sea-
son only just around the corner.

Art, that is the art of the painter, is also well repre-
sented in the January calendar. A very novel exhibit
is on the walls of the Beaux Arts gallery, beginning



January 7. A splendid collection of copies of the de-
tail of the frescoes of the Ajanta Caves in India, the
drawings made by F. H. Das. Kenneth Saunders will
lecture on the exhibit on the evening of January 15,
with slides on the magic lantern for further illumina-
tion. Mrs. Beatrice Judd Ryan is still mentor of the
gallery, and promises a number of charming showings
for the year.

THE East-West gallery, that very noble experi-
ment of Estelle Taylor and the Western Women's
Club, is still burgeoning along, and from January 1 to
22, Allan Clark's sculptures of wood, bronze and silver,
some of them decorated with Chinese lacquer, will
be on view. Clark was sent out with the research ex-
pedition of the Fogg Gallery of Harvard University,
to Turkestan, Siam and Indo-China, in his capacity
as artist. The exhibit recently was shown in New
York.

An exhibit of local gathering, of Chinese paintings
medieval and modern, assembled by Katherine M.
Ball, and shown in the East-West gallery from Jan-
uary 8 to 20, will have the additional interest of lec-
tures given by the doyen herself. Miss Ball is author
of "Decorative Motive in Oriental Art," and her talk
will have the value of real authority.

Incidentally, the Blanding Sloan Puppet Shows at
the quaint little theatre at 718 Montgomery will pre-
sent "Emperor Jones" on Thursday, Friday and Sat-
urday nights, at 8:30, after January 10.

This is a sort of zero hour for clothes, though the
wise shopper, always supposing she has any money
left after the Christmas shopping orgy, will take ad-
vantage of the after-holiday sales to restock her ward-
robe against the late season demands. Just a hint at
buying last season's vintage to advantage. Beware of
short skirts ! Long ones are on the way, except in the
extreme sport modes. Don't be lured too swiftly to
the gay prints, unless you have a string bean figure.
Beige is always safe, as are the soft dark colors, made
simply without too much trimming. No one knows
exactly what the spring will bring forth as its favorite
color, as brown and blue came barging in last year.
Red is too popular now to be so very long. If you
like it, wear it now, for tomorrow may be too late.
White for evening holds its own, and the creamy
"ofif" tones are vastly becoming.

For evening wraps, one sees Spanish shawls every-
where. It is a wise fair one who takes a heavy scarf
or shawl with her fur coat to an evening's shindig,
for our forefathers built without regard to draftiness,
and some of our best old homes are mere invitations
to a sneeze, if one hasn't a scarf to shelter one's
shoulders against the blast. Besides the possibilities
of grace and allurement in a fringed shawl are not
to be trifled with. But for the love of the ghosts of
the early Spaniards, who may be hovering about, don't
"go Spanish" unless you look a little that way to
begin. A night or so ago, at one of our best hotels, a
gay party of young people were dining and dancing.
One of the young women, blonde, pasty and wearing
horn-rimmed glasses on her size forty nose, was
dressed from head to foot in an exaggerated almost
(Turn to Page 21)



January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



15



Parks and Museums



By W. M. Strother



IN LOOKING back, at the
beginning of the new year, at
the events of the past twelve-
month, a number of important
projects under the supervision of
the Park Commission and affect-
ing the parks, stand out notice-
ably. One of these is the
increase in the size of Kezar
Stadium from 22.600 seating
capacity to 60.000. This has
given the City one of the finest
stadiums anywhere and has
made possible the handling with
greater comfort of the crowds at
such games as the Army-Xavy,
the Lowell-Polytechnic, and the
East-West.

In connection with this work
it has been necessary to change
one of Golden Gate Park's most
famous show places. Rhododen-
dron Dell. Many of these won-
derful shrubs have been replaced
alongside Kezar Stadium, but
others have been relocated — one
fine group on the point between
South Drive and the Waller and
Haight street entrances to the
Park ; and another opposite the
Garden of Shakespeare's Flowers
near the Academy of Sciences.

The South Drive itself, from
the Waller and Stanyan street
entrance to the Park to the Third
Avenue and Lincoln \\'ay en-
trance, has been widened and
paved, making a direct route
from the down-town section of
the City to the Sunset District.

Between the South Drive, Lin-
coln Way, and the drive from
Arguello Boulevard a new prac-
tice field for the high school boys
has been provided.

Another great project in co-
operation between the Park

Commission and the Board of Public Works is the
Beach Esplanade and the Great Highway develop-
ment for the three miles from the Cliff House to the
Herbert Fleishhacker Playfield and Sloat Boulevard.
New artificial rocks and cypress plantings have been
placed just below Sutro Heights and opposite the
Cliff House. The esplanade is being extended all the
distance to Lincoln Way alongside Golden Gate Park.
Beyond this the Great Highway will be 320 feet wide.
It will consist on the land side first of a service drive
fifty-five feet wide; then a terraced lawn seventy feet
in width, extending up to a level eight feet above the
service drive; alongside this, at the higher level will




Rhododendron Dell, Golden Gate Park

be a twenty-foot bridle path, followed by a ten-foot
wide strip of lawn ; after this will come a one-way
drive fifty feet in width, followed by a twentv-five
foot parking strip: after that another fifty-foot one-
way drive, then twenty feet of lawn, and lastly a walk
twenty feet wide. Park Superintendent John McLaren
declares that when the work is finished, as it will be
in a few weeks, this will make one of the finest and
most scenic boulevards in the world.

Another Park Commission project has been the
extension of the sea wall at Yacht Harbor and the
(Turn to Page 28)



16



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January



A MODERN INSTITUTION
Catering to an ever growing demand for

HOTEL AND RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT

Kitchen Supplies i Dishwashers i Sheet Metal r Croctery
Glassware f Silverware

CONTRACT TILE for

Residences < Hospitals i Schools i Institutions
Buildings i Steamships

Wholesale Household Supplies

MANGRUM 8C OTTER, INC.

1235 Mission Street San Francisco, Calif.

"For Service" — Phone MArket 2400



BURNELL SMOKERIE

JOE BURNS

Phone VAlencia 345

3313 Mission Street, opp. 29th, San Francisco



FRANK OLMO

REAL ESTATE / INSURANCE
3359 Mission Street . Mission 0535

First Vice-President
Excelsior People's Impvt. Ass'n

Director
Central Council of Civic Clubs



<i?



The plans for the Tiffany Avenue Extension to
the Bernal Cut, now before the City Engineer's
Office, will permit through traffic from Market
Street out Valencia to the Cut, independent of
Mission Street.

It should be started now to be ready when the
Bernal Cut is completed.



BERNAL CUT WILL BC



TL^ NOWN as one of the most progressive
cities in the United States, San Fran-
cisco took another step forward when the
Board of Supervisors recently authorized con-
struction of Bernal Cut, a civic improve-
ment that, when completed, will have cost
^1,400,000.

The cut will be 4200 feet long, having a
width of 117 feet, six inches on the bottom,
and an average width of approximately 160
feet on the top. It will have a six-foot walk
on either side on the top, and an eight-foot
walk, forty-two-foot vehicular roadway, a
right of way for double tracks for the Mu-
nicipal Railway and a right of way for
double tracks for the Southern Pacific Com-
pany, with walls on either side at the bottom,
five feet in height.



SUPERVISC

Chairma

th,



Telephone VALENCIA 7336



M. W. WELCH, Prop.



Cortland Sheet Metal Works

Patent Chimneys, Chimney Tops
Cornices and Skylights

ROOFS REPAIRED AND PAINTED
Furnaces Installed and Repaired

1414 Valencia Street, near 25th Street, San Francisco



Phone MI:

COLLE

woo

3761 Miu

i



MISRAGK'S



50 29th Street, near Mission Telephone VAlencia 0699

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT

Lowest Prices i Best Service 1 Radios
Auto Supplies f Tires

PLENTY TIME TO PAY

Liberal Allowance on Your Old Radio



EXCl



I



4492 Missi



R. E. OLSON



PHONE MISSION 7548



MISSION BATTERY SERVICE

Exlde Battery Distributors

UNITED STATES TIRES

AUTOMOBILE ELECTRICIANS

3494 Mission Street Opposite Cortland Avenue
SAN FRANCISCO



Gore



4C
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Furnis



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January



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



17



MISSION DISTRICT




.LAGHER
ittee of



THE Mission, densely populated business
and home district and known as the
warm belt of San Francisco, with completion
of Bernal Cut will experience the greatest
advancement in its history. Completion of
Bernal Cut means —

Opening of tracts of land where 60,000
homes will be built and businesses estab-
lished;

Extension of the Municipal Railway car
lines into the delightful Ocean View, Excel-
sior and University Mound districts;

Increase in taxable value of land that now
contributes very little to the City Treasury;

Relief of traffic congestion on Mission
Street;

Opening of a new traffic lane to peninsular
cities.




&, Son

fARD

IN

nd Ave.



VIRGINIA BABY SHOPPE

Wciblc SC Zoltarclli, Props.

LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S WEAR

Phone ATwater 4760

3349 Mission Street San Francisco



3RY



ph 0303



WHITTHORNE 8c SWAN

22ND AND MISSION STREETS



hop



Dad



PHONES: MISSION 8866 - MISSION 8867

L. DEPAOLI
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE

Renting and Collecting
3289 Mission Street, opp. 29th St., San Francisco, Calif.



Salient Points of

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Water.

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3. A health builder for body
tissues and organs.

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springs to ultimate consumer.



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326 Ritch Street



Sutter 0540



Phone MARKET 1461

H. LEOPOLD MACHINE AND
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GENERAL MACHINE WORK

LAUNDRY MACHINERY / GEAR CUTTING

MACHINISTS f ENGINEERS

3250 SEVENTEENTH ST., corner Capp



LEIB, KEYSTON

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Members San Francisco Stock Exchange



Mission Branch:

3052 16th Street, at Valencia

50 Post Street
235 Columbus Avenue

SAN FRANCISCO



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18



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



January




Chutes-At'The
Beach

San Francisco's Only
Outdoor Amusement



OPEN EVERY DAY IN THE YEAR UNTIL
MIDNIGHT



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Take Cars Geary B or Cars No. 5 or No. 7



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 2 of 84)