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party will visit Prince Rupert, Ket-
chikan, ^^'^rangell, Juneau and the
world-famous Taku glacier. This
last is a sheer wall of ice, a mile
wide and two hundred feet high.
Vibrations from the ship's whistle
causes huge blocks of ice to crash
into the sea and this in turn causes
further wreckage.



From Skagway the party will
make the famous trip over the
Alaska and Yukon Railway to Lake
Bennett.

Fifteen days in all will be spent
by the excursionists, who plan to re-
turn to San Francisco on Saturday,!
June 29. Skagway will be reached!
on June 21, the longest day in the]
year, when the midnight sun is at
its brightest.

Those who wish to join this ex-
cursion may communicate with Mr.!
Herget in the Bureau of Supplies."
He will be pleased to furnish any
information necessary. A most rea-
sonable all-expense fare has been
arranged for the trip.



KNOWN AT THE HALL



IT might attach a bit of human in-
terest in recounting Ben Selig's
career — everybody knows Ben — to
say that he was born in the old Selig
mansion on Mission, between
Fourth and Fifth streets, so long
ago he has forgotten the date, and
that when 13 years old he forsook
school studies and started a meat-
jobbing business at Sixth and Clara
streets.

Having acquired considerable
business acumen while supplying
meat to ships and wind-jammers out
of this port in the early days, Ben
decided it was time to branch out.
He joined his father, Moses Selig,
a pioneer butcher who came to Cali-
fornia in 1849, in the old Center
Market on Sutter street, where the
White House now stands. The
father passed on some thirty-six
years ago. During his lifetime he
was a leader in the civic and philan-
thropic life of San Francisco. He
was president of Temple Emanu-El
at the time of his death.

After the fire of 1906, Ben joined
his brothers and brother-in-law,
Charles Johnson, in the firm of J.
G. Johnson, Inc., meat dealers,
where he is now actively connected
as director and plant manager.

Mr. Selig's hobbies are sports and
politics. He has taken active part
in every important sporting event
this side of the Rockies. Toward
the close of his sporting career he
handled the affairs of the famous
Joe Gans, the champion of cham-
pions.

Air. Selig likes politics, but not
for personal gain. He has never
held public office, but has devoted
his time to further the aspirations
of his friends. He is a warm per-




BEN SELIG

sonal friend of Mayor Rolph and has
stood staunchly by the latter in all
his mayoralty campaigns. It has
been the good fortune of Ben Selig
to have served on every important
committee that was appointed to
welcome visiting notables, includ-
ing the late Presidents Roosevelt
and Harding, former President Taft,
and others. In politics. Mr. Selig is
a Republican. For ten years he has
been a member of the Republican
State Central Committee. He is a
warm personal friend of Senators
Johnson and Shortridge. During
1915-16 Mr. Selig was chairman of
the Police Committee of the County
Grand Jury.

In fraternal circles Ben is as well
known as in business and political
circles. He holds membership in
nearly every order in the city.



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS EDITION




smjyicE-EFnaENcr-caopEKATioN



Twenty-Five Cents



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, JUNE, 1929



Vol. Ill, No. 6




WHEN THE NEW GREAT HIGHWAY FORMALLY WAS OPENED TO TRAFFIC
Mayor .Limes Ralph, Jr., in the center, looking on as Miss Lucy Young (with the scissors), daughter of Governor C. C. Young, cut
the ribbon across the Great Highway to permit a parade to inaugurate it. Others in the foreground, left to right, are: Superintendent
„i P-,t, l^U„ »f^f ^,^„ C.,ft„,v;^or /tUrf^ Knnrn-yieri. President Timothy A. Reardon of the Board of Public H orks. Rita DuFossee,



CALAVERAS CEMENT

Uniform in

Strength — Color — Chemical Analysis



Calaveras Cement Company

315 MONTGOMERY STREET
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA



THE AMERICAN ROLLING
MILL COMPANY

OF CALIFORNIA

H. O. STEVENS, Manager Telephone MArket 3495

Office and Warehouse

540 TENTH STREET SAN FRANCISCO

Sheet Mills Located at
MIDDLETOWN and ZANESVILLE. OHIO - ASHLAND, KENTUCKY < BUTLER, PENN.

Blast Furnaces
COLUMUS, OHIO ' ASHLAND, KENTUCKY



V'



Mention This Magazine When You Patronize Advertisert



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imflo^ee



PUBLISHED MONTHLY BY

MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE PUBLISHING COMPANY

1093 Market Street Phone Market 8438



Philip P. Lew
Business Manager



Herbert B. Gee, Editor

M. B. BOTHWELL

Advertising Manager
George H. Allen, General Manager



John D. Gibson
Assistant Business Manager



I



Volume III



JUNE, 1929



No. 6



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CONTRIBUTING EDITORS



Assessor's Office _ Louise M. O'Hara

Auditor's Office J. Everett Sharp

Board of Education _

D. P. Hardy and Mrs. Harriet Leaman

Board of Health Edward M. Coffey

Board of Public Works Sid Hester

Bureau of Engineering _ N. A. Eckart

Bureau of Supplies Ivy Perkins Cerkel

City Attorney's Office Edmond P. Bergerot

Civil Service Commission James J. Maher

Civil Service Association Edward M. Coffey

Coroner's Office Jane Walsh

County Clerk Howard Gudelj

Dept. of Electricity Joseph P. Murphy

District Attorney Henry Goldman

Engineers' Union J. L. Slater, Jr.

Exposition Auditorium James L. Foley

Fire Department Lieut. Fred Jones

Justice Courts Robert W. Dennis



Mayor's Office Edward Rainey

Municipal Railway Eugene W. Clisbee

Municipal Carmen's Union Edward D. Vandeleur

Office Employees' Assn William T. Bonsor

Parks and Museums W. M. Strother

Per Diem Men's Assn F. J. Ferguson

Playground Commission Veda B. Young

Principals' Association Susie A. Ward

Public Library Anne M. Farrell

Public Administrator Henry Boyen

Recorder's Office Daniel McGloin

Registrar's Office George L. Sharp

Retirement Board John W. Rogers

San Francisco Hospital Mrs. Mae H. Noonan

Sealer of Weights and Measures Mrs. M. Dolan

Sheriff's Office W. J. Martenson

Superior Courts Henry J. McGrath

Tax Collector's Office Homer Warren

Treasurer's Office I. A. Richardson



In This Issue



PAGE

Official Endorsements 1

Editorial 1 1

The Board of Public Works 12

By Mayor James Rolph, Jr.

San Francisco's Architectural Department 17

By Charles H. Sawyer

sThe Superintendent of Public Buildings 20

Bureau of Buildmg Inspection 19

By John B. Leonard



PAGE

The Bozos — Social Side of the Board of

Public Works 21

By Jt'ilUam J. (Dick) Fitzgerald

Cleaning San Francisco's Streets 22

By George S. Sullivan

Two Important Board of Works Events 27

Completing the Great Highway, 1929 28

John E. Foley 30

The City's Street Car System 32

By Frederick Boeken

Camp Adami, an Ideal Spot for \'acationists 34



I



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10



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



Jur




Transits

Levels

Alidades




Field and

Drafting

Equipment



A SAN FRANCISCO INDUSTRY



SINCE 1882



THE A. LIETZ CO.



61 POST STREET



SAN FRANCISCO



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Bea C. Gerwick, President

Contractors i Engineers

Specialists in Pier and Wharf Repairs

Construction of

WHARVES, PIERS, TERMINALS, BRIDGES

FOUNDATIONS, CAISSONS

SUBMARINE « SUBAQUEOUS WORK

PILE DRIVING

Telephone DOuglas 6329
112 Market Street San Francisco



Certified Laboratory
Products

Nitrous Oxide Oxygen Ethylene
Carbon Dioxide



Phone MArket 4227
1379 Folsom Street San Francisco, Calif.



Sierra Electric Company

INCORPORATED
San Francisco < Seattle f Portland / Los Angeles

MANUFACTURER'S REPRESENTATIVES

Teletype

Lake Bells -f Couch Telephones

Signaling Equipment



BUGYRUS-ERIE GO.

Shovels and Excavators' Equipment
FOR EVERY PURPOSE



PHONE SUTTER 3660
989 Folsom Street San Francisco



NATIONAL METER
COMPANY

NEW YORK CITY
Manufacturers of

WATER METERS

Since 1870
A METER FOR EVERY KIND OF SERVICE



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PACIFIC COAST BRANCHES

SAN FRANCISCO
1048 Folsom Street

LOS ANGELES
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Buy from firms that advertise with us



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EDITORIAL PAGE



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San Francisco's Board of Public Works



No DEPARTMENT of this great City's govern-
ment is more entitled to special recognition
than the Board of Public Works. That depart-
ment is entrusted with the immense tasks of a
great city's maintenance and construction. This
is a big job; a tremendously important job in
San Francisco. It has been carried on for years
under the supervision of President Timothy A.
Reardon, and Commissioners Charles E. Stanton
and Frederick W. Meyer — carried on in a big
and most successful way.

That one department of the City government
spends millions of dollars every year! That the
Board of Public Works has expended these huge
sums year in and year out without ever the breath
of scandal — and practically free from criticism —
is a record that marks its efficiency and splendid
organization. It is a record to which any big city
can point with pride.

Mayor Rolph, in the leading article in this
issue of The Municipal Employee, in paying
tribute to the members of the Board of Public
Works, remarks: "The members of the Board
of Public Works are all high-class men of varied
experiences, with loft}- civic pride and responsi-
bility; they give their entire time to their duties,
perform them well, are honest and perfectly fitted
for the positions they occupy. The Board has
won the highest praise for the efficiency and
rigid honesty of all its works and dealings with
the public, and its members will be survived for
all time to come by numerous monuments to
their devotion to the welfare of our city, ex-
pressed in public improvements of the highest
type and greatest community usefulness."

QOME of those monuments, it might be noted,
^ in passing, are the magnificent Cit)- Hall — the
most imposing structure of its kind in the United
States — with a dome that is forty-seven feet five
inches loftier than the dome of the National
Capitol Building in Washington; the com-



modious, beautiful Civic Auditorium, one of the
finest convention structures in America; the Pub-
lic Library, with its thousands of volumes of
immortal books; the Cit>- and County Hospi-
tal, including the Laguna Honda Home, the
haven of the aged and infirm, and the Health
Farm near Redwood City; six high schools;
four junior high schools; fifty-eight elementary
schools; miles and miles of enduring street im-
provements; the Municipal Railway, with its
spacious Geary Street and Potrero Avenue car
barns; the Duboce, Stockton and Twin Peaks tun-
nels; the Ferry viaduct; the Great Highway and
the Ocean Beach Esplanade, designed by City-
Engineer M. M. O'Shaughnessy; the great
Hetch Hetchy project that will furnish water
to San Francisco for future generations and elec-
tricit}- for lighting and industrial purposes.

The duties of the Board of Public Works, as
defined by the charter, are as follows:

npHEY shall have charge, superintendence and
^ control, under such ordinances as may from
time to time be adopted by the Supervisors: Of
streets, pipes, wires, sewers, drainage, cleaning
and sprinkling and lighting of streets, of mainte-
nance and repairs to all public buildings, the con-
struction of all public buildings, of conduits, gar-
bage and sewerage systems, of the construction,
maintenance and operation of any and all public
utilities owned, controlled and operated by the
Cit}- and County of San Francisco.

In line with the policy of The MUNICIPAL
Employee to give, in addition to its general news
of municipal affairs, some comprehension of the
size and importance of municipal undertakings,
and to keep the city at large in touch with its
responsible servants, it is fitting that this magazine
give deserved recognition to the Board of Public
Works in an edition dedicated to that Depart-
ment. This number of THE MUNICIPAL EM-
PLOYEE is so dedicated.



12



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



June




iptl



The Board of Public
Works



An Account of Activities in One of the

City's Most Important

Departments



By Mayor James Rolph, Jr.



MAYOR JAMES ROLPH, JR.

THE Board of Public Works of
this City and County is com-
posed of Timothy A. Reardon, Presi-
dent; Colonel Charles E. Stanton,
Commissioner and Frederick W.
Meyer, Commissioner. Sidney J.
Hester is the capable Chief Deputy
Commissioner and Secretary of the
Board. They are all high class men
of varied experiences, with lofty
civic pride and responsibility ; they
give their entire time to their duties,
perform them well, are honest and
perfectly fitted for the positions
which they occupy.

The Board of Public Works de-
votes its principal efforts to the de-
velopment of projects of general
municipal benefit. It has charge and
supervision of all City work ; re-
ceives bids for all contract work let
to private contractors ; supervises
and inspects all City work; tests
and examines all materials to be
used, and hires experts for every
class of work.

The Board of Public Works has
supervision over the construction
and maintenance of sewers, streets,
roads, highways, Municipal Railway,
Hetch Hetchy water supply and its
hydro-electric energy, public build-
ings and all work which its name im-
plies. It has as its Chief Engineer
M. M. O'Shaughnessy, its Superin-
tendent of Municipal Railways, Fred
Boeken.

During the last sixteen years the



Board of Public Works has been
engaged on many public projects —
the planning and erection of the
Civic Center with its magnificent
City Hall whose dome is forty-seven
feet five inches loftier than the dome
of the Capitol at Washington ; Pub-
lic Library, City and County Hos-
pital, miles and miles of street im-
provements. Municipal Railway, Du-
boce, Stockton and Twin Peaks tun-
nels. Ferry Viaduct, and the Hetch



Hetchy water system which will
bring water to San Francisco for
future generations and electricity for
lighting and industrial purposes.

The Board of Public Works of any
city is one of the most important de-
partments; it plays an important
part in the development thereof and
maintains a high standard of effi-
ciency. The Board of Public Works
maintains an Accounting Depart-
ment to check and keep an accurate



i^€#r













President Timothy A. Reardon being installed in office, January 17, 1916



June



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



13



account of all money received and
spent by it.

Timothy A. Reardon

Mr. Timothy A. Reardon has
served as President of the Board of
Public Works since January, 1914.
Mr. Reardon is a Native Son and
was born July 14, 1875, in San Fran-
cisco. He married Miss Agnes M.
Oneil. They have two sons and a
daughter. Mr. Reardon was edu-
cated in the public schools of San
Francisco, and is one of the alumni
of the famous old Lincoln Grammar
School. He served as a steam fitter
and apprenticed at the Risdon Iron
Works. Mr. Reardon is very active
in the cause of organized labor and
has represented the Steam Fitters'
Union at many important local and
international conventions as a dele-
gate from San Francisco.

Prior to being connected with the
Board of Public Works, Mr. Rear-
don was Deputy County Recorder;
Superintendent of Public Buildings,
and a member of the Playground
Commission and he has always been
very active and helpful to the May-
or's office on its program of progress.
Col. Charles E. Stanton

Colonel Charles E. Stanton was
born in Monticello, Piatt County,
Illinois, November 22, 1859. He mi-
grated to. Denver, Colorado, in 1860,




TIMOTHY A. REARDON
President, Board of Public trorks

and later followed with his parents
the construction of the Union Pa-
cific Railroad and pulled the bell on
Engine 116 at the ceremony of lay-
ing the last tie between the Union
and Central Pacific lines at Promon-
tory, Utah, May 10, 1869.

He attended Lincoln Grammar
School from September, 1869, to
May, 1870, and Santa Clara College,
1873-4-5 ; in Sheffield Scientific
School of Yale in 1878. He farmed



in Minnesota 1884-89, thence moved
to Salt Lake City, Utah, where he
was City Recorder 1892-3 and Coun-
ty Clerk 1895-96.

Colonel Stanton entered the Army
of the United States on August 3,
1898, as Major and Additional Pay-
master of Volunteers; later was
made a captain in the regular army
February 8, 1901, retiring with rank
of Colonel November 13, 1920. He
was awarded the Distinguished
Service Medal, and is an Officier de
La Legion d'Honneur de France.
He accompanied General Pershing
abroad, and on July 4, 1917, deliv-
ered an address on behalf of the
American Expeditionary Forces at
the tomb of La Fayette in Pic-Pus
Cemetery, Paris, the concluding
words in his famous peroration be-
ing "La Fayette, we are here!"

Colonel Stanton was made a mem-
ber of the Board of Public Works by
me November 14, 1921, and by suc-
cessive appointments is still a mem-
ber of that board.

Frederick W. Meyer

Mr. Frederick W. Meyer was born
in San Francisco February 12, 1870,
and was educated in the public
schools. He has been an active mem-
ber of the State and local Grocers
and Merchants' Association. He was




San Francisco's City Hall. A magnificent monument to the Board of Public Works



14



THE M U N ICIPAL EMPLOYEE



June




FREDERICK W. MEYER
Commissioner, Board of Public Works

elected President of the California
Retail Grocers and Merchants' Asso-
ciation at Del Monte, and was Presi-
dent of the San Francisco Retail
Grocers' Association during the
World's Fair of 1915.

Mr. Meyer has been an ardent
worker in civic affairs. He was ap-
pointed a member of the City Plan-
ning Commission by me January 7,
1924, serving on the commission un-
til April 28, 1926. Mr. Meyer was
made a member of the Board of
Public Works April 29. 1926, and by
successive appointments is now a
member of that board.

Mr. Meyer is the father of two
children, Dr. Frederick Meyer and
Miss Ada Meyer.

Sidney J. Hester

Mr. Sidney J. Hester, Chief Dej)-
uty Commissioner and Secretary of
the Board of Public Works, was




SID ]. HESTER

Chief Deputy Commitsiorter and

SfCrttary o) Ea.ird of Public Works



born in Stockton, California, Feb-
ruary 2, 1885. In 1895 he moved to
San Francisco and has lived here
continuously since that time. Mr.
Hester was educated in grammar
and Polytechnic High Schools.

He served his clerical apprentice-
ship with the Pacific Coast Steam-
ship Company. He was employed
as head bookkeeper for the O'Day
Contracting Company until 1911,
when he was successful in a Civil
.Service examination and entered the
employ of the City and County of
San Francisco on January 3, 1912,
and was assigned to the Street Clean-
ing Division of the Board of Public
Works. In August, 1912, he was
assigned as head clerk in the Bureau
of Pulilic Buildings, serving under
Timothy A. Reardon, who at that
time was Superintendent of Public
Buildings. In 1914 he was assigned
as chief clerk in the Cost Accounting
Bureau of the Board of Public
Works, serving in that capacity un-
til 1919. and thereafter was assigned
to the Secretary's office as assistant
to William J. Fitzgerald, the Secre-





Commissioner Frederick W. Meyer at time of his induction in office, April 28, 1926



COLONEL CHARLES E. STANTON
Commissioner, Board of Public Works

tary. He was appointed January 9.
1928, to the position of Chief Deputy
Commissioner and Secretary of the
Board of Public Works.

Mr. Hester is the father of two
children, James T. Hester, a senior.
Engineering College, University of
California, and Helen E. Hester,
a junior. Polytechnic High School.

School Construction

Since my election to office, the
Board of Public Works has built six
high schools, four junior high
schools and fifty-eight elementary
schools, as follows:

HIGH SCHOOLS

Galileo 1926

Girls' 1912

High School of Commerce ....1926

Lowell 1912

Mission 1927

Polytechnic 1913

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS

Francisco Jr 1926

Hamilton Jr 1912

Horace Mann Jr 1923

Portola Jr 1927

ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

.\dams 1922

Agassiz 1912

Alamo 1926

Alvarado '. 1926

Andrew Jackson 1923

Argonne 1919

Balboa 1927

Bernal 1921

Bret Harte. 1925



Tune



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



15



Burnett 1912

Cabrillo 1925

Columbus 1923

Commodore Sloat 1927

Commodore Stockton 1924

Dudley Stone 1926

Emerson 1926

Edward Robeson Taylor 1924

Fairmount 1917

Franklin 1912

Frank McCoppin 1912

Gough 1923

Grant 1921

Grattan 1919

Guadalupe 1927

Hancock 1922

Harrison 1921

Hawthorne 1926

Hillcrest 1918

Jefferson 1927

John Swett 1913

Junipero Serra 1912

Kate Kennedy 1912

Lafayette 1927

Laguna Honda 1912

Le Conte .1926

Madison 1927

•Marshall 1914

McKinley 1922

Monroe 1919

Pacific Heights 1924

Parkside 1926

Patrick Henry 1913

Paul Revere 1917

Raphael Weill 1927

Redding 1917

Sanchez 1926

Sarah B. Cooper 1915

Sherman 1927

Spring Valley 1926

Starr King 1914

Sunnyside 1927

Twin Peaks 1919

Ungraded Primary- 1917

Visitacion Valley 1913

Washington Irving 1914



MILESTONES IN SAN

FRANCISCO'S CIVIC

PROGRESS



Reading from top to bottom :
1 — War Memorial Work
Started. 2 — Bernal Cut Ground-
Breaking. 3 — Relief Home
Dedication. '1 — Mayor Rolph
Dedicating San Francisco's
Municipal Airport at Mills
Field.




t^^':P ^9^'^'



16



THE MUNICIPAL EMPLOYEE



June




The netu Portola Junior High School, a 1928 Board of Works accomplishment



West Portal 1926

Verba Buena 1923

There are now either under con-
struction or practically finished :

Francisco Junior High School ;

Geary Street Elementary School ;

Jefferson School;

Winfield Scott School ;

Addition to Polytechnic High
School ;

Roosevelt Junior High School ;

Second and third units Balboa
High School ;

Harrison Street Warehouse which
is used by the Store Department.

The Board of Public Works main-
tains a fully equipped office and has
supervision over the Accounting Di-
vision, the Bureau of Architecture,
the Bureau of Building Repairs, Bu-
reau of Stores and Yards, Bureau of
Building Inspection, Bureau of En-
gineering — including Hetch Hetchy,
Street Repair Department, Munici-
pal Asphalt Plant; sidewalks, curb



DURING the administration
of Mayor James Rolph
Jr., he has appointed to office
the following commissioners of
the Board of Public Works :

Daniel Gray Eraser, retired.

Adolph Judell, retired.

Timothy A. Reardon.

Major David J. McCoy, de-
ceased.

Colonel Charles E. Stanton.

Frederick W. Meyer.



setting, basalt block maintenance,
maintenance and operation of
bridges ; Street Cleaning Depart-
ment, Bureau of Sewer Repairs,
Sewer Pumping Station, and numer-
ous other details incidental to the
upkeep of city property, the person-
nel of which is approximately 3,200.
The Board of Public Works has
just about completed one of the
world's finest esplanades, being 4,298
feet in length, from the Cliff House




The new Paul Revere School Annex, Folsom and Banks streets,
•which nuas dedicated December 2, 1928



to Lincoln Way, which will connect
with the Great Highway just fin-
ished. The Esplanade will cost ap-
proximately $720,000 and will be 300
feet wide.

The Great Highway, from Lincoln
Way to Sloat Boulevard at the
Fleishhacker Pool, will be 1.8 miles
long, composed of two roads fifty
feet wide, one bridle path twenty 1
feet wide, three pedestrian ways to
the ocean beach, each 226 feet long;
two comfort stations — the total cost
being $600,000.

This Esplanade and the Great
Highway were designed by Chief
M. M. O'Shaughnessy, City En-
gineer. The Esplanade and the Great
Highway from the Cliff House to
the Sloat Boulevard are approxi-
mately three miles.

The Board of Public Works is
charged with the letting of many
important contracts in the future for
numerous other municipal projects
for the further development of San
Francisco. There loom in the not
distant future, two projects across
San Francisco Bay — the Golden
Gate and the Rincon Hill bridges;
the latter probably will be built un-
der the supervision of the Board of
Public Works of San Francisco.

The Board has won the highest
praise for the efficiency and rigid



Online LibrarySan Francisco (Calif.). Board of SupervisorsThe municipal employee (Volume v.3 (Jan. - Sept. 1929)) → online text (page 22 of 84)